UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses at the University of Virginia    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
<
African-American and African Studies
AAS 1010Introduction to African-American and African Studies I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This introductory course surveys the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean from approximately the Middle Ages to the 1880s. Emphases include the Atlantic slave trade and its complex relationship to Africa; the economic systems, cultures, and communities of Africans and African-Americans in the New World, in slavery and in freedom; the rise of anti-slavery movements; and the socio-economic systems that replaced slavery in the late 19th century.
AAS 1020Introduction to African-American and African Studies II (4.00)
This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 1010. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora.
AAS 1559New Course in African and African American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of African American Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2010
AAS 2224Black Femininities and Masculinities in the US Media (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course, taught as a lower-level seminar, will address the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of 'Blackness' in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.
AAS 2450The Health of Black Folks (3.00)
An interdisciplinary course analyzing the relationship between black bodies and biomedicine both historically and in the present. The course is co-taught by Norm Oliver, M.D. (UVa Department of Family Medicine), and offers political, economic, and post-structuralist lenses with which to interpret the individual and socio/cultural health and disease of African-Americans. Readings range across several disciplines including anthropology, epidemiology/public health, folklore, history, science studies, political science, sociology and literary criticism. Topics will vary and may include: HIV/AIDS; reproductive issues; prison, crime and drugs; and body size/image and obesity; the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Trials. Cross listed as ANTH 2450.
AAS 2559New Course in African and African American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of African and African American Studies
AAS 2700Festivals of the Americas (3.00)
Communities throughout the Caribbean, and South, Central and North America celebrate festivals which are rooted in religious devotion, and which serve to mark sacred time and and to assert claims about religious, ethnic, and national identities. The class will read ethnographic accounts and listen to musical recordings of signature religious festivals--such as Saint Patrick's Day in Boston, Mardi Gras in New Orleans, and Carnival in Brazil.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
AAS 3000Women and Religion in Africa (3.00)
This course examines women's religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women
AAS 3157Caribbean Perspectives (3.00)
Breaking with popular constructions of the region as a timeless tropical paradise, this course will re-define the Caribbean as the birthplace of modern forms of capitalism, globalization, and trans-nationalism. We will survey the founding moments of Caribbean history, including the imposition of slavery, the rise of plantation economies, and the development of global networks of goods and peoples.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
AAS 3200Martin, Malcolm and America (3.00)
An intensive examination of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. We will come to grips with the American legacy of racial hatred and oppression systematized in the institutions of antebellum chattel slavery and post-bellum racial segregation and analyze the array of critical responses to, and social struggles against, this legacy.
AAS 3231Rise and Fall of the Slave South (3.00)
A history of the American South from the arrival of the first English settlers through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Cross-listed with HIUS 3231.
AAS 3240Plantations in Africa and the Americas (3.00)
Comparative analysis of plantation culture, economy and polity in Africa, the US, and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or permission of instructor.
AAS 3250MotherLands: Landscapes of Hunger, Futures of Plenty (3.00)
This course explores the legacy of the "hidden wounds" left upon the landscape by plantation slavery along with the visionary work of ecofeminist scholars and activists daring to imagine an alternative future. Readings, guest lectures, and field trips illumine the ways in which gender, race, and power are encoded in historical, cultural, and physical landscapes associated with planting/extraction regimes such as tobacco, mining, sugar, and corn.
Course was offered Spring 2012
AAS 3280Reading the Black College Campus (3.00)
Historically Black Colleges and University campuses are records of the process of democratizing (extending to excluded social groups such as African-Americans) opportunities for higher education in America. Through landscapes, we trace this record, unearthing the politics of landscapes via direct experience as well as via interpretations of representations of landscapes in literature, visual arts, maps, plans, and photographs.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011
AAS 3351African Diaspora Religions (3.00)
This seminar examines changes in ethnographic accounts of African diaspora religions, with particular attention to the conceptions of religion, race, nation, and modernity found in different research paradigms. Prerequisite: previous course in one of the following: religious studies, anthropology, AAS, or Latin American studies.
AAS 3356Culture, Race and World Politics (3.00)
This course explores the role of culture and race in international politics. Cultural and ethnic factors have long influenced international relations, especially in the post Cold War era. These "identity" issues raise new questions about the role of national sovereighty and the prospects for democracy in countries around the world. We focus on several broad themes structured around the pivot of identity and otherness.
AAS 3400Changing Worlds, Making Tradition: Culture and Identity in South Africa (3.00)
Students will have a unique opportunity to explore another culture that of the Venda region in South Africa with linguists from that region. Students will work with visiting faculty to consider the forces shaping Venda culture today. In particular, we will discuss the ways in which indigenous knowledge is constructed and contested in contemporary Africa, and the intersections of this practice with post-colonial thought.
Course was offered Summer 2014
AAS 3456The Supreme Court and the Civil Rights Movement (3.00)
This course explores the role of the United States Supreme Court in defining the legality of racial distinctions in the United States in the post-Civil War era. Special attention is paid to the role of the court's landmark 1954 decision, Brown v. Board of Education. The class will be taught in a discussion format based upon assigned readings.
AAS 3457Issues in Civil Rights Law (3.00)
An exploration of critical issues in modern civil rights law. We engage competing visions of racial equality through law by examining topics such as school desegregation, affirmative action, urban policymaking, and the crisis of mass incarceration. This course will also highlight the limitations of civil rights law and consider the ways in which the law is often complicit in perpetuating race, gender and class hierarchies.
Course was offered Summer 2011
AAS 3471History of American Labor (3.00)
This course examines the economic, cultural, and political lives of the US working classes from the end of the Civil War to the present.
AAS 3500Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Reading, class discussion, and written assignments on a special topic in African-American and African Studies Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
AAS 3559New Course in African and African American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New course in the subject of African and African American Studies.
AAS 3652African American History since 1865 (3.00)
This course surveys the major political, economic, and cultural developments in black America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Through an engagement with various primary and secondary texts, and multimedia, students examine African Americans' endeavors to build strong families and communities, create socially meaningful art, and establish a political infrastructure capable of bringing into existence a more just and humane world.
AAS 3749Food and Meaning in Africa and the Diaspora (3.00)
This course investigates the traditions and symbolics of food and eating in Africa and throughout the African Diaspora -- wherever people of African descent have migrated or have been forced to move. This course will help students to investigate the way the foods people eat' or don't eat' hold meaning for people within a variety of cultural contexts.Topics will include symbol, taboo, sexuality, bodies, ritual, kinship & beauty, among others.
AAS 4070Directed Reading and Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Students in the Distinguished Majors Program should enroll in this course for their first semester of thesis research.
AAS 4080Thesis (3.00)
Second-semester DMP students should enroll in this course to complete their theses.
AAS 4109Civil Rights Movement and the Media (3.00)
Course examines the crucial relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and mass media from 1950s through early 1970s, looking at a variety of media forms: Hollywood cinema, network television, mainstream newspapers, photojournalism, the black press, and news as primary documents that can tell us something about American race relations during this period and how the nation responded to challenges posed by a powerful social change movement.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014
AAS 4500Advanced Seminar in African-American and African Studies (3.00)
Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminatiing in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
AAS 4501Advanced Research Seminar in History & AAS (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year AAS and History students--double majors and others. Crosslisted with the History major seminar.
AAS 4559New Course in African and African American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of African and African American Studies.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
AAS 4570Advanced Research Seminar in African-American & African Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminating in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
AAS 4845Black Speculative Fiction (3.00)
This course seeks to explore the world of African American 'speculative' fiction. This genre of writing largely includes science fiction, fantasy fiction, and horror. In this class, we will read, watch, and discuss narratives by black writers of speculative fiction to better understand the motivation, tone, and agenda in the work of black writers. We will also consider the role of black culture and representation in the larger field.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AAS 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Allows students to work on an individual research project. Students must propose a topic to an appropriate faculty member, submit a written proposal for approval, prepare an extensive annotated bibliography on relevant readings comparable to the reading list of a regular upper-level course, and complete a research paper of at least 20 pages.
AAS 5559New Course in African and African American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of African and African American Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2010
Accounting
ACCT 2010Introductory Accounting I (3.00)
Designed to introduce students to the language of business, the course begins with the role of financial data in contemporary society, proceeds to develop the accounting model for capturing financial data, and finishes with the problems of measuring and reporting income, assets, liabilities, and equities.
ACCT 2020Introductory Accounting II (3.00)
Continuation of ACCT 2010. Approximately one third of the course deals with additional financial accounting topics, emphasizing managerial considerations and financial analysis. Cost accumulation, allocation, and product cost methods are studied in a manufacturing setting. Matters such as evaluation of performance planning, cost behavior, and special decisions are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 2010.
ACCT 3110Intermediate Accounting I (3.00)
An intensive study of the generally accepted accounting principles for asset valuation, income measurement, and financial statement presentation for business organizations, and the processes through which these principles evolve. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020.
ACCT 3120Intermediate Accounting II (3.00)
Continuation of ACCT 3110, emphasizing accounting for the equities of a firm's investors and creditors. Covers special problem areas in financial accounting including accounting for leases, pensions, and income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT 3110.
ACCT 3140Cost Accounting (3.00)
Addresses analysis of cost behavior and volume profit relationships; responsibility accounting and reporting flexible budgets; and the use of standard costs to guide and control performance. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020.
ACCT 4450Federal Taxation I (3.00)
An analysis of the federal income tax law and its application to individuals. A study is made of problems covering personal and business tax situations. Several cases are assigned for which the student prepares illustrative tax returns. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020 or instructor permission.
ACCT 4700Federal Accounting (3.00)
Provides a comprehensive overview of accounting principles, terminology, concepts, and standards unique to federal accounting to include an analysis and discussion of the laws, regulations, rule-setting organizations, and policies leading to current day federal accounting and reporting practices. Requisite: ACCT 2020
Course was offered Fall 2016
ACCT 5210Introductory Auditing (3.00)
Examines auditing methodology through a study of auditing standards. Includes the nature of evidence, program planning, work papers, internal control evaluation, types of audit tests, and audit reports. Prerequisite: ACCT 3120.
ACCT 5250Advanced Auditing (3.00)
Builds on the concepts and practice examples from introductory auditing to provide students with an in-depth understanding of professional standards, the audit process, advanced audit techniques, and the auditor's role in ensuring that publicly issued financial statements are fairly presented. Prerequisite: ACCT 5210.
ACCT 5310Selected Topics in Advanced Accounting (3.00)
Studies accounting and financial reporting for partnerships, business enterprise segments, home office/branch office, foreign transactions and translation, business combinations, and other intercorporate investments and consolidated statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 3120.
ACCT 5330Accounting for Non-Business Organizations (3.00)
Financial accounting for governmental and non-profit organizations. Studies the theory and techniques of accounting and reporting for various funds and groups of accounts. Prerequisite: ACCT 3120.
ACCT 5410Fraud Examination (3.00)
Focuses on the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. Examines how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. Prerequisite: ACCT 3120 Intermediate Accounting II
ACCT 5460Federal Taxation II (3.00)
Analyzes the federal income tax law and its application to corporations, shareholders, partnerships, partners, estates, and gift transactions. Prerequisite: ACCT 4450.
Air Science
AIRS 100Leadership Laboratory (0.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A mandatory laboratory in leadership and followership development for AFROTC cadets. As a complement to the air science classes, this laboratory focuses on applying leadership principles and understanding leaders' responsibilities while emphasizing the benefits of practical experience. (2 hrs.)  Prerequisite: Enrollment in Air Force ROTC.
AIRS 101AFROTC Physical Training (0.00)
Fulfills weekly physical training requirement for AFROTC cadets. Emphasis is placed on increasing cardio-vascular endurance through various forms of exercise, including, but not limited to, calisthenics, circuit training and running.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
AIRS 1100The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Topics include mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer career opportunities. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs)
AIRS 1200The Foundations of the U.S. Air Force (1.00)
Introduces the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Topics include Air Force core values, leadership team building and communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
AIRS 2100The Evolution of Air and Space Power (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the first balloons and dirigibles through the Korean War. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
AIRS 2200The Evolution of Air and Space Power (1.00)
Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective, from the Vietnam Conflict to the space-age global positioning systems used in today's conflicts. Presents historical examples of the development of Air Force capabilities and missions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Investigates several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension (e.g., Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power). Considers the general element and employment of air and space power from institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspectives. Discusses the importance of Air Force core values using operational examples and historical Air Force leaders. Continues to develop communication skills. Corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)   
AIRS 3100Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
AIRS 3200Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management (3.00)
Focuses on the study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership, core values, and military ethics as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Prerequisite: Officer Field Training attendance; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
AIRS 4100National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines the national security process, constitutional provisions, advanced leadership ethics, joint operations, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, civilian control of the military, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet briefings. Prerequisite: AIRS 3100 and/or 3200; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
AIRS 4200National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty (3.00)
Examines military law, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Topics include the military as a profession, officership, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting the military. Emphasizes refining communication skills through cadet presentations. Prerequisite: AIRS 3100 and/or 3200; corequisite: AIRS 100. (2 hrs.)
Architecture and Landscape Architecture
ALAR 5010Introduction to Design (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to design concepts from the scale of the city to the body, developing an understanding of design process and compositional strategies in architecture and landscape architecture. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5020Introduction to Design Visualization (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to both digital and manual representational techniques, developing the precision and facility necessary for visual communication. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5030Introduction to Design Theory and Analysis (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to the analysis of the physical environment at the intersection of historical understanding and contemporary imagination. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5500Special Topic in Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture and landscape architecture.
Course was offered Summer 2012, Summer 2011
ALAR 7010Research Studio 1 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Prerequisite: ARCH 6020 or LAR 6020.
ALAR 7020Foundation Studio III (6.00)
Intermediate-level design problems, emphasizing structure, enclosure, life safety and building systems. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010
ALAR 8010Research Studio 2 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Part one of a two part comprehensive design sequence. Prerequisite: ARCH 7020 or LAR 7020.
ALAR 8020Design Development Studio (6.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Typical projects include brownfields, urban landscape infrastructure, and sustainable designs. Prerequisite: ARCH 8010 or LAR 8010
ALAR 8030Design Studio 3 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010 and ALAR 8010.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ALAR 8060Urbanism Design Studio (6.00)
This design studio pulls together many issues that graduate students have studied individually in design technology, theory and history courses into a complex and integrated section of a living and working community. This research looks at integrating infrastructure systems as a community connection system, energy producing ecology and as a civic public space symbol.
ALAR 8100Design Research Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is for students in architecture/landscape undertaking an independent design/thesis studio in the spring semester, or students interested in strategic design thinking. Methods for initiating a thesis, research systems, documentation strategies, design experimentation, and modes of production and presentation will be covered. Collective critical discussion, analysis, and feedback as well as production of a final book will be required.
ALAR 8102Design Research Seminar (1.00 - 2.00)
This course is for architecture or landscape architecture students expecting to undertake an independent thesis studio during the following fall semester. ALAR 8100 is the prerequisite. This student-driven course will engage with faculty and other students to support their independent work. Students are expected to gather the appropriate resources and focus on contextualizing their work.
ALAR 8993Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ALAR 8995Independent Design Research Studio (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Design Research Studio. Prerequisite: ALAR 8100 and permission of the chair.
ALAR 8999Non-Topical Design Research-Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Design Thesis Studio. Prerequisite: ALAR 8100 and permission of the chair.
Applied Mechanics
AM 6010Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3.00)
Reviews basic stress-strain concepts and constitutive relations. Studies unsymmetrical bending, shear center, and shear flow. Analyzes of curved flexural members, torsion, bending, and twisting of thin walled sections. Cross-listed as CE 6710. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanics and mathematics.
AM 6020Continuum Mechanics With Applications (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as APMA 6020, MAE 6020; Taught concurrently with CE 6720. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6030Computational Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes of variational and computational mechanics of solids, potential energy, complementary energy, virtual work, Reissner's principle, Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement, force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis, including shape functions, convergence and integration; and applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 6730.
AM 6040Plates and Shells (3.00)
Includes the classical analysis of plates and shells of various shapes; closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution of governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross listed with MAE 6040 and taught concurrently w/ CE 6740. Prerequisite: APMA 6410 and CE 6710 or 6720.
AM 6060Applied Boundary Element Analysis (3.00)
Analyzes the fundamental concepts of Green's functions, integral equations, and potential problems; weighted residual techniques and boundary element methods; poisson type problems, including cross-sectional analysis of beams and flow analyses; elastostatics; and other applications. Prerequisite: AM 6710 or 6030.
AM 6070Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Reviews concepts/stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke's law;displacement & stress formulations of elasticity problems;plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates;Airy's stress function; plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates,axisymmetric problems;torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real functions);thermal stress;energy methods.Pre-requisites:CE 6720, AM/MAE 6020,or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 6130Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics (3.00)
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. The relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; the kinematics of finite deformations and motions leading to the definition of finite strain measures; the process of linearization; and the concept of stress. Conservation laws of mechanics yield the equations of motion and equilibrium and description of constitutive theory leading to the constitute laws for nonlinear elasticity, from which the more familiar generalized Hooke's law for linearly elastic solid is derived. Constitutive laws for a Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid are also discussed. The basic problems of continuum mechanics are formulated as boundary value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as APMA 6130. Prerequisite: Linear algebra, vector calculus, elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
AM 6200Energy Principles in Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes the derivation, interpretation, and application of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work to engineering problems; related theorems, such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigliano's Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduces generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles; variational methods of approximation, Hamilton's principle, and Lagrange's equations of motion. Uses variational theorems to approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 6700. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
AM 6210Analytical Dynamics (3.00)
Topics include the kinematics of rigid body motion; Eulerian angles; Lagrangian equations of motion, inertia tensor; momental ellipsoid; rigid body equations of motion, Euler's equation, force-free motion; polhode and herpolhode; theory of tops and gyroscopes; variational principles; Hamiltonian equations of motion, Poinsote representation. Prerequisite: Differential equations, undergraduate dynamics course.
AM 6220Waves (3.00)
The topics covered are: plane waves; d'Alembert solution; method of characteristics; dispersive systems; wavepackets; group velocity; fully-dispersed waves; Laplace, Stokes, and steepest descents integrals; membranes, plates and plane-stress waves; evanescent waves; Kirchhoff's solution; Fresnel's principle; elementary diffraction; reflection and transmission at interfaces; waveguides and ducted waves; waves in elastic half-spaces; P, S, and Rayleigh waves; layered media and Love waves; slowly-varying media and WKBJ method; Time-dependent response using Fourier-Laplace transforms; some nonlinear water waves. Also cross-listed as MAE 6220. Prerequisite: MAE/AM 6020 Continuum Mechanics and Applications, or equivalent.
AM 6230Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped single-degree-of-freedom systems and undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems; use of Lagrange's equations; Laplace transform, matrix formulation, and other solution methods; normal mode theory; introduction to vibration of continuous systems. Cross-listed as CE 6230. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6280Motion Biomechanics (3.00)
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) which act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopaedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as BME 6280. Prerequisite: BME 6103 or instructor permission.
AM 6310Fluid Mechanics I (3.00)
Analyzes of hydrostatics, including surface tension; kinematics; non-inertial reference frames; rigorous formulation of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy; Euler and Bernoulli equations; vorticity dynamics; two-dimensional potential flow theory, complex potentials; applications to airfoils; the Navier-Stokes equations: selected exact and approximate solutions. Cross-listed as MAE 6310. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6320Fluid Mechanics II (3.00)
Topics include the laminar boundary layer equations, differential and integral; elementary similar and integral solutions; introduction to and modeling of turbulent flows; surface waves; quasi-one-dimensional compressible, perfect gas dynamic analysis; practical applications. Cross- listed as MAE 6320. Prerequisite: AM 6310.
AM 6650Mechanics of Composite Materials (3.00)
Analyzes the properties and mechanics of fibrous, laminated composites; stress, strain, equilibrium, and tensor notation; micromechanics, lamina, laminates, anisotropic materials, classical lamination theory, stiffness and strength, interlaminar stresses, fabrication, and test methods; thermal stresses, analysis, design and computerized implementation. Taught concurrently with CE 6750. Prerequisite: CE 2310 or equivalent and a computer language
AM 6660Stress Analysis of Composites (3.00)
Focuses on 3-D anisotropic constitutive theory, edge effects and interlaminar stresses, failure criteria, fracture, anisotropic elasticity, micromechanics, laminated plates, hygro-thermal effects, conduction and diffusion. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6660. Prerequisite: CE 6750 or AM 6650.
AM 6710Finite-Element Analysis (3.00)
Introduces finite element methods for solving problems in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, and electrical fields. Emphasizes the basics of one, two, and three-dimensional elements; applications to bars, electrical networks, trusses, conduction and convection heat transfer, ideal and viscous flow, electrical current flow, plane stress, plane strain, and elasticity; development of computer codes to implement finite element techniques. Cross-listed as MAE 6710. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6750Theory of Structural Stability (3.00)
Introduces the elastic stability of structural and mechanical systems. Topics include classical stability theory and buckling of beams, trusses, frames, arches, rings and thin plates and shells; derivation of design formulas; computational formulation and implementation. Cross-listed as CE 6775. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6910Special Problems in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Detailed study of special topics in mechanics.
AM 6920Special Problems in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Detailed study of special topics in mechanics.
AM 6993Independent Study in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 6995Supervised Project Research in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Pre-requisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 7030Thermal Structures (3.00)
Topics include the fundamentals of thermal structural analysis; mechanical and thermodynamic foundations; formulation of heat transfer and thermal-structural problems; heat transfer in structures; thermal stresses in rods, beams, and plates; thermally induced vibrations; thermoelastic stability; and computational methods. Prerequisite: AM 6020 or instructor permission; corequisite: AM 6070.
AM 7040Theory of Shells (3.00)
Introduces the nonlinear, thermoelastic theory of shells. Governing equations are derived by a mixed approach in which those equations of three-dimensional continuum mechanics that are independent of material properties are used to derive the corresponding shell equations, whereas the constitutive equations of shell theory which, unavoidably, depend on experiments, are postulated. Emphasizes efficient, alternative formulations of initial/boundary value problems, suitable for asymptotic or numerical solution, and discusses variational principles. Some comparisons made with exact, three-dimensional solutions. Prerequisite: AM 6020 and 6040.
AM 7080Inelastic Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as APMA 7080. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
AM 7120Advanced Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Topics include generalized Hooke's law, strain-energy density, uniqueness; classes of boundary value problems (Navier's and Beltrami-Mitchell equations); torsion (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems); flexure; complex variable formulation of torsional (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems) and two-dimensional problems; general solution methodologies based on complex variable techniques and elements of potential theory for torsional and two-dimensional problems; three-dimensional problems; wave propagation; and energy methods. Prerequisite: AM 6020 or instructor permission and AM 6070.
AM 7140Nonlinear Elasticity Theory (3.00)
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. New features not present in the linear theory are emphasized. These include instabilities (both material and geometric), normal stress effects, non-uniqueness, bifurcations and stress singularities. A variety of illustrative boundary value problems will be discussed which exhibit some of the foregoing features. Both physical and mathematical implications considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as APMA 7140. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
AM 7250Random Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include a review of probability theory; stochastic processes, with an emphasis on continuous, continuously parametered processes; mean square calculus, Markov processes, diffusion equations, Gaussian processes, and Poisson processes; response of SDOF, MDOF, and continuous linear and nonlinear models to random excitation; upcrossings, first passage problems, fatigue and stability the considerations; Monte Carlo simulation, analysis of digital time series data, and filtered excitation models. Cross-listed as CE 7750. Prerequisite: Background in probability theory and vibration analysis.
AM 7290Selected Topics in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Subject matter varies from year to year depending on students' interest and needs. Typical topics may include geophysics, astrodynamics, water waves, or nonlinear methods. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
AM 7320Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials (3.00)
Develops the tools necessary for fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Continuum fracture mechanics principles are presented. Fracture modes are discussed from the interdisciplinary perspectives of continuum mechanics and microscopic plastic deformation/fracture mechanisms. Cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, and environmental cracking are included, with emphasis on micromechanical modeling. Cross-listed as MSE 7320. Prerequisite: MSE 7310 or instructor permission.
AM 7670Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media (3.00)
Analyzes averaging principles, equivalent homogeneity, effective moduli, bounding principles, self-consistent schemes, composite spheres, concentric cylinders, three phase model, repeating cell models, inelastic and nonlinear effects, thermal effects, isotropic and anisotropic media, strength and fracture. Cross-listed as APMA 7670 and CE 7707. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
AM 7993Independent Study in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Pre-requisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 8220Biomechanics (3.00)
Topics include the rheological properties of biological tissues and fluids, with emphasis on methods of measurement and data organization; basic principles of continuum mechanics and their application to mechanical problems of the heart, lung, and peripheral circulation; criteria for selecting either lumped or continuous models to simulate mechanical interaction of biological systems (and mechanical prostheses) and application of such models under static and dynamic loading conditions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 8987Graduate Teaching Instruction in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's students.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 8995Supervised Project Research in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
AM 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral students.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
American Studies
AMST 1559New Course in American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New Course in the subject of American Studies
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016
AMST 2001Introduction to American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces students to American Studies, the interdisciplinary study of US culture. Students will be exposed to the three main categories of American Studies methods, historical analysis, close analysis, and fieldwork and to a broad variety of cultural forms, including films, photographs, music, sermons, journalism, fiction, speeches, court decisions, government documents, and web-based materials including social media sites.
AMST 2100Introduction to Asian American Studies (3.00)
An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama.
AMST 2155Whiteness & Religion: Religious Foundations of a Racial Category (3.00)
This class examines the role religion plays in defining a racial category known as whiteness. By reading cultural histories and ethnographies of the religious practices of various communities, we will examine how groups now classified as white (Irish, Italians, Poles, Jews, etc.) and religious images (depictions of Jesus and the Virgin Mary) "became white" and the role that religious practice played in this shift in racial classification.
Course was offered Spring 2017
AMST 2210Arts of the Harlem Renaissance (3.00)
Studies the literature, painting, photography and prints produced by New York artists based in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s, and examines their relation to concurrent social, cultural, and aesthetic issues.
AMST 2220Race, Identity and American Visual Culture (3.00)
Surveys popular visual material (advertisements, cartoons, films, paintings and photographs) and its representation of race in the united States from 1850 to 1950.
Course was offered Spring 2012
AMST 2300Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies (3.00)
A small lecture course (35) AMST 2300 offers students close study and analysis of significant texts or cultural artifacts that are printed, visual, oral or musical representing the perspective and contributions of the main Latino populations in the United States. These works include, but are not limited to, cultural manifestations from Puerto Rican, Chicano, Dominican, Central American and Cuban American origin.
AMST 2420Cultural Landscapes of the United States (3.00)
This course introduces the study of everyday landscapes as cultural spaces that illuminate the history of social and political developments in the U.S. It encourages a broad understanding of landscape across genres-painting, photography, fiction, journalism. Particular focus will be paid to the political economy of landscapes to explore the connections between landscape and public policy from multiple vantage points.
AMST 2422Point of View Journalism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course analyzes 'point-of-view' journalism as a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of ''objectivity' in the U.S. news media. It will survey point-of-view journalists from Benjamin Franklin to the modern blog.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
AMST 2460Language in the U.S. (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Through diverse academic/theoretical readings and spoken, written, and visual material, students will learn to analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments as related to critical linguistic and cultural analysis of primary and secondary source material. This course examines complex relationships among American language and cultural practices, American history, race, gender, and class ideologies, and social identities.
Course was offered Spring 2016
AMST 2462Language & New Media (3.00)
This course investigates the interactional relationship between language and American society with a focus on New Media contexts. More specifically, it considers how language both shapes and is shaped by society in email, texting, Facebook, blogging, online gaming, YouTube, and more. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students examine how social constructions are created by, and are realized in New Media genres.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
AMST 2470Disney (3.00)
This discussion course examines the cultural role of Disney and its effects on the visual arts in the 20th and 21st centuries. It considers a range of material to interrogate how Disney as both a corporation and a cultural icon promotes and reinforces national ideals. Presented both chronologically and thematically, students engage with aesthetic, ideological and theoretical concerns regarding history, identity, space/place, and popular culture.
Course was offered Spring 2017
AMST 2500Major Works for American Studies (3.00)
Topics vary according to instructor. The goal of the course is to introduce students to interdisciplinary work in American Studies by juxtaposing works across disciplinary boundaries and from different methodological perspectives.
AMST 2559New Course in American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New Course in subject of American Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
AMST 2660Spiritual But Not Religious: Spirituality in America (3.00)
What does ¿spiritual but not religious¿ mean, and why has it become such a pervasive self-description in contemporary America? This interdisciplinary course surveys spirituality in America, with a particular eye for the relationship between spirituality and formal religion, on the one hand, and secular modes of understanding the self, such as psychology, on the other.
Course was offered Spring 2017
AMST 2711American Environmental History (3.00)
Explores the historical relationship between people and the environment in North America from colonial times to the present. Topics include the role of culture, economics, politics, and technology in that relationship. Prerequisite: first-year writing course (e.g. TCC 101, ENWR 101)
AMST 2753Arts and Cultures of the Slave South (4.00)
This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts- architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture- it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.
AMST 3001Theories and Methods of American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar course will introduce majors to various theories and methods for the practice of American Studies. The three goals of the seminars are (1) to make students aware of their own interpretive practices; (2) to equip them with information and conceptual tools they will need for advanced work in American Studies; and (3) to provide them with comparative approaches to the study of various aspects of the United States. Prerequisites: American Studies Major
AMST 3180Introduction to Asian American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama.
AMST 3200African American Political Thought (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores the critical and the constructive dimensions of African American political thought from slavery to the present. We will assess the claims that black Americans have made upon the polity, how they have defined themselves, and how they have sought to redefine key terms of political life such as citizenship, equality, freedom, and power.
AMST 3221Hands-On Public History (3.00)
This course introduces the issues and debates that have shaped public history as a scholarly discipline, but the focus of the course will be on the contemporary practice of public history. Students will work with Special Collections to produce their own public history exhibits. Readings and field trips will provide a foundation for students' hands-on engagement with public history.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
AMST 3355Border Media (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In this course we consider the depiction of the U.S.-Mexico border from the perspective of popular and mass media cultures. We examine the border as a site of cultural exchanges, resistance and critical negotiation; interchanges that impact the construction of race, ethnicity, sexuality and gender from both sides of the border.
AMST 3425American Material Culture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will introduce you to the study of material culture, the physical stuff that is part of human life. Material culture includes everything we make and use, from food and clothing to art and buildings. This course is organized into six sections, the first introducing the idea of material culture, and the other five following the life cycle of an object: material, making, designing, selling, using.
AMST 3460Reading America at Home and Abroad (3.00)
This course explores ideas of America, as they are constructed both at "home" in the United States, and "abroad," in and through a number of global locales. It considers a range of representations, in literature, art, film and music, and also the everyday life of American culture. In asking how America has seen itself and how others have seen America, we will effectively theorize the concepts of both nation and globality.
Course was offered Fall 2015
AMST 3462Harlem Stories: Literature and Culture of the Modern World (3.00)
This course examines the multiplicity of Harlem, in global and historical contexts. It considers how Harlem represents itself and how representation shapes the experience of place, the ways that stories of Harlem are simultaneously lived and circulating, and how different disciplinary techniques offer different renditions of Harlem.
AMST 3491Rural Poverty in Our Time (3.00)
This course will use an interdisciplinary format and document based approach to explore the history of non-urban poverty in the US South from the 1930s to the present. Weaving together the social histories of poor people, the political history of poverty policies, and the history of representations of poverty, the course follows historical cycles of attention and neglect during the Great Depression, the War on Poverty, and the present.
AMST 3559New Course in American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New Course in the subject of American Studies
AMST 3630Vietnam War in Literature and Film (3.00)
In the US, Vietnam signifies not a country but a lasting syndrome that haunts American politics and society, from foreign policy to popular culture. But what of the millions of Southeast Asian refugees the War created? What are the lasting legacies of the Vietnam War for Southeast Asian diasporic communities? We will examine literature and film (fictional and documentary) made by and about Americans, Vietnamese, Cambodians, Laotians, and Hmong.
Course was offered Fall 2016
AMST 3641Native America (3.00)
This course will introduce students to deep history of Native North America. Using primary and secondary sources, we will cover such topics as mutually beneficial trade and diplomatic relations between Natives and newcomers; the politics of empire; U.S. expansion; treaties and land dispossession; ecological, demographic, and social change; pan-Indian movements; legal and political activism; and many, many others.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
AMST 3740Cultures of Hip-Hop (3.00)
This course explores the origins and impacts of American hip-hop as a cultural form in the last forty years, and maps the ways that a local subculture born of an urban underclass has risen to become arguably the dominant form of 21st-century global popular culture. While primarily focused on music, we will also explore how forms such as dance, visual art, film, and literature have influenced and been influenced by hip-hop style and culture.
AMST 3880Literature of the South (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes selected works of literature by major Southern writers. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
AMST 4401Literature of the Americas (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores a wide range of (broadly defined) fictions from and about the Americas, from writings by Columbus and the conquistadors through modern and contemporary novels, novellas, and short stories. Students consider the intersection of fiction and history through topics that include New world "discovery" and conquest; borderlands and contact zones; slavery and revolution; and the haunting of the global present by the colonial past.
AMST 4403Transamerican Encounters (3.00)
This comparative, interdisciplinary course focuses on the encounter between the U.S. and the wider Americas as represented in literature, history, and film. Working across a range of historical periods, it explores the varied international contexts underpinning narratives of U.S. national identity and history. It also considers how cultural forms access histories and perspectives outside of official accounts of the past and present.
AMST 4410Censorship (3.00)
This course examines the social, legal, aesthetic, and theoretical issues raised by censorship of art, mass media, literature, film, and music in the U.S. While censorship is usually associated with explicit sexuality, we will also look at cases involving racial stereotyping, violence, social disorder, and religion. Our cases will center around novels, art, film, music, mass media, and other cultural phenomena.
Course was offered Fall 2015
AMST 4430Documentary Film and the South (3.00)
This course explores how documentary filmmakers have represented the US South from the 1930s through the end of the twentieth century and the place of films made in and about the region in the history of documentary film. Students will conduct original research, shape their findings into paper, and make their own documentary short about a topic of their choosing.
AMST 4440Visions of Apocalypse in American Culture (3.00)
This course examines how Americans have envisioned the end of the world. Through religious and cultural history and contemporary cultural studies, it considers the ways social, political, and economic tensions are reflected in visions of the apocalypse. It explores the impact of imagined futures on previous generations, and how religious and secular ideologies of apocalypticism have shaped social movements, politics, and popular culture.
Course was offered Spring 2016
AMST 4470American Film Noir (3.00)
This seminar examines the phenomenon of American Film Noir produced during the 1940s and 50s. Using urban culture to frame debates about films noir, it explores the ways in which "the city" is represented as a problematic subject and a frequent resource immediately before and after World War II. The course also discusses the influences of early twentieth-century photography, American Scene art, and Abstract Expressionist painting.
AMST 4472Hollywood Cinema's Golden Age: The 1930s (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course examines American cinema produced in Hollywood during the 1930s. While the Great Depression serves as an important backdrop to our investigation, we will interrogate how issues such as ethnic/racial representation, shifting gender roles, sexuality, and urbanity are mediated in popular cinema in this decade. The course also considers the studio system, the Hayes Code, stardom, and changes within narrative and film techniques.
AMST 4474Stardom and American Cinema (3.00)
This course examines the role of stardom and star performance in American cinema from the silent era to the present. Using social history, cultural studies and film criticism theory, we will explore topics such as the cultural patterns of stardom, constructions and subversions of star identity, and the ways in which issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality affect the star image both inside and outside cinema.
AMST 4500Fourth-Year Seminar in American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar is intended to focus study, research, and discussion on a single period, topic, or issue, such as the Great Awakening, the Civil War, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, or the 1960s. Topics vary.
AMST 4559New Course in American Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of American Studies.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
AMST 4893Independent Study in Asian Pacific American Studies (3.00)
An elective course for students in the Asian Pacific American Studies minor. Students will work with an APAS core faculty member to support the student's own research. Topics vary, and must be approved by the APAS Director. 
AMST 4993Independent Study (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An elective course for American Studies majors who have completed AMST 3001-3002. Students will work with an American Studies faculty member to support the student's own research. Topics vary, and must be approved by the Program Director. Prerequisite: AMST 3001, 3002.
AMST 4998Distinguished Majors Program Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Students spend the fall semester of their 4th years working closely with a faculty advisor to conduct research and begin writing their Distinguished Majors Program (DMP) thesis.
AMST 4999Distinguished Majors Thesis Seminar (3.00)
This workshop is for American Studies majors who have been admitted to the DMP program. Students will discuss the progress of their own and each other's papers, with particular attention to the research and writing processes. At the instructor's discretion, students will also read key works in the field of American Studies. Prerequisites: admission to DMP.
AMST 8001Graduate Seminar in American Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces graduate students to the field of American Studies, the interdisciplinary study of US culture. Students will be exposed to a variety of influential theoretical and methodological interventions that have occurred over the field's history, and will also be introduced to some of the principal intellectual, political, and professional issues they will face while pursuing a career in the field.
Anthropology
ANTH 1010Introduction to Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a broad introductory course covering race, language, and culture, both as intellectual concepts and as political realities. Topics include race and culture as explanations of human affairs, the relationship of language to thought, cultural diversity and cultural relativity, and cultural approaches to current crises.
ANTH 1050Anthropology of Globalization (3.00)
Anthropology of Globalization
ANTH 1090Colloquia for First-Year Students (3.00)
Colloquium designed to give first-year students an opportunity to study an anthropological topic in depth in a small-scale, seminar format. Topics will vary; may be repeated for credit.
ANTH 1401Your Heritage Language (3.00)
This course introduces students to the fields of structural linguistics, social approaches to the study of language, and language policy through a focus on the traditional languages or heritage languages spoken more or less actively within students' own families and home communities, either at present or in recent generations.
Course was offered Fall 2012
ANTH 1559New Course in Anthropology (3.00)
New course in the subject of anthropology.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Summer 2014, Fall 2012
ANTH 2120The Concept of Culture (3.00)
Culture is the central concept that anthropologists use to understand the striking differences among human societies and how people organize the meaningful parts of their lives. In this course we explore this diversity, examine its basis in neuroplasticity and human development, and consider its implications for human nature, cognition, creativity, and identity. By learning about other cultures, we gain new understanding of ourselves.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ANTH 2153North American Indians (3.00)
Ethnological treatment of the aboriginal populations of the New World based on the findings of archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, biological anthropology, and social anthropology.
ANTH 2156Peoples and Cultures of Africa (3.00)
Studies African modernity through a close reading of ethnographies, social histories, novels, and African feature films.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
ANTH 2190Desire and World Economics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an insight into the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services practiced by peoples ignored or unknown to classic Western economics. Its principle focus will open upon the obvious differences between cultural concepts of the self and the very notion of its desire. Such arguments as those which theorize on the "rationality" of the market and the "naturalness" of competition will be debunked.
ANTH 2210Marriage and the Family (3.00)
Compares domestic groups in Western and non-Western societies. Considers the kinds of sexual unions legitimized in different cultures, patterns of childrearing, causes and effects of divorce, and the changing relations between the family and society.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2010
ANTH 2230Fantasy and Social Values (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines imaginary societies, in particular those in science fiction novels, to see how they reflect the problems and tensions of real social life. Focuses on 'alternate cultures' and fictional societal models.
ANTH 2240Progress (3.00)
An ideal of progress has motivated Westerners since the Enlightenment, and is confirmed by rapid technological innovation. Theories of social evolution also foresaw, however, the extinction of those left behind. This course addresses the ideological roots of our notion of progress, the relation between technological and social progress, and what currently threatens our confidence in the inevitability of progress.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ANTH 2250Nationalism, Racism, Multiculturalism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world.
ANTH 2270Race, Gender, and Medical Science (3.00)
Explores the social and cultural dimensions of biomedical practice and experience in the United States. Focuses on practitioner and patient, asking about the ways in which race, gender, and socio-economic status contour professional identity and socialization, how such factors influence the experience, and course of, illness, and how they have shaped the structures and institutions of biomedicine over time.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 2280Medical Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course introduces medical anthropology, and contextualizes bodies, suffering, healing and health. It is organized thematically around a critical humanist approach, along with perspectives from political economy and social constructionism. The aim of the course is to provide a broad understanding of the relationship between culture, healing (including and especially the Western form of healing known as biomedicine), health and political power.
ANTH 2285Anthropology of Development and Humanitarianism (3.00)
This course explores anthropological writings on development and humanitarianism to better understand the historical context and contemporary practice of these distinct modes of world saving. We will attend to critiques of development and humanitarianism, and will also consider writings by anthropologists who champion the humanitarian project
Course was offered Spring 2016
ANTH 2291Global Culture and Public Health (3.00)
This course considers the forces that influence the distribution of health and illness in different societies, with attention to increasing global interconnectedness. We will examine the roles of individuals, institutions, communities, corporations and states in improving public health, asking how effective public health and development efforts to improve global health have been and how they might be re-imagined.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Spring 2012
ANTH 2310Symbol and Ritual (3.00)
Studies the foundations of symbolism from the perspective of anthropology. Topics include signs and symbols, and the symbolism of categorical orders as expressed in cosmology, totemism, and myth.
ANTH 2320Anthropology of Religion (3.00)
Explores anthropological approaches to religion, in the context of this discipline's century-old project to understand peoples' conceptions of the world in which they live.
ANTH 2325Anthropology of God (3.00)
How does the study of society and culture create an intellectual space for any explanation and experience of the Divine? How does anthropology deal specifically with explaining (rather than the explaining away) knowledge and understanding about divinity? Is God an American? If God has a gender and race, what are they? These and many other pertinent questions will be engaged and tackled in this cross-cultural study of the divine.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Summer 2011
ANTH 2340Anthropology of Birth and Death (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Comparative examination of beliefs, rites, and symbolism concerning birth and death in selected civilizations.
ANTH 2345Anthropology of Reproduction: Fertility and the Future (3.00)
In this course, we will study human reproduction as a cultural process. Questions include how gender, class, race, and religion shape reproductive ideals and practices around the world. Ethnographic examples will come from around the world, but will emphasize South Asia and the United States. This course examines the perspectives of both men and women and situates local examples within national and global struggles to (re)produce the future.
Course was offered Summer 2013, Summer 2011
ANTH 2360Don Juan and Castaneda (3.00)
Analyzes the conceptual content in Castaneda's writings as an exploration of an exotic world view. Focuses on the concepts of power, transformation, and figure-ground reversal.
ANTH 2365Art and Anthropology (3.00)
The course emphasizes art in small-scale (contemporary) societies (sometimes called ethnic art or "primitive art"). It includes a survey of aesthetic productions of major areas throughout the world (Australia, Africa, Oceania, Native America, Meso-America). Included are such issues as art and cultural identity, tourist arts, anonymity, authenticity, the question of universal aesthetic cannons, exhibiting cultures,and the impact of globalization.
ANTH 2370Japanese Culture (3.00)
This course offers an introductory survey of Japan from an anthropological perspective. It is open without prerequisite to anyone with a curiosity about what is arguably the most important non-Western society of the last 100 years, and to anyone concerned about the diverse conditions of modern life. We will range over many aspects of contemporary Japan, and draw on scholarship in history, literature, religion, and the various social sciences.
Course was offered Fall 2014
ANTH 2375Disaster (3.00)
Sociocultural perspectives on disaster, including analysis of the manufacture of disaster, debates on societal collapse, apocalyptic thought, disaster management discourse, how disasters mobilize affect, disaster movies, and disasters as political allegory. Students work through a series of case studies from different societies that cover "natural," industrial, and chronic disasters, as well as doomsday scenarios.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015
ANTH 2400Language and Culture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior. No prior knowledge of linguistics is required.
ANTH 2410Sociolinguistics (3.00)
Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
ANTH 2415Language in Human Evolution (3.00)
Examines the evolution of our capacity for language along with the development of human ways of cooperating in engaged social interaction. Course integrates cognitive, cultural, social, and biological aspects of language in comparative perspective. How is the familiar shape of language today the result of evolutionary and developmental processes involving the form, function, meaning and use of signs and symbols in social ecologies?
ANTH 2420Language and Gender (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language.
ANTH 2430Languages of the World (3.00)
An introduction to the study of language relationships and linguistic structures.  Topics covered the basic elements of grammatical description; genetic, areal, and typological relationships among languages; a survey of the world's major language groupings and the notable structures and grammatical categories they exhibit; and the issue of language endangerment. Prerequisite: One year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
ANTH 2440Language and Cinema (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Looks historically at speech and language in Hollywood movies, including the technological challenges and artistic theories and controversies attending the transition from silent to sound films. Focuses on the ways that gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. Introduces semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics, or film studies.
ANTH 2470Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with MEST 2470.
ANTH 2500Cultures, Regions, and Civilizations (3.00)
Intensive studies of particular world regions, societies, cultures, and civilizations.
ANTH 2541Topics in Linguistics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with linguistics.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ANTH 2557Culture Through Film (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester covering the diversity of human cultural worlds and the field of anthropology as presented through film. A variety of ethnographic and commercial films will be viewed and discussed in conjunction with readings.
ANTH 2559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of anthropology.
ANTH 2560Hierarchy and Equality (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Provides an anthropological perspective on relations of inequality, subordination, and class in diverse societies, along with consideration of American ideas of egalitarianism, meritocracy, and individualism. Specific topics will be announced prior to each semester.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ANTH 2565Society and Politics in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3.00)
Courses on the comparative anthropological study of topics announced prior to each semester.
ANTH 2570History and Narrative (3.00)
This course examines how people make history through specific processes of remembering, commemoration, reenactment, story-telling, interpretation, and so on. How do the narrative genres of a particular culture influence the relationship people have to the past?
ANTH 2575Migrants and Minorities (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with migration and migrants, and the experience of ethnic and racial minorities.
Course was offered Fall 2013
ANTH 2589Topics in Archaeology (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with archaeology.
ANTH 2590Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
ANTH 2620Sex, Gender, and Culture (3.00)
Examines the manner in which ideas about sexuality and gender are constructed differently cross-culturally and how these ideas give shape to other social phenomena, relationships, and practices.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Summer 2014
ANTH 2621Culture, Gender and Violence (3.00)
Beginning with a discussion of the cultural patterning of social action, this course examines sex, gender, and sexuality as culturally constructed and socially experienced, with special attention to non-Western examples that contrast with sex and gender norms in the U.S. The course then focuses on gender violence at U.S. universities, asking whether structural violence can be effectively countered by programs that focus on individual responses.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ANTH 2625Imagining Africa (3.00)
Africa is commonly imagined in the West as an unproblematically bounded and undifferentiated entity. This course engages and moves beyond western traditions of story telling about Africa to explore diverse systems of imagining Africa's multi-diasporic realities. Imagining Africa is never a matter of pure abstraction, but entangled in material struggles and collective memory, and taking place at diverse and interconnected scales and locales. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015
ANTH 2660The Internet Is Another Country: Community, Power, and Social Media (3.00)
The peoples of Polynesia and Indonesia, sharing a cultural and linguistic heritage, have spread from Madagascar to Easter Island. Examines their maritime migrations, the societies and empires that they built, and recent changes affecting their cultural traditions.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2009
ANTH 2670How Others See Us (3.00)
Explores how America, the West, and the white racial mainstream are viewed by others in different parts of the world, and at home.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ANTH 2800Introduction to Archaeology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics include alternative theories of prehistoric culture change, dating methods, excavation and survey techniques, and the reconstruction of the economy, social organization, and religion of prehistoric societies.
ANTH 2810Human Origins (3.00)
Studies the physical and cultural evolution of humans from the initial appearance of hominids to the development of animal and plant domestication in different areas of the world. Topics include the development of biological capabilities such as bipedal walking and speech, the evolution of characteristics of human cultural systems such as economic organization and technology, and explanations for the development of domestication.
ANTH 2820The Emergence of States and Cities (3.00)
Surveys patterns in the development of prehistoric civilizations in different areas of the world including the Inca of Peru, the Maya, the Aztec of Mexico, and the ancient Middle East.
ANTH 2850American Material Culture (3.00)
Analysis of patterns of change in American material culture from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. Consideration of how these changes reflect shifts in perception, cognition, and worldview.
ANTH 2890Unearthing the Past (3.00)
An introduction to prehistory covering 4 million years of human physical evolution and 2.5 million years of human cultural evolution. Provides students with an understanding of how archaeologists reconstruct the rise and fall of ancient civilizations. Covers some major developments in prehistory such as origins of modern humans, the rise of the first complex societies & agriculture, and the emergence of ancient civilizations in North America.
ANTH 2900The Cultural Politics of American Family Values (3.00)
This course provides a broad, introductory survey of the range of cultural understandings, economic structures, and political and legal constraints that shape both dominant and alternative forms of kinship and family in the United States.
ANTH 3010Theory and History of Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Overview of the major theoretical positions which have structured anthropological thought over the past century.
ANTH 3020Using Anthropology (3.00)
The theoretical, methodological and ethical practice of an engaged anthropology is the subject of this course, We begin with a history of applied anthropology. We then examine case studies that demonstrate the unique practices of contemporary sociocultural, linguistic, archaeological and bioanthropological anthropology in the areas of policy and civic engagement.
ANTH 3070Introduction to Musical Ethnography (3.00)
Explores music and sound as a social practice, using genres and traditions from throughout the world.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ANTH 3105Love and Romantic Intimacies (3.00)
This course offers an introduction to recent anthropological scholarship on romance to examine how intimate relationships shape human experiences. Through readings and films, we investigate the increasingly popular idealization of "companionate marriages," in which spouses are ideally linked by affection. Our examples include queer and straight experiences, and a diversity of racial, cultural, classed, and gendered representations.
