UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Catalog of Courses for History    
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These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
History-African History
HIAF 1501Introductory Seminar in African History (3.00)
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2010
HIAF 1559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
HIAF 2001Early African History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of African civilizations from the iron age through the era of the slave trade, ca. 1800. Emphasizes the search for the themes of social, political, economic, and intellectual history which present African civilizations on their own terms.
HIAF 2002Modern African History (3.00)
Studies the history of Africa and its interaction with the western world from the mid-19th century to the present. Emphasizes continuities in African civilization from imperialism to independence that transcend the colonial interlude of the 20th century.
HIAF 2031The African Diaspora (4.00)
A history of African peoples and their interaction with the wider world; emphasis on historical and cultural ties between African diasporic communities and the homeland to the mid-nineteenth century.
Course was offered Spring 2010
HIAF 2559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
HIAF 3011North African History from Carthage to the Algerian Revolution (3.00)
Surveys the main outlines of North African political, economic, and cultural history from the rise of Carthage as a Mediterranean power until the conclusion of the Algerian war for independence in 1962, and the creation of a system of nation-states in the region. It places the North African historical experience within the framework of both Mediterranean/European history and African history. Focuses mainly upon the area stretching from Morocco's Atlantic coast to the Nile Delta; also considered are Andalusia and Sicily, and the ties between Northwest Africa and sub-Saharan regions, particularly West Africa.
HIAF 3021History of Southern Africa (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of Africa generally south of the Zambezi River. Emphasizes African institutions, creation of ethnic and racial identities, industrialization, and rural poverty, from the early formation of historical communities to recent times.
HIAF 3051West African History (3.00)
History of West Africans in the wider context of the global past, from West Africans' first attempts to make a living in ancient environments through the slave trades (domestic, trans-Saharan, and Atlantic), colonial overrule by outsiders, political independence, and ever-increasing globalization.
HIAF 3091Africa in World History (3.00)
World history from the perspective of Africa, for advanced undergraduates. The interpretive emphasis falls equally on the epistemology of thinking historically, historical processes recurring throughout the human experience, and the specific ways in which Africans experienced and elaborated them. The course develops a strong critique of conventional textbook approaches to both Africa and world history.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIAF 3112African Environmental History (3.00)
This course explores how Africans changed their interactions with the physical environments they inhabited and how the landscapes they helped create in turn shaped human history. Topics covered include the ancient agricultural revolution, health and disease in the era of slave trading, colonial-era mining and commodity farming, 20th-century wildlife conservation, and the emergent challenges of land ownership, disease, and climate change.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIAF 3559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
HIAF 4501Seminar in African History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. Seminar work results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIAF 4511Colloquium in African History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIAF 4559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIAF 4591Topics in African History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIAF 4993Independent Study in African History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member, any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIAF 5559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIAF 7002The History and Historiography of Africa (3.00)
Taught for graduate students with no previous experience in African history; consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of HIAF 2001, 2002, and weekly discussions devoted to more detailed examination of the technical and interpretive problems in writing African history.
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIAF 7031History and Historiography of North Africa, ca. 1800-Present (3.00)
Introduces the literature on North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia) from the precolonial period to the postcolonial era. An intensive readings and discussion colloquium devoted to the major issues in the region's political, economic, social, and cultural history, and to the issues raised by colonial historiography. Prerequisite: HIME 2001, 2002.
HIAF 7559New Course in African History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of African History.
History-East Asian History
HIEA 1501Introductory Seminar in East Asian History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIEA 1559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 2011History of Chinese Civilization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An intro to the study of Chinese civilization. We shall begin with the earliest human remains found in China & conclude in the present. The goal of this coure is not merely to tell the story of Chinese history, rich and compelling though the story is. Rather, our aim will be to explore what makes Chinese civilization specifically Chinese, & how the set of values, practices, & institutions we associate with Chinese society came to exist.
HIEA 2031Modern China (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the transformation of Chinese politics, society, institutions, culture and foreign relations from the Opium War. through the post-Mao Reform Era. Emphasizes the fluid relationship between tradition and transformation and the ways in which this relationship continues to shape the lives of the Chinese people.
HIEA 2072Modern Japanese Culture and Politics (3.00)
An introduction to the politics, culture, and ideologies of modern Japan from roughly 1800 to the present. We will pay special attention to the interplay between Japan's simultaneous participation in global modernity and its assertion of a unique culture as a way to explore the rise of the nation-state as a historically specific form.
HIEA 2073Japan to 1868: An Historical Introduction (3.00)
This lecture class surveys the history of Japanese civilization from prehistory to the end of the nineteenth century. Through an assortment of historical, literary, religious and visual materials, it offers an introduction to the political, social, religious, intellectual, artistic, and cultural life of Japan in its various epochs.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIEA 2081Korea: Antiquity through the 12th Century (3.00)
The development of Korean culture from the Three Kingdoms Period through the Silla (675-918) and Early Koryo (936-1200) dynasties.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2009
HIEA 2091Korea 13th-19th Centuries (3.00)
Second of a three part sequence on the history of Korea from earliest times into the 21st century. This course covers the period bracketed by the Mongols in the 13th and 14th centuries and the opening of the Yi Dynasty in the late 19th century.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2010
HIEA 2101Korea: Late Nineteenth through Early Twenty First Centuries (3.00)
History of Korea from 1876 into the first decade of the 21st century.
HIEA 2559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 3111China to the Tenth Century (3.00)
Surveys the social, political and economic organization of traditional Chinese society, traditional Chinese foreign policy, and major literary, artistic, and intellectual movements.
HIEA 3112Late Imperial China (3.00)
Survey of the social, political, and cultural history of China from 10th to the early 20th centuries. Topics include the philosophic basis of state and society, the formation of social elites, the influence of nomadic peoples, and patterns of popular dissent and rebellion, among others
HIEA 3141Political and Social Thought in Modern China (3.00)
Studies political and social thought from the early 20th century to the present, as reflected in written sources (including fiction), art, and films.
HIEA 3151East Asian-American Relations in the 20th Century (3.00)
A lecture and discussion course focusing on the changing relationship between East Asian Countries (China, Japan, Vietnam and Korea in particular) and the United States in the 20th century.
HIEA 3162Historical China and the World (3.00)
The course traces China's external relations from antiquity to our own times, identifying conceptions, practices, and institutions that characterized the ancient inter-state relations of East Asia and examining the interactions between "Eastern" and "Western," and "revolutionary" and "conventional" modes of international behavior in modern times. The student's grade is based on participation, midterm test, final exam, and a short essay.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIEA 3171Meiji Japan (3.00)
This course will examine the rise of the nation-state form in Japan as a new form of historical subjectivity. It will explore in depth the political, economic, social, and cultural changes in the wake of the collapse of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868 to the start of the Tasiho period in 1912.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
HIEA 3172The Japanese Empire (3.00)
This course is an exploration of Japan's imperial project from roughly 1890-1945. We will start by developing a critical theoretical vocabulary with which we will then focus on three recent and important books on Japanese imperialism in East Asia. At the end of the semester we will also look briefly at anti-imperial and decolonization movements as well as the status of the category of 'empire' for analyzing the postwar period.
Course was offered Spring 2014
HIEA 3211Japan's Economic Miracle (3.00)
Examines the history of Japan since the early 19th century by exploring the causes and consequences of the economic and social changes that have made Japan one of the most important advanced industrial countries in the contemporary world.
HIEA 3221Japan's Political History (3.00)
Examines Japanese history since the early 19th century, exploring changes in political ideas, institutions, and behavior among both governing elites and the mass of Japanese citizenry.
HIEA 3311Peasants, Students and Women: Social Movement in Twentieth-Century China (3.00)
Studies rural revolution, student movements, women's liberation, and the transformation of the social order since the late 19th century.
HIEA 3321China and the Cold War (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The class examines China's entanglement with the Cold War from 1945 to the early 1990s. The course raises China-centered questions because it is curious in retrospect that China, a quintessential Eastern state, became so deeply involved in the Cold War, a confrontation rooted in Western history. In exploring such questions, this course does not treat China as part of the Cold War but the Cold War as a period of Chinese history.
Course was offered Fall 2015
HIEA 3323China and the United States (3.00)
The course explores Chinese-American relations since the late 18th century. Starting as an encounter between a young trading state and an ageless empire on the two sides of the Pacific Ocean, the relationship has gone through stages characterized by the two countries¿ changing identities. The course understands the relationship broadly and seeks insights at various levels.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIEA 3559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 4501Seminar in East Asian History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEA 4511Colloquium in East Asia (4.00)
A small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEA 4559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 4591Topics in East Asian History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIEA 4993Independent Study in East Asia (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIEA 5151Mao and the Chinese Revolution (3.00)
This course, an advanced reading seminar, provids an in-depth investigation of one of the most magnificent, yet destructive, revolutions in human history--the Chinese Communist revolution, as well as the person who led the revoilution--Mao Zedong.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIEA 5559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 7031Modern East Asian History (3.00)
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in modern East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on modern East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level on the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.
HIEA 7041Modern East Asian History (3.00)
Offered to graduate students with no previous background in modern East Asian history. Consists of attendance at the lecture sessions of undergraduate courses on modern East Asian history and directed readings at an advanced level on the development of the social, political and cultural institutions of East Asia.
HIEA 7559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 8011East Asian History (3.00)
Directed readings, discussions, and research papers on selected topics in Chinese and Japanese history.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIEA 8111Traditional Chinese History (3.00)
Studies documents related to social and political philosophy. Emphasizes translated texts, but some attention will be paid to Chinese texts and the problems of translation.
HIEA 8211Japanese History (3.00)
Discusses selected issues in the social, political, and economic development of Japan from the Tokugawa period to the present.
HIEA 8559New Course in East Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of East Asian History.
HIEA 9021Tutorial in "China in Hot and Cold Wars in Modern Times". . . (3.00)
This tutorial explores three types of conflicts in China modern experiences: civil wars, international conflicts, and Cold War confrontations. Reading materials include major scholarships on these topics. The class meets biweekly, and the students are evaluated on the basis of participation, short book reviews, and a final paper.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEA 9022Tutorial in "Making of the 'Chinese Nation'". . . (3.00)
This tutorial is about conceptual and political constructions of the "Chinese Nation" in the 20th century. Readings include relevant writings by important intellectual and political figures of 20th-century China and major scholarships on the subject from multiethnic perspectives. The class meets biweekly, and the students are evaluated on the basis of participation, short book reviews, and a final paper.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEA 9023Tutorial in Modern Japanese Thought, Culture, & Politics (3.00)
Introduction the history and historiography of modern Japanese Thought, Culture, and Politics. Topics include modernity, empire, the nation-state, war, fascism, and capitalist development.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
History-European History
HIEU 1501Introductory Seminar in Pre-1700 European History (3.00)
Intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIEU 1502Introductory Seminar in Post-1700 European History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIEU 1559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 2001Western Civilization I (3.00)
Surveys the fundamental institutions and ideas that have shaped the Western world. Topics include great religious and philosophical traditions, political ideas, literary forms, artistic achievements and institutional structures from the world of the ancient Hebrews to the eve of the modern world (ca. 3000 b.c. to 1600 a.d.).
HIEU 2002Western Civilization II (3.00)
Surveys the political and cultural history of the Western world in modern times. Emphasizes the distinctiveness of Western civilization, on the reasons for the rise of the West to global domination, and the relative decline of the West in recent times.
HIEU 2031Ancient Greece (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the political, military, and social history of Ancient Greece from the Homeric age to the death of Alexander the Great, emphasizing the development and interactions of Sparta and Athens.
HIEU 2041Roman Republic and Empire (3.00)
Surveys the political, social, and institutional growth of the Roman Republic, focusing on its downfall and replacement by an imperial form of government, the subsequent history of that government, and the social and economic life during the Roman Empire, up to its own decline and fall.
HIEU 2051Economic History of Europe (3.00)
Studies European economic history from the middle ages to the industrial revolution. Emphasizes the emergence of the market and the rise of capitalism in Great Britain.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
HIEU 2061The Birth of Europe (3.00)
Studies ways of life and thought in the formation of Western Europe from the 4th century a.d. to the 15th. Includes a survey of the development of society and culture in town and countryside, the growth of economic, political, and religious institutions, and the impact of Muslim and Byzantine civilizations.
HIEU 2071Early Modern Europe and the World (3.00)
European history, from the Reformation to Napoleon, in global perspective.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
HIEU 2072Modern European History Since 1815 (3.00)
Analyzes the political, social, and economic developments in Europe from the age of Napoleon to the present.
HIEU 2101Jewish History I: The Ancient and Medieval Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course surveys the pre-modern Jewish historical experience from antiquity through the sixteenth century.
HIEU 2102Modern Jewish History (3.00)
Survey of Jewish history from the seventeenth century to the present, primarily in Europe, but with further treatment of Jewish life in the U.S. and Israel. Major topics include Jewish historical consciousness; patterns of emancipation; religious adjustment; the role of women; anti-Semitism; Zionism; the American Jewish experience; the Holocaust; the establishment of Israel; and Jewish life in Europe after the Holocaust.
HIEU 2111History of England to 1688 (3.00)
Studies England and the British Isles from earliest times to the accession of William III.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
HIEU 2112The Emergence of Modern Britain, 1688-2000 (3.00)
This lecture course surveys the history of Britain from the Glorious Revolution to our own time. The making and remaking of this nation state over three hundred years will be shown in its connections with the history of Europe, and the wider story of the making of the modern world.
HIEU 2132The Jews of Poland from 1600 to the Present (3.00)
The Jews of Poland from 1600 to the Present
HIEU 2152History of the Russian Empire 1700-1917 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of Russia from Peter the Great to the Bolshevik Revolution and the establishment of Soviet power.
HIEU 2162History of Russia Since 1917 (3.00)
Explores the collapse of the Russian Empire and the rise of the Communist state. Emphasizes the social revolution, Stalinism and subsequent 'de-Stalinization,' national minorities, and the collapse of the Soviet regime.
HIEU 2212Contemporary Europe (3.00)
This class surveys the major developments in Europe from 1945 up to the present day. Topics that we examine include the legacy of World War II, the division of Europe during the cold war, the economic and political progress of the continent, the crises triggered by decolonization and imigration, and the continuing struggles of Europeans to build a united, peaceful and stable union.
HIEU 2559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 2721Supernatural Europe, 1500-1800 (3.00)
Surveys the intellectual, religious, and social history of Europe c.1500-1800 through the lens of changing beliefs about the supernatural. Selected topics include the rise and decline of witch-hunting, changing understandings of the universe, the impact of religious reform on traditional belief, and the "disenchantment" of European society as beliefs in the supernatural declined in the 18th century.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
HIEU 3000Modern Imperialism: 19th and 20th Centuries (3.00)
A history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.
HIEU 3021Greek and Roman Warfare (3.00)
Surveys the history of ancient warfare from the Homeric era until the fall of Rome.
HIEU 3041The Fall of the Roman Republic (3.00)
Surveys the history and culture of the last century of the Roman Republic (133-30 b.c.), emphasizing the political and social reasons for the destruction of the Republican form of government and its replacement by a monarchy.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
HIEU 3051History and Civilization of France: Revolution to 1945 (3.00)
The social, political, economic, philosophical, and artistic developments in France from the Revolution to 1945. Taught in French.
HIEU 3091Ancient Law and Society (3.00)
Study of the interrationships between law, politics and society in ancient Greece (chiefly Athenian) culture, the Hellenistic kingdoms and Rome (from the XII Tables to the Justinianic Code). Focuses particularly on the development of the idea of law; on the construction of law's authority and legitimacy; on the use of law as one method of social control; and on the development, at Rome, of juristic independence and legal codification. Prerequisite: HIEU 2031 or HIEU 2041, or permission of the instructor.
HIEU 3101Early Medieval Civilization (3.00)
Studies early medieval civilization from late antiquity to the 11th century. Emphasizes selected themes in cultural history.
HIEU 3111Later Medieval Civilization (3.00)
Discusses intellectual and cultural history, political and social theories, and religious movements from the 11th to the 16th centuries.
HIEU 3121Medieval Society: Ways of Life and Thought in Western Europe (3.00)
An introduction to the social and intellectual history from the tenth century to the sixteenth.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011
HIEU 3131The World of Charlemagne (3.00)
Explores the Byzantine, Muslim, and European worlds in the 8th and 9th centuries. Compares political, institutional, and social history, and the Catholic, Orthodox, and Islamic faiths.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
HIEU 3141Anglo-Saxon England (3.00)
Surveys England and its Celtic neighbors in Wales, Scotland, and Ireland from the departure of the Romans in the early 5th century to the Scandinavian conquest in 1016. Emphasizes the human diversity and cultural and institutional creativity of the Anglo-Saxons.
HIEU 3151Medieval Iberia, 411-1469 (3.00)
This course offers an introduction to Islam and a cultural history of Al Andalus from 711 until the expulsion of the Moriscos from early modern Spain in 1609.
HIEU 3152History of the British Empire (3.00)
This course will focus primarily on the 'second' empire in Asia and Africa, although the first empire in the Americas will be our first topic. Topics covered include the slave plantations in the West Indies, the American Revolution, the rise of the British East India Company and its control of India, and the Scramble for Africa. Special emphasis will be placed on the environmental history of our points of debarkation.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2010
HIEU 3161The Medieval Church (3.00)
The history of the western church from the time of Constantine through the sixteenth century, based on a study of selected texts.
HIEU 3171Eastern Christianity (3.00)
Surveys the history of Christianity in the Byzantine world and the Middle East from late antiquity (age of emperor Justinian) until the fall of Constantinople. Emphasizes developments in theology, spirituality and art, and the relation of Christianity to Islam. Considers Eastern Christianity in modern times.
HIEU 3181Medieval Christianity (3.00)
Detailed study of the development of Christianity in the Middle Ages and of how it reflected upon itself in terms of theology, piety, and politics. Cross-listed as RELC 3181.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIEU 3211Medieval and Renaissance Italy (3.00)
Surveys the development of the Italian city-state between 1050 and 1550, emphasizing the social and political context of Italian culture.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
HIEU 3215Dante's Italy (3.00)
This course investigates Italy's history and culture at the end of the Middle Ages through the life and writings of Dante Alighieri, Italy's greatest author of the medieval and early modern period. Through lectures and discussions on Dante's most important writings, students will be introduced to the culture of Italian city-states as well as to the most important literary and philosophical ideas of the late Middle Ages.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
HIEU 3221The Culture of the Renaissance (3.00)
Surveys the growth and diffusion of educational, literary, and artistic innovations in Europe between 1300 and 1600.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIEU 3231Reformation Europe (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys the development of religious reform movements in continental Europe from c. 1450 to c. 1650 and their impact on politics, social life, science, and conceptions of the self. Cross-listed as RELC 3231.
HIEU 3241Later Medieval England (3.00)
A documentary history of English society from the Conquest to the death of Richard II.
HIEU 3251Imperial Spain and Portugal, 1469-1808 (3.00)
General survey of the Iberian peninsula from Ferdinand and Isabella to Napoleon, including the development of absolutism, the enforcement of religious orthodoxy, the conquest of the New World and the Iberian imperial systems, the price revolution, the 'decline' of Spain and the Bourbon reforms, and the arts and literature of the Golden Age.
HIEU 3261History of Russia to 1700 (3.00)
Topics include the history of the formation of the Kievan State, the Appanage period, Mongol domination and the emergence of the Muscovite state; foundations of the first Russian state, evolution of its institutions, cultural influences from the origin to the decline; and the rise of successor states and particularly the multi-national state of Moscow.
HIEU 3271Three Faiths, One Sea: The Early Modern Mediterranean (3.00)
The course will provide students with an overview of the Mediterranean world from the conquest of Constantinople (1453) to the displacement of the sea in a globalizing economy. The main purpose of this course is to demonstrate the cultural, political, and religious diversity of the Mediterranean region. Special emphasis is placed on Christian, Jews, and Muslim interaction.
HIEU 3291Stuart England (3.00)
Studies the history of England (and its foreign relations) from 1603 to 1714, with commentary on some major themes of early Hanoverian England to the end of Sir Robert Walpole's ministry. Includes newer interpretations on Stuart monarchy, the background and consequences of the Civil War, restoration ideology and politics in relation to the Cromwellian Interregnum, the Revolution of 1688, social and local history, and the creation of the first British Empire.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIEU 3311Social History of Early Modern Europe (3.00)
Surveys social, economic, and demographic structure and change in pre-industrial Europe, focusing on social unrest and rebellions.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
HIEU 3321The Scientific Revolution, 1450-1700 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of modern science in its formative period against the backdrop of classical Greek science and in the context of evolving scientific institutions and changing views of religion, politics, magic, alchemy, and ancient authorities.
HIEU 3322Science in the Modern Age: 1789-1950 (3.00)
This course covers major developments in modern science from the 18th through the 20th centuries in the fields of chemistry, biology, geology, and physics. Three scientists, Antone Lavosier, Charles Darwin, and Albert Einstein, will be discussed.
HIEU 3331Intellectual History of Early Modern Europe (3.00)
Analyzes the main currents of European thought in the 17th and 18th centuries. Emphasizes major social movements and cultural changes.
HIEU 3341Society and the Sexes in Europe from Late Antiquity to the Reformation (3.00)
Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from late antiquity through the Reformation.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIEU 3342Society and the Sexes in Europe from the Seventeenth Century to the Present (3.00)
Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from the 17th century to the present.
HIEU 3352Modern German History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the political, social and cultural history of modern Germany from the French Revolution to the present. Cross-listed in the German department. Taught in English.
HIEU 3372German Jewish Culture and History (3.00)
This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture and history of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Sigmund Freud.
HIEU 3382Revolutionary France, 1770-1815 (3.00)
This course will examine the social, cultural, intellectual and political history of France from the end of the Old Regime through the Napoleonic Empire. The origins, development, and outcome of the French Revolution will be the main focus. Attention will also be paid to the international legacy of various French revolutionary concepts and to the history of the interpretation of this critical period of upheaval.
HIEU 3390Nazi Germany (3.00)
Detailed survey of the historical origins, political structures, cultural dynamics, and every-day practices of the Nazi Third Reich. Cross-listed in the German department. Taught in English.
HIEU 3392Women, Men, and Politics in the Age of Democratic Revolutions, 1760-1848 (3.00)
Surveys the origins, development, and consequences of key revolutionary struggles of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, emphasizing changes in gender relations. Prerequisite: A course in history or gender studies.
HIEU 3402Nineteenth-Century Europe (3.00)
Surveys the major social, economic, and political trends between the defeat of the Napoleonic Empire and the First World War. Stresses the developments in Western Europe as industrialization, democracy, nationalism, and representative institutions took root.
HIEU 3412Twentieth-Century Europe (3.00)
Studies the main developments in European history from the turn of the century to the eve of the Second World War.
Course was offered Fall 2010
HIEU 3422Twentieth-Century Europe (3.00)
Studies the main developments in European history from the outbreak of the Second World War to the present.
HIEU 3432France Since 1815 (3.00)
Studies French politics and society from the defeat of Napoleon to De Gaulle's republic.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIEU 3442European History, 1890-1954 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys Continent's troubled history from the Victorian Age to the welfare state. Addresses features of modernization and industrialization, nationalism and imperialism, causes and consequences of both world wars, Communist and Fascist challenges, Weimar and Nazi Germany, the Great Depression and crisis of capitalism, the Holocaust and decline of old Europe, and Social Democratic transformation.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
HIEU 3452Jewish Culture and History in Eastern Europe (3.00)
This course is a comprehensive examination of the culture and history of East European Jewry from 1750 to 1935. Course cross-listed with YITR 3452.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIEU 3462Neighbors and Enemies in Germany (3.00)
Explores the friend/foe nexus in Germany history, literature and culture, with an emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.
HIEU 3471English Legal History to 1776 (3.00)
The development of legal institutions, legal ideas, and legal principles from the medieval period to the 18th century. Emphasizes the impact of transformations in politics, society, and thought on the major categories of English law: property, torts and contracts, corporations, family law, constitutional and administrative law, and crime.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
HIEU 3472Nineteenth Century Britain (3.00)
A history of Britain and the British Empire from the Union with Ireland in 1801 to the death of Queen Victoria in 1901.
Course was offered Fall 2009
HIEU 3482Twentieth Century Britain (3.00)
A history of Britain and the British Empire from the death of Queen Victoria in 1901 to the re-election of Tony Blair in 1001.
HIEU 3492The British Empire (3.00)
Surveys the rise, rule, and demise of the British Empire from the Seven Years War (1756-63) to decolonization after World War II.  Topics include the expansion and consolidation of empire, opposition, and resistance, and the cultural consequences of imperialism. 
Course was offered Fall 2010
HIEU 3502History of Central Europe (3.00)
This lecture course will explore the 19th- and 20th-century history of Central Europe as both region and idea, tracing two stories in parallel: 1) the entangled history of Austrians, Czechs, Germans, Hungarians, Jews, Lithuanians, Poles, Slovaks, and Ukrainians; and 2) attempts by writers and scholars belonging to these groups (from Sigmund Freud to Milan Kundera) to 'imagine' their own versions of a Europe caught between 'East' and 'West.'
HIEU 3559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 3602Twentieth Century Spain (3.00)
Twentieth Century Spain
Course was offered Spring 2010
HIEU 3612Age of Reform and Revolution in Russia, 1855-1917 (3.00)
Studies the changes resulting from the wake of reforms following the Crimean War. Explores the social and political effects of efforts to modernize and industrialize Russia, which led to the growth of political and revolutionary opposition and the overthrow of the monarchy.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIEU 3622Russian Intellectual History in the 19th Century (3.00)
Studies the background of Westernization, rise of intelligentsia, development of radical and conservative trends, and the impact of intellectual ferment on Russian culture and politics to 1917.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2010
HIEU 3652Russian and Soviet Diplomatic History, 1850-Present (3.00)
Studies the foreign policy legacy of the Russian Empire to the present. Emphasizes World War I, foreign intervention in Russia, the Comintern, the Second World War and after, the Cold War, the expansion and decline of world communism, the collapse of the Soviet empire, and current Russian prospects.
HIEU 3670The Fall of Communism: How the Soviet Empire Lost the Cold War (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will examine the roots, causes, and aftermath of communism¿s collapse in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. We will consider economic stagnation and abortive attempts at reform; political crises and the rise of dissident movements; cultural exchange and the influence of mass media; and the role of social and nationalist activism.
HIEU 3672Revolutionary Russia (3.00)
Detailed study of the social, cultural, and political history of the revolutionary movement: the 1905 Revolution, the February Revolution, and the Bolshevik Revolution from Lenin to Stalin.
HIEU 3692The Holocaust (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course aims to clarify basic facts and explore competing explanations for the origins and unfolding of the Holocaust (the encounter between the Third Reich and Europe's Jews between 1933 and 1945) that resulted in the deaths of almost six million Jews.
HIEU 3695The Holocaust and the Law (3.00)
This course explores the pursuit of justice after the Holocaust. We will study legal responses to the Nazi genocide of Europe¿s Jews from 1945 to the 1960s through the lens of pivotal post-Holocaust trials, including the 1945-1946 Nuremberg Trial; the 1961 Eichmann Trial, and the 1963-1965 Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial. We will ask how the pursuit of legal justice after the Holocaust affects our understanding of the legal process.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIEU 3702Russia as Multi-Ethnic Empire (3.00)
Traces and analyzes the ethno-religious complexion of the vast region governed by Russia and the USSR from the 16th century to the present. Special attention is given to the experiences of minorities such as Jews, the various Turkic-Muslim peoples, Ukrainians, Poles, and peoples of Transcaucasia, as well as the relations of these groups with the Russian state and ethnic Russian population.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2013
HIEU 3712Spanish Culture & Civilization (3.00)
Spanish Culture & Civilization
HIEU 3721Witchcraft (3.00)
Surveys Western attitudes toward magic and witchcraft from ancient times to the present, with emphasis on the European age of witch hunting, 1450-1750. Cross-listed as RELG 3721. Prerequisite: First-year students not admitted except by instructor permission.
HIEU 3732European Social History, 1770-1890 (3.00)
Studies the evolution of private life from the era of early capitalism to the end of the nineteenth century. Focuses on family life, work experience, material conditions, women's roles, childhood, and youth.
HIEU 3742European Social History, 1890-1980 (3.00)
Studies the evolution of private life from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day. Focuses on family life, work experience, material conditions, women's roles, childhood, and youth.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
HIEU 3752Evolution of the International System, 1815-1950 (3.00)
Analyzes the evolution of great-power politics from the post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna and the systems of Metternich and Bismarck to the great convulsions of the twentieth century and the Russo-American Cold War after World War II.
HIEU 3772Science in the Modern World (3.00)
Studies the development of scientific thought and institutions since 1700, emphasizing the increasing involvement of science in economic, social, political, and military affairs and its relations with philosophical and religious thought.
HIEU 3782Origins of Modern Thought, 1580-1943 (3.00)
Introduces central themes, theorists, and texts in secular European thought since 1580. Surveys the 'age of reason,' the Enlightenment, romanticism, historicism, positivism, existentialism, and related matters. Works by a variety of thinkers are read, explicated, and discussed.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
HIEU 3792Intellectual History of Modern Europe (3.00)
Studies the main currents of European thought in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasizes major social movements and cultural changes.
HIEU 3802Origins of Contemporary Thought (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies selected themes in intellectual history since the mid-19th century, focusing on Darwin, Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, and other thinkers, emphasizing the intellectual contexts out of which they came and to which they contributed.
HIEU 3812Marx (3.00)
Introduces the social theory of Karl Marx. What Marx said, why he said it, what he meant in saying it, and the significance thereof. Situates Marx's writing in the context of 19th-century intellectual history. Focuses on the coherence and validity of the theory and its subsequent history.
HIEU 3851History of London (3.00)
History of London
HIEU 4501Seminar in Pre-1700 European History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4502Seminar in Post-1700 European History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIEU 4511Colloