UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog for the East Asian Studies Program    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
American Studies
AMST 3180Introduction to Asian American Studies (3.00)
An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama.
Anthropology
ANTH 3340Ecology and Society: An Introduction to the New Ecological Anthropology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Forges a synthesis between culture theory and historical ecology to provide new insights on how human cultures fashion, and are fashioned by, their environment. Although cultures from all over the world are considered, special attention is given to the region defined by South and East Asia, and Australia. Prerequisite: At least one Anthropology course, and/or relevant exposure to courses in EVSC, BIOL, CHEM, or HIST or instructor permission
ANTH 3630Chinese Family and Religion (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Analyzes various features of traditional Chinese social organization as it existed in the late imperial period. Includes the late imperial state; Chinese family and marriage; lineages; ancestor worship; popular religion; village social structure; regional systems; and rebellion.
ANTH 3660China: Empire and Nationalities (3.00)
Explores the distant and recent history of Han and non-Han nationalities in the Chinese empire and nation-state. Examines the reaction of minority nationalities to Chinese predominance and the bases of Chinese rule and cultural hegemony. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010 or equivalent, a course in Chinese history, or instructor permission.
ANTH 7590Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with social and cultural anthropology.
ANTH 7630Chinese Family and Religion (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Analyzes various features of traditional Chinese social organization as it existed in the late imperial period. Includes the late imperial state; Chinese family and marriage; lineages; ancestor worship; popular religion; village social structure; regional systems; and rebellion.
History of Art and Architecture
ARAH 5585Topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Examines focused topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 7580Research Problems in the Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 7585Research Problems in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARAH 9585Seminar in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of East, South, and Southeast Asia
Architectural History
ARH 3607Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 7602World Buddhist Architecture (3.00)
The history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world which includes East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.
ARH 7607Adv Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
History of Art
ARTH 2861East Asian Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.
ARTH 2862Arts of the Buddhist World- India to Japan (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Surveys the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Considers aspects of history and religious doctrine.
ARTH 2863Chinese Decorative Arts (3.00 - 4.00)
Chinese Decorative Arts
ARTH 3861Chinese Art (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writings of leading scholars.
ARTH 3862Japanese Art (3.00)
Introduces the arts and culture of Japan. Focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played central roles in Japanese art and society. Analyzes how artists, architects, and patrons expressed their ideals in visual terms. Examines sculptures, paintings, and decorative objects and their underlying artistic and cultural values.
Chinese
CHIN 1010Elementary Chinese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Introduction to the fundamentals of modern Chinese. No prerequisites. This course is not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Prerequisite: none.
CHIN 1016Intensive Introductory Chinese (4.00)
Beginning-level course in Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no prior experience in the language. This course is not intended for native and near-native speakers of Chinese. The course provides students with systematic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills on a daily basis. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
CHIN 1020Elementary Chinese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The second in a two-semester introduction to modern Chinese. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Course is not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 1010 or equivalent background (as demonstrated in the department's placement test).
CHIN 1026Intensive Introductory Chinese (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: CHIN 1016 or equivalent.
CHIN 1060Accelerated Elementary Chinese (4.00)
Specifically intended for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve control of the Chinese sound system (the 4 tones and Pinyin) and basic components of Chinese characters; (b) be able to write 400-500 characters, (c) express themselves clearly in written form on a variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary, (d) improve their basic reading skills (including learning to use a Chinese dictionary).
CHIN 116Intensive Introductory Chinese (0.00)
Beginning-level course in Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no prior experience in the language. This course is not intended for native and near-native speakers of Chinese. The course provides students with systematic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills on a daily basis.
CHIN 126Intensive Introductory Chinese (0.00)
Beginning-level course in Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese for students with little or no prior experience in the language. This course is not intended for native and near-native speakers of Chinese. The course provides students with systematic training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills on a daily basis.
CHIN 1559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
CHIN 2010Intermediate Chinese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Builds on the foundations acquired in CHIN 1010-1020 with further refinement of all four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course is not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 1020 or equivalent background (as demonstrated in the department's placement test).
CHIN 2016Intensive Intermediate Chinese (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: CHIN 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.
CHIN 2020Intermediate Chinese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Prerequisite: CHIN 2010, 2020 are the continuation of CHIN 1020. They are not intended for native or near-native speakers of Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students improve their spoken and aural proficiency, achieve a solid reading level, and learn to express themselves clearly in writing on a variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. These goals are approached through grammar and reading-writing exercises, classroom drills, listening and speaking activities, and written quizzes and exams.
CHIN 2026Intensive Intermediate Chinese (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: CHIN 1016, 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
CHIN 2060Accelerated Intermediate Chinese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is specifically designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but with reading and writing ability equivalent to a student who has completed CHIN 1020. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve a basic level of reading competency with a vocabulary of 1000 characters; (b) express themselves clearly in written Chinese on a variety of topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. Prerequisite: CHIN 1060 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
CHIN 216Intensive Intermediate Chinese (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
CHIN 226Intensive Intermediate Chinese (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
CHIN 2559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
CHIN 3010Pre-Advanced Chinese I (3.00)
This course is the continuation of Intermediate Chinese (CHIN 2020). All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Readings and discussions are related to various aspects of modern China. The class is conducted mainly in Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 2020 or 2060 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
CHIN 3015Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Chinese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
CHIN 3020Pre-Advanced Chinese II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is a continuation of CHIN 3010. Readings and discussion are related to various aspects of modern China. The class is conducted mainly in Mandarin Chinese. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Prerequisite: CHIN 3010, CHIN 3050, Placement Test Results or Instructor Permission
CHIN 3025Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For students residing in the Chinese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
CHIN 3050Pre-Advanced Speaking & Reading in Chinese I (2.00)
This course focuses on improving oral communication skills needed for various social settings, such as carrying on an intelligent conversation about various aspects of modern life, telling a story in a detailed or compelling manner, or engaging in extensive discussion of various social issues. Readings will be used as input to enhance speaking skills. Prerequisite: CHIN 2020 or CHIN 2060.
CHIN 3060Pre-Advanced Speaking & Reading in Chinese II (2.00)
This course is the continuation of CHIN3050. Students will continue advancing their proficiency in speaking and reading. Graded and authentic reading materials will be used to enhance reading skills and in-class discussion based on the readings will be used to further improve speaking. Students who finish this course can continue to take CHIN 4010 or other upper-level courses based on instructor permission.
CHIN 3460Chinese Culture and Society through Films (2.00 - 3.00)
An integral part of the UVa summer Chinese language study abroad program intended specifically for students who take intensive Readings in Modern Chinese (CHIN 3010 and CHIN 3020) during the 8 week summer abroad program in Shanghai. Will view and study Chinese films made in China to learn, to think and to discuss specific topics of Chinese culture. May be offered on an irregular basis during fall or spring terms for 3 credits.
CHIN 3559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
Course was offered Spring 2018
CHIN 4010Advanced Chinese I (3.00)
This course is a continuation of CHIN 3020. The goal of these courses is to help students understand journalistic essays and some literature pieces through systematic study of sentence patterns and formal writing styles. All aspects of Chinese language learning are still evenly balanced. Prerequisites: CHIN 3020 or equivalent.
CHIN 4020Advanced Chinese II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is a continuation of CHIN4010. Readings and discussion are related to various aspects of modern China. The class is conducted in Mandarin Chinese. All four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Students constantly work with authentic materials and engage in communications with native speakers in various formats and contexts. Prerequisite: CHIN 4010, Placement Test Results or Instructor Permission.
CHIN 4030Business Chinese (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Business Chinese is a one-term language course for business purposes designed for students who have studied Chinese for at least four years in a regular college program or with the equivalent language proficiency. It is aimed to enhance student's Chinese skills in the business context and promote their understanding about the macro and micro business environment and culture in contemporary China.
CHIN 4060Advanced Chinese: Topics on Modern China (3.00)
The goal of CHIN 4060 is to continue enhancing students' reading comprehension and writing skills by systematically exposing them to formal written Chinese, works of literature, and vigorous writing exercises. By the end of the course the students should be able to read authentic materials with the help of a dictionary and be able to write essays of 500 words in length on assigned topics. Prerequisite: CHIN 3020 or CHIN 3050 or equivalent.
CHIN 4200Modern Chinese Literary Translation (3.00)
This course uses modern Chinese literary texts to introduce students to the special skills and problems associated with translation. Activities include: familiarization with key theoretical issues in translation studies, dictionary training, assessing and comparing existing translations, group work, draft revision, and quizzes on reading assignments. Prerequisite: CHIN 4020 or equivalent level. Some familiarity with Chinese literature preferred.
Course was offered Fall 2018
CHIN 4559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2010
CHIN 4830Introduction to Classical Chinese Prose (3.00)
Introduces the grammar and structure of classical Chinese prose. Requisite: Consent of Instructor
CHIN 4840Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Introduces the grammar and structure of classical Chinese poetry. Requisite: Consent of Instructor
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2013
CHIN 4993Independent Study in Chinese (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Chinese.
CHIN 5210Readings in Modern Chinese Poetry (3.00)
Readings from major Chinese poets of the 20th and 21st centuries in the original Chinese. Designed as a literary survey, this course also takes into account the needs of Chinese language learners. Poems are selected with difficulty level in mind. The course attends to general reading comprehension as well as the features of modern Chinese poetic language and its relationship to tradition.
CHIN 5230Chinese Conversation and Composition (in Chinese) (3.00)
Development of writing and speaking skills at a higher level than CHIN 5020. Prerequisite: CHIN 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2011
CHIN 5240Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition (in Chinese) (3.00)
Further develops writing and speaking skills to an advanced level. Prerequisite: CHIN 5230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012
CHIN 5500Introduction to Chinese History, Culture and Society (1.00 - 3.00)
An integral part of the UVa summer Chinese language program in Shanghai, this course combines lectures and guest presentations with field trips, using the resources specifically available in Shanghai and other parts of China to offer an introduction to China's long history, splendid culture, and dynamic and changing society. Taught in English.
CHIN 5559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
CHIN 5680Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language (1.00 - 5.00)
The course aims to help novice and continuing Chinese language teachers enhance their expertise in teaching Chinese as a foreign language. It integrates a balance of Chinese language acquisition theories and research-supported practices into the curriculum through a structured and supervised practicum. Teacher participants will create the E-portfolio that documents their extensive learning and experiences throughout the course. Prerequisites: Instructor permission or CHIN 3020.
CHIN 5810Media Chinese I (3.00)
Studies electronic and print media in Chinese, emphasizing current events as reported in the Chinese speaking world, to further develop oral and written proficiency. Prerequisite: CHIN 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
CHIN 7559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
CHIN 8559New Course in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese.
CHIN 8993Independent Study in Chinese (1.00 - 4.00)
Independent Study in Chinese. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Chinese in Translation
CHTR 1559New Course in Chinese in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese literature in translation
CHTR 2559New Course in Chinese in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese literature in translation
CHTR 2800Chinese Calligraphy (1.00 - 3.00)
Introduction to the history, masters, styles and techniques of Chinese brush calligraphy. Enhances familiarity with use of brush and ink; active and passive differentiation of styles and techniques; and appreciation of Chinese Calligraphy as an art form.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
CHTR 3010Survey of Traditional Chinese Literature (3.00)
Introductory survey of Chinese literature from earliest times (first millenium BCE) to the Qing Dynasty (ended 1911) in English translation, including major works from the genres of poetry, essays, drama, and fiction. There will be a midterm examination, three 3-page short papers and a 10-page term paper. In addition to familiarizing students with the Chinese literary canon, the course will focus on literary analysis and interpretation, cross-cul
CHTR 3020Survey of Modern Chinese Literature (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Revolutionary Tradition in Modern Chinese Literature and Film is a general introduction to modern Chinese literary culture.
CHTR 3122Sunzi and The Art of War (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This seminar on The Art of War, the 5th century BCE Chinese classic attributed to Sunzi, will familiarize students with traditional interpretations of the text. The course will emphasize a close reading of several translations of the text and will also consider the influence of its historical and philosophical contexts. Contemporary Chinese military writings will also be surveyed to investigate the relevance of the text to modern warfare.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017
CHTR 3125Winning the Argument: Disputation and Persuasion in Early China (3.00)
A survey of early Chinese [800 BCE - 200 CE] writings about the role of argumentation during this turbulent period of Chinese history. Part one will investigate how philosophical disputation was considered & practiced by key Chinese philosophers (e.g. Confucius, Laozi, Mozi). Part two will appraise the evolving role of political persuasion during this era. The emphasis will be close reading and analyses of representative texts.
CHTR 3132Legends and Lore of Early China (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course explores early Chinese legends and lore through close readings in two texts: the Zuo Commentary on the Spring and Autumn Annals (Chunqiu Zuo zhuan) and the Categorized Biographies of Women (Lienü zhuan). Students will also examine the systems of belief and legendary events that shaped the lives of a diverse array of heroes and exemplars.
Course was offered Spring 2016
CHTR 3559New Course in Chinese in Translation (3.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
New course in the subject of Chinese literature in translation
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2015
CHTR 3810Chinese Modernism (3.00)
Exploration of modernist and avant garde Chinese film and literature. Discussion of issues of translation and modernity in a global context in fiction, poetry, drama, and film from the 1920s to the 1990s. Authors from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong include Lu Xun, Ding Ling, Yu Dafu, Shi Zhecun, Mu Shiying, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Yu Hua, CanXue, Zhu Tianwen. Films by Stan Lai, Huang Jianxin, Wong Kar-wai. Prerequisite: CHTR 3020 or Instructor Permission
CHTR 3820The Modern Chinese Essay (3.00)
Readings from major Chinese essayists of the 20th century in the English translation. Chinese texts will also be available for interested students. Discussion of genre and literary history, literary relationship between tradition and modernity, language and style.
CHTR 3830Modern Chinese Poetry (3.00)
Readings from major Chinese poets of the 20th and 21st centuries in English translation. Discussion focuses on modern Chinese poetic expression in relationship to tradition, politics, history and gender. Authors from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong included.
CHTR 3840Writing Women in Modern China (3.00)
This seminar focuses on works of fiction from modern China that articulate womanhood from a variety of perspectives. In addition to women writers (Qiu Jin, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Chen Ran, Zhu Tianxin), male writers such as Xu Dishan, Mao Dun, and Lao She who devote unusual attention to feminine subjectivity are also included. Familiarity with Chinese culture and society and literary analysis are preferred, but not required.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2012
CHTR 3850Documentary Writing and Film in China (3.00)
A seminar exploring the role of the documentary impulse in modern Chinese writing and film. Beginning with reportage literature and foreign documentaries about China from the early 20th century, the course follows the development of documentary art forms in the People's Republic of China (with some attention to Taiwan as well), culminating in the recent trend of independent documentary film making and its influence on narrative film.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
CHTR 4010Legendary Women in Early China (3.00)
Examines the biographies of female heroines and villains as found in the early Chinese text Tradition of Exemplary Women (ca. 18 B.C.). Students gain a familiarity with (a) the history of women in early China, (b) the evolving codes of behavior that shaped women's' culture for two millennia, and (c) the way in which the Chinese understand gender. Enhances an understanding of the function of role models in both ancient China and their own lives. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.
CHTR 4220Gender, Family, and Sexuality in Chinese Fiction (3.00)
An exploration of family, gender and sexuality as represented in traditional Chinese prose fiction in translation.
CHTR 4559New Course in Chinese in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Chinese literature in translation
CHTR 4991Chinese Capstone (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Restricted to Chinese majors, this course is designed as a capstone seminar that will require a class presentation and an extended final paper that demonstrate the significant knowledge of Chinese language.
CHTR 5010Survey of Traditional Chinese Literature (3.00)
Study of the literary heritage of China. Examines the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.
CHTR 5020Survey of Modern Chinese Literature (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A general introduction to modern Chinese literary culture. Examines the major genres through selected readings of representative authors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement.
CHTR 5122Sunzi and the Art of War (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This seminar on The Art of War, the 5th century BCE Chinese classic attributed to Sunzi, will familiarize students with traditional interpretations of the text. The course will emphasize a close reading of several translations of the text and will also consider the influence of its historical and philosophical contexts. Contemporary Chinese military writings will also be surveyed to investigate the relevance of the text to modern warfare.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017
CHTR 5125Winning the Argument: Disputation and Persuasion in Early China (3.00)
A survey of early Chinese [800 BCE - 200 CE] writings about the role of argumentation during this turbulent period of Chinese history. Part one will investigate how philosophical disputation was considered & practiced by key Chinese philosophers (e.g. Confucius, Laozi, Mozi). Part two will appraise the evolving role of political persuasion during this era. The emphasis will be on close reading and analyses of representative texts.
CHTR 5132Legends and Lore of Early China (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course explores early Chinese legends and lore through close readings in two texts: the Zuo Commentary on the Spring and Autumn Annals (Chunqiu Zuo zhuan) and the Categorized Biographies of Women (Lienü zhuan). Students will also examine the systems of belief and legendary events that shaped the lives of a diverse array of heroes and exemplars.
Course was offered Spring 2016
CHTR 5559New Course in Chinese in Translation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
New course in the subject of Chinese literature in translation
CHTR 5810Chinese Modernism (3.00)
Exploration of modernist and avant garde Chinese film and literature. Discussion of issues of translation and modernity in a global context in fiction, poetry, drama, and film from the 1920s to the 1990s. Authors from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong include Lu Xun, Ding Ling, Yu Dafu, Shi Zhecun, Mu Shiying, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Yu Hua, CanXue, Zhu Tianwen. Films by Stan Lai, Huang Jianxin, Wong Kar-wai. Students enrolled in the 5000 level version of the course will be required to use some Chinese language materials. Prerequisite: CHTR 3020 or instructor's permission.
CHTR 5820The Modern Chinese Essay (3.00)
Readings from major Chinese essayists of the 20th century in the English translation. Chinese texts will also be available for interested students. Discussion of genre and literary history, literary relationship between tradition and modernity, language and style. Students enrolled in the 5000 level of this course will be required to use some Chinese language materials as well.
CHTR 5830Modern Chinese Poetry (3.00)
Readings from major Chinese poets of the 20th and 21st centuries in English translation. Discussion focuses on modern Chinese poetic expression in relationship to tradition, politics, history and gender. Authors from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong included.
CHTR 5840Writing Women in Modern China (3.00)
This seminar focuses on works of fiction from modern China that articulate womanhood from a variety of perspectives. In addition to women writers (Qiu Jin, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Chen Ran, Zhu Tianxin), male writers such as Xu Dishan, Mao Dun, and Lao She who devote unusual attention to feminine subjectivity are also included. Familiarity with Chinese culture and society and literary analysis are preferred, but not required. Students enrolled in the 5000 level course will be required to use some Chinese language materials.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2012
CHTR 5850Documentary Writing and Film in China (3.00)
A seminar exploring the role of the documentary impulse in modern Chinese writing and film. Beginning with reportage literature and foreign documentaries about China from the early 20th century, the course follows the development of documentary art forms in the People's Republic of China (with some attention to Taiwan as well), culminating in the recent trend of independent documentary film making and its influence on narrative film.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
EALC 1559New Course in East Asian Literatures and Cultures (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of East Asian Literatures and Cultures
EALC 2559New Course in East Asian Languages and Cultures (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of East Asian Languages and Cultures.
Course was offered Spring 2010, Fall 2009
EALC 3120Words and Images in East Asian Sacred Texts (3.00)
This course explores the role of words and images in East Asian religious literature, by focusing on influential Buddhist and Daoist scriptures. In this context, we will assess both the way pictures are written about and texts rendered in visual forms, as well as their interactions. Ultimately, we will also tackle issues of representation relevant to study of China, Korea and Japan from both a historical and conceptual perspective. Prerequisite: Introduction to Buddhism or Survey course on Chinese or Japanese Literature
EALC 3559New Course in East Asian Literatures and Cultures (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of East Asian Literatures and Cultures.
Course was offered Fall 2014
EALC 4559New Course in East Asian Literatures and Cultures (3.00)
New course in East Asian languages, literatures, and cultures.
Course was offered Spring 2011
EALC 4998Distinguished Majors Senior Thesis I (3.00)
The first part of a two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Languages and Literatures.
EALC 4999Distinguished Majors Senior Thesis II (3.00)
The second part of a two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Languages and Literatures. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Languages and Literatures and have already completed EALC 4998.
EALC 5120Words and Images in East Asian Sacred Texts (3.00)
This course explores the role of words and images in East Asian religious literature, by focusing on influential Buddhist and Daoist scriptures. In this context, we will assess both the way pictures are written about and texts rendered in visual forms, as well as their interactions. Ultimately, we will also tackle issues of representation relevant to study of China, Korea and Japan from both a historical and conceptual perspective. Prerequisite: Introduction to East Asian Religions or Literature
EALC 5559New Course in East Asian Literatures and Cultures (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of East Asian Literatures and Cultures
Course was offered Fall 2014
East Asian Studies
EAST 1010East Asian Canons and Cultures (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
An introduction to conceptions of self, society, and the universe as they have been expressed in canonical literary, philosophical, and religious texts in East Asia from earliest times up through modern times. Readings will be in English translation, supplemented by reference.
EAST 1559New Course in East Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in East Asian studies.
Course was offered Spring 2010
EAST 3559New Course in East Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in East Asian studies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015
EAST 4559New Course in East Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in East Asian Studies
EAST 4991East Asian Studies Capstone (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Capstone course required for all East Asian Studies majors in their final year. Pre-Requisites: Restricted to Fourth Year, Fifth Year East Asian Studies majors
EAST 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent study in special field under the direction of a faculty member in East Asian Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
EAST 4998Distinguished Majors Senior Thesis I (3.00)
The first part of a two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies and have already completed EAST 4998.
EAST 4999Distinguished Majors Senior Thesis (3.00)
The second part of a two-semester sequence of tutorial work for students completing a Senior Thesis as part of the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies or East Asian Languages and Literatures. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the Distinguished Majors Program in East Asian Studies and have already completed EAST 4998. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
EAST 5110Hollywood Goes to Asia: Transnational Asian Media (3.00)
The fundamental objectives of the course include cultivating a rigorous understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the media industry, technology and policy within the context of South and East Asia. Students will also be expected to develop fresh critical perspectives on the significance of analysis of industry practice as a means to critique media texts.
EAST 5111China to 1000 (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This class introduces Chinese history from its origins through the end of the 10th century. Its goal is to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese and how the set of values, practices, and institutions we associate with Chinese society came to exist. Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history will all be covered, though not equally for all periods. Major themes of the course include intellectual developments, empire
EAST 5162Historical China and the World (3.00)
The course traces China's external relations from antiquity to our own times, identifying conceptions, practices, and institutions that characterized the ancient inter-state relations of East Asia and examining the interactions between "Eastern" and "Western," and "revolutionary" and "conventional" modes of international behavior in modern times. The student's grade is based on participation, midterm test, final exam, and a 20-page essay. Prerequisites: Graduate students only and permission by instructor.
EAST 5321China and the Cold War (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The class examines China's entanglement with the Cold War from 1945 to the early 1990s. The course raises China-centered questions because it is curious in retrospect that China, a quintessential Eastern state, became so deeply involved in the Cold War, a confrontation rooted in Western history. In exploring such questions, this course does not treat China as part of the Cold War but the Cold War as a period of Chinese history. Prerequisites: Graduate Students only and permission by instructor.
EAST 5323China and the United States (3.00)
The course explores Chinese-American relations since the late 18th century. Starting as an encounter between a young trading state and an ageless empire on the two sides of the Pacific Ocean, the relationship has gone through stages characterized by the two countries' changing identities. The course understands the relationship broadly and seeks insights at various levels. Prerequisites: Graduate students only and permission by instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2018
EAST 5511China's Borderlands (3.00)
This seminar examines important events and historical questions relevant to China's borderlands during the 20th century. Students read and discuss scholarly works about modern Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, and Manchuria. Students write book reviews each week and also produce a research essay. Prerequisites: Graduate Students only and permission by instructor.
EAST 5559New Course in East Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in East Asian Studies
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015
EAST 5861Chinese Art (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course familiarizes students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts.
Course was offered Spring 2018
EAST 5862Monuments of Japanese Art (3.00)
The course focuses on key monuments and artistic traditions that have played a central role in Japanese art and society. Topics range from art and architecture of Shinto and Buddhism of the classical period, late Heian court art, Zen paintings and garden architecture, and also decorative paintings and woodblock prints of the later period.
Course was offered Spring 2018
EAST 8998Non-Topical Research: Preparation for Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
EAST 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
English-Modern & Contemporary Literature
ENMC 3650Asian-American Fiction (3.00)
Studies Asian American literature as a cultural phenomenon and literary tradition, presenting a range of twentieth-century fictions by immigrants or their descendants from India, Pakistan, China, Korea, Vietnam, Japan, and the Philippines. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
Environmental Sciences
EVSC 4100Management of Forest Ecosystems (4.00)
An ecosystem course which treats the ecology of forests and consequences of forest processes in natural and managed systems. The class emphasizes the "pattern and process" concept that is the central theme in modern vegetation sciences at increasing scales: from form and function of leaves and other parts of trees through population, community and landscape ecology to the role of forests in the global climate and carbon-cycling. Pre-requisites: EVSC 3200, 3400, or 3500 recommended.
Graduate Business
GBUS 8305Strategic Thinking: Integrating East and West (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2019
As economies and businesses become more global, companies worldwide will increasingly need to examine their economic practices and beliefs. The purpose of this seminar is to help participants 1) develop a deep understanding of the strategic concepts and business models underlying foreign (in this case, Chinese) business, based on a thorough knowledge of cultural and institutional differences. Prerequisites: Restricted to Darden Students.
History-East Asian History
HIEA 1501Introductory Seminar in East Asian History (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIEA 1559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 2011History of Chinese Civilization (3.00)
An intro to the study of Chinese civilization. We shall begin with the earliest human remains found in China & conclude in the present. The goal of this coure is not merely to tell the story of Chinese history, rich and compelling though the story is. Rather, our aim will be to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese, & how the set of values, practices, & institutions we associate with Chinese society came to exist.
HIEA 2031Modern China (3.00)
Studies the transformation of Chinese politics, society, institutions, culture and foreign relations from the Opium War. through the post-Mao Reform Era. Emphasizes the fluid relationship between tradition and transformation and the ways in which this relationship continues to shape the lives of the Chinese people.
HIEA 2072Modern Japanese Culture and Politics (3.00)
An introduction to the politics, culture, and ideologies of modern Japan from roughly 1800 to the present. We will pay special attention to the interplay between Japan's simultaneous participation in global modernity and its assertion of a unique culture as a way to explore the rise of the nation-state as a historically specific form.
HIEA 2073Japan to 1868: An Historical Introduction (3.00)
This lecture class surveys the history of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the end of the nineteenth century. Through an assortment of historical, literary, religious and visual materials, it offers an introduction to the political, social, religious, intellectual, artistic, and cultural life of Japan in its various epochs.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIEA 2081Korea: Antiquity through the 12th Century (3.00)
The development of Korean culture from the Three Kingdoms Period through the Silla (675-918) and Early Koryo (936-1200) dynasties.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2009
HIEA 2091Korea 13th-19th Centuries (3.00)
Second of a three part sequence on the history of Korea from earliest times into the 21st century. This course covers the period bracketed by the Mongols in the 13th and 14th centuries and the opening of the Yi Dynasty in the late 19th century.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2010
HIEA 2101Korea: Late Nineteenth through Early Twenty First Centuries (3.00)
History of Korea from 1876 into the first decade of the 21st century.
HIEA 2559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 3111China to the Tenth Century (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Surveys the social, political and economic organization of traditional Chinese society, traditional Chinese foreign policy, and major literary, artistic, and intellectual movements.
HIEA 3112Late Imperial China (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Survey of the social, political, and cultural history of China from 10th to the early 20th centuries. Topics include the philosophic basis of state and society, the formation of social elites, the influence of nomadic peoples, and patterns of popular dissent and rebellion, among others
HIEA 3141Political and Social Thought in Modern China (3.00)
Studies political and social thought from the early 20th century to the present, as reflected in written sources (including fiction), art, and films.
HIEA 3151East Asian-American Relations in the 20th Century (3.00)
A lecture and discussion course focusing on the changing relationship between East Asian Countries (China, Japan, Vietnam and Korea in particular) and the United States in the 20th century.
HIEA 3162Historical China and the World (3.00)
The course traces China's external relations from antiquity to our own times, identifying conceptions, practices, and institutions that characterized the ancient inter-state relations of East Asia and examining the interactions between "Eastern" and "Western," and "revolutionary" and "conventional" modes of international behavior in modern times. The student's grade is based on participation, midterm test, final exam, and a short essay.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2016
HIEA 3171Meiji Japan (3.00)
This course will examine the rise of the nation-state form in Japan as a new form of historical subjectivity. It will explore in depth the political, economic, social, and cultural changes in the wake of the collapse of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868 to the start of the Tasiho period in 1912.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
HIEA 3172The Japanese Empire (3.00)
This course is an exploration of Japan's imperial project from roughly 1890-1945. We will start by developing a critical theoretical vocabulary with which we will then focus on three recent and important books on Japanese imperialism in East Asia. At the end of the semester we will also look briefly at anti-imperial and decolonization movements as well as the status of the category of 'empire' for analyzing the postwar period.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2014
HIEA 3211Japan's Economic Miracle (3.00)
Examines the history of Japan since the early 19th century by exploring the causes and consequences of the economic and social changes that have made Japan one of the most important advanced industrial countries in the contemporary world.
HIEA 3221Japan's Political History (3.00)
Examines Japanese history since the early 19th century, exploring changes in political ideas, institutions, and behavior among both governing elites and the mass of Japanese citizenry.
HIEA 3311Peasants, Students and Women: Social Movement in Twentieth-Century China (3.00)
Studies rural revolution, student movements, women's liberation, and the transformation of the social order since the late 19th century.
HIEA 3321China and the Cold War (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The class examines China's entanglement with the Cold War from 1945 to the early 1990s. The course raises China-centered questions because it is curious in retrospect that China, a quintessential Eastern state, became so deeply involved in the Cold War, a confrontation rooted in Western history. In exploring such questions, this course does not treat China as part of the Cold War but the Cold War as a period of Chinese history.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2015
HIEA 3323China and the United States (3.00)
The course explores Chinese-American relations since the late 18th century. Starting as an encounter between a young trading state and an ageless empire on the two sides of the Pacific Ocean, the relationship has gone through stages characterized by the two countries' changing identities. The course understands the relationship broadly and seeks insights at various levels.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Spring 2017
HIEA 3559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 4501Seminar in East Asian History (4.00)
A small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEA 4511Colloquium in East Asia (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEA 4559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 4591Topics in East Asian History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIEA 4993Independent Study in East Asia (1.00 - 3.00)
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIEA 5050International History of East Asia (3.00)
This seminar familiarizes graduate students with scholarships about relations among states, societies, and peoples of the Asia-Pacific region during the 20th century, and helps students refine their ongoing research projects or initiate new ones. In applying rigorously methods of historical research to their projects, students produce scholarly works or research proposals that can meet expectations in actual scholarly fields.
Course was offered Fall 2018
HIEA 5052China and the World: From Empire to Nation (3.00)
This reading seminar is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. It examines Chinese perspectives, practices, and interactions with other states in the international scene from antiquity to the People's Republic of China. Students read about and discuss recurring issues in China's historical external relations. Evaluation of student performance is based on participation, weekly written responses, and a historiographical essay.
HIEA 5151Mao and the Chinese Revolution (3.00)
This course, an advanced reading seminar, provids an in-depth investigation of one of the most magnificent, yet destructive, revolutions in human history--the Chinese Communist revolution, as well as the person who led the revoilution--Mao Zedong.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIEA 5559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 7031Modern East Asian History (3.00)
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in modern East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on modern East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level on the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.
HIEA 7041Modern East Asian History (3.00)
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in modern East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on modern East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level on the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.
HIEA 7559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 8011East Asian History (3.00)
Directed readings, discussions, and research papers on selected topics in Chinese and Japanese history.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIEA 8111Traditional Chinese History (3.00)
Studies documents related to social and political philosophy. Emphasizes translated texts, but some attention will be paid to Chinese texts and the problems of translation.
HIEA 8211Japanese History (3.00)
Discusses selected issues in the social, political, and economic development of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the present.
HIEA 8559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 9021Tutorial in "China in Hot and Cold Wars in Modern Times". . . (3.00)
This tutorial explores three types of conflicts in China modern experiences: civil wars, international conflicts, and Cold War confrontations. Reading materials include major scholarships on these topics. The class meets biweekly, and the students are evaluated on the basis of participation, short book reviews, and a final paper.
HIEA 9022Tutorial in "Making of the 'Chinese Nation'". . . (3.00)
This tutorial is about conceptual and political constructions of the "Chinese Nation" in the 20th century. Readings include relevant writings by important intellectual and political figures of 20th-century China and major scholarships on the subject from multiethnic perspectives. The class meets biweekly, and the students are evaluated on the basis of participation, short book reviews, and a final paper.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEA 9023Tutorial in Modern Japanese Thought, Culture, & Politics (3.00)
Introduction the history and historiography of modern Japanese Thought, Culture, and Politics. Topics include modernity, empire, the nation-state, war, fascism, and capitalist development.
Japanese
JAPN 1010First-Year Japanese (4.00)
Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced.
JAPN 1020First-Year Japanese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Introduces the basic speech patterns and grammatical units, including casual, daily spoken style, and the polite speech used in formal occasions. Emphasizes speaking, listening, and reading. Writing hiragana, katakana, and 200 kanji are also introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 1010 or equivalent.
JAPN 1559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
JAPN 2010Second-Year Japanese (4.00)
Continuation of Elementary Japanese introducing more complex sentence patterns, idioms, and vocabulary to prepare students for an intermediate-level communication. Reinforces spoken Japanese skills with writing and reading exercises, and 250 kanji are introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 1020 or equivalent.
JAPN 2020Second-Year Japanese (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Prerequisite: JAPN 1020 or equivalent.
JAPN 2559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
JAPN 3010Third-Year Japanese I (3.00)
Emphasizes comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Various topics on current Japanese culture and society are introduced. Prerequisite: JAPN 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
JAPN 3015Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Japanese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
JAPN 3020Third-Year Japanese II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Continuation of Third-Year Japanese, emphasizing comprehension and active reproduction of modern Japanese beyond the basic patterns of speech and writing. Continued introduction of topics on current Japanese culture and society. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or instructor permission.
JAPN 3025Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For students residing in the Japanese group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
JAPN 3100Supplemental Reading in Japanese I (1.00)
The first in a two-part sequence, to be taken in conjunction with JAPN 3010. Students will acquire college-level reading and writing skills through engagement with articles and essays written by Japanese for the Japanese public.
JAPN 3110Supplemental Reading in Japanese II (1.00)
The second of a two-part reading course, to be taken in conjunction with JAPN 3020. In-depth study of authentic materials such as newspapers, short essays, and brief articles. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent background.
JAPN 3559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
JAPN 4500Topics in Japanese Literature (3.00)
An advanced language seminar devoted to literary texts and criticism with topics determined by instructor.
JAPN 4559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2011
JAPN 4710Introduction to Literary Japanese (Bungo) (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
An introduction to the Japanese language as it was written from earliest times up until the mid-twentieth century. In addition to familiarizing students with grammatical fundamentals of literary Japanese and their differences from the modern language, the course will introduce students to representative writing styles from a wide variety of genres and historical periods. Prerequisite: JAPN 3010 or equivalent background.
JAPN 4800Lost and Found in Translation (3.00)
This course is an advanced language seminar in which students will read, analyze, and translate works by leading contemporary Japanese fiction writers. By comparing translations with those of others (including professionals), students will also learn to appreciate not only the inevitability of losing something in translation, but also the pleasure of unearthing something unintended even by the author. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent background.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2013
JAPN 4801Japanese for Professionals (3.00)
This advanced Japanese language course aims to cultivate future professionals who will acquire awareness of cross-cultural differences that enable them to operate effectively in the global world. Critical thinking and communication skills will be emphasized.
Course was offered Spring 2017
JAPN 4810Modern Literary Texts (3.00)
Reading and discussion in Japanese. Develops comprehension and verbal expression skills at the fourth-year level. Reading selections include works by modern and contemporary novelists, short story writers and poets. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2013
JAPN 4830Media Japanese (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
In this course, students will interpret, analyze, and discuss various media for education, business and entertainment--such as newspaper articles, blogs, and statistics--in order to gain a deeper linguistic and cultural understanding of contemporary Japan by comparing and contrasting different perspectives on current issues. Prerequisite: JAPN 3020 or equivalent background.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2010
JAPN 4993Independent Study in Japanese (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Japanese.
JAPN 5559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of Japanese.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2011
JAPN 5993Independent Study in Japanese (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Japanese; Prerequisites: permission of instructor
JAPN 7559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
JAPN 8559New Course in Japanese (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese.
Japanese in Translation
JPTR 2559New Course in Japanese in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese in translation.
JPTR 3010Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature (3.00)
This course provides an introduction to Japanese literature from earliest times through to the nineteenth century. We will read selections from representative texts and genres, including myth, poetry, prose fiction, memoir literature, drama, and works of criticism. No knowledge of Japanese culture or language is required.
JPTR 3020Survey of Modern Japanese Literature (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A gateway to the rich, diverse modern Japanese literary tradition, from the early 1900s to the present, this course adopts socio-cultural and gender perspectives in the context of world literature.
JPTR 3100Myths and Legends of Japan (3.00)
A seminar exploring Japan's earliest myths describing the origins of its islands, their gods, and rulers through close readings in English of eighth-century chronicles and poems. Fulfills the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2012
JPTR 3210The Tale of Genji (3.00)
A seminar devoted to an in-depth examination in English translation of Japan's most renowned work of literature, often called the world's first novel. Satisfies the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2014
JPTR 3290Feminine Fictions in Japanese Court Literature (3.00)
This seminar will take up the world's earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2013
JPTR 3320Cinematic Images of Japanese Culture and Society (3.00)
This seminar examines how films from Japan visually raise different cultural and social issues, and how they relate to the universal human condition. With an understanding that films involve so many different disciplines, this seminar examines contemporary Japan via comparativist and cross-cultural perspectives by paying careful attention to the effects of the imagistic and visual power that only films can offer.
Course was offered Fall 2018
JPTR 3400Tales of the Samurai (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A seminar focusing on influential medieval and early-modern narratives such as the Tale of Heike in which the notion of the samurai first developed. No prerequisites. Satisfies the non-Western and Second-Writing requirements.
JPTR 3559New Course in Japanese in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
New course in Japanese in translation.
JPTR 3600Urban Fantasies in Edo Literature (3.00)
This seminar takes up Japanese literature made between 1600 and 1900, including such iconic forms as haiku poetry and kabuki, that came out of one of the most sophisticated and advanced forms of urban culture in global history centered around the million-plus inhabitants of Edo (now Tokyo). Satisfies the Non-Western and Second Writing requirements.
JPTR 3700Japanese Popular Culture (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course examines multiple forms of Japanese popular culture such as film, literature, TV and anime, among others, focusing on the role they play in imagining contemporary Japanese identities as they relate to race, gender, technology, consumption, nationalization and globalization.
JPTR 4559New Course in Japanese in Translation. (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Japanese in translation.
JPTR 4991Japanese Capstone (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Restricted to Japanese majors, this course is designed as a capstone seminar that will require a class presentation and an extended final paper that demonstrate the significant knowledge of Japanese language.
JPTR 5010Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature (3.00)
This course provides an introduction to Japanese literature from earliest times through to the nineteenth century. We will read selections from representative texts and genres, including myth, poetry, prose fiction, memoir literature, drama, and works of criticism. No knowledge of Japanese culture or language is required.
JPTR 5020Survey of Modern Japanese Literature (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Introduction to the modern Japanese canon (1890's to the present). Writers studied include Natsume Sôseki, the first modern writer to delve into the human psyche; Mori Ôgai, the surgeon-turned writer; Rynôsuke Akutagawa, the consummate writer of short stories; Shiga Naoya, the "god" of "I-Novel" Japanese fiction; Yukio Mishima, whose seppuku suicide caused a sensation world-wide; Endô Shôsaku, the Christian writer; two Nobel laureates, Yasunari Kawabata, the pure aesthetician, and Kenzaburo Ôe, the political gadfly.
JPTR 5100Myths and Legends of Japan (3.00)
A seminar exploring Japan's earliest myths describing the origins of its islands, their gods, and rulers through close readings in English of eighth-century chronicles and poems.
JPTR 5210The Tale of Genji (3.00)
This course is devoted to an in-depth examination of Japan's most renowned work of literature and the world's first novel. Topics covered will include: material culture (architecture, clothing, gardens); political and social history; gender and class; marriage customs; poetry and poetics; the arts (music, perfume, painting, etc.); and religious beliefs (in particular spirit possession) among others.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
JPTR 5290Feminine Fictions in Japanese Court Literature (3.00)
This seminar will take up the world's earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2013
JPTR 5320Cinematic Images of Japanese Society and Culture (3.00)
This seminar examines how films from Japan visually raise different cultural and social issues, and how they relate to the universal human condition. With an understanding that films involve so many different disciplines, this seminar examines contemporary Japan via comparativist and cross-cultural perspectives by paying careful attention to the effects of the imagistic and visual power that only films can offer.
Course was offered Fall 2018
JPTR 5400Tales of the Samurai (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A seminar focusing on influential medieval and early-modern narratives such as the Tale of Heike in which the notion of the samurai first developed. No prerequisites. Satisfies the non-Western and Second-Writing requirements.
JPTR 5559New Course in Japanese in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
New course in Japanese in translation.
JPTR 5600Urban Fantasies in Edo Literature (3.00)
This seminar takes up Japanese literature made between 1600 and 1900, including such iconic forms as haiku poetry and kabuki, that came out of one of the most sophisticated and advanced forms of urban culture in global history centered around the million-plus inhabitants of Edo (now Tokyo).
JPTR 5700Japanese Popular Culture (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course examines multiple forms of Japanese popular culture such as film, literature, TV and anime, among others, focusing on the role they play in imagining contemporary Japanese identities as they relate to race, gender, technology, consumption, nationalization and globalization.
JPTR 5990Modern Japanese Women Writers (3.00)
Introduces the resurgence of the female literary tradition from 1904 to the present. Focuses on how literary women in Japan express their subversive voice often through the autobiographical fiction. Taught in English. Restricted to area studies majors and minors. Prerequisite: JPTR 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Korean
KOR 1010Elementary Korean I (4.00)
Introduction to the fundamentals of modern Korean. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed.
KOR 1020Elementary Korean II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The second in a two-semester introduction to modern Korean. Prerequisite: KOR 1010 or equivalent background (as demonstrated in the department's placement test).
KOR 1060Accelerated Elementary Korean (4.00)
This course is specifically designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Korean, but with reading and writing ability equivalent to a student who has completed KOR 1020. The course seeks to achieve a basic literacy and the ability to express themselves clearly on a variety of topics. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
KOR 1559New Course in Korean (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Korean.
Course was offered Spring 2013
KOR 2010Intermediate Korean I (4.00)
Builds on the foundations acquired in KOR 1010-1020 with further refinement of all four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: KOR 1020 or equivalent background (as demonstrated in the department's placement test).
KOR 2020Intermediate Korean II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The second in a two-semester intermediate language sequence. Prerequisite: KOR 2010 or equivalent background (as demonstrated in the department's placement test).
KOR 2559New Course in Korean (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Korean.
KOR 3010Advanced Korean I (3.00)
A continuation of Intermediate Korean. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Readings and discussions are related to various aspects of modern Korea. Prerequisite: KOR 2020 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
KOR 3015Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Korean conversation for residents of the Shea language house.
KOR 3020Advanced Korean II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The second part in a two-semester sequence. All four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are equally stressed. Readings and discussions are related to various aspects of modern Korea. Prerequisite: KOR 3010 or equivalent (as demonstrated in the placement test).
KOR 3559New Course in Korean (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Korean.
Course was offered Spring 2011
KOR 4010Advanced Readings in Modern Korean I (3.00)
This course will offer the students the opportunities to develop advanced reading proficiency in modern Korean language. The course will deal with advanced reading material, mostly from authentic writings in various genres and styles, such as newspaper editorials, columns, essays, T.V. news clips, short stories, and other expository and literary writings. Prerequisites: KOR 3010 or instructor permission.
KOR 4020Advanced Readings in Modern Korean II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is the second in a two-course sequence offering students the opportunity to develop advanced reading proficiency in modern Korean language through advanced reading material, mostly from authentic writings in various genres and styles, such as newspaper editorials, columns, essays, T.V. news clips, short stories, and other expository and literary writings. Prerequisites: KOR 4010 or instructor permission
KOR 4559New Course in Korean (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Korean
KOR 4993Independent Study in Korean (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Korean
KOR 5559New Course in Korean (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean.
Korean in Translation
KRTR 1559New Course in Korean in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean literature in translation
KRTR 2559New Course in Korean in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean literature in translation
KRTR 3020Survey of Modern Korean Literature (3.00)
A general introduction to modern Korean literature. Examines the major texts through selected readings of representative writers. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives and Second Writing requirement.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
KRTR 3030Survey of Korean Cinema (3.00)
A general introduction to Korean cinema. Examines the major films through selections by representative directors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
KRTR 3559New Course in Korean in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean literature in translation
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
KRTR 3700Contemporary Korea, Urban, Global (3.00)
An examination of representations of the urban and global in contemporary Korea.
KRTR 4559New Course in Korean in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean literature in translation
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2011
KRTR 5020Survey of Modern Korean Literature (3.00)
A general introduction to modern Korean literature. Examines the major texts through selected readings of representative writers. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives and Second Writing requirement.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
KRTR 5030Survey of Korean Cinema (3.00)
A general introduction to Korean cinema. Examines the major films through selections by representative diriectors. Taught in English. Fulfills the non-Western perspectives requirement. Graduate students are required to write a 25-30 page seminar paper using primary sources in Korean.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
KRTR 5559New Course in Korean in Translation (3.00)
New course in the subject of Korean literature in translation
KRTR 5700Contemporary Korea, Urban, Global (3.00)
An examination of representations of the urban and global in contemporary Korea.
Media Studies
MDST 3110Hollywood Goes to Asia (3.00)
Film production between Asian and Euro-American companies is rapidly on the rise. The fundamental objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous theoretical understanding of the media industries within a global Asian network. We will ask: What are the cultural, political and economic implications of transnational co-productions both for global and domestic film markets?
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
MDST 3706Media in China: Technology, Policy and Commerce (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The growth of media industries in China sits at the intersection between commerce, technology and policy. The objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of these three areas within the context of China's global expansion. Students will also be expected to develop fresh critical perspectives on the significance of analysis of industry practice as a means to critique media texts.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Politics-Comparative Politics
PLCP 3610Chinese Politics (3.00)
General introduction to Chinese politics in its societal context. Conveys a concrete appreciation of China's societal reality and how it interacts with the political system. Covers China's changing role in Asia and the world. Prerequisite: Some background in comparative politics and/or the history of China.
PLCP 5610Politics of China (3.00)
Studies the structure and process of the Chinese political system, emphasizing political culture, socio-economic development, and political socialization. Prerequisite: Some background in comparative politics and/or history of China.
Politics-International Relations
PLIR 2030International Relations of East Asia (3.00)
An introduction to leading theories in the field of international relations with reference to major events in the history of diplomacy, war, and economic relations in the East Asian region.
Course was offered Summer 2013, Spring 2012, Fall 2009
PLIR 4720Japan in World Affairs (3.00)
Studies the international relations of Japan; domestic and foreign factors and forces that condition its foreign policies; and the political, economic, military, and social problems resulting from contacts with China, the Soviet Union, and the Western powers. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations and/or the history of Japan.
Course was offered Fall 2012
PLIR 5710China in World Affairs (3.00)
Includes international relations of China; conditioning historical, political, economic, and social forces; and the aims, strategy, and tactics of China's foreign policy. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations and/or the history of China.
PLIR 5810Asymmetry and International Relations (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A seminar exploring a new approach to international relations focused on relationships between countries with disparate capacities. Students will participate actively in developing and applying the new approach and contrasting it with other theories of international relations.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2016, Spring 2010
Religion-Buddhism
RELB 2054Tibetan Buddhism Introduction (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Provides a systematic introduction to Tibetan Buddhism with a strong emphasis on tantric traditions of Buddhism - philosophy, contemplation, ritual, monastic life, pilgrimage, deities & demons, ethics, society, history, and art. The course aims to understand how these various aspects of Tibetan religious life mutually shape each other to form the unique religious traditions that have pertained on the Tibetan plateau for over a thousand years.
RELB 2100Buddhism (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Theravada, Mahayana, and Tantrayana Buddhist developments in India.
RELB 2715Introduction to Chinese Religions (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course serves as an introductory survey of religious life in China, with emphasis on everyday religious practice over doctrine. Through primary texts (in translation), we will explore key figures and texts, core concepts, and ritual traditions with reference to the cultural, historical, political and material contexts in which they were conceived and expressed.
RELB 5480Literary Tibetan VI (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, or equivalent.
RELB 5810Literary Tibetan VIII (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya's Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, 5470, 5480 or equivalent
Religion-General Religion
RELG 1040Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions (3.00)
Introduces various aspects of the religious traditions of India, China, and Japan.
Sociology
SOC 3440Chinese Society (3.00)
This seminar provides a survey of Chinese society and social changes in the reform-era (1979 to the present). It uses sociological analysis to comprehensively examine various aspects of contemporary Chinese society including: economic development, social inequality, governance, political reform, nationalism, religion, ethnicity, and popular culture.
SOC 5080Comparative Historical Sociology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course will focus not so much on methodological as on substantive issues of macro sociological inquiry. Among the topics covered will be: the state, power, revolution, nationalism and class formation. Prerequisite: Six credits of sociology or instructor permission.
Tibetan
TBTN 1010Elementary Tibetan I (4.00)
An introduction to the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan for beginners with the intention of developing proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Examples are drawn from Tibetan short stories and proverbs, among other sources. Students gain knowledge of Tibetan culture to improve communication skills using a dynamic, interactive format.
TBTN 1016Intensive Introductory Tibetan (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
TBTN 1020Elementary Tibetan II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
An introduction to the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan for beginners with the intention of developing proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Examples are drawn from Tibetan short stories and proverbs, among other sources. Students gain knowledge of Tibetan culture to improve communication skills using a dynamic, interactive format. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 1010 Elementary Tibetan I.
TBTN 1026Intensive Introductory Tibetan (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN1016 or equivalent.
TBTN 116Intensive Introductory Tibetan (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for TBTN 1016.
TBTN 126Intensive Introductory Tibetan (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for TBTN 1026.
TBTN 1559New Course in Tibetan (3.00)
New course in Tibetan.
TBTN 2010Intermediate Tibetan I (4.00)
Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 1020 Elementary Tibetan II.
TBTN 2016Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN 1016 & 1026 or equivalent
TBTN 2020Intermediate Tibetan II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2010 Intermediate Tibetan I.
TBTN 2026Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: TBTN 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
TBTN 216Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for TBTN 2016.
TBTN 226Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for TBTN 2026.
TBTN 2559New Course in Tibetan (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Tibetan.
TBTN 3010Advanced Modern Tibetan I (3.00)
A continuation of the Intermediate Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Emphasis is laid on mastering comprehension and communication in colloquial Tibetan, writing skills in the various scripts of literary Tibetan, and integrating comprehension of colloquial and literary forms. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2020 Intermediate Tibetan II.
TBTN 3020Advanced Modern Tibetan II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A continuation of the Advanced Modern Tibetan I language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communication skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan I. Pre-requisites: TBTN 3010: Advanced Modern Tibetan I.
TBTN 3030Advanced Modern Tibetan III (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan I/II language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan II. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3020 Advanced Modern Tibetan II.
TBTN 3040Advanced Modern Tibetan IV (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in previous courses. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 3030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III.
TBTN 3559New Course in Tibetan (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Tibetan.
TBTN 4559New Course in Tibetan (3.00)
New course in the subject of Tibetan.
TBTN 4993Independent Study in Tibetan (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Tibetan Prerequisites: permission of instructor
TBTN 5010Advanced Modern Tibetan I (3.00)
A continuation of the Intermediate Tibetan I/II sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Emphasis is placed on mastering comprehension and communication in colloquial Tibetan, writing skills in the various scripts of literary Tibetan, and integrating comprehension of colloquial and literary forms. The course employs a dynamic, interactive format to foster speaking and listening skills. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 2020 Intermediate Tibetan II.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
TBTN 5020Advanced Modern Tibetan II (3.00)
Advanced Modern Tibetan II
TBTN 5030Advanced Modern Tibetan III (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan I/II language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan II. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 5020 Advanced Modern Tibetan II.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
TBTN 5040Advanced Modern Tibetan IV (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in previous courses. Pre-Requisites: TBTN 5030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
TBTN 5060Advanced Modern Tibetan for Research & Fieldwork (3.00)
A course in the Advanced Tibetan language sequence stressing mastery of modern Tibetan as it is currently used in Tibetan communities and in Tibetan-language international media. Emphasis will be placed on fluency in speaking and listening comprehension as well as on the application of a wide variety of grammatical, syntactical, and rhetorical structures. Instruction will utilize Tibetan-language newspaper, journal, radio, and television sources. Prerequisite: Instructor Consent
Course was offered Spring 2012
TBTN 5559New Course in Tibetan (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in Tibetan.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
TBTN 8012Advanced Modern Tibetan I (3.00)
A continuation of the Intermediate Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Emphasis is laid on mastering comprehension and communication in colloquial Tibetan, writing skills in the various scripts of literary Tibetan, and integrating comprehension of colloquial and literary forms. Prerequisite: TBTN 8021 Intermediate Tibetan II
TBTN 8016Intensive Intro. Tibetan (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
TBTN 8017Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: TBTN8016 & 8026 or equivalent
TBTN 8022Advanced Modern Tibetan II (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Modern Tibetan I language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communication skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan I. Prerequisite: TBTN8012 Advanced Modern Tibetan I
Course was offered Fall 2016
TBTN 8026Intensive Introductory Tibetan II (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: TBTN8016 or equivalent
TBTN 8027Intensive Intermediate Tibetan (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: TBTN 8016, 8026 & 8017 or equivalent
TBTN 8030Advanced Modern Tibetan III (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan I/II language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in Advanced Modern Tibetan II. Prerequisite: TBTN8022 Advanced Modern Tibetan II
TBTN 8040Advanced Modern Tibetan IV (3.00)
A continuation of the Advanced Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Additional emphasis will be placed on mastering oral communications skills through conversation, utilizing grammatical structures introduced in previous courses. Prerequisite: TBTN8030 Advanced Modern Tibetan III
TBTN 8060Advanced Modern Tibetan for Research & Fieldwork (3.00)
A course in the Advanced Tibetan language sequence stressing mastery of modern Tibetan as it is currently used in Tibetan communities and in Tibetan-language international media. Emphasis will be placed on fluency in speaking and listening comprehension as well as on the application of a wide variety of grammatical, syntactical, and rhetorical structures. Instruction will utilize Tibetan-language newspaper, journal, radio, and TV sources.
TBTN 8993Independent Study in Tibetan (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Tibetan