ANTH 3129Marriage, Mortality, Fertility (3.00)
Explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures.
ANTH 3130Disease, Epidemics and Society (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. Prerequisite: introductory anth or soc course
ANTH 3152Amazonian Peoples (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes ethnographies on the cultures and the societies of the South American rain forest peoples, and evaluates the scholarly ways in which anthropology has produced, engaged, interpreted, and presented its knowledge of the 'Amerindian.'
ANTH 3154Indians of the American Southwest (3.00)
Ethnographic coverage of the Apaches, Pueblos, Pimans, and Shoshoneans of Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Northwestern Mexico. Topics include prehistory, socio-cultural patterns, and historical development.
ANTH 3155Anthropology of Everyday American Life (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Provides an anthropological perspective of modern American society. Traces the development of individualism through American historical and institutional development, using as primary sources of data religious movements, mythology as conveyed in historical writings, novels, and the cinema, and the creation of modern American urban life. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
ANTH 3157Caribbean Perspectives (3.00)
Explores the histories and politics that have shaped the nations and dependencies that are geographically and politically defined as Caribbean, including French, English, and Spanish. Takes a regional and a national perspective on the patterns of family and kinship; community and household structures; political economy, ethnicity and ethnic relations; religious and social institutions; and relations between Caribbeans abroad and at home. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ANTH 3170Anthropology of Media (3.00)
Explores the cultural life of media and the mediation of cultural life through photography, radio, television, advertising, the Internet, and other technologies.
Course was offered Spring 2013
ANTH 3171Culture of Cyberspace: Digital Fluency for an Internet-Enabled Society (3.00)
Today's personal, social, political, and economic worlds are all affected by digital media and networked publics. Together we will explore both the literature about and direct experience of these new literacies: research foundations and best practices of individual digital participation and collective participatory culture, the use of collaborative media and methodologies, and the application of network know-how to life online.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ANTH 3175Native American Art: The Astor Collection (3.00)
This is an upper-level anthropology course which is intended to engage students in the study of Native American art as well as the history and current debate over the representation of Native American culture and history in American museums. After a thorough review of the literature on those topics, the class focuses specifically on the Astor collection owned by the University of Virginia.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ANTH 3180Social History of Commodities (3.00)
Introduces the anthropological study of production, exchange, consumption, and globalization by exploring the cultural life-cycle of particular commodities in different places and times.
ANTH 3200Marriage, Gender, Political Economy (3.00)
Cross-cultural comparison of marriage and domestic groups, analyzed as a point of intersection between cultural conceptions of gender and a larger political economy.
ANTH 3205Modern Families, Global Worlds (3.00)
This course examines the importance of kinship for the structure and dynamics of transnational economic relations and for the meaning and constitution of nation and citizenship in the contemporary global political economy.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ANTH 3210Kinship and Social Organization (3.00)
Cross-cultural analysis and comparison of systems of kinship and marriage from Australian aborigines to the citizens of Yankee city. Covers classic and contemporary theoretical and methodological approaches. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
ANTH 3220Economic Anthropology (3.00)
Comparative analysis of different forms of production, circulation, and consumption in primitive and modern societies. Exploration of the applicability of modern economic theory developed for modern societies to primitive societies and to those societies being forced into the modern world system.
Course was offered Summer 2017
ANTH 3230Legal Anthropology (3.00)
Comparative survey of the philosophy and practice of law in various societies. Includes a critical analysis of principles of contemporary jurisprudence and their application. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
ANTH 3240The Anthropology of Food (3.00)
By exploring food and eating in relationship to such topics as taboo, sexuality, bodies, ritual, kinship, beauty, and temperance and excess, this course will help students to investigate the way the foods people eat--or don't eat--hold meaning for people within multiple cultural contexts.
ANTH 3255Anthropology of Time and Space (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
All societies position themselves in space and time. This course samples the discussion of the ways social systems have configured spatial/temporal orders. It considers both internalized conceptions of time and space and the ways an analyst might view space and time as external factors orientating a society's existence. And it samples classic discussions of spatial-temporal orientations in small and large, "pre-modern" and "modern" societies.
ANTH 3260Globalization and Development (3.00)
Explores how globalization and development affect the lives of people in different parts of the world. Topics include poverty, inequality, and the role of governments and international agencies.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2010
ANTH 3265Cultures, Spaces, and Worldviews of International Aid (3.00)
The main focus of this class is the culture and values of development practitioners, and how these shape ideas of development itself. It explores the interconnected processes, relationships, and spaces through which development practitioners and planners learn, live , work, and encounter (or not) people who are the targets of development plans and interventions.
ANTH 3270Anthropology of Politics (3.00)
Reviews the variety of political systems found outside the Western world. Examines the major approaches and results of anthropological theory in trying to understand how radically different politics work. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014
ANTH 3272Anthropology of Dissent (3.00)
This course will investigate various processes of opposition, resistance, and revolution. The first half of the course will survey foundational works of revolutionary theory, while the second half will examine political practice from an ethnographic perspective, with an eye towards the lived experience of political participation and the formation (and transformation) of resisting subjects.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ANTH 3300Tournaments and Athletes (3.00)
A cross-cultural study of sport and competitive games. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.
ANTH 3310Controversies of Care in Contemporary Africa (3.00)
In this course we will draw on a series of classic and contemporary works in history and anthropology to come to a better understanding of current debates concerning corruption and patronage, marriage and sexuality, and medicine in Sub-Sahararn Africa.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ANTH 3320Shamanism, Healing, and Ritual (3.00)
Examines the characteristics of these nonmedical practices as they occur in different culture areas, relating them to the consciousness of spirits and powers and to concepts of energy. Prerequisite: At least a 2000-level ANTH course, or instructor permission.
ANTH 3325Capitalism: Cultural Perspectives (3.00)
Examines capitalist relations around the world in a variety of cultural and historical settings. Readings cover field studies of work, industrialization, "informal" economies, advertising, securities trading, "consumer culture," corporations; anthropology of money and debt; global spread of capitalist markets; multiple capitalisms thesis; commodification; slavery and capital formation; capitalism and environmental sustainability.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ANTH 3340Ecology and Society: An Introduction to the New Ecological Anthropology (3.00)
Forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology to provide new insights on how human cultures fashion, and are fashioned by, their environment. Although cultures from all over the world are considered, special attention is given to the region defined by South and East Asia, and Australia. Prerequisite: At least one Anthropology course, and/or relevant exposure to courses in EVSC, BIOL, CHEM, or HIST or instructor permission
ANTH 3360Fieldwork, Ethnographic Methods, and the Field Experience (3.00)
Introduction to ethnographic methods of research. This course combines practical exercises in participant observation with readings that illuminate the field experience, its politics, ethics, limitations, and possibilities.
ANTH 3370Power and the Body (3.00)
Studying the cultural representations and interpretations of the body in society. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or permission of the instructor.
ANTH 3395Mythodology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A hands-on seminar in myth interpretation designed to acquaint the student with the concept and techniques of obviation.
ANTH 3440Language and Emotion (3.00)
This course explores emotion from the perspectives of cultural anthropology and sociolinguistics. Topics include: emotion in the natural vs. social sciences; cross-cultural conceptions of emotion; historical change in emotion discourses; emotion as a theory of the self; the grammatical encoding of emotion in language; (mis-) communication of emotion; and emotion in the construction of racialized and gendered identities.
ANTH 3450Native American Languages (3.00)
Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.
ANTH 3455African Languages (3.00)
An introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax); the classification of African languages; the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory; language and social identity; verbal art; language policy debates; the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with MEST 3470. Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.
ANTH 3480Language and Prehistory (3.00)
This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory.
ANTH 3490Language and Thought (3.00)
Language and Thought
ANTH 3541Topics in Linguistics (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with linguistics.
ANTH 3550Ethnography (3.00)
Close reading of several ethnographies, primarily concerned with non-Western cultures.
ANTH 3559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New course in the subject of Anthropology.
ANTH 3560The Museum in Modern Culture (3.00)
Topics include the politics of cultural representation in history, anthropology, and fine arts museums; and the museum as a bureaucratic organization, as an educational institution, and as a nonprofit corporation.
ANTH 3580Science and Culture (3.00)
Seminar on the the role of science in culture, and on the culture of science and scientists. Topics may include different national traditions in science, the relation between scientific authority and social hierarchy, the cultural history of science, and the relationship between scientific and popular culture ideas.
ANTH 3589Topics in Archaeology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with archaeology.
ANTH 3590Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
ANTH 3603Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (http://www.daacs.org).
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ANTH 3630Chinese Family and Religion (3.00)
Analyzes various features of traditional Chinese social organization as it existed in the late imperial period. Includes the late imperial state; Chinese family and marriage; lineages; ancestor worship; popular religion; village social structure; regional systems; and rebellion.
ANTH 3660China: Empire and Nationalities (3.00)
Explores the distant and recent history of Han and non-Han nationalities in the Chinese empire and nation-state. Examines the reaction of minority nationalities to Chinese predominance and the bases of Chinese rule and cultural hegemony. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or equivalent, a course in Chinese history, or instructor permission.
ANTH 3675Museums and Cultural Representation in Quebec (3.00)
In this J-term course, we visit museums in Montreal and Quebec City to examine the politics of cultural representation, asking how various kinds of group identity are exhibited in art, history, and anthropology museums. Daily museum visits are accompanied by readings and lectures.
ANTH 3680Australian Aboriginal Art and Culture (3.00)
This class studies the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past thirty years. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art. Students will conduct object-based research using the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or instructor permission.
ANTH 3685Austronesia: World of Islands (3.00)
Languages of the Austronesian faily are found from Madagascar through the archipelago of Southeast Asia, and across the vast Pacific. It is a world of islands. Being part of no continent, Austronesia is all but invisible. We approach this hidden world by seeing oceans instead of continents. In doing so, we learn about the migrations of its people, their diverse historical experiences, and the resulting extraordinary range of cultures.
ANTH 3700Globalizing India: Society, Bazaars and Cultural Politics (3.00)
A study of selected interrelated major cultural, religious and political changes for comprehending India after independence. The course will focus on major urban centers for explicating changing family, marriage and caste relationships; middle class Indians; status of women and Dalits; and rising religious/ethnic violence, including Hindu religious politics and religious nationalism. Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology or permission of instructor.
ANTH 3705Anthropology of the Middle East (3.00)
Anthropological readings and films provide insight into the diversity of peoples and cultures of the modern Middle East. The focus will be on the everyday lived experiences of peoples in this part of the world. As we explore the rich diversity of cultures in the Middle East, key topics to be examined include tribalism, gender and politics, Islam, religion and secularism, colonialism, nationalism, and economic inequalities.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2015
ANTH 3810Field Methods in Archaeology (3.00 - 6.00)
Provides a comprehensive training in archaeological field techniques through participation in research projects currently in progress under the direction of the archaeology faculty. The emphasis is on learning, in an actual field situation, how the collection of archaeological data is carried out in both survey and excavation. Students become familiar with field recording systems, excavation techniques, survey methods, sampling theory in archaeology, and artifact processing and analysis. (Field methods courses outside anthropology or offered at other universities may be substituted for ANTH 3810 with the prior approval of the student's advisor.) Supporting Courses. The following list includes additional courses which have been approved for the major program. Other courses can be added, depending on the student's area of concentration, with the approval of an advisor.
ANTH 3820Field Methods in Historical Archaeology (3.00)
Introduces the basic field methods used in conducting archaeological investigations of historic sites. Surveying, excavation, mapping, and recording are all treated.
ANTH 3830North American Archaeology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys the prehistoric occupations of several areas of North America emphasizing the eastern United States, the Plains, California, and the Southwest. Topics include the date of human migration into the New World, the economy and organization of early Paleo-Indian populations, and the evolution of organization and exchange systems.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
ANTH 3840Archaeology of the Middle East (3.00)
This course is an introduction to the prehistory/early history of the Middle East (Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Levant and southeast Anatolia) from 10,000 to 4,000 BP.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ANTH 3850Historical Archaeology (3.00)
Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evaluate credible inferences about the past.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ANTH 3870Archaeology of Virginia (3.00)
Reviews the current state of archaeological and ethnohistoric research in Virginia. Emphasizes the history and culture of Native Americans in Virginia from the earliest paleoindian cultures to the period of European colonization.
ANTH 3880African Archaeology (3.00)
Surveys transformations in Africa from four million years ago to the present, known chiefly through archaeology, and focusing on Stone and Iron Age societies in the last 150,000 years. Prerequisite: ANTH 2800 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2009
ANTH 3885Archaeology of Europe (3.00)
A survey of European archaeology beginning with the Neanderthal debate, and including interpretations of Upper Paleolithic cave painting, the spread village farming from the Near East, the role of megalithic monuments, the interaction of Rome and the `Barbarians', the growth of urban centers, the Iron Age, and the Viking expansion.
ANTH 3890Archaeology of the American Southwest (3.00)
The northern section of the American Southwest offers one of the best contexts for examining the evolution of local and regional organization from the prehistoric to the historic period. Readings and discussion focus on both archaeological and ethnographic studies of the desert (Hohokam), mountain (Mogollon), and plateau (Anasazi/Pueblo) cultures.
ANTH 3930Kinship and the New Reproductive Technologies (3.00)
The course explores the manner in which cultural understandings of kinship relations both give shape to and are transformed by the new reproductive technologies-including surrogacy, in vitro fertilization, pre-implantation diagnosis, cloning and amniocentesis. Prerequisite: ANTH 2900 or permission of instructor.
ANTH 4060People, Culture and Environment of Southern Africa (3.00)
Focusing on the intersection between peoples, cultures, and environments of southern Africa, this summer study abroad course details the continuities and contrasts between life in rural, marginalized and under-served regions of South Africa and Mozambique. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the community role in education and sustainable development - both developmental and anthropogenic impacts on the environment but also environmental.
ANTH 4420Theories of Language (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ANTH 4559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of Anthropology.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
ANTH 4590Social & Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ANTH 4591Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Integrates the major subdivisions of anthropology, emphasizing selected theoretical topics and primary sources. Primarily for majors in their final year.
ANTH 4630Eastern European Societies (3.00)
This course explores Eastern European societies through an examination of the practices of everyday social life. Topics include the changing cultural meanings of work and consumption, the nature of property rights and relations, family and gender, ethnicity and nationalism, religion and ritual. Cross Listed with SOC 4630. Prerequisite: one course in anthropology, sociology, or permission of the instructor.
ANTH 4840Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology I (3.00)
Examines the quantitative analytical techniques used in archaeology. Includes seriation, regression analysis, measures of diversity, and classification.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2011
ANTH 4841Quantitative Analysis II (3.00)
This course offers training in statistical models and methods that will be useful for students in multiple fields, including archaeology, anthropology, and environmental science. The goal is to equip students with statistical skills useful in systematically describing and analyzing empirical variation, deciphering links to the environmental and historical contexts in which that variation occurs, and using the results to advance science. Prerequisites: ANTH 4840 Quantitative Analysis I.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 4993Independent Study in Anthropology (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent study conducted by the student under the supervision of an instructor of his or her choice.
ANTH 4998Distinguished Majors Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research, under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers, toward the DMP thesis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Majors Program in Anthropology.
ANTH 4999Distinguished Majors Thesis Writing (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 pages, under the supervision of the faculty DMP thesis readers. Prerequisite: ANTH 4998.
ANTH 5200History of Kinship Studies (3.00)
Critical assessment of major theoretical approaches to the study of kinship and marriage (from the 19th century to the present) and of the central role of kinship studies in the development of anthropological theory.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2012, Spring 2010
ANTH 5210Reconfiguring Kinship Studies (3.00)
Examines the ways in which the forms of kinship have been reconfigured in contemporary societies, and the ways in which traditional kinship studies have been reconfigured by their intersection with culture theory, feminist theory, gender studies, postmodern theory, gay and lesbian studies, and cultural studies of science and medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 5200 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2013
ANTH 5220Economic Anthropology (3.00)
Considers Western economic theories and their relevance to non-Western societies. Includes a comparative analysis of different forms of production, consumption, and circulation.
ANTH 5225NGOs, Development, and International Aid (3.00)
Graduate level seminar explores the scholarly literature on NGOs and development aid organizations, emphasizing results of field studies. Issues include the relationship between policy and practice, the impact of changing trends and funding priorities, the politics of representing the voices of aid clients, economic and racial hierarchies in development, assessment and audit, and the nature of motivations to help. Prerequisite: 4th year ANTH, GDS, or PST Majors; or A&S Graduate students
Course was offered Spring 2014
ANTH 5235Legal Anthropology (3.00)
This course is an introduction to legal anthropology for graduate students or advanced undergraduates. This course investigates law systems, legal argumentation, and people's interactions with these thoughts and forms. Rather than taking as given the hegemonic power that legal structures might hold over people's lives and thought, this course questions how people use, abuse, subvert, and leverage legal structures in which they find themselves.
Course was offered Fall 2014
ANTH 5360World Mental Health (3.00)
This course will examine mental health issues from the perspectives of biomedicine and anthropology, emphasizing local traditions of illness and healing as well as evidence from epidemiology and neurobiology. Included topics will be psychosis, depression, PTSD, Culture Bound Syndromes, and suicide. We will also examine the role of pharmaceutical companies in the spread of western based mental health care and culturally sensitive treatment.
ANTH 5401Linguistic Field Methods (3.00)
Investigates the grammatical structure of non-European language on the basis of data collected in class from a native speaker. A different language is the focus of study each year.
ANTH 5410Phonology (3.00)
An introduction to the theory and analysis of linguistic sound systems. Covers the essential units of speech sound that lexical and grammatical elements are composed of, how those units are organized at multiple levels of representation, and the principles governing the relation between levels.     
ANTH 5440Morphology (3.00)
An overview of morphological theory within the generative paradigm. Covers notions of the morpheme, theories of the phonology-syntax interface (e.g., lexical phonology, prosodic morphology, optimality theory), and approaches to issues arising at the morphology-syntax interface (e.g., inflection, agreement, incorporation, compounding).
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ANTH 5470Language and Identity (3.00)
In anthropology, where identity has become a central concern, language is seen as an important site for the construction of, and negotiation over social identities. In linguistics, reference to categories of social identity helps to explain language structure and change. This seminar explores the overlap between these converging trends by focusing on the notion of discourse as a nexus of cultural and linguistic processes.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2010
ANTH 5475Multimodal Interaction (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Students build knowledge and practice of analysis of peoples¿ joint-engagement in embodied interactions. How does action weave together multiple sensory modalities into semiotic webs linking interactions with more durative institutions of social life? Course includes workshops on video recording, and the transcription and coding of verbal and non-verbal actions. Prior coursework in Linguistics, Anthropology or instructor permission recommended.
ANTH 5480Literacy and Orality (3.00)
This course surveys ethnographic and linguistic literature on literacy, focusing on the social meanings of speaking vs. writing (and hearing vs. reading) as opposed communicative practices, looking especially at traditionally oral societies.
Course was offered Fall 2014
ANTH 5490Speech Play and Verbal Art (3.00)
This graduate-level seminar seeks to understand variation in language (and its significance for social relations and social hierarchies) by focusing on forms of language that are aesthetically valued (whether as powerful or as poetic) in particular communities. The course assumes some familiarity both with technical analysis of language and anthropological perspectives on social formations.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2012
ANTH 5510Topics in Ethnography (3.00)
Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2011
ANTH 5528Topics in Race Theory (3.00)
This course examines theories and practices of race and otherness, in order to analyze and interpret constructions, deconstructions and reconstructions of race from the late 18th to the 21st centuries. The focus varies from year to year, and may include 'race, 'progress and the West,' 'gender, race and power,' and 'white supremacy.' The consistent theme is that race is neither a biological nor a cultural category, but a method and theory of social organization, an alibi for inequality, and a strategy for resistance. Cross listed as AAS 5528. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010, 3010, or other introductory or middle-level social science or humanities course
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
ANTH 5541Topics in Linguistics (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with linguistics.
ANTH 5549Topics in Theoretical Linguistics and Linguistic Anthropology (3.00)
Seminars in topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced students will be announced prior to each semester.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ANTH 5559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New course in the subject of anthropology.
ANTH 5589Selected Topics in Archaeology (1.00 - 6.00)
Seminars in topics announced prior to each semester.
ANTH 5590Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
ANTH 5610Critical medical anthropology: healers, patients, scholars (3.00)
This class focuses on critical issues in medical anthropology on topics of patienthood, healing and healers and the theoretical, methodological and ethnographic perspectives of anthropologists who integrate issues of politics, economics, power and resistance in understanding health, illness, healing as individually experienced and culturally shaped phenomena .
ANTH 5620The Middle East in Ethnographic Perspective (3.00)
Survey of the anthropological literature on the Middle East & N. Africa. Begins historically with traditional writing on the Middle East and proceeds to critiques of this tradition and attempts at new ways of constructing knowledge of this world region. Readings juxtapose theoretical and descriptive work toward critically appraising modern writers' success in overcoming the critiques leveled against their predecessors.
Course was offered Spring 2013
ANTH 5808Method and Theory in Archaeology (3.00)
Investigates current theory, models, and research methods in anthropological archaeology.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ANTH 5840Archaeology of Complex Societies (3.00)
Examines archaeological approaches to the study of complex societies using case studies from both the Old and New Worlds.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2009
ANTH 5870Archaeozoology (3.00)
Laboratory training in techniques and methods used in analyzing animal bones recovered from archaeological sites. Include field collection, data analysis, and the use of zooarchaeological materials in reconstructing economic and social systems.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2010
ANTH 5880Gender in Archaeology (3.00)
Explores the range of case studies and theoretical literature associated with the emergence of gender as a framework for research in archaeology.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ANTH 5885Archaeology of Colonial Expansions (3.00)
Exploration of the archaeology of frontiers, expansions and colonization, focusing on European expansion into Africa and the Americas while using other archaeologically-known examples (e.g., Roman, Bantu) as comparative studies. Prerequisite: For undergraduates, ANTH 4591 senior seminar or instructor permission.
ANTH 5993Independent Studies in Anthropologies (3.00)
Independent study conducted by the student under the supervision of an instructor of his or her choice.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ANTH 7010History of Anthropological Theory I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores the diverse intellectual roots of the discipline, showing how they converged into a unitary program in the late nineteenth century, and how this program was criticized and revised in the first half of the 20th century.
ANTH 7020History of Anthropological Theory II (3.00)
Analyzes the main schools of anthropological thought since World War II, a half century during which separate English, French, and American traditions have influenced each other to produce a broad and subtle international discipline.
ANTH 7040Ethnographic Research Design and Methods (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Seminar on ethnographic methods and research design in the qualitative tradition. Surveys the literature on ethnographic methods and explores relations among theory, research design, and appropriate methodologies. Students participate in methodological exercises and design a summer pilot research project. Prerequisite: Second year graduate in anthropology or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
ANTH 7050Ethnographic Writing and Representation (3.00)
Seminar on the craft of ethnographic writing and the ethical, political, and practical challenges of describing studied people in scholarly books and articles. What can student researchers do during fieldwork to help them write better dissertations more easily? How should they analyze and present field data? Prerequisite: ANTH 7040 or instructor permission. Suitable for pre- and post-field graduate students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2013
ANTH 7060Dissertation Research Proposal Workshop (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A workshop for graduates preparing dissertation proposals and writing grant applications. Each student prepares several drafts of a proposal, revising it at each stage in response to the criticisms of classmates and the instructor.
ANTH 7129Marriage, Mortality, Fertility (3.00)
Explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Readings are drawn from comparative anthropology and historical demography. Cross-listed as ANTH 3129.
ANTH 7130Disease, Epidemics and Society (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics covered in this course will include emerging diseases and leading killers in the twenty-first century, disease ecology, disease history and mortality transitions, the sociology of epidemics, the role of epidemiology in the mobilization of public health resources to confront epidemics, and the social processes by which the groups become stigmatized during disease outbreaks. Prerequisites: previous ANTH or SOC course
ANTH 7290Nationalism and the Politics of Culture (3.00)
Analyzes the ways in which a spirit of national or ethic solidarity is mobilized and utilized.
ANTH 7340Anthropology and History (3.00)
This course explores the mutuality of the disciplines of anthropology and history, as well as the differences in their approaches and methods, in order to reassert the epistemology and subject matter common to the two disciplines, and to bring strength to disciplinary analysis. We will read works of scholars who traverse the two disciplines, paying close attentions to their methodological approaches.
Course was offered Fall 2010
ANTH 7370Power and the Body (3.00)
Study of the cultural representations and interpretations of the body in society.
ANTH 7400Linguistic Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically-oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, language and nationalism, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. The course is required for all Anthropology graduate students. It also counts toward the Theory requirement for the M.A. in Linguistics.
ANTH 7420Theories of Language (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ANTH 7440Language and Emotion (3.00)
This course explores emotion from the perspectives of cultural anthropology and sociolinguistics. Topics include: emotion in the natural vs. social sciences; cross-cultural conceptions of emotion; historical change in emotion discourses; emotion as a theory of the self; the grammatical encoding of emotion in language; (mis-) communication of emotion; and emotion in the construction of racialized and gendered identities.
ANTH 7450Native American Languages (3.00)
Surveys the classification and typological characteristics of Native American languages and the history of their study, with intensive work on one language by each student. Some linguistics background is helpful.
ANTH 7455African Languages (3.00)
An introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax); the classification of African languages; the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory; language and social identity; verbal art; language policy debates; the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. Taught concurrently with ANTH 3455.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 7470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Language and Culture in the Middle East
ANTH 7480Language and Prehistory (3.00)
This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics (the study of how languages change over time) and the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. Considered is the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. Fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics graduate students.
ANTH 7541Topics in Sociolinguistics (3.00)
Analyzes particular aspects of the social use of language. Topics vary from year to year.
ANTH 7559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of anthropology.
ANTH 7589Topics in Archaeology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with archaeology.
ANTH 7590Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
ANTH 7603Archaeological Aproaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (http://www.daacs.org).
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ANTH 7630Chinese Family and Religion (3.00)
Analyzes various features of traditional Chinese social organization as it existed in the late imperial period. Includes the late imperial state; Chinese family and marriage; lineages; ancestor worship; popular religion; village social structure; regional systems; and rebellion.
ANTH 7840Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology I (3.00)
This course examines the quantitative analytical techniques used in anthropology and archaeology. Topics include seriation, regression analysis, measures of diversity, and classification.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2011
ANTH 7841Quantitative Analysis II (3.00)
This is a second course in statistical methods useful in many disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, and environmental sciences. Coverage includes linear and generalized linear models, non-parametric regression, multivariate distances, clustering, ordination methods, and discriminant functions. The course emphasizes practical data analysis using R. Prerequisite: Quantitative Analysis I (ANTH 4840/7840) or an introductory statistics course and a basic knowledge of R.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 7855Historical Archaeology (3.00)
Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of the continental and transoceanic human migrations that began in the fifteenth century, their effects on native peoples, and historical trajectories of the societies that they created. This course offers an introduction to the field. It emphasizes how theoretical models, analytical methods, and archaeological data can be combined to make and evlaluate credible inferences about the past.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ANTH 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ANTH 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
ANTH 9010Directed Readings (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Directed Readings
ANTH 9020Directed Readings (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Directed Readings
ANTH 9050Research Practicum (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research Practicum
ANTH 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
ANTH 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Applied Mathematics
APMA 1000Preparation for Engineering Mathematics (2.00)
Covers the fundamental concepts necessary for success in engineering courses and Applied Mathemtics courses.
Course was offered Fall 2009
APMA 1090Single Variable Calculus I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The concepts of differential and integral calculus are developed and applied to the elementary functions of a single variable. Limits, rates of change, derivatives, and integrals. Applications are made to problems in analytic geometry and elementary physics. For students with no exposure to high school calculus.
APMA 1110Single Variable Calculus II (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Includes the concepts of differential and integral calculus and applications to problems in geometry and elementary physics, including inverse functions, indeterminate forms, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, including Taylor and Maclaurin series. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 1090 or equivalent.
APMA 1501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (1.00)
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
APMA 2102Discrete Mathematics I (3.00)
Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include sets (finite and infinite, such as sets of strings over a finite alphabet), elementary combinatorial problems, and finite state automata. Develops tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems. Cross-listed as CS 2102. Prerequisite: APMA 1110 and CS 1110, or equivalent.
APMA 2120Multivariable Calculus (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics include vectors in three-space and vector valued functions. The multivariate calculus, including partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and the vector calculus, including Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes's theorem. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.
APMA 2130Ordinary Differential Equations (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
First order differential equations, second order and higher order linear differential equations, reduction of order, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms, linear systems of first order differential equations and the associated matrix theory, numerical methods. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 2501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special topics in applied mathematics
Course was offered Fall 2016
APMA 2502Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Special topics in applied mathematics.
Course was offered Spring 2017
APMA 3080Linear Algebra (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes the systems of linear equations; vector spaces; linear dependence; bases; dimension; linear mappings; matrices; determinants; quadratic forms; eigenvalues; eigenvectors; orthogonal reduction to diagonal form; inner product spaces; numerical methods; geometric applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3100Probability (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A calculus-based introduction to probability theory and its applications in engineering and applied science. Includes counting techniques, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution functions, expected value and variance, joint distributions, covariance, correlation, the Central Limit theorem, the Poisson process, an introduction to statistical inference. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3102Theory of Computation (3.00)
Introduces computation theory including grammars, finite state machines and Turing machines; and graph theory. Prerequisite: APMA 2102 and either CS 2110 or 2220 all with grades of 'C' or better.
APMA 3110Applied Statistics and Probability (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines variability and its impact on decision-making. Introduces students to basic concepts of probability, such as random variables, probability distribution functions, and the central limit theorem. Based on this foundation, the course then emphasizes applied statistics covering topics such as descriptive statistics, statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression modeling, statistical quality control. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and APMA 3120. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3120Statistics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Includes confidence interval and point estimation methods, hypothesis testing for single samples, inference procedures for single-sample and two-sample studies, single and multifactor analysis of variance techniques, linear and non-linear regression and correlation, and using Minitab for large data sets. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and APMA 3110. Prerequisite: APMA 3100.
APMA 3140Applied Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Separation of variables, superposition, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems, eigenfunction expansion techniques. Particular focus on the heat, wave, and Laplace partial differential equations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Prerequisites: APMA 2120 and 2130 or equivalents.
APMA 3150From Data to Knowledge (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course uses a Case-Study approach to teach statistics with R. Basic statistical techniques covered include: correlation, confidence interval and point estimation methods, hypothesis testing for single samples, inference procedures for single-sample and two-sample studies, single and multifactor analysis of variance techniques, linear and non-linear regression, Monte-Carlo simulation techniques and bootstrap sampling.
Course was offered Fall 2016
APMA 3340Complex Variables with Applications (3.00)
Topics include analytic functions, Cauchy Theorems and formulas, power series, Taylor and Laurent series, complex integration, residue theorem, conformal mapping, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Applies mathematical techniques to special problems of current interest. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
APMA 4501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Applies mathematical techniques to special problems of current interest. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
Course was offered Spring 2017
APMA 4993Independent Reading and Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.
APMA 4995Independent Reading and Research (3.00)
Reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 5070Numerical Methods (3.00)
Introduces techniques used in obtaining numerical solutions, emphasizing error estimation. Includes approximation and integration of functions, and solution of algebraic and differential equations. Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra and differential equations, and the ability to write computer programs in any language.
APMA 6000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (3.00)
APMA 6020Continuum Mechanics with Applications (3.00)
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as AM 6020, MAE 6020, CE 6720 Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
APMA 6130Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics (3.00)
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. Review of relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; kinematics of finite deformations and motions; finite strain measures; linearization; concept of stress; conservation laws of mechanics and equations of motion and equilibrium; constitutive theory; constitutive laws for nonlinear elasticity; generalized Hooke's law for a linearly elastic solid; constitutive laws for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; basic problems of continuum mechanics as boundary-value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as AM 6130. Prerequisite: Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus, Elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
APMA 6150Linear Algebra (3.00)
Analyzes systems of linear equations; least squares procedures for solving over­ determined systems; finite dimensional vector spaces; linear transformations and their representation by matrices; determinants; Jordan canonical form; unitary reduction of symmetric and Hermitian forms; eigenvalues; and invariant subspaces. Prerequisite: Three years of college mathematics or instructor permission.
APMA 6240Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves (3.00)
Introduces phase-space methods, elementary bifurcation theory and perturbation theory, and applies them to the study of stability in the contexts of nonlinear dynamical systems and nonlinear waves, including free and forces nonlinear vibrations and wave motions. Examples are drawn from mechanics and fluid dynamics, and include transitions to periodic oscillations and chaotic oscillations. Also cross-listed as MAE 6240. Prerequisite: Undergraduate ordinary differential equations or instructor permission.
APMA 6340Numerical Analysis (3.00)
Topics include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, calculations of matrix eigenvalues, least squares problems, and boundary value problems in ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra, and the ability to write computer programs.
APMA 6370Singular Perturbation Theory (3.00)
Analyses of regular perturbations; roots of polynomials; singular perturbations in ODE's; periodic solutions of simple nonlinear differential equations; multiple-Scales method; WKBJ approximation; turning-point problems; Langer's method of uniform approximation; asymptotic behavior of integrals; Laplace Integrals; stationary phase; and steepest descents. Examples are drawn from physical systems. Cross-listed as MAE 6370. Prerequisite: Familiarity with complex analysis.
APMA 6410Engineering Mathematics I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Review of ordinary differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems, and various physical applications. Linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and various applications. Scalar and vector field theory, including the divergence theorem, Green's theorem, Stokes theorem, and various applications. Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of partial differential equations by separation of variables, superposition, Fourier series, variation of parameters, d' Alembert's solution. Eigenfunction expansion techniques for nonhomogeneous initial-value, boundary-value problems. Particular focus on various physical applications of the heat equation, the potential (Laplace) equation, and the wave equation in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Cross-listed as MAE 6410. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
APMA 6420Engineering Mathematics II (3.00)
Further and deeper understanding of partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of linear partial differential equations by eigenfunction expansion techniques. Green's functions for time-independent and time-dependent boundary value problems. Fourier transform methods, and Laplace transform methods. Solution of a variety of initial-value, boundary-value problems. Various physical applications. Study of complex variable theory. Functions of a complex variable, and complex integral calculus, Taylor series, Laurent series, and the residue theorem, and various applications. Serious work and efforts in the further development of analytical skills and expertise. Cross-listed as MAE 6420. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and APMA 6410 or equivalent.
APMA 6430Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (3.00)
Analyzes the role of statistics in science; hypothesis tests of significance; confidence intervals; design of experiments; regression; correlation analysis; analysis of variance; and introduction to statistical computing with statistical software libraries. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies.
APMA 6440Applied Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posedness of initial and boundary value problems. Cross-listed as MAE 6440. Prerequisite: APMA 6420 or equivalent.
APMA 6548Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics vary from year to year and are selected to fill special needs of graduate students.
APMA 6720Computational Fluid Dynamics I (3.00)
Topics include the solution of flow and heat transfer problems involving steady and transient convective and diffusive transport; superposition and panel methods for inviscid flow; finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations; elementary grid generation for odd geometries; and primitive variable and vorticity-steam function algorithms for incompressible, multidimensional flows. Extensive use of personal computers/workstations including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 6720. Prerequisite: MAE 6310 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
APMA 6995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 7080Inelastic Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as AM 7080. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
APMA 7140Nonlinear Elasticity Theory (3.00)
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. Both physical and mathematical implications considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as AM 7140 Nonlinear Elasticity. Prerequisite: AM 6020 Continuum Mech. (or equiv)
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
APMA 7340Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Topics include the numerical solution of elliptic equations by finite element methods; solution of time dependent problems by finite element and finite difference methods; and stability and convergence results for the methods presented. Prerequisite: One or more graduate courses in mathematics or applied mathematics.
APMA 7548Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Content varies annually; topics may include wave propagation theory, shell theory, control theory, or advanced numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
APMA 7670Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media (3.00)
Includes averaging principles; equivalent homogeneity; effective moduli; bounding principles; self-consistent schemes; composite spheres; concentric cylinders; three phase model; repeating cell models; inelastic and nonlinear effects; thermal effects; isotropic and anisotropic media; and strength and fracture. Cross-listed as AM 7670, and CE 7770. Prerequisite: APMA 6020.
APMA 7720Computational Fluid Dynamics II (3.00)
A continuation of APMA 6720. More advanced methods for grid generation, transformation of governing equations for odd geometries, methods for compressible flows, methods for parabolic flows, calculations using vector and parallel computers. Use of personal computers/workstations/supercomputer including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 7720. Prerequisite: APMA 6720 or equivalent.
APMA 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of advanced graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
APMA 8548Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Course content varies from year to year and depends on students' interests and needs. See APMA 7548 for possible topics. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
APMA 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's students.
APMA 8995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Applied Mathematics degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 8999Non-Topical Research, Master's Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral students.
APMA 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010, Fall 2009
Arabic
ARAB 1010Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.
ARAB 1016Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1020Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice. Prerequisite: ARAB 1010 or equivalent.
ARAB 1026Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 or equivalent.
ARAB 116Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 126Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 6.00)
New Course in Arabic
ARAB 2010Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2016Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequistes: ARAB 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.
ARAB 2020Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2026Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
ARAB 216Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2250Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (1.50)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
ARAB 226Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2260Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 2250 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2266Introduction to Levantine Arabic II (1.50)
This course is a continuation of ARAB 2256 and it intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: ARAB 2256
ARAB 256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
ARAB 266Introduction to Levantine Arabic-II (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First year Arabic and ARAB 0256/2256
ARAB 3010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ARAB 3020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARAB 3230Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or instructor permission.
ARAB 3240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 3310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 3330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 3340Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 3330 or permission of instructor.
ARAB 3559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2011
ARAB 3672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 3810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4010Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4020Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context.
ARAB 4120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 4230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 4450The Other in Premodern Arabic Sources (3.00)
This course explores the unduly studied corpus of Arabic writings that describes the encounters with and perception of the Other. Much effort will be devoted to investigate medieval and early modern Arab-Muslim views of the Other in a cross-generic selection of non-religious Arabic prose such as travelogues, diplomatic memoirs, captivity reports, marvels, folktales, literary debates/boasting, and poetry. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARAB 4559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2009
ARAB 4993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Study in Arabic
ARAB 5010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 5240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 5310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 5330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 5410Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5420Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 4010 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
ARAB 5810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5830Topics in Arabic Prose I (3.00)
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5840Topics in Arabic Prose II (3.00)
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5830 or instructor permission.
ARAB 5850Media Arabic (3.00)
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5530 and 5540, or ARAB 3010/5010 and 3020/5020, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5870Media Arabic II (3.00)
A survey of print and electronic media, news and news reports, analysis, commentaries from or about the Arab world, intended to increase students' familiarity with the language used in news as reported in Arabic-media venues.  Prerequisite:  ARAB 5850, completion of ARAB 5530 and 5540 or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARAB 6559New course in Arabic (3.00)
This course is to allow 6000-level new courses to be taught for one semester
ARAB 6672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 7120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 8559New Course in Arabic (3.00)
New Course in Arabic Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARAB 8993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Study in Arabic.
Arts Administration
ARAD 1550Topics in Arts Administration (1.00)
Topics in Arts Administration, where the topic may change. At present (2012) The Art Business and Art Criticism are topic examples under the ARAD 1550 banner, both being taught in Fall, 2012.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014
ARAD 2993Independent Study (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity for independent study in the subject of Arts Administration. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARAD 3100Principles and Practices of Arts Administration (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.
ARAD 3550Topics of Arts in Context (3.00)
Topics course on The Arts in Context, where role of the arts in human society is examined in various contexts.
ARAD 3559New Course in Development for the Arts (3.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Development for the Arts.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Summer 2010, Spring 2010
ARAD 3993Independent Study (3.00)
Independent study in Arts Adminstration
ARAD 4559New Course in Arts Administration (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Arts Administration.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2010
ARAD 5050Arts Marketing Theory and Practice (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Audience development theory and marketing strategies and techniques as they apply specifically to the arts and arts institutions.
ARAD 5200Development and Board Management (3.00 - 4.00)
This course explores techniques and rationales behind the giving and the raising of funds; and the closely related skills of leading and managing trustees, boards and volunteers. The course will examine these fields using both theory and practical applications. Both in-class discussions and distinguished guest speakers will be utilized.
ARAD 5300The Arts in Community / Community in the Arts (3.00)
The Arts in Community / Community in the Arts' examines selected topics from among the multiplicity of relations between the two. Included will be spatial and community aspects of public art, art found locally, art to which the local community aspires, and the idea of community within artist populations. Using guest speakers, readings and other resources focuses class discussion on two sites:Charlottesville's Downtown Mall, & UVA's Art Grounds.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAD 5500Introduction to Design Thinking (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is a pilot seminar designed to launch for the School of Architecture a curriculum in Design Thinking, to be broadened and deepened in subsequent semesters. The course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques.
History of Art and Architecture
ARAH 5253Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I (3.00)
Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I
ARAH 5254Italian 16th Century Painting (3.00)
Italian 16th Century Painting
ARAH 5559New Course in History of Art (3.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of History of Art.
ARAH 5575Topics in Modern Art History (3.00)
examines focused topics in the history of modern art
Course was offered Fall 2012
ARAH 5585Topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Examines focused topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 5681Museum Studies (3.00)
Museum Studies
ARAH 5752Representations of Race in American Art (3.00)
Representations of Race in American Art
ARAH 5753Southern History and Material Culture (3.00)
Southern History & Material Culture is an intensive graduate-level introduction to the decorative arts, history and material culture of the American South. The four-week course includes a number of lectures, collection studies and workshops by members of the staff of the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Old Salem, Inc., the faculty of the University of Virginia, and guest scholars.
Course was offered Summer 2012
ARAH 5951African Art (3.00)
African Art
ARAH 7500Research Problems in Ancient Architecture/Archaeology (3.00)
Reading and research problems in ancient architecture and archaeology.
ARAH 7505Research Problems in Ancient Art/ Archaeology (3.00)
Reading and research on problems in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman art.
ARAH 7510Research Problems in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in medieval architecture
ARAH 7515Research Problems Medieval Art (3.00)
Reading and research on problems in medieval art and its social background.
ARAH 7520Research Problems in Renaissance/Baroque Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in Renaissance/Baroque architecture
ARAH 7525Research Problems in Renaissance/Baroque Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in Renaissance/Baroque art
ARAH 7530Research Problems in 18th/19th Century Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 18th/19th century architecture
ARAH 7535Research Problems in 18th/19th Century Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 18th/19th century art
ARAH 7540Research Problems in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 20th/21st century architecture
ARAH 7545Research Problems in 20th/21st Century Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 20th/21st century art.
ARAH 7560Research Problems in Architecture Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Reading and research problems in architecture theory, comparative & other topics.
ARAH 7565Research Problems in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Reading and research problems in art theory, comparative & other topics.
ARAH 7570Research Problems in the Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of the Americas.
ARAH 7575Research Problems in the Art of the Americas (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of the Americas.
ARAH 7580Research Problems in the Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 7585Research Problems in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARAH 7590Research Problems in the Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 7595Research Problems in the Art of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 8051Theory and Interpretation in the Visual Arts (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in the theory and interpretation of the visual arts
ARAH 8052Library Methodology in the Visual Arts (1.00)
Required for all entering graduate students. Introduces the bibliography of the visual arts including architecture, archaeology, painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts. Specific research and reference publications are analyzed in terms of their scope, special features, and applications to meeting research and information needs.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARAH 8091MA Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
MA Thesis Research
ARAH 8092MA Thesis Writing (3.00)
The MA thesis, up to 50 pages in length, will be prepared under the supervision of the major advisor, reviewed by a three-person committee and defended orally before the end of term.
ARAH 8095Dissertation Proposal (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Preparation of a 15-20 page dissertation proposal under the supervision of a dissertation advisor.
ARAH 8695Special Reading Problems (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special Reading Problems
ARAH 8940Special Reading Problems in Art (1.00 - 3.00)
Special Reading Problems in Art
ARAH 8950Special Reading Problems (1.00 - 12.00)
Special Reading Problems
ARAH 8998Non-Topical Rsch, Masters Prep (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ARAH 8999Non-Topical Research, Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
ARAH 9500Seminar in Ancient Architecture/Archaeology (3.00)
Investigates problems in ancient architecture/archaeology.
ARAH 9505Seminar in Ancient Art/Archaeology (3.00)
Investigates problems in ancient art/archaeology
ARAH 9510Seminar in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Investigates problems in medieval architecture
ARAH 9515Seminar in Medieval Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in medieval art
ARAH 9520Seminar in Renaissance/Baroque Architecture (3.00)
Investigates problems in Renaissance and/or Baroque architecture.
ARAH 9525Seminar in Renaissance/Baroque Art (3.00)
Investigates problems in renaissance/baroque art
ARAH 9535Seminar in 18th/19th Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in 18th-19th century art
ARAH 9540Seminar in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in 20th/21st century architecture
ARAH 9545Seminar in 20th/21st Century Art (3.00)
Investigates problems in 20th/21st century architecture.
ARAH 9560Seminar in Architecture Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture theory, comparative, and other topics.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ARAH 9565Seminar in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture theory, comparative, and other topics
ARAH 9570Seminar in the Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of the Americas
ARAH 9575Seminar in the Art of the Americas (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of the Americas
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARAH 9580Seminar in the Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia
ARAH 9585Seminar in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of East, South, and Southeast Asia
ARAH 9590Seminar in the Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of Africa or Islam
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAH 9595Seminar in the Art of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 9995Supervised Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Supervised Research
ARAH 9998Non-Topical Rsch,Doctoral Prep (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
ARAH 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Architecture
ARCH 1010Lessons of the Lawn (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The study of architecture as a speculation on origins is located at the conjunctive core of any liberal arts curriculum and serves as the physical armature and conceptual foundation of the University. This course is concerned with the contemporary imagination, attempting to make the discipline of architecture meaningful to a wide range of citizens in its public obligation to be constructive and optimistic in the most profoundly ethical, pragmatic, and magical of terms.
ARCH 1020Lessons in Making (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
IIn this course we explore the delights and dilemmas of design. Through writing, drawing, and making collages and models we seek to answer fundamental questions. What are the basic elements of design? What does an artist or architect do when he or she designs? Are there key principles of design? What are the difficulties of the design process? What are its rewards? To see students' work visit: http://www.arch.virginia.edu/designfundamentals/
ARCH 1030Foundation Studio I (4.00)
The studio course introduces first year students from architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.
ARCH 1031Summer Foundation Studio I (4.00)
The studio course introduces architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.
ARCH 1040Introduction to Design (4.00)
Introduction to the principles, methods, and processes that designers use to observe and design the constructed environment. Working in both two and three-dimensional analog and digital media, students will analyze inputs and propose places through innovative forms of visual communication. Spatial, conceptual, relational, and critical thinking will all be creatively explored within a lively interdisciplinary community.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARCH 2010Foundation Studio II (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 1010, 1020, 1030.
ARCH 2011Summer Intro to Design Studio (6.00)
Prerequisite: For undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. This introductory architectural design studio explores comprehensive & foundational design principles, skill sets, & critical thinking. The material covered is presented through a series of lectures, projects, exercises,workshops, symposia & reviews involving the beginning design student in the thoughtful application of comprehensive critical design.
ARCH 2020Foundation Studio III (6.00)
The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 2010
ARCH 2021Summer Intro to Design Studio 1 (6.00)
Prerequisite: ARCH 2010 or 2011, for undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. The second architectural studio in the core curriculum fosters the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions.
ARCH 2040Introduction to Architectural Design (3.00)
Introduction to Architectural Design
ARCH 2150Global Sustainability (3.00)
Earth's ecosystems are unraveling at an unprecedented rate, threatening human wellbeing and posing substantial challenges to contemporary society. Designing sustainable practices, institutions, and technologies for a resource-constrained world is our greatest challenge. This integrated and interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand, innovate and lead the efforts necessary to engage in this task.
ARCH 2230Systems, Sites and Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
ARCH 2240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures for undergraduates to develop analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation. Topics include statics, mechanics of materials, computer-based structural analysis, and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: Equivalent college-level physics.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 2500Special Topics in Architecture (3.00)
Topical offerings in the subject of Architecture.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 2710CAAD 3D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive hands-on course in three-dimensional computer aided design that ranges from beginning to advanced methods in geometrical modeling, macro programming, and visualization used in design related disciplines. The class explores approaches to design made possible through computer-based methods. Lectures and workshops provide a conceptual and applied framework, examine state-of-the-art techniques today,and speculate on future advances
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
ARCH 3010Research Studio I (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 2020
ARCH 3011Design Thinking Studio I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 3020Foundation Studio IV (6.00)
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3010
ARCH 3021Design Thinking Studio II (4.00)
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 3070Foundations in Design Thinking (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This design thinking course will focus on complex design challenges with the goal of generating relevant proposals that benefit the common good. Design thinking approaches will be used to leverage innovative scenarios from novel perspectives to frame new interdisciplinary relationships and design strategies. Design principles and iterative applications will frame project-based exercises and involve students from across the University
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ARCH 312020th Century History of Ideas (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class examines major themes & methodologies found in or taken up by twentieth century architectural theory. The course considers architecture through a wider set of cultural studies that include critical theory, phenomenology, semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism & psychoanalysis.Questions involve the associations constructed between architecture &autonomy, technology, perception, art,theory&practice. Prereq: ARH 1010 &1020
ARCH 3122Contemporary Spatial Practices (3.00)
This seminar will present a critical account of contemporary spatial practices and develop a theoretical framework of spatial operations enabling students to situate their own work within this new territory.
ARCH 3140Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings of Modernism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates the link between ideas and forms of significant buildings in the canon of modern architecture.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3230Systems, Sites and Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures for undergraduates to develop analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation. Topics include statics, mechanics of materials, computer-based structural analysis, and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: Equivalent college-level physics.
ARCH 3260Building Matters (4.00)
Explores and evaluates the properties of basic building materials and construction assemblies. Introduces building construction from a variety of viewpoints, with emphasis on ecological thinking in architectural decision-making. Students will analyze and critique materials and construction systems, and how they correspond to aesthetic, technical, financial and ethical issues.
ARCH 3270Intro Parametric Structural Design (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This second course in structures for undergraduate students focuses on synthesis of structural issues and design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2240
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 3271Breaking BIM (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM workflow, associative modeling, conceptual massing, building components, site tools, customizing components, materials, detailing, schedules, and visualization. With successful completion students will be able to use Revit proficiently in a design process.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARCH 3410CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization (3.00)
A comprehensive course in three-dimensional computer aided design and visualization methods used in architecture and landscape architecture. The class explores design worlds that are made accessible through computer-based media. Lectures provide a theoretical framework for computer-aided design, describe current methods, and speculate on advanced methods.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3422Computer Animation: Design in Motion (3.00)
Arch 3422 is a hands-on workshop in moviemaking by techniques in three-dimensional computer animation with composite video, sound editing and capture. We screen independent and feature film animation and ongoing student work concluding in a 1 to 5 min. final project. Short readings are in film and cognitive science. Students may enroll from diverse areas such as design, art, drama, computer science, the physical sciences, and education.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2016
ARCH 3500Special Topics in Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 3640Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 3710Photography and Digital Media (3.00)
This course seeks to give students the ability to conceive and create digital photographic imagery with control and sophistication. Topics include fundamentals of photography, color theory, digital control of visual qualities, and methods of image montage for both still images and short animations. Methods include production and presentation for both printed hard copy and for the World Wide Web.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2016
ARCH 3993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 4010Research Studio II (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020
ARCH 4011Design Thinking Studio III (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3021
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 4020Independent Design Research Studio (6.00)
Students pursue a semester long independent design project. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 or ARCH 4011.
ARCH 4021Ind. Design Thinking Research Studio (6.00)
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011/3021
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 4100Undergraduate Thesis Preparation (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Architectural research methods are introduced and applied to the development of an undergraduate thesis in Architecture. Students develop and investigate research questions, research methods, and data sources. Open to both Pre-Professional and Design Thinking concentrations.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARCH 4201Forms and Materials of the Buildings of Venice (3.00)
The course aims at introducing the physical essence of Venice through direct contact with selected materials by means of manifold complementary approaches. Different specialists, from week to week, will go into depth on the techniques & their aesthetics through time, taking the students to sites of interest. Among others, the course provides an experience in a glass furnace as part of a practical design atelier, & focuses on marbles & stones.
ARCH 4401Drawing Venice (3.00)
This course will focus on the analysis of urban space and flows, with a focus on the development of representational techniques that investigate the relationship between urban form and urban life. The course will engage a range of media, from hand drawing through digital mapping, photography and film. The students will be expected to develop a capacity to diagram both static and dynamic conditions that structure the urban experience.
ARCH 4500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 4510J-Term Courses (1.00 - 3.00)
January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of "J-term" classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.
ARCH 4820Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Selected students lead a seminar (of 8 to 10 younger students each) for 'Lessons of the Lawn' and 'Lessons in Making.' All student assistants attend class lectures (for a second time) and then meet with their seminar groups weekly, leading discussions of topics and questions raised by the instructor.
ARCH 4821Research Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
ARCH 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 4995Ind Design Res Thesis Studio (6.00)
Independent Design Research Studio for 4th year students in their final year. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 and permission of the chair.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 5011International Summer Studio (6.00)
Students will design proposals for the complex cultural, formal, spatial and constructional context of a particular location outside the US. Pedagogical objectives include strengthening analytical and creative abilities at multiple scales through an iterative design process, studying material and tectonics, developing critical thinking abilities, and improving graphic, verbal and written communication skills.
ARCH 5110Design Approaches to Existing Sites (3.00)
Explores various approaches by designers to the contexts of their work. Examines buildings, urban infrastructure, and landscape interventions, and includes lectures, discussions, and presentations by visitors and students.
Course was offered Fall 2011
ARCH 5130Paper Matters (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Which is the role of publications in the contemporary architectural debate & in a school of architecture? The seminar has the purpose of experimenting the critical edition of contents, reflect on the instruments & educate in the related skills. It will combine the research on themes & other publications, the presence of experts & the editorial staff meetings, & will include short exercises, the definition of an editorial line.
ARCH 5132Paper Matters II (3.00)
Which is the role of publications in the contemporary architectural debate & in a school of architecture? The seminar has the purpose of experimenting the critical edition of contents, reflect on the instruments & educate in the related skills. It will combine the research on themes & other publications, the presence of experts & the editorial staff meetings, & will include short exercises, the definition of an editorial line.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 5140Advanced Design Themes of Great Cities (3.00)
This course discusses the design qualities of the world's great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 5150Global Sustainability (3.00)
Earth's ecosystems are unraveling at an unprecedented rate, threatening human wellbeing and posing substantial challenges to contemporary society. Designing sustainable practices, institutions, and technologies for a resource-constrained world is our greatest challenge. This integrated and interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand, innovate and lead the efforts necessary to engage in this task.
ARCH 5160Models for Higher Density Housing (3.00)
This seminar will focus on density and contemporary housing issues, specifically related to affordable housing. As cities have spread out or decayed at the core, the variety of housing options has decreased leading to a growing divide between where and how people can afford to live. Assignments range from readings and leading discussion to case study presentations of recent global and local housing designs.
ARCH 5170New Urban Housing (3.00)
The class attempts to give students an introduction to the design issues associated with high-density urban housing. This area was a focus of experimentation for the first generation of modern architects. Today, pressures from urban sprawl and concerns for sustainable patterns of living have renewed the need to find ways of making modern urban neighborhoods. Issues of innovation and continuity need to be explored. This seminar will discuss the history of modern housing and explore a range of contemporary architectural projects, built and unbuilt.
ARCH 5180Issues in Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
Participants will investigate a diverse range of issues confronted in the conception, making and interpretation of contemporary architecture, including urban, social, aesthetic, representational, and technological concerns. Questions will be examined through a case study model grounded in history and supplemented by readings. During each class, 2-3 buildings will be formally analyzed to illustrate the thematic investigation.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
ARCH 5190Cultural Criticism in Architecture (3.00)
This seminar explores the relationship between architecture and culture. The seminar will study the effects of advanced capitolism, identity politics and latent biases that form the foundation of the architecture profession.
ARCH 5201ARCH Materials and Techniques of Building in Venice (3.00)
An introduction to architectural restoration and preservation in Venice, in conjunction with a series of workshops with industrial designers and artisans in Venice, demonstrating techniques of terrazzo, glass making, boat building, plaster finishing, and so forth.
ARCH 5300ecoMOD/ecoREMOD Seminar (3.00)
This interdisciplinary seminar is focused on ecoMOD and ecoREMOD, two parallel design / build / evaluate projects at the university -- (ecomod.virginia.edu). The project goal is to develop sustainable, prefabricated or renovated housing units for affordable housing organizations.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ARCH 5301Eco-Mod Seminar (3.00)
This seminar is focused on an evaluation of the third ecoMOD project. ecoMOD is a research and design / build / evaluate project at the School of Architecture, in partnership with the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project goal is to develop ecological, prefabricated and affordable house prototypes for low-income families. Over the next several years, interdisciplinary teams of UVA students and faculty are designing and building several 600 to 1,400 square foot housing units. The completed homes are being evaluated carefully. The results of these efforts will directly influence later designs. The objective of the seminar is to analyze the third project, using the building monitoring, life cycle assessments, post occupancy evaluations and an affordability analysis. The course is open to graduate as well as 3rd and 4th year undergraduates from any program at the university. In particular, the instructor is hoping for a mix of architecture, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, economics, business and environmental science students. Engineering students will be enrolled in a separate course, led by engineering professor Paxton Marshall. The engineering students will meet with the class on a regular basis, so that all disciplines can work together on the final report.
ARCH 5310Learning Barge: Intention Fabrication (3.00)
Learning Barge: Intention Fabrication
ARCH 5320Some Assembly Required: Research and Development (3.00)
This course functions as research and development seminar - the research and development initiatives will consist of three distinct and critically interdependent phases: first, case study analysis and interpretation; secondly, development of issue-specific project proposal; and thirdly, innovative advancement of research topic. In consultation with the course instructor, research initiatives focus on a specific topic of building construction
ARCH 5321Some Assembly Required: Design Build (4.00)
The course focuses on the study of modern fabrication practices in the context of design/build projects.
ARCH 5340Construction Practice Management (3.00)
Provides future architects, engineers, lawyers, and developers with an overall understanding of the construction process for commercial, industrial, and institutional projects. Follows the history of a typical project from selection of architect to final completion of construction. Topics include design cost control, cost estimating, bidding procedures, bonds and insurance, contracts and sub-contracts, progress scheduling, fiscal controls, payment requests, submittals, change orders, inspections, overall project administration, and continuing architect-owner-contractor relationships. Lectures and related field trips.
ARCH 5342Energy Performance Workshop (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a workshop in energy performance analysis for buildings. Using a range of building simulation and climate study software, this workshop will teach and apply the principles and practice of building performance simulation, with a focus on passive design and passive vs. active energy optimizations. Our intent is to assess, understand, and develop an intuition for energy performance issues in design, while learning the tools to model them.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 5360Concepts in Architecture Detailing (3.00)
An exploration of the life of details in building. Examines the ways in which technical decisions are made, and focuses on details and constructions within particular regional contexts.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ARCH 5361Advanced Architectural Detailing (3.00)
An exploration of the life of details in building. Examines the ways in which technical decisions are made, and focuses on details and constructions within particular regional contexts.
ARCH 5370Depth of Surface (3.00)
Construction systems and material selection must be a generative process not a reactive application. What are the possibilities for the Depth of Surface to exploit the tension between internal criteria and external forces & context? The fundamental issues of buildability must be driven by a sense of 'what do you want to see?' as well as the pragmatic - with the detail reinforcing, not diluting, the whole. How can overall composition, form, performance and structure of building envelope come together (via detail) within a specific conceptual context?
ARCH 5380Soft Surface Operations (3.00)
We will explore the parameters of shaping the flow of light, wind, and water; then test these discoveries through full-scale mock-ups, exploring practical potentials as well as the experiential aspects of weather phenomena and surface performance. Working with a set of high performance fabrics, it will be possible to produce operable, interactive, beautiful surfaces that create comfortable semi-exterior conditions year-round.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 5400Experimental Technologies (3.00)
Covering theory to practice, the course is an introduction to the use of digital technologies for the analysis, simulation and visualization of space, time and processes on cultural sites. The course focuses on the use of computer technologies for the visualization, exploration and analysis of natural and built environments (broad enough to include issues and methodologies of interest to architects, landscape architects, archaeologists and architectural historians). Topics are explored through class lectures on the theory and application of computational/visualization technology, guest lectures, example projects, field trips to project site and exercises examining emergent issues.
ARCH 5401Drawing Venice (3.00)
This course will focus on the analysis of urban space and flows, with a focus on the development of representational techniques that investigate the relationship between urban form and urban life. The course will engage a range of media, from hand drawing through digital mapping, photography and film. The students will be expected to develop a capacity to diagram both static and dynamic conditions that structure the urban experience.
ARCH 5420Digital Animation & Storytelling (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An exploration of moviemaking through exercises in computer animation. Approximately five independently developed short animations constitute the work of the semester, culminating in a one- to five-minute long final movie project. It is anticipated that an interdisciplinary group of students admitted to the seminar will bring perspectives from across the visual & design arts. Movie projects may range in creative subject areas. Instructor Consent
ARCH 5422Computer Animation: Design in Motion (3.00)
Arch 5422 is a hands-on workshop in moviemaking by techniques in three-dimensional computer animation with composite video, sound editing and capture. We screen independent and feature film animation and ongoing student work concluding in a 1 to 5 min. final project. Short readings are in film and cognitive science. Students may enroll from diverse areas such as design, art, drama, computer science, the physical sciences, and education.
ARCH 5424Direct Cinema Media Fabrics (3.00)
An interdisciplinary workshop and seminar that combines documentary moviemaking and video input with virtual and physical media output. Video and sound recording or a motion capture body suit may be used to collect initial data. The data may be translated to facilitate the making or movement of physical objects. Or, the data may be translated to figure creatively in virtual representations such as used in motion picture production.
ARCH 5430Land Development Workshop (3.00)
Explores the land development process from the perspective of the private land developer interacting with local governments. Includes development potential, site, and traffic analysis; land planning; development programming; and services to accommodate new development and public regulation of land development.
Course was offered Fall 2012
ARCH 5450Digital Moviemaking & Animation (3.00)
Visual storytelling is the basis for making movies in this hands-on production oriented class. The technology of both computer graphics animation and digital video production are explored. Themes may incorporate short character studies or visual narratives related to the built and natural environment, such as its observable symbols and images, the process of physical and conceptual assembly, transformations of light and form, spatial or formal composition, the movement of people and objects, and similar phenomena that vary over time. Students have the option to use either computer graphics animation or video production. The links between perception, representation, and design are examined within both a historical and a contemporary critical framework. Prerequisite: ARCH 3410/6410 or instructor permission.
ARCH 5470Information Space (3.00)
We live in a world rich with information. This course concentrates on the identity and role of information in our environs: in the buildings and cities that we inhabit and in the evolving networks and World Wide Web that are increasingly a part of our daily lives. The course looks practically and theoretically at how we build information, why, and how we use and populate it in our world. In both the physical and digital realms we study language, graphics, and urban form as `Information Space`, and look for ways to build new architectures that use information well. The course uses web design technology as a vehicle to explore these themes.
ARCH 5490CNC Fabrication (3.00)
This is a seminar about computation and the physical making of architecture. The course centers on student research into computer-controlled modeling and fabrication through hands-on use of CNC machines and advanced CAD technologies. The course focuses on the making of objects, parts, and systems at real-world, real-material scales and on the invention of strategies that link geometric form and computation with fabrication and material processing.
ARCH 5500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 5501Special Topics in Architecture (0.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 5510J-Term Courses (1.00 - 3.00)
J Term Courses
ARCH 5590Faculty Research Seminar (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Affords students opportunities to participate in specific faculty's advance research projects.
ARCH 5605Urban Materiality. The construction of the Public Space (3.00)
This class will introduce students to understand the city scale and landscape design in terms of materiality. The students will learn how to use the materials to resolve urban and landscape issues.
ARCH 5607International Design Research (3.00)
Interanally-focused independent design research conducted under the guidance and direct supervision of a faculty member.
ARCH 5608China Design Workshop (3.00)
The course will combine field analysis, precedent study, and collaborative design proposals into contemporary Chinese architecture and urban form. Focused readings will supplement the design investigation.
ARCH 5609India Research Seminar (3.00)
Students will study seminal and everyday works of architecture and urbanism through sketches, drawings, paintings, collage, photographs, video and narrative. They will investigate literary, historical and philosophical foundations through the close reading of texts and films. Discussions will focus on the evolving environmental, political, religious, social discourse that informs the contemporary India built environment.
ARCH 5610Urban Land (3.00)
The UrbanLand is a research seminar about the catalysts of the contemporaneous urbanity. This seminar will address the impunity spaces in between the Urban and the Land. How can we design and provoke the new urbanity? How can we work in the UrbanLand spaces in the mechanical to digital era? Which are our new tools? How the city will deals with the landscape? How can we design a new generous UrbanLand?
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARCH 5612Introduction to Urban Design (3.00)
This course introduces urban design as an area of expertise that deals with the physical form and performance of the city, integrating various scales from a building, to a group of buildings, to entire districts, with particular focus on the open spaces between them. As an interdisciplinary practice it bridges between architecture, landscape architecture and city planning. Its role will be examined through core issues from a global perspective.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARCH 5620Robotic Ecologies (3.00)
The seminar will explore recent advances in the interdisciplinary fields of architecture, landscape and urbanism, where design research has intersected with the advanced sciences to produce entirely new modes of thinking, designing and building. We will explore the promise of robotics to productively intermesh and interact with the complex ecologies of our physical environment.
ARCH 5630Design of Cities (3.00)
Cities are physical artifacts that are experienced psychologically and socially. This course investigates the theories surrounding these processes to reach an understanding of humanistic urban design intentions. Experiential realities are explored through case studies, readings, and mapping exercises.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 5640Adv. Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 5660Design and Leadership (3.00)
The aim of this course is to give students a fundamental and practical understanding of leadership and the role that design plays in exercising leadership and mobilizing the resources of a group. This is a course designed for students currently being educated in the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and urban planning. The purpose is to increase significantly one's individual capacity to sustain the demands of leadership and to strengthen considerably one's individual ability to exercise both leadership and authority within in the larger arena of public life.
ARCH 5680Lessons of the City (3.00)
This course explores the relationship between cultural values and urban form, introducing students to a body of literature and projects examining the various historical, social, political, regulatory, economic and physical conditions, which influence the design of cities. Through lecture, selected reading, class discussion, individual and group projects, and field trips this class examines the history, theories, and practices that have influenced the development of cities from antiquity to the present. Much of the discussion is on the evolution of the American city; using a field trips as a means to explore first hand urban environments
ARCH 5700InfoLab: Laboratory for Visualizing Information (3.00)
The design process has become an essential filter of all types of information. Due to contemporary forms of communication and media, this process has now been charged with the task of gathering, filtering, comprehending, processing, interpreting, forming and representing information in a clear and coherent manner. This laboratory seeks to introduce its participants to various modes of forming and representing information, qualifying, quantifying and visualizing it with the ultimate goal of familiarizing themselves with contemporary representational techniques and creating new visualization tools.
ARCH 5710Photography and Digital Methods (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course seeks to give students the ability to conceive and create digital photographic imagery with control and sophistication. Topics include fundamentals of photography, color theory, digital control of visual qualities, and methods of image montage. Methods include production and presentation for both print and monitor screen.
ARCH 5750Drawing and Composition (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course covers the fundamentals of drawing with a focus on the human figure. The assignments address line, tone, volume, space, scale, proportion and artistic expression. The analysis of human form (inside and out) is applied to rendering buildings, interiors, still life and landscapes.
ARCH 5760Drawing For Design (3.00)
This course will cover the fundamentals of drawing with a focus on the human figure. It will address line, tone volume, space, scale, proportion and artistic expression. The analysis of human form will also be applied to rendering still-life, buildings, interiors and landscapes. Various wet and dry media will be introduced to illustrate the drawing objectives. An emphasis on 'process' will direct the momentum of this course.
ARCH 5770Drawings and Collages (3.00)
In this course we make collages, drawings, and mixed media projects. Rather than distinguishing collage and drawing as separate categories, we explore their exciting in-between territory. We make plane (and plain) images: configurations of relatively stable, still marks on two-dimensional surfaces. We use traditional drawing methods (graphite, colored pencil or ink on paper) as well as more unusual tools and materials (sidewalk chalk, earth, trash, recycled materials). Through brief weekly readings and discussions we explore the relationship between aesthetics and ethics between "good forms" and forms that in some way contribute or allude to the "common good."
ARCH 5780Painting and Public Art (3.00)
In this course we make paintings and mixed media projects. We stress the process rather then the artistic product and, like artist Sol LeWitt, define painting 'as an activity on a flat plane.' We make plane (and plain) images: configurations of relatively stable, still marks on two-dimensional surfaces. We use traditional methods (watercolor or ink on paper, acrylics on canvas) as well as more unusual tools and materials (sidewalk chalk, earth, trash, recycled materials). Through weekly readings and discussions we explore the relationship between aesthetics and ethics between 'good forms' and forms that in some way contribute or allude to the 'common good.'
ARCH 5800Vicenza Program (6.00)
Summer study abroad in Vicenza, Italy. Students will be introduced to Italian culture through the study of architecture, landscape architecture, and city planning. Both the formal ideals as well as the constructed reality of these three subjects will be studied through critical observation and documentation of universal conditions and critical junctures.
ARCH 5993Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 6010Foundation Studio I (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introductory design problems in architecture for  First Professional degree students.  Emphasizes developing a systemic approach to design on the land and in the city through experience with a constructional kit of parts and an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. The faculty reviews all work in ARCH 6010-6020 to determine the progress and potential of each student.
ARCH 6020Foundation Studio II (6.00)
Introductory design problems in architecture for First Professional degree students. Emphasizes developing a systemic approach to design on the land and in the city through experience with a constructional kit of parts and an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. The faculty reviews all work in ARCH 6010-6020 to determine the progress and potential of each student. Prerequisite: ARCH 6010.
ARCH 6120Architectural Theory and Analysis (3.00)
Investigates the role that ideas play in the conception, making, and interpretation of buildings and cities, and assists students in clarifying their own values and intentions as designers. Lectures cover a broad range of topics, with special emphasis placed on contemporary issues.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 6140Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings of Modernism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates the link between ideas and forms of significant buildings in the canon of modern architecture.
ARCH 6231Building Integration Workshop 1 (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For first year students in the first professional MArch program (Path A). This course is part one of a year-long workshop and discussion seminar focused on dynamic site systems, bioclimatic and passive design, construction assembly methods and building materials. Students are required to sit in on the lectures of ARCH 6232.
ARCH 6232Systems, Sites & Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
ARCH 6240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures for undergraduate or graduate students with degrees in other disciplines. Develops analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation of structures. Topics include static; mechanics of materials; computer-based structural analysis; and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: College-level physics.
ARCH 6261Building Integration Workshop 2 (4.00)
For first year students in the first professional MArch program. This course is part two of a year-long workshop and discussion seminar focused on dynamic site systems, bioclimatic and passive design, construction assembly methods and building materials. Students are required to sit in on the lectures of ARCH 3260, Building Matters.
ARCH 6270Parametric Structural Design (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New integration of structural analysis into standard design software links design with immediate analysis and feedback, allowing architects to extend their structural intuition. This course covers basic structural systems, their historical development, design considerations, and analysis through physical and parametric modeling.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 6410Advanced CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization (3.00)
A comprehensive course in three-dimensional computer aided design and visualization methods used in architecture and landscape architecture. The class explores design worlds that are made accessible through computer-based media. Lectures provide a theoretical framework for computer-aided design, describe current methods, and speculate on advanced methods.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 6500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 6605Urban Materiality, Gaudi's Legacy (3.00)
Gaudi is one of the best known Catalan architects from Barcelona. He is famous for his buildings and his furniture, but he is not known as an urban designer. This class will introduce the students to understanding the city scale in terms of Materiality. It will be apparent by looking at Gaudi¿s work how important it is to understand the laws of construction and framework for creating a good design.
ARCH 6710CAAD 3D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive hands-on course in three-dimensional computer aided design that ranges from beginning to advanced methods in geometrical modeling, macro programming, and visualization used in design related disciplines. The class explores approaches to design made possible through computer-based methods. Lectures and workshops provide a conceptual and applied framework, examine state-of-the-art techniques today,and speculate on future advances
ARCH 7020Foundation Studio 3 (6.00)
Intermediate-level design problems, emphasizing structure, enclosure, life safety and building systems. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 712020th Century History of Ideas (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will investigate the role that ideas play in the conception, making and interpretation of buildings. As a basis for this inquiry, the course will explore significant architectural and urban theories, design strategies, and architectural projects developed primarily from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Lectures will cover a broad range of theoretical positions that have influenced or emerged from form making.
ARCH 7122Contemporary Spatial Practices (3.00)
This seminar will present a critical account of contemporary spatial practices and develop a theoretical framework of spatial operations enabling students to situate their own work within this new territory.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 7210Structural Design for Dynamic Loads (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines wind and earthquake loads in structural design, reviewing the vocabulary of lateral resisting systems, and the basic dynamic theories that underlie building code requirements. Explores recent developments in research and practice. Student projects include reviewing and presenting literature on lateral load research and design.
ARCH 7230Design Development (3.00)
This course focuses on the resolution of an architectural project with particular emphasis on issues of comfort, life safety, structural stability assembly processes.
ARCH 7250Environmental Systems (3.00)
The course involves the study of human comfort, environmental conditioning systems, building systems, daylighting and lighting technology. Students will be exposed to digital simulation tools to assess daylighting and energy use.
ARCH 7270BIM and Revit 1 (1.00)
This visualization module offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM interface, parametric objects, parametric families, file organization, workflow, drawing setup, and output techniques. No experience with BIM is required for this module.
ARCH 7271Adv. Breaking BIM (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM workflow, associative modeling, conceptual massing, building components, site tools, customizing components, materials, detailing, schedules, and visualization. With successful completion students will be able to use Revit proficiently in a design process.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARCH 7272BIM and Revit 2 (1.00)
This visualization module is the second component in the Building Information Modeling (BIM) sequence and serves as an advanced study of the principles of BIM. Emphasis will be on the exploitation of parametric tools and data within BIM software for specific design agendas. Topics will include scheduling, energy analysis and adaptive components. BIM and Revit 1 is a prerequisite unless sufficient knowledge of Revit can be demonstrated.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 7500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8230Building Synthesis (3.00)
This course investigates, develops and applies environmental and design strategies at various scales of operation through the concurrent ARCH 8020 Comprehensive Design Research Studio 2.
ARCH 8300Preservation/ Adaptive Use (1.00 - 4.00)
Individual study directed by a faculty member.
ARCH 8480Professional Ethics and Communication (3.00)
Introduces the primary issues involved in the practice of architecture: professional ethics, business practices, project process and management, personnel management, management of the process of producing a building, and the methods available to do so.
ARCH 8481Professionl Ethics & Communctn Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces students to standards for the set of documents used in architectural project construction.
ARCH 8500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 6.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Teaching Experience Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8801Research Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
ARCH 8993Advanced Independent Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8999Non-Topical Research, Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
Archaeology
ARCY 3993Independent Study (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An Independent Study in Archaeology. Subject to be determined by student and instructor.
ARCY 4998Undergraduate Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by archaeology majors who have been accepted into the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Distinguished Majors Program. Prerequisite: acceptance into Archaeology DMP
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
ARCY 4999Undergraduate Thesis Writing (3.00)
Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the spring semester of the fourth year by archaeology majors who have been accepted into the Interdisciplinary Archaeology Distinguished Majors Program. Prerequisite: acceptence into DMP program
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Architectural History
ARH 1000History of Architecture: Survey (3.00)
The history of Western architecture from ancient times to the present.
ARH 1004History of Architecture (3.00)
Surveys architecture from the Ancient to the present.
ARH 1010History of Architecture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
We will explore how architecture affects us, as well as how it informs us about past societies. In what ways does architecture shape our experiences; how does it enhance or detract from human activities? This course will cover material from the pre-historic period through c. 1420 largely in Europe with some examples from Asia, Africa and the Americas. Classes will be a combination of lectures and in-class activities.
ARH 1020History of Architecture II (3.00)
This course will examine architecture and urbanism from around 1400 C.E. to the present, tracing connections and distinctions that have guided the design, uses, and meanings of built environments around the globe. You will be introduced to celebrated buildings and less well-known sites and cities, with particular attention to the aesthetic, social, cultural, and institutional situations in which they developed.
ARH 1700Thomas Jefferson's Architecture (3.00)
Surveys Jefferson's architectural world with special emphasis on the Lawn.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ARH 2252High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (3.00)
Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 2401History of Modern Architecture (3.00)
Tracing the history of architecture and urbanism from 1870 through the 1970s, this course considers how architecture has participated in and responded to shifting aesthetic, technological, social, environmental, and theoretical challenges during this period. While Europe is an important terrain of investigation, the course emphasizes networks of exchange with Latin America, North Africa, Turkey, India, and Japan.
ARH 2500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARH 2753Arts & Cultures of the Slave South (4.00)
This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts, architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture; it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.
ARH 3010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
ARH 3030World Vernacular Architecture (3.00)
Vernacular Architecture is often understood to be all the built environment that is not 'High Architecture.' This is a profound misunderstanding; Vernacular is any aspect of the built environment examined through the lens of the local AND it is a method of interrogating the relationship between architecture and the human experience. This lecture class enlists global examples to explore the many complex dimensions of vernacular.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 3040Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 3100History of Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Examines the architecture of Medieval Western Europe, emphasizing the period from 1000-1400. Includes the iconography, function, structure and style of buildings, and the use of contemporary texts.
ARH 3101Early Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 800-1150.
ARH 3102Later Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 1140-1500.
ARH 3103Reconstructing the Medieval Haj (3.00)
Our course will reconstruct the journey of Ibn Jubayr, a twelfth century Spanish Muslim who recorded his haj from Spain to Mecca. Using his lively travel diary, we will analyze the visual culture and built environment of the medieval Mediterranean and together recreate key sites from his journey with easy to use digital tools such as Neatline.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARH 3201Italian Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
This course aims to introduce the principal architects, monuments, and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The lectures will be varied in approach and scope, some considering broad issues, others focusing on particular architects, buildings, or texts. Special topics will include architectural theory, patronage, villas, gardens, architectural drawing, and urban design.
ARH 3202Renaissance Architecture 16th Century (3.00)
Developments in classicism in Italy between 1500 and 1600.
ARH 3203European Classical Architecture Outside Italy, 1400-1750 (3.00)
The development of classicism primarily in France, England, and Germany between 1400 and 1750.
ARH 3204Italy, Spain, & The Ottoman Empire (3.00)
This course will examine Islamic architecture around the Mediterranean in relation to developments in Italy. Particular problems to be considered in a cross-cultural context include those of geometry and ornament, architectural theory, the role of the architect, and garden design and conception. Also important will be issues such as the visual ideology and cultural politics of empire; and the role of the traveler, merchant and ambassador in cultural exchange. Geographical focus will be on Southern Spain, or Andalusia, on Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire, as well as on various cities and regions of Italy including Venice, Genoa, Rome, Naples and Sicily. In the case of Southern Spain, analysis will focus on the points of contact and tension between the Roman heritage, the architectural achievements of the Nasrid Empire, the Gothic tradition, and the imported Italian style. With regard to the Ottoman Empire, an attempt will be made to understand how an obsessive concern among Italian humanists, political leaders, and popes with the Ottoman threat could coincide with cultural fascination and appropriation.
ARH 3205Rome, Istanbul, Venice (3.00)
This course will consider architecture, urbanism and landscape in three cities with multilayered histories: Rome, Venice, and Istanbul. While conditioned by distinct historical and topographic circumstances, each city negotiated complex and varied local traditions: Roman and Medieval in Rome; Byzantine and Gothic in Venice; and Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman in Istanbul.
ARH 3206Mediterranean Architecture (3.00)
This course will consider a range of buildings and landscapes from across the Mediterranean world, encompassing Italy, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, North Africa and Egypt. Its chronological and geographical scope are meant to bring into question some the conventional categories by which art and architectural history are studied: Medieval, Renaissance, Italian, Islamic, Eastern, Western, etc.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 3207Arts and Architecture of the Islamic World (3.00)
In order to understand the production, representation and perception of space in the Islamic world, this survey course examines significant works of arts, architecture, urbanism & landscape from 650 to 1800. While studying common themes & shared values of the Islamic world, the course questions the disparities and novelties in the reception of Islam as a social, cultural & political practice, mapping distant geographies from Al-Andalus to India
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARH 3402Postwar Architecture (3.00)
An examination of critical issues in the history and theory of architecture, from World War II to the present, focused particularly on how the shifting geopolitical contours of the postwar world have helped to shape key projects and debates. The course will also provide the opportunity to discuss recent studies in architectural history that have trained renewed attention on this period.
ARH 3403World Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
As the construction of cities redistributes its activities across the world in the twenty-first century, this course considers the ways in which architecture and architects are changed by a complex shifting field of forces. These forces include critical and ethical discourses, digital media, global finance and trade, developments in materials science, environmental awareness, and geo-political strategies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 3500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 3591Architectural History Colloquium (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Architectural History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of architectural history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 20.
Course was offered Fall 2013
ARH 3601East Meets West (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies cultural exchanges in architecture between East and West, emphasizing master architects such as F.L. Wright and L. Kahn.
ARH 3602World Buddhist Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world, including East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.
ARH 3603Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ARH 3604Historical Archaeology (3.00)
An introduction to analytical methods in historical archaeology, their theoretical motivation, and their practical application in the interpretation of the archaeological record of the early Chesapeake. The use of computers in the analysis of real archaeological data is emphasized.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ARH 3605Drawing Historic Architecture (3.00)
This is mainly a drawing workshop, with some lectures. Learn the classical features of historic architecture such as five orders and domes in details through drawing them. Learn the techniques of drawing the historic architecture, with pencil and pen. There is a focus topic each week to learn and draw. Some drawings are to be done with field trips in the nearby area. At the mid-term and the end of the semester there are group reviews.
ARH 3606Landscape Archaeology (3.00)
This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011
ARH 3607Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 3701Early American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
American architecture from the first European contact to the death of Jefferson. Lectures and field trips.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
ARH 3702Later American Architecture (3.00)
Surveys American architecture from 1800 to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 3703Nineteenth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
The development of architecture from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Lloyd Wright, along with consideration of issues in housing, landscape design, city planning, and influences from Europe.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 3704Twentieth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys American architecture emphasizing the development of modernism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 3801East Asia Architecture (3.00)
Surveys traditional architecture in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the main features and monuments of East Asian and landscape architecture.
ARH 3802Modern Japanese Architecture (3.00)
The history of architecture in modern Japan from Meiji period to the present. Focuses on post-WW II development; discusses the major influential architects such as Tange, Kikutake, Maki, Isozaki, Kurokawa, and Ando.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARH 4120History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure and agricultural systems, public and private space, theater and performance, court rituals, horticultural display, natural philosophy and aesthetic theory, visual representation, and the professionalization of landscape design.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 4130History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 4201Art and Architecture of Venice (3.00)
This course examines the art and architecture of Venice from the fifth century until the seventeenth century. We consider the major ¿nuclei¿ of the city like Piazza San Marco and personalities that shaped the built and artistic environment - Codussi, Sansovino, Palladio, and Titian for example. Our study explores the factors that contributed to Venetian art such as political and social context and contact with Byzantine, Islamic and northern Europe.
ARH 4500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 4510J-Term Courses (3.00)
January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of "J-term" classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.
ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture (3.00)
Research seminar for majors in the department of architectural history. Topics vary.
ARH 4600Arch History Practicum: Preserv Intern (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Internship at World Heritage Site; Monticello or the University of Virginia. 6-8 hours weekly. Some projects have a digital component.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 4993Independent Studies in Architectural History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students.
ARH 4999Major Special Study: Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research projects by fourth year architectural history students. Prerequisite: Instructor approval and departmental approval of topic.
ARH 5001Library Methodology (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Required for all entering M.A. students. Introduces research tools and methods for architectural history and related disciplines, reflecting the current breadth of scholarship in the field. Specific research resources are analyzed in terms of their scope, special features, and applications to meeting research and information needs.
ARH 5120History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure & agricultural systems, public & private space,theater & performance,court rituals,horticultural display,natural philosophy & aesthetic theory,visual representation, & the professionalization of landscape design. Graduates Only.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 5130History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 5201Venetian Architecture, from its Origins to the Present (3.00)
Part one, will introduce the history of Venice from it origins through the early Modern period, focused around visits to historic monuments & museums, but also compliments by classrooms lectures. Part two, will consider modern and contemporary Venetian architecture in a wider European context; will include site visits both within Venice & beyond; sessions taught through a combination of on site sessions & classroom lectures.
ARH 5500Selected Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special topics pursued in a colloquium. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ARH 5600Arch History Practicum: Preserv Intern (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Internship at World Heritage Site; Monticello or the University of Virginia. 6-8 hours weekly. Some projects have a digital component.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
ARH 5601Historic Preservation Theory and Practice (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar surveys preservation from its historical beginnings through contemporary emerging trends, focusing on the changing nature of its ideals and practice in a critical and international perspective. We will explore the role of historic preservation and heritage in cultural politics, historical interpretation, urban development, and planning and design practice
ARH 5602Community History Workshop (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Community History Workshop is both an in-depth historical analysis of the architecture, urban form, and planning of a selected community, and a forum for speculative futures and plan making for the community, informed by the historical analysis. This preservation-focused course explores the historical significance of the built landscape as an element in, and an expression of, the social and cultural life of the community.
ARH 5603Community Public History Seminar (3.00)
Explores a variety of approaches to conveying the architectural and cultural history of a community to a diverse public constituency. Builds upon ARH 5602 (Community History Workshop). Also analyzes the preservation implications of the work undertaken in collaboration with students in ARCH 8300 (Community Preservation Studio).
ARH 5604Field Methods I Building Archaeology (3.00)
This combined upper level undergraduate and graduate class is a field based seminar on methods of analyzing and recording historic buildings, especially vernacular buildings and landscapes. Students will be introduced to an intensive building analysis geared to understanding change over time. Students will also learn methods of careful field recording for the purposes of both documentation and analysis.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
ARH 5605Falmouth Field School (3.00)
The Falmouth Field School in Historic Preservation is a four-week, three-credit program in applied historic preservation held on-site in Falmouth, Jamaica. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, the field school engages many aspects of the practice of preservation in the culturally diverse and economically complex context of the Caribbean.
ARH 5606Chinese Architecture and Culture (3.00)
Students will learn about Chinese architecture and culture, and have the opportunity to meet professionals in the field. Students will spend a total of six weeks in China, with four weeks in Beijing and the first two weeks traveling to historical sites in and around Shanghai.
ARH 5607Historic Preservation at UVA (3.00)
This course surveys the changing ideals, philosophy, and methods that have guided the historic preservation of buildings and landscapes at the University of Virginia.Taught by preservation professionals from the University's Office of the Architect the course will explore in case studies and readings the design and conservation decisions made on the Rotunda and other historic buildings and landscapes at UVA.
ARH 5610Representing Buildings and Landscapes (3.00)
This field-based workshop explores advanced methods of both traditional and digital representation of historic buildings and landscapes. While engaging cutting-edge methods of digital representation, an emphasis will be placed on critical perspectives on story-telling, meaning, and representation.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ARH 5611Architectural Field School: The Cultural Landscape of Birdwood (3.00)
Through lectures, readings, discussions and on-site tutorials, students in this course will learn fieldwork and archival research methodology through a detailed exploration of the historic UVA Birdwood site. Students will analyze and interpret the data collected to prepare field reports and formal architectural drawings explicating the meanings and significance of the site. 9am to 12pm daily, with time spent both on-site and in the studio.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2016
ARH 5612Introduction to Urban Design (3.00)
This course introduces urban design as an area of expertise that deals with the physical form and performance of the city, integrating various scales from a building, to a group of buildings, to entire districts, with particular focus on the open spaces between them. As an interdisciplinary practice it bridges between architecture, landscape architecture and city planning. Its role will be examined through core issues from a global perspective.
ARH 5613A Design Process. Gaudi¿s Origin and Legacy (3.00)
Gaudi is one of the best known Catalan architects from Barcelona. He is famous for his buildings and his furniture, but he is not known as an urban designer. This class will introduce the students to understanding the city scale in terms of Materiality. It will be apparent by looking at Gaudi¿s work how important it is to understand the laws of construction and framework for creating a good design.
ARH 5614Historic Preservation in Venice (3.00)
Not only is Venice an extraordinary repository of early modern architecture, it is also a locus of cutting edge conservation technologies and progressive design strategies for historic sites. The 1964 Venice Charter was a landmark document in historic preservation and has positioned Venice at the front edge of new conservation technologies for decades while the International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, founded in 1980.
ARH 5616History of American Building Technology (3.00)
This course examines the history of American building technology. Over the past three centuries, a wide range of materials and techniques have been used to erect the structures in which we live, work, and play. Local buildings will serve as case studies for investigating this technology - from commonplace building materials such as wood, masonry, steel, and concrete to less familiar materials such as structural tile and iron vaulting.
ARH 5993Independent Studies in Architectural History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
ARH 6010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
ARH 6603Barcelona Urban History (3.00)
The students will understand the history of Barcelona from its Roman foundation to the extension of its medieval walls. The development of its urban structural grid, example of Cerdà, as well as its current state of remodeling for the Olympic games, and the ongoing urban transformations will all be studied in this class.This course will consist of lectures, field trips and practical exercises.
ARH 7010History of Architecture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will introduce students to the tools of visual analysis, reading architectural drawings and the study of architecture as a part of the larger cultural, social and political context of its society. While the course will focus on Western Europe, it will also include topics from the eastern Mediterranean and Asia.
ARH 7020History of Architecture II (3.00)
This course will examine architecture and urbanism from around 1400 C.E. to the present, tracing connections and distinctions that have guided the design, uses, and meanings of built environments around the globe. You will be introduced to celebrated buildings and less well-known sites and cities, with particular attention to the aesthetic, social, cultural, and institutional situations in which they developed.
ARH 7030World Vernacular Architecture (3.00)
Vernacular Architecture is often understood to be all the built environment that is not 'High Architecture.' This is a profound misunderstanding; Vernacular is any aspect of the built environment examined through the lens of the local AND it is a method of interrogating the relationship between architecture and the human experience. This lecture class enlists global examples to explore the many complex dimensions of vernacular.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 7040Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 7100History of Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Examines the architecture of Medieval Western Europe, emphasizing the period from 1000-1400. Includes the iconography, function, structure and style of buildings, and the use of contemporary texts.
ARH 7101Early Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 800-1150.
ARH 7102Later Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 1140 and 1500.
ARH 7103Adv. Reconstructing the Medieval Haj (3.00)
Our course will reconstruct the journey of Ibn Jubayr, a twelfth century Spanish Muslim who recorded his haj from Spain to Mecca. Using his lively travel diary, we will analyze the visual culture and built environment of the medieval Mediterranean and together recreate key sites from his journey with easy to use digital tools such as Neatline.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARH 7201Italian Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
This course aims to introduce the principal architects, monuments, and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The lectures will be varied in approach and scope, some considering broad issues, others focusing on particular architects, buildings, or texts. Special topics will include architectural theory, patronage, villas, gardens, architectural drawing, and urban design.
ARH 7202Italian Architecture, 1550-1750 (3.00)
Developments in classicism in Italy between 1550 and the advent of neoclassicism, including urban form and landscape.
ARH 7203European Classical Architecture Outside Italy, 1400-1750 (3.00)
The development of classicism primarily in France, England, and Germany between 1400 and 1750 including discussion of cities and landscape design.
ARH 7204Italy, Spain & The Ottoman Empire, 1400-1700 (3.00)
This course will examine Islamic architecture around the Mediterranean in relation to developments in Italy. Particular problems to be considered in a cross-cultural context include those of geometry and ornament, architectural theory, the role of the architect, and garden design and conception. Also important will be issues such as the visual ideology and cultural politics of empire; and the role of the traveler, merchant and ambassador in cultural exchange. Geographical focus will be on Southern Spain, or Andalusia, on Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire, as well as on various cities and regions of Italy including Venice, Genoa, Rome, Naples and Sicily. In the case of Southern Spain, analysis will focus on the points of contact and tension between the Roman heritage, the architectural achievements of the Nasrid Empire, the Gothic tradition, and the imported Italian style. With regard to the Ottoman Empire, an attempt will be made to understand how an obsessive concern among Italian humanists, political leaders, and popes with the Ottoman threat could coincide with cultural fascination and appropriation.
ARH 7205Rome, Istanbul, Venice (3.00)
This course will consider architecture, urbanism and landscape in three cities with multilayered histories: Rome, Venice, and Istanbul. While conditioned by distinct historical and topographic circumstances, each city negotiated complex and varied local traditions: Roman and Medieval in Rome; Byzantine and Gothic in Venice; and Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman in Istanbul.
ARH 7206Mediterranean Architecture (3.00)
This course will consider a range of buildings and landscapes from across the Mediterranean world, encompassing Italy, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, North Africa and Egypt. Its chronological and geographical scope are meant to bring into question some the conventional categories by which art and architectural history are studied: 'Medieval,' 'Renaissance,' 'Italian,' 'Islamic,' 'Eastern,' 'Western,' etc.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 7207Arts and Architecture of the Islamic World (3.00)
In order to understand the production, representation and perception of space in the Islamic world, this survey course examines significant works of arts, architecture, urbanism & landscape from 650 to 1800. While studying common themes & shared values of the Islamic world, the course questions the disparities and novelties in the reception of Islam as a social, cultural & political practice, mapping distant geographies from Al-Andalus to India
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARH 7401History of Modern Architecture (3.00)
Tracing the history of architecture and urbanism from 1870 through the 1970s, this course considers how architecture has participated in and responded to shifting aesthetic, technological, social, environmental, and theoretical challenges during this period. While Europe is an important terrain of investigation, the course emphasizes networks of exchange with Latin America, North Africa, Turkey, India, and Japan.
ARH 7402Postwar Architecture (3.00)
An examination of critical issues in the history and theory of architecture, from World War II to the present, focused particularly on how the shifting geopolitical contours of the postwar world have helped to shape key projects and debates. The course will also provide the opportunity to discuss recent studies in architectural history that have trained renewed attention on this period.
ARH 7403World Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
As the construction of cities redistributes its activities across the world in the twenty-first century, this course considers the ways in which architecture and architects are changed by a complex shifting field of forces. These forces include critical and ethical discourses, digital media, global finance and trade, developments in materials science, environmental awareness, and geo-political strategies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 7500Special Topics in Architecture History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
ARH 7601East Meets West (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A study of cultural exchanges and interactions in architecture between East and West. Major events and master architects like F.L. Wright and L. Kahn who contributed to the exchanges are discussed. The forms and meaning of East-West architecture are compared.
ARH 7602World Buddhist Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world which includes East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.
ARH 7603Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ARH 7604Historical Archaeology (3.00)
An introduction to analytical methods in historical archaeology, their theoretical motivation, and their practical application in the interpretation of the archaeological record of the early Chesapeake. The use of computers in the analysis of real archaeological data is emphasized.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ARH 7605Drawing Historic Architecture (3.00)
This is mainly a drawing workshop, with some lectures. Learn the classical features of historic architecture such as five orders and domes in details through drawing them. Learn the techniques of drawing the historic architecture, with pencil and pen. There is a focus topic each week to learn and draw. Some drawings are to be done with field trips in the nearby area. At the mid-term and the end of the semester there are group reviews.
ARH 7606Landscape Archaeology (3.00)
This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data - from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011
ARH 7607Adv Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 7612Theory and Practice in Rural Preservation (3.00)
This course investigates rural heritage sites, communities, and areas in Virginia's countryside in a context of historic trends and national practice. Exploring principles of historic preservation and land conservation, students will develop a critical understanding of the interactions of nature and culture in the settlement, development, & evolution of the countryside as part of an urban/rural continuum.
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARH 7701Early American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey of American architecture from the first European contact to 1800 including Jefferson, urban form and landscape design.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
ARH 7702Later American Architecture (3.00)
A survey of American architecture from 1800 to present including landscape and urban design.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 7703Nineteenth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
The development of architecture from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Lloyd Wright, along with consideration of issues in housing, landscape design, city planning, and influences from Europe.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 7704Twentieth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey of American architecture emphasizing the development of modernism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 7801Adv. East Asia Architecture (3.00)
A survey and introduction of traditional architecture and allied arts in China, Japan and Korea. Study of the main features and major monuments of East Asian architecture and landscape architecture.
ARH 7802Modern Japanese Architecture (3.00)
The history of architecture in modern Japan from the Meji period to the present. Focus on post-WW II development. Influential architects, like Tange, Kikutake, Maki, Isozaki, Kurokawa, and Ando are discussed along with urban issues.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARH 7993Independent Study: Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.
ARH 8001Methods in Architectural History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Required for candidates for the degree of Master of Architectural History. An investigation of the nature of architectural history, materials, methods, and writings.
ARH 8002Digital Technologies in Architectural History (3.00)
The study of analytic and digital technologies for Architectural History Master Students.
Course was offered Fall 2010
ARH 8604Field Methods I: Reading and Recording Historic Buildings (3.00)
This combined upper level undergraduate and graduate class is a field based seminar on methods of analyzing and recording historic buildings, especially vernacular buildings and landscapes. Students will be introduced to an intensive building analysis geared to understanding change over time. Students will also learn methods of careful field recording for the purposes of both documentation and analysis.
ARH 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Supervised teaching research under the guidance of a faculty supervisor, Permission of the Chair.
ARH 8994Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Preparation and completion of a thesis..
ARH 8995MA Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research on topic for Master Thesis.
ARH 8999Thesis Project (6.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For Thesis Preparation, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ARH 9100Seminar in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.  Past topics have discussed Gothic/Non-Gothic, Norman, and Monastic architecture. 
ARH 9202Borromini & Baroque Rome (3.00)
This seminar will consider the architecture of Francesco Borromini as a lens into Baroque Rome. Broadly, it will examine the struggle to define the classical in the seventeenth century. The famous rivalry between Borromini and Bernini was not merely personal, but involved competing claims to interpret the heritage of ancient Rome. Bernini's vision ultimately triumphed, but it is Borromini who tests the limits of classical language.
ARH 9500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
ARH 9510Seminar in Medieval Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9520Seminar in Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
Seminar discussion of special research topics. Past topics have discussed anthropomorphism in Renaissance and Baroque architecture; Alberti's De re Aedificatoria; Renaissance and Baroque buildings in their larger settings; the Rome of Julius II; Renaissance and Baroque classification of Buildings; Renaissance Space; Brunelleschi and Alberti; Renaissance urbanism; Rome and the Renaissance; and the Renaissance palace.
ARH 9530Seminar in 18th/19th Century Architecture (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 9540Seminar in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9550Seminar in Ancient/Archaeology Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9560Seminar in Theory, Comparative, & Other Topics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 9570Seminar in Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARH 9580Seminar in Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARH 9590Seminar in Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Fall 2010
ARH 9993Independent Studies in Architectural History (3.00)
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
ARH 9999Non-Topical Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
History of Art
ARTH 1004A History of Architecture (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the study of architecture through an examination of selected examples from the history of architecture with a focus on Europe and the United States and buildings relevant to those regions (e.g. the Great Pyramids, the Parthenon, Versailles). Classes will be a combination of lectures and discussions as students are taught the fundamentals of architectural history as well as how to analyze buildings.
ARTH 1051History of Art I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey of the great monuments of art and architecture from their beginnings in caves through the arts of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, Byzantium, the Islamic world, and medieval western Europe. The course attempts to make art accessible to students with no background in the subject, and it explains the ways in which painting, sculpture, and architecture are related to mythology, religion, politics, literature, and daily life. The course serves as a visual introduction to the history of the West.
ARTH 1052History of Art II: Renaissance to Post-Modern Art and Architecture (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the present.
ARTH 1500Introductory Seminars in Art History (3.00)
Introductory Seminars in Art History are small classes for first- and second-year students that emphasize reading, writing, and discussion. While subject varies with the instructor, topics will be selected that allow students to engage broad issues and themes historically and in relationship to contemporary concerns and debates. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 15.
ARTH 1505Topics in Art History (3.00)
Examines focused topics in Art History.
ARTH 1559Topics in Art History (3.00)
This course is an introductory level course in art history on a new topic
ARTH 2051Art of the Ancient Near East and Prehistoric Europe (3.00)
Studies the art of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and prehistoric Europe, from the sixth to the second millennium b.c. Examines the emergence of a special role for the arts in ancient religion.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ARTH 2052Ancient Egypt (3.00 - 4.00)
Survey of Egyptian art and architecture (Predynastic-New Kingdom, 4000-1100 BC). The course introduces students to the great monuments and works of art, and to the beliefs that engendered them. While the focus is on pharaonic 'visual' culture, neglected 'others' (women, cross-gendered persons, foreigners, commoners) and their material/visual cultures are brought to attention to provide a nuanced understanding of Egyptian society and culture.
ARTH 2053Greek Art and Archaeology (3.00 - 4.00)
The vase painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts of the Greeks, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic periods. Works are studies in their social, political, and religious contexts with a special focus on archaeology and material culture.
ARTH 2054Roman Art and Archaeology (4.00)
Following an overview of Etruscan art, the course examines the development of Roman architecture, urbanism, sculpture and painting from the Republic to Constantine. A focus is Rome itself, but other archaeological sites, such as Pompeii, in Italy and throughout the empire are also considered. Themes, such as succession, the achievements of the emperor, the political and social role of art, and the dissolution of classical art, are traced.
ARTH 2055Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3.00 - 4.00)
Introduces the history, theory, and field techniques of classical archaeology. Major sites of the Bronze Age (Troy, Mycenae) as well as Greek and Roman cities and sanctuaries (e.g., Athens, Olympia, Pompeii) illustrate important themes in Greek and Roman culture and the nature of archaeological data.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013
ARTH 2056Aegean Art and Archaeology (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to the art and archaeology of the prehistoric Aegean, from the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1200 BCE). Notable sites examined include Troy, Knossos, Mycenae, Thebes, Pylos. The course also examines cultural and artistic connections with New Kingdom Egypt and the Late Bronze Age Levant.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2010
ARTH 2151Early Christian and Byzantine Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the art of the early Church in East and West and its subsequent development in the East under the aegis of Byzantium. Includes the influence of theological, liturgical and political factors on the artistic expression of Eastern Christian spirituality.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARTH 2152Medieval Art in Western Europe (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the arts in Western Europe from the Hiberno-Saxon period up to, and including, the age of the great Gothic cathedrals.
ARTH 2153Romanesque and Gothic Art (3.00 - 4.00)
From the Romanesque churches along the Pilgrimage Routes to the new Gothic architecture at St. Denis outside Paris and on to late medieval artistic production in Prague, this course examines profound and visually arresting expressions of medieval piety, devotion, and power made by artists from roughly 1000-1500. Throughout our investigations, particular attention will be paid to the contributions of important medieval women.
ARTH 2154Early Medieval Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course examines art created in the era from 300 to 1100, when early medieval artists, motivated by devotion to their faiths and scientific beliefs, crafted beautiful and refined visual expressions of their values. These crafted confessions in stone, paint, parchment, and metal provide the living historical records of a vibrant period, during which medieval artists asserted their various cultural identities.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARTH 2251Italian Renaissance Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Focuses on the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.
ARTH 2252High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.
ARTH 2271Northern Renaissance Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Surveys major developments in painting and graphics in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in the Netherlands and Germany. Includes the rise of Netherlandish naturalism and the origins of woodcut and engraving. Explores the effects of humanist taste on sixteenth-century painting and the iconographic consequences of the Reformation. Emphasizes the work of major artists, such as Van Eyck, Van der Weyden, Dürer, Bosch, and Bruegel.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTH 2273Disneyland (3.00)
This course examines the visual, aesthetic and cultural effects of Disneyland. It considers the history of the theme parks, its relationship to Disney films, and its visual construction of space, leisure, and American cultural identity. Presented both chronologically and thematically, this course is both reading and writing intensive.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2015, Summer 2013
ARTH 2275Heroes, Superheroes and American Visual Culture (3.00)
This course examines the aesthetic and cultural importance of 'heroes' and heroic representation in American visual culture from the mid-18th century to the present. It considers the construction and representation of heroic figures within debates about aesthetics, national identity, political representation, and popular culture. Presented both chronologically and thematically, this coure is both reading and writing intensive.
Course was offered Summer 2016, Summer 2014
ARTH 2281The Age of Caravaggio, Velázquez, and Bernini (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth century in Italy, the Low Countries, France, and Spain. Focuses on Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Poussin.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
ARTH 2282The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Baroque Art in the Netherlands (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey of the art of the Dutch and Flemish Golden Age, including such artists as Rubens, Rembrandt, van Dyck, Hals and Vermeer. The course examines innovations in style and new subjects like landscape, still life and daily-life genre in relation to major historical developments, including the revolt of the Netherlands, the rise of the Dutch Republic, and the Counter-Reformation. The course includes a survey of Dutch architecture.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Fall 2009
ARTH 2351Eighteenth-Century European Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Surveys European painting and sculpture from the late Baroque period to Neo-Classicism. Emphasizes the artistic careers of major figures and on the larger social, political, and cultural contexts of their work. Artists include Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Falconet, Pigalle, Greuze, Batoni, Rusconi, Hogarth, Gainsborough, and Reynolds.
Course was offered Fall 2011
ARTH 2352Art of Revolutionary Europe (3.00 - 4.00)
Surveys European painting and sculpture from the last decades of the Ancien Regime to the liberal revolutions of 1848. Major artists, such as David, Canova, Ingres, Constable, Turner, Gericault, Delacroix, Friedrich, Goya, Corot, and Thorvaldsen are examined in their political, economic, social, spiritual, and aesthetic contexts.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARTH 2353European Art and Empire (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines the relationship of visual art to empire from the colonization of North America to the scramble for Africa, focusing on the period between 1700 and 1900. The course examines the work of European artists working on five continents and it engages with readings in which art history intersects with that of other disciplines including anthropology and museum studies.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ARTH 2354British Art (3.00 - 4.00)
This survey of British Art in the modern period examines the work of some of Britain's greatest painters, sculptors, and printmakers including Hogarth, Blake, Flaxman, Turner, the Pre-Raphaelites, Sickert, Bacon, and Freud. Major themes include the relationship of British art to religion, urbanization, empire, industrialization, and post-colonialism.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ARTH 2361Nineteenth-Century European Art (3.00 - 4.00)
A thematic survey of European art in the long nineteenth century, the course examines the work of German, French, Italian, British and Scandinavian artists, among them Boucher, Vien, David, Friedrich, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Whistler, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, and others. Key course themes will include artistic training and practice, exhibition, and art-theoretical debates of the period.
Course was offered Spring 2012
ARTH 2371Impressionism and Post Impressionism (3.00 - 4.00)
Surveys modernist movements in European art during the second half of the nineteenth century. Major themes include the establishment of modernity as a cultural ideal, the development of the avant-garde, and the genesis of the concept of abstraction.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
ARTH 2372Paris, "Capital of the Nineteenth Century" (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines the places, spaces, practices and representations of Paris in the nineteenth century. Tracing the changing faces of the city, we will study the modern city through architecture and urban planning, painting, drawing, photography, popular imagery and literature. Topics include Paris 'types'; fashion and birth of the department store; Haussmannization; and the 'spectacular' Paris of the panorama, morgue, Opera, and World's Fairs.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ARTH 2451Modern Art, 1900-1945 (3.00 - 4.00)
A survey of major artistic movements in Europe and the United States during the first half of the twentieth century: Fauvism and Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, the School of Paris, Dada and Surrealism, the Russian avant-garde, modernist trends in America. Painting, sculpture, photography, and the functional arts are discussed.
ARTH 2471Art Since 1945 (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys art production and theory in the U.S. and Europe since World War II. Relationships between artistic practice and critical theory are stressed in an examination of movements ranging from abstract expressionism to neo-geo.
ARTH 2472Modern Art in Italy (3.00 - 4.00)
ARTH 2472 will use the resources of Italy's modern and contemporary art museums supplemented by classroom and on-site lectures to offer an overview of the major movements of modern art in Italy. It will examine the historical and political contexts for developments from Futurism and Valori Plastici to Informel and Arte Povera, with a particular focus on the postwar years..
ARTH 2491The History of Photography (3.00 - 4.00)
General survey of the photographic medium from 1839 to the present. Emphasizes the technical, aesthetic, and critical issues particular to the medium.
ARTH 2525Topics in Renaissance Art History (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines focused topics in Renaissance Art History.
ARTH 2559New Course in History of Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject History of Art.
ARTH 2659Sacred Sites (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines the art and architecture of ten religious sites around the world focusing on ritual, culture, and history as well as the artistic characteristics of each site.
ARTH 2745African American Art (3.00)
This course surveys the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, prints, mixed media and textiles) produced by those of African descent in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Presented both chronologically and thematically, the class interrogates issues of artistic identity, gender, patronage and the aesthetic influences of the African Diaspora and European and Euro-American aesthetics on African American artists.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
ARTH 2751American Art to the Armory Show (3.00 - 4.00)
This lecture course will examine American visual arts from the time of European settlement to around 1900 with special emphasis on its political, social and cultural contexts. The course is both chronological and thematic. It focuses on major artistic figures, but it also focuses on issues such as the construction of an American identity, the role of fine arts in American society, and the tensions of class, gender, race & ethnicity in Amer Art.
Course was offered Fall 2013
ARTH 2752American Art Since Reconstruction (3.00 - 4.00)
This lecture course examines the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, prints) of the United States from the late 19th-century to World War II. Particular emphasis is placed on cultural, political, and social issues that provide a contextual framework for the analysis of these images. The course interrogates topics such as artistic identity, American modernism, patronage, and the influence of popular culture on fine art.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011, Spring 2010
ARTH 2753Arts & Cultures of the Slave South (3.00 - 4.00)
This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts 'architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture' it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.
ARTH 2771American Modernism (3.00 - 4.00)
American Modernism is a survey of American art in the first half of the 20th century. The course will address the arrival of modern art in America, the situation of the American artist in relation to European art, and an American public, and the question of the American art.
ARTH 2772American Film Noir and the City (3.00 - 4.00)
Studies the classic period of film noir and its engagement with the city as a problematic subject and a frequent resource within American Art and culture immediately before and after WW II. Using the classic period of film noir as a framework, this lecture and discussion course examines the ways in which 'the city' is represented as a problematic subject and a frequent resource within American Art and culture immediately before and after WWII.
Course was offered Summer 2010
ARTH 2773Hollywood Cinema's Golden Age: The 1930s (3.00 - 4.00)
The course examines American cinema produced in Hollywood during the 1930s. While the Great Depression serves as an important historical backdrop, we will interrogate how issues such as ethnic/racial representation, shifting gender roles, sexuality, and urbanity are mediated in popular cinema in this decade.
Course was offered Summer 2011
ARTH 2774Stardom and American Film (3.00)
This course examines the role of stardom and star performance in American cinema from the silent era to the 1960s. Using art history, cultural studies and film criticism, we will explore topics such as visions of stardom, constructions and subversions of star identity, and the ways in which the media of film actively constructs how we look at and respond to stars as cultural and pictorial icons.
ARTH 2851World Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Big art history, on the role of art in human cultures. The construction of spaces in relation to human presence. Materials, skills, and the making of social hierarchies. Places, group origins, and identity. Kingship and empire across the continents; art and world religions. Contact, interaction and the beginnings of the present world.
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARTH 2861East Asian Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.
ARTH 2862Arts of the Buddhist World- India to Japan (3.00 - 4.00)
Surveys the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Considers aspects of history and religious doctrine.
ARTH 2863Chinese Decorative Arts (3.00 - 4.00)
Chinese Decorative Arts
ARTH 2871The Arts of India (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The class is an overview of Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the Third Millennium BC to the 18th century AD and includes works from Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic traditions.
ARTH 2961Arts of the Islamic World (3.00 - 4.00)
The class is an overview of art made in the service of Islam in the Central Islamic Lands, Egypt, North Africa, Spain, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and South and Southeast Asia.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARTH 2993Independent Study (3.00)
Independent study in the history of art.
Course was offered Fall 2010
ARTH 3051Greek Vase Painting (3.00 - 4.00)
Survey of the major styles, techniques, and painters of Greek vases produced in the Archaic and Classical periods (c. 700-350 b.c.). Emphasizes themes of myth and daily life, the relationship of vases to other ancient arts, the legacy of form and decoration in the arts of later periods, such as 18th century England, and comparisons with other cultures, such as the Native American southwest. Prerequisite: any course in Art History, Anthropology, Classics or History.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ARTH 3052Art and Poetry in Classical Greece (3.00)
Study of the major themes in Greek sculpture and painting of the fifth century, including mythological narrative, cult practices, banqueting, and athletics. In order to view these themes in the context of classical Greek culture, the course seeks out shared structures of response and feeling in contemporary poetry; including readings in translation in Anakreon, Pindar, Aischylos, Sophokles, and Euripides.
ARTH 3053The Greek City (3.00)
Study of the Greek city from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. The course focuses on such themes as city planning, public buildings and houses, gender distinctions, the relationship between city and territory, and the nature of the polis.
ARTH 3061Roman Architecture (3.00)
Study of the history of Roman architecture from the Republic to the late empire with special emphasis on the evolution of urban architecture in Rome. Also considered are Roman villas, Roman landscape architecture, the cities of Pompeii and Ostia, major sites of the Roman provinces, and the architectural and archaeological field methods used in dealing with ancient architecture.
ARTH 3062Pompeii (3.00)
Explores the life, art, architecture, urban development, religion, economy, and daily life of the famous Roman city destroyed in the cataclysmic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in a.d. 79.
ARTH 3151Art and Science in the Middle Ages (3.00 - 4.00)
During the medieval period, power and knowledge required the endorsement of clerics. Alongside secular courtiers they also cultivated creative expressions of their erudition, revealing the medieval interpenetration of art, science and religion. The artworks surveyed in this course provide lasting records of critically creative confrontations between the scientific and spiritual traditions linked to medieval Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARTH 3251Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600. Prerequisite: A previous course in art history or gender studies.
ARTH 3253Renaissance Art and Literature (3.00)
Examines the interrelations between literature and the visual arts in Italy from 1300 to 1600. The writings of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio and their followers are analyzed in relation to the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Giotto, Brunelleschi, Botticelli, Raphael, and Michelangelo, among others.
ARTH 3254Leonardo da Vinci (3.00)
An analysis of Leonardo da Vinci's paintings, drawings, and notes, giving special attention to his writings and drawings on human anatomy, the theory of light and shade, color theory, and pictorial composition. His work is considered in relation to the works of fellow artists such as Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo as well as within the context of Renaissance investigation of the natural world. Prerequisite: One course in the humanities.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011
ARTH 3255Renaissance Art on Site (3.00)
Firsthand, direct knowledge of Renaissance art and architecture through an intensive program of on-site visits in Florence and Rome. The course aims to provide a deeper understanding of the specificity of images and sites; that is, their materials, texture, scale, size, proportions, colors, and volumes. It also aims to instill a full sense of the importance of the original location for the understanding and interpretation of Renaissance art. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ARTH 3257Michelangelo and His Time (3.00)
Analyzes the work of Michelangelo in sculpture, painting and architecture in relation to his contemporaries in Italy and the North. The class focuses on the close investigation of his preparatory drawings, letters, poems and documents. Prerequisite: One course in the history of art beyond the level of ARTH 1051 and 1052
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARTH 3281Rembrandt (3.00)
Study of the life and work of the great Dutch seventeenth-century master. Topics include Rembrandt's interpretation of the Bible and the nature of his religious convictions, his relationship to classical and Renaissance culture, his rivalry with Rubens, and the expressive purposes of his distinctive techniques in painting, drawing, and etching.
ARTH 3351British Art: Tudors through Victoria (3.00)
Surveys English (British) painting, sculpture, and printmaking from the reign of Henry VII Tudor (1485) to the death of Queen Victoria (1901). Major artists such as Holbein, Mor, Mytens, Rubens, van Dyck, Lely, Kneller, Hogarth, Rysbrack, Roubilliac, Gainsborough, Reynolds, Rowlandson, Flaxman, Lawrence, Constable, Turner, Landseer, the Pre-Raphaelites and Alma-Taddema are examined in their political, social, economic, spiritual, and aesthetic contexts. Prerequisite: At least one post-medieval art history course is recommended.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ARTH 3491Women Photographers and Feminist Aesthetics (3.00)
This course explores the question of whether there might be something called a 'feminist aesthetics.' We look at the work of a handful of women photographers, and read criticism about photography, to leverage our exploration into feminist aesthetics. The course works within the frame of feminist discourse. It presents the work of a small number of photographers whose work we will interpret in conjunction with readings in criticism and theory.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ARTH 3525Topics in Renaissance Art History (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines focused topics in Renaissance Art History.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARTH 3545Topics In 20th/21st Century Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Examines focused topics in 20th/21st Art History.
ARTH 3559New Course in History of Art (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject History in Art.
ARTH 3591Art History Colloquium (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Art History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. This course fulfills the second writing requirement, involving at least two writing assignments totaling at a minimum 4,000 words (20 pages).
ARTH 3595Art History Practicum (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Art History Practicum course places added emphasis on immersive experience and the active construction of knowledge, involving hands-on projects, experiments, lab work, and field trips of varying lengths, including on-site studies at archaeological sites, laboratories, or museums.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015
ARTH 3651Anthropology of Australian Aboriginal Art (3.00)
This class studies the intersection of anthropology, art and material culture focusing on Australian Aboriginal art. We examine how Aboriginal art has moved from relative obscurity to global recognition over the past 30 yrs. Topics include the historical and cultural contexts of invention, production, marketing and appropriation of Aboriginal art. Students will conduct research using the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection and Study Center.
ARTH 3751Material Life in Early America (3.00)
Studies American domestic environments (architecture, landscapes, rural and urban settings) and decorative arts (furniture, silver, ceramics, and glass) in relation to their social, cultural, and historical contexts from European settlement to 1825. Prerequisite: At least one course in either American art or early American history or literature is recommended.
ARTH 3761Women in American Art (3.00)
Analyzes the roles played by women both as visual artists and as the subjects of representation in American art from the colonial period to the present. Explores the changing cultural context and institutions that support or inhibit women's artistic activity and help to shape their public presentation. Some background in either art history or women's studies is desirable.
ARTH 3781New York School (4.00)
The New York School focuses on the background, development, and dissemination of abstract expressionism, beginning with an examination of the place and politics of the artist in America in the depression era. The slide lectures and required readings examine the social and intellectual groundings of the subjects of abstract painting in the 1940s and the development of an international art scene in New York in the 1950s.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARTH 3861Chinese Art (3.00 - 4.00)
The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writings of leading scholars.
ARTH 3862Japanese Art (3.00)
Introduces the arts and culture of Japan. Focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played central roles in Japanese art and society. Analyzes how artists, architects, and patrons expressed their ideals in visual terms. Examines sculptures, paintings, and decorative objects and their underlying artistic and cultural values.
ARTH 3951African Art (3.00)
Studies Africa's chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present.
ARTH 3993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent study in the history of art
ARTH 4051Art History: Theory and Practice (3.00)
This course introduces art history majors to the basic tools and methods of art historical research, and to the theoretical and historical questions of art historical interpretation. The course will survey a number of current approaches to the explanation and interpretation of works of art, and briefly address the history of art history. Prerequisite: Major or minor in art history.
ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of art history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Representative subjects include the life and art of Pompeii, Roman painting and mosaics, history and connoisseurship of baroque prints, art and politics in revolutionary Europe, Picasso and painting, and problems in American art and culture. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ARTH 4951University Museums Internship (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is the second semester of the internship at either the Fralin Museum of Art or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Prequisite: ARTH/GDS 4951 and instructor permission, by application. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment
ARTH 4952University Museums Internship (3.00)
This is the second semester internship at either UVA Art Museum or Kluge Ruhe. Students will work approximately 100 hours per semester in the museum, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. ARTH/GDS 4951 and instructor permission, by application; deadline May 1. Please see information at www.virginia.edu/art/arthistory/courses and www.artsandsciences.virginia.edu/globaldevelopment
ARTH 4998Undergraduate Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.
ARTH 4999Undergraduate Thesis Writing (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Writing of a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the spring semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.
ARTH 5559New Course in Art History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of art history.
Course was offered Spring 2016
Arabic in Translation
ARTR 2500Taboo and the Arabic Novel (3.00)
This class introduces the contemporary Arabic novel as it deals with religious and social taboo. The course surveys major works of Arabic literature that generated confrontations with the State, readers, or religious movements. It looks at the reception of texts in the Arabic world, the texts' intersection with social and political taboos, and the problems of censorship and confiscation of artistic work. Texts include work by Naguib Mahfouz.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARTR 3245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARTR 3290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.
ARTR 3350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 3390Love, Alienation, and Politics in the Contemporary Arabic Novel (3.00)
Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.
ARTR 3490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 3559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
ARTR 5245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In this course we will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene. We will organize the course around selected readings from a variety of premodern Arabic jocular, culinary and erotological literature available in English translations.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARTR 5290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). No knowledge of Arabic is required. Taught in English.
ARTR 5350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 5490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 5559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation.
Studio Art
ARTS 1000Drawing at Sea I (3.00)
This course will focus on the fundamentals of drawing: visual perception, elements of line, gesture, proportion, spatial relationships, scale, value, and texture. It is intended for beginning students. During the semester, students will develop a range of skills that will enable them to hone their observational sensibilities and then apply them to their work.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2012
ARTS 1010Drawing at Sea II (3.00)
This course is intended for students who have previously completed a college level drawing class (either Introduction to Drawing or Introduction to Figure Drawing). Building on the principles of basic drawing, students will further investigate drawing from observation and creating the illusion of 3-dimensional form and space on a 2-dimensional surface.
ARTS 1220Intro to Digital Media at Sea (3.00)
The course will be an introduction to digital imagery, using photography as the source for creative manipulation in Adobe Photoshop. At the beginning of the semester, questions about how to use one's camera skillfully, how to compose an interesting photograph, how to interpret and to evaluate work will be addressed.
Course was offered Fall 2012
ARTS 1559New Course in Studio Art (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of studio art.
ARTS 1710Intro to Painting at Sea (3.00)
Designed for beginning painters, the course will introduce students to color theory, color mixing, and color application. It aims to improve observational skills in both drawing and painting. Students will experiment with composition and collage construction.
ARTS 2110Introduction to Photography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Focuses on gaining a working understanding of black and white photo processes and, most importantly, opening up a dialogue about photography. Class assignments help students understand the visual language of photography using 35mm film and printing in the darkroom. In addition, lectures explore examples from the historical and contemporary worlds of fine art photography and readings range from art and philosophy to science. Prereq: ARTS 2610
ARTS 2112Introduction to Photography II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Building off of 2110, this course offers an introduction to color photography, digital printing methods, and medium format cameras. Advanced skills are demonstrated and practiced with the goal of increasing the quality of the work. Further explorations into historical and contemporary art issues via presentations, visiting artists, and readings increase awareness. Students create a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110
ARTS 2220Introduction to New Media I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class introduces digital techniques in the context of fine art. Topics covered include digital imaging and basic interactive art. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.
ARTS 2222Introduction to New Media II (3.00)
Building on the skills and concepts established in ARTS 2220, this class introduces animation techniques in the context of fine arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220.
ARTS 2310Installation and Performance Art I (3.00)
This course introduces new art genres including installation, performance, and video documentation to the student's art practice. Includes contemporary Art History, theory, and the creation of art made with non-traditional materials, methods and formats. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610
Course was offered Summer 2017, Spring 2013, Fall 2010
ARTS 2312Installation and Performance Art II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2310.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARTS 2370Introduction to Cinematography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course introduces experimental 16mm film production as a practice of visual art. These courses include technical, historical, and theoretical issues that apply to cinematography and its relationship to the traditional visual arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.
ARTS 2372Introduction to Cinematography II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2370
ARTS 2511Special Topics in Photography (3.00)
This course will focus on the topic of documentary photography, a working style that combines accurate depiction with impassioned advocacy, usually with the goal of arousing public commitment to social change. Since the 1980s this mode has expanded to include formal and iconographical investigation of social experience with a counterstain of personal images. This class will use digital photography to develop projects and portfolios.
ARTS 2559New Course in Studio Art (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of studio art.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ARTS 2560Special Topics in Printmaking (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An introduction to the specialized materials, methods, processes, and cultural issues as they relate to the history and practice of Printmaking
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARTS 2570Special Topics in Painting (3.00)
Students are introduced to specialized materials, methods and cultural issues as they relate to painting.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Spring 2012, Fall 2011
ARTS 2580Special Topics in Sculpture (3.00)
An introduction to the specialized materials, methods, processes, and cultural issues as they relate to the history and practice of Sculpture
ARTS 2610Introduction to Drawing I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Drawing provides students with a foundation of skills, judgement, and observational abilities that are essential to artistic expression. ARTS2000 is required for every Studio Art major and minor and a prerequisite for all other media related courses in Studio Art.
ARTS 2620Introduction to Drawing II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of ARTS 2610 with projects emphasizing on drawing skills and analytical thinking. The majority of assignments will be concept-based to encourage students to develop individual visual language. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.
ARTS 2630Life Drawing I (3.00)
Creations of drawings of a living model in various media. Topics include artistic anatomy, figure and portrait drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.
ARTS 2632Life Drawing II (3.00)
Creations of drawings of a living model in various media. Topics include artistic anatomy, figure and portrait drawing. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610.
ARTS 2670Introduction to Printmaking I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to basic black and white etching techniques, basic black and white plate lithography, and techniques of stone lithography. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.
ARTS 2672Introduction to Printmaking II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Prerequisite: ARTS 2670.
ARTS 2710Introduction to Painting I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to basic water painting techniques and materials (including acrylic, gouache, and water color), emphasizing perception and color. Assignments are designed to assist the student in understanding the creative process and interpreting the environment through a variety of subject matter expressed in painted images. Encourages individual stylistic development. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.
ARTS 2712Introduction to Painting II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Prerequisite: ARTS 2710.
ARTS 2810Introduction to Sculpture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates the sculptural process through modeling, carving, fabricating and casting. Examines traditional and contemporary concerns of sculpture by analyzing historical examples and work done in class. Prerequisite: ARTS 2610 and either ARTS 2620, ARTS 2630, or ARTS 2632.
ARTS 2812Introduction to Sculpture II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Prerequisite: ARTS 2810.
ARTS 3110Intermediate Photography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Expands technical possibilities available to students by introducing large format cameras. Class time involves evaluating work in progress, slide presentations (sometimes by students as research projects) or discussion of reading material. Students create a final portfolio from assignments. Cameras provided. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110 and ARTS 2112
ARTS 3112Intermediate Photography II (3.00)
Explores intermediate-level photographic techniques and concepts. Specific course content varies according to faculty. (Spring only). Prerequisite: ARTS 2110 and ARTS 2112.
ARTS 3220Intermediate New Media Part I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class continues the investigation of digital art begun in ARTS 2220 and 2222 through the introduction of experimental video history and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220 and ARTS 2222.
ARTS 3222Intermediate New Media II (3.00)
This class focuses primarily on creative and conceptual development within the technical and artistic framework established in previous semesters. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220 and ARTS 2222.
ARTS 3370Intermediate Cinematography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course continues the practice of 16mm experimental film production with an increased emphasis on audio and digital video motion picture making. Student will complete assignments based on genres of experimental film making such as expressionism, naturalism, and realism. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2372.
ARTS 3372Intermediate Cinematography II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2372.
ARTS 3559New Course in Studio Art (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of studio art.
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARTS 3670Intermediate Printmaking I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Includes relief printing, advanced lithography techniques, including color lithography, color etching, monotypes, and further development of black and white imagery. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2670 and ARTS 2672.
ARTS 3672Intermediate Printmaking II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2670, 2672.
ARTS 3710Intermediate Painting I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Exploration of contemporary painting materials, techniques, and concepts, as well as a continuation of basic oil painting processes. Assignments are designed to assist the student in developing their perceptions and imagination and translating them into painted images. Direction is given to the formation of personal original painting styles. Prerequisite: ARTS 2710, 2712.
ARTS 3712Intermediate Painting II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2710, 2712.
ARTS 3810Sculpture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of ARTS 2810 and ARTS 2812 with greater emphasis on the special problems of the sculptural discipline. Prerequisite: ARTS 2810, 2812.
ARTS 3812Sculpture II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 2810, 2812.
ARTS 4110Advanced Photography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Group study designed to assist students in preparing their required thesis exhibitions. Meets twice a week as a group to evaluate and discuss work in progress. (Fall only.) Prerequisite: ARTS 3110 or ARTS 3112.
ARTS 4112Advanced Photography II (3.00)
Assists students in preparing their required thesis exhibitions. Meets twice a week as a group to evaluate and discuss work in progress. Students participate in class portfolio and acquire a print from each member of the class. One becomes part of the University collection. Graduating fourth-year students are expected to complete a quality slide portfolio, resume, and artist statement in conjunction with the thesis exhibition. (Spring only) Prerequisite: ARTS 3110 or ARTS 3112.
ARTS 4220Advanced New Media I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class encourages independent development of a semester long project that engages with the discourses and techniques around contemporary new media art. Prerequisite: ARTS 3220 or ARTS 3222.
ARTS 4222Advanced New Media II (3.00)
A continuation of artistic investigations begun in ARTS 4220. Prerequisite: ARTS 3220 or ARTS 3222.
ARTS 4370Advanced Cinematography I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Course continues the practice of 16mm film or digital video experimental production with an emphasis on a completed piece for public screenings or exhibitions. Prerequisite: ARTS 3370 or ARTS 3372.
ARTS 4372Advanced Cinematography II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 3370 or ARTS 3372.
ARTS 4450Distinguished Major Project (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, cinematography, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program.
ARTS 4452Distinguished Major Project (3.00)
Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, cinematography, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program. ARTS 4450 Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program.
ARTS 4670Advanced Problems in Printmaking (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Designed for students who have completed two or more semesters of study of a specific printmaking technique (woodcut, etching, or lithography) and wish to continue their exploration of that technique. Prerequisite: ARTS 3670 or 3672.
ARTS 4672Advanced Problems in Printmaking (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 3670 or 3672.
ARTS 4710Advanced Painting I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The capstone of a three year study in painting. Continues the investigation of oil painting as an expressive medium and stresses the development of students' ability to conceive and execute a series of thematically related paintings over the course of the semester. Painting professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or 3712.
ARTS 4712Advanced Painting II (3.00)
Painting professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or ARTS 3712.
ARTS 4810Advanced Sculpture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of the sculpture sequence with greater emphasis on developing a student's individual voice. Advanced projects in moldmaking, metal casting, and non-traditional sculpture materials are assigned. The creation of a sculptural installation is also assigned. Sculpture professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3810 or 3812.
ARTS 4812Advanced Sculpture II (3.00)
Prerequisite: ARTS 3810 or 3812.
ARTS 4900Advanced Project in Art (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigation and development of a consistent idea or theme in painting, sculpture, or the graphic arts. May be taken more than once under the same course number by students who are sufficiently advanced in studio work. This course is not intended to be used for major credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ARTS 5900Graduate Projects in Studio Art (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced problems and situations in art-making including the development of skills related to the creation of new research.
American Sign Language
ASL 1010Elementary American Sign Language I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority.
ASL 1020Elementary American Sign Language II (4.00)
Introduces receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, including basic vocabulary, sentence structure, classifiers, use of space, non-manual type indicators, and fingerspelling. Examines signing deaf people as a linguistic/cultural minority. Prerequisite: ASL 1010 or successful completion of placement exam.
ASL 1559New Course in American Sign Language (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course offering in the subject of American Sign Language.
ASL 2010Intermediate American Sign Language I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. Prerequisite: ASL 1020 or successful completion of placement exam.
ASL 2020Intermediate American Sign Language II (3.00)
Continues training in American Sign Language, with focus on more complex sentence types, signs, and idioms. Considers ASL literary forms such as poetry, theater, and storytelling, as well as deaf history and other related topics. Prerequisite: ASL 2010 or successful completion of placement exam.
ASL 2300Women and Gender In The Deaf World (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture. No prior knowledge of ASL is required.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ASL 2450Deaf People, Society, and the Law (3.00)
This course will explore the Deaf community, discrimination, and laws affecting Deaf people in the United States. We will consider the experiences of Deaf people before and after such measures as the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 to gain insight into how the law affects social perceptions and people's everyday lives. No prior knowledge of ASL or Deaf culture is required for this course.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
ASL 2559New Course in American Sign Language (1.00 - 4.00)
New course offering the subject of American Sign Language.
ASL 3010Conversational ASL (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continues language and cultural instruction with emphasis on everyday conversation. Topics include common idioms and slang, explaining rules, discussing finances and major decisions, and storytelling techniques such as role-shifting and narrative structure. Students will be required to interact with deaf signers. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 or successful completion of placement interview.
ASL 3081History of the American Deaf Community (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This new course will examine the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods and secondary sources. We will also view a few historical films. Prerequisite: none (thought a previous class in History or ASL is recommended)
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013
ASL 3559New Course in American Sign Language (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of American Sign Language.
ASL 4112Psychology and Deaf People (3.00)
This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people. Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ASL 4115Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores cultural influences on identity development, family systems, linguistics, engagement with educational and community agencies, and resilience within the Deaf community. The interaction of culture, identity and language will be highlighted and applied to future trends for groups within the Deaf community, such as children of Deaf adults, GLTB community members, ethnic minority groups, women, and persons with disabilities.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ASL 4559New Course in American Sign Language (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of American Sign Language.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013
ASL 4750Topics in Deaf Studies (3.00)
Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
ASL 4810Deafness in Literature and Film (3.00)
Studies representations of deaf people in literature and film over the last three centuries. Takes a contrapuntal approach, juxtaposing canonical literature and mainstream films with works (in either English or American Sign Language) by relatively unknown deaf artists.
ASL 4993Independent Study in American Sign Language (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Study in American Sign Language. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
Astronomy
ASTR 1210Introduction to the Sky and Solar System (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A study of the night sky primarily for non-science majors. Provides a brief history of astronomy through Newton. Topics include the properties of the sun, earth, moon, planets, asteroids, meteors and comets; origin and evolution of the solar system; life in the universe; and recent results from space missions and ground-based telescopes.
ASTR 1220Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A study of stars, star formation, and evolution primarily for non-science majors. Topics include light, atoms, and modern observing technologies; origin of the chemical elements; supernovae, pulsars, neutron stars, and black holes; structure and evolution of our galaxy; nature of other galaxies; active galaxies and quasars; expanding universe, cosmology, the big bang, and the early universe.
ASTR 1230Introduction to Astronomical Observation (3.00)
An independent laboratory class for non-science majors, meeting at night, in which students work individually or in small groups on observational projects that focus on the study of constellations, planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies using binoculars, 8-inch telescopes, and imaging equipment at the department's student observatory. Prerequisites: ASTR 1210, 1220, or 1270 or instructor permission.
ASTR 1260Threats from Outer Space (3.00)
This introductory astronomy course for non-science majors deals with harmful, or potentially harmful, astronomical phenomena such as asteroid/comet impacts, supernovae, gamma ray bursts, solar storms, cosmic rays, black holes, galaxy collisions, and the end of the universe. Physical principles will be used to evaluate the dangers involved.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ASTR 1270Unsolved Mysteries in the Universe (3.00)
An exploration of the unsolved mysteries in the universe and the limits of our knowledge for non-science majors. The class emphasizes the nature of scientific endeavor, and explores the boundaries between science, philosophy, and metaphysics. A number of thought provoking topics are discussed including the beginning and end of the universe, black holes, extraterrestrial life, the nature of time, dark matter and dark energy.
ASTR 1280The Origins of Almost Everything (3.00)
From ancient Babylon to modern cosmology, nearly every culture on Earth has stories and myths of creation. It is a universal human desire to understand where we came. In this introductory astronomy class for non-science majors, students will explore the origins of the Universe, structure and galaxies, stars, planets and life. The course will use the content to illustrate the nature of science and scientific inquiry.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ASTR 1290Black Holes (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Black holes are stellar remnants that are so dense that nothing, not even light, can escape their gravitational pull. Nevertheless, systems that contain these "dark stars" are among the brightest sources in the universe. In this introductory course, aimed primarily at non-science majors, students will explore the seemingly paradoxical nature of black holes and evaluate the astronomical evidence for their existence.
ASTR 1500Seminar (1.00)
Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.
ASTR 1510Seminar (1.00)
Primarily for first and second year students, taught on a voluntary basis by a faculty member. Topics vary.
ASTR 1559New Course in Astronomy (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of astronomy.
ASTR 1610Intro to Astronomical Research for Potential Astronomy/Astrophysics Majors (1.00)
For first and second year students considering Astronomy/Astronomy-Physics as a major, or current A/A-P majors. Faculty will present ongoing research to introduce students to both the subject matter and the required physical, mathematical, and computational background of contemporary astronomy research. Potential long term undergraduate research projects will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus and one semester of physics.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ASTR 2110Introduction to Astrophysics I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on physical principles. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 1210 or 1310, PHYS 1610 or 2310, or instructor permission; ASTR 2110 and 2120 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.
ASTR 2120Introduction to Astrophysics II (3.00)
Primarily for science majors. A thorough discussion of the basic concepts and methods of solar system, stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on physical principles. Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 2110, MATH 1210 or 1310, PHYS 1610 or 2310, or instructor permission; ASTR 2110 and 2120 form a sequence and should be taken in that order.
ASTR 2559New Course in Astronomy (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of Astronomy.
ASTR 3130Observational Astronomy (4.00)
Primarily for science majors. A lecture and laboratory course that deals with basic observational techniques in astronomy. The laboratory section generally meets at night. Students use observational facilities at the McCormick and Fan Mountain Observatories. Additional work outside posted laboratory hours will be required to take advantage of clear skies. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110,2120 or ASTR 1210,1220, or instructor permission.
ASTR 3140Introduction to Observational Radio Astronomy (3.00)
An introduction to the tools, techniques, and science of radio astronomy. Discussion includes fundamentals of measuring radio signals, radiometers, antennas, and interferometers, supplemented by illustrative labs; radio emission mechanisms and simple radiative transfer; radio emission from the Sun and planets, stars, galactic and extragalactic sources, and the cosmic microwave background. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110, 2120.
ASTR 3340Teaching Astronomy (3.00)
A seminar-style class offered primarily for non-majors planning to teach science or looking to improve their ablility to communicate science effectively. In addition to astronomy content, students will learn effective teaching strategies and gain practical experience by developing and implementing their own concept-based astronomy lessons. Prerequisite: ASTR 1210, 1240; instructor permission
ASTR 3410Archaeo-Astronomy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Open to non-science students. Discussion of prescientific astronomy, including Mayan, Babylonian, and ancient Chinese astronomy, and the significance of relics such as Stonehenge. Discusses the usefulness of ancient records in the study of current astrophysical problems such as supernova outbursts. Uses current literature from several disciplines, including astronomy, archaeology, and anthropology. Prerequisite/corequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course, or instructor permission.
ASTR 3420Life Beyond the Earth (3.00)
Open to non-science students. Studies the possibility of intelligent extraterrestrial life; methods and desirability of interstellar communication; prospects for humanity's colonization of space; interaction of space colonies; and the search for other civilizations. Prerequisite/corequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course or instructor permission.
ASTR 3460Development of Modern Astronomy (3.00)
The 20th Century saw a revolution in our study of the origin and evolution of the universe. It was a dynamic period with the opening of the electromagnetic spectrum and the transition to "Big Science." This course is a survey of the development of modern astrophysics, with an emphasis on the second half of the 20th Century. Prerequisite: A 1000- or 2000-level ASTR course or instructor permission.
ASTR 3470Science and Controversy in Astronomy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Open to non-science students. Investigates controversial topics in science and pseudo-science from the astronomer's perspective. Analyzes methods of science and the nature of scientific evidence, and their implications for unresolved astrophysical problems. Topics include extraterrestrial life, UFO's, Velikovsky, von Daniken, and astrology. Prerequisite/corequisite: ASTR 1210 or 1240, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
ASTR 3480Introduction to Cosmology (3.00)
Open to first-year students; primarily for non-science students. A descriptive introduction to the study of the ultimate structure and evolution of the universe. Covers the history of the universe, cosmological speculation, and the nature of the galaxies. Provides a qualitative introduction to relativity theory and the nature of space-time, black holes, models of the universe (big bang, steady-state, etc.) and methods of testing them.
ASTR 3559New Course in Astronomy (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of astronomy.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ASTR 3880Planetary Astronomy (3.00)
Studies the origin and evolution of the bodies in the solar system, emphasizing the geology of the planets and satellites of the inner solar system and the satellites of the gaseous planets. Topics will include the interpretation of remote sensing data, the chemistry and dynamics of planetary atmospheres and their interactions with the planetary surfaces, and the role of impacts. Prerequisite: Introductory course in geosciences or astronomy.
ASTR 3881Planetary Astronomy Laboratory (1.00)
Optional one hour laboratory for students in ASTR 3880 that provides practical experience in accessing and analyzing data related to the origin and geology of solar system planetary bodies, including the Moon, Mars, and outer planet satellites.
ASTR 4140Research Methods in Astrophysics (3.00)
Primarily for astronomy/astrophysics majors. Students will be exposed to a research methods-intensive set of mini projects,with emphasis on current active areas of astrophysics research. The goal is to prepare students for research in astrophysics. Topics will include databases and database manipulation, astronomical surveys, statistics, space observatories and observation planning, intro to numerical simulations, and proposal writing. Prerequisites: ASTR 2110/2120 and PHYS 2660, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ASTR 4559New Course in Astronomy (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of astronomy.
ASTR 4810Astrophysics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Basic concepts in mechanics, statistical physics, atomic and nuclear structure, and radiative transfer are developed and applied to selected fundamental problems in the areas of stellar structure, stellar atmospheres, the interstellar medium, and extragalactic astrophysics. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110, 2120 (recommended); MATH 5210, 5220; PHYS 3210, 3310 (concurrent), 3430 (concurrent), 3650; or instructor permission.
ASTR 4993Tutorial (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent study of a topic of special interest to the student under individual supervision by a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASTR 4998Senior Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASTR 5010Astrophysical Processes (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An introduction to the basic physics of astronomy and astrophysics organized around learning physical principles and applying them to astrophysical objects. Physics covered will be chosen from fluid mechanics, radiative transfer, statistical mechanics, classical and quantum radiation processes, and quantum mechanics of atomic and molecular structure. This graduate course will involve more complex and difficult assignments than ASTR 4810. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.
ASTR 5110Astronomical Techniques (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys modern techniques of radiation measurement, data analysis, and image processing, and their application to astrophysical problems, especially the physical properties of stars and galaxies. Relevant laboratory experiments and observations with the department's telescopes are included. Students are expected to develop a familiarity with programming and other basic computer skills if they do not already possess them. Prerequisite: ASTR 2110-2120; PHYS 3420, 3430 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ASTR 5140Advanced Research Methods in Astrophysics (3.00)
Graduate students will be exposed to a research methods-intensive set of projects, with emphasis on current active areas of astrophysics research. The goal is to prepare students for research in astrophysics. Topics will include databases and database manipulation, astronomical surveys, statistics, space observatories and observation planning, intro to numerical simulations, and proposal writing.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ASTR 5260Introduction to Astrochemistry (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This interdisciplinary course will introduce advanced undergraduates and graduates to molecules and their chemistry in different sources throughout the universe. Topics include gas-phase and grain-surface reactions, astronomical spectroscopy, laboratory experiments, and astrochemical modeling. Prerequisite: There are no formal prerequisites, but some knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and/or the interstellar medium will be helpful.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
ASTR 5340Introductory Radio Astronomy (3.00)
Studies the fundamentals of measuring power and power spectra, antennas, interferometers, and radiometers. Topics include thermal radiation, synchrotron radiation, and line frequency radiation; and radio emission from the planets, sun, flare stars, pulsars, supernovae, interstellar gas, galaxies, and quasi-stellar sources.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
ASTR 5350Introduction to Radio Astronomy Instrumentation (3.00)
An introduction to the instrumentation of radio astronomy. Discussion includes fundamentals of measuring radio signals, noise theory, basic radiometry, antennas, low noise electronics, coherent receivers, signal processing for continuum and spectral line studies, and arrays. Lecture material is supplemented by illustrative labs. Prerequisite: ASTR 5340 or Instructor permission.
ASTR 5420Interstellar Medium (3.00)
Studies the physics of the interstellar gas and grains, the distribution and dynamics of gas, and cosmic radiation and interstellar magnetic fields. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASTR 5430Stellar Astrophysics (3.00)
Studies observed properties and physics of stars including radiative transfer; stellar thermodynamics; convection; formation of spectra in atmospheres; equations of stellar structure; nuclear reactions; stellar evolution; and nucleosynthesis. Includes applicable numerical techniques. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASTR 5440Stellar Astrophysics (3.00)
Studies observed properties and physics of stars including radiative transfer; stellar thermodynamics; convection; formation of spectra in atmospheres; equations of stellar structure; nuclear reactions; stellar evolution; and nucleosynthesis. Includes applicable numerical techniques. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ASTR 5450High Energy Astrophysics (3.00)
Introduces the physics of basic radiation mechanisms and particle acceleration processes that are important in high energy phenomena and space science. Discusses applications to pulsars, active galactic nuclei, radio galaxies, quasars, and supernovae. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ASTR 5559New Course in Astronomy (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of astronomy.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
ASTR 5610Galactic Structure and Stellar Populations (3.00)
Explores the structure and evolution of star clusters and galaxies, with emphasis on the kinematics, chemistry, ages, and spectral energy distributions of stellar populations. The course introduces fundamental tools of Galactic astronomy, including methods for assessing the size, shape, age, and dynamics of the Milky Way and other stellar systems, galaxy formation, interstellar gas and dust, dark matter, and the distance scale. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ASTR 5630Extragalactic Astronomy (3.00)
This course provides an overview of extragalactic astronomy. Topics include both qualitative and quantitative discussion of various types of galaxy (ellipticals, spirals, dwarf, starburst); results from theory of stellar dynamics; groups and clusters of galaxies; active galaxies; high-redshift galaxies; galaxy evolution; the intergalactic medium; and dark matter. The course is intended for advanced undergraduate astrophysics majors and first and second year graduate students. Prerequisite: Physics and Math through PHYS 2610, MATH 3250 (or equivalent); ASTR 2110, 2120 (or equivalent).
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
ASTR 5640Extragalactic Astronomy II (3.00)
This course provides an overview of extragalactic astronomy. Topics include both a qualitative and quantitative discussion of star formation in galaxies, galaxy interactions and mergers, active galaxies and quasars, cosmology, structure formation in the universe, and galaxy formation and evolution. The course is intended for advanced undergraduate astrophysics majors and first and second year graduate students. Proposed: This course provides an overview of extragalactic astronomy. Topics include both a qualitative and quantitative discussion of star formation in galaxies, galaxy interactions and mergers, active galaxies and quasars, cosmology, structure formation in the universe, and galaxy formation and evolution. The course is intended for advanced undergraduate astrophysics majors and first and second year graduate students. Prerequisite: ASTR 5630 or Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ASTR 6210Introduction to Sky and Solar System Concepts (3.00)
The subject matter of this course is the same as ASTR 1210. Students are offered special assignments and consultation on introductory astronomy concepts on the sky and solar system related to education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections, but restricted to graduate students in the Curry school. Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.
ASTR 6220Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, and Universe Concepts (3.00)
The subject matter of this course is the same as ASTR 1220. Students are offered special assignments and consultation on introductory astronomy concepts on the stars, galaxies and universe related to education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections but restricted to graduate students in the Curry school. Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.
ASTR 6230Introduction to Astronomical Observation Concepts (3.00)
The subject matter of this course is the same as ASTR 1230. Students are offered special assignments and consultation on introductory concepts in observational astronomy related to education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections. Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.
ASTR 6340Astronomy Concepts in the Classroom (3.00)
A seminar-style class offered for graduate students in the School of Education and in-service teachers seeking credit towards (re) certification. In addition to astronomy content, students will learn effective astronomy lessons. Prerequisite: instructor permission
ASTR 6420Life Beyond the Earth Concepts (3.00)
The subject matter of this course is the same as ASTR 3420. Students are offered special reading assignments and consultation on extraterrestrial life concepts related to education. Offered concurrently with undergraduate sections. Prerequisite: Curry School students; instructor permission.
ASTR 6470Science and Controversy Concepts (3.00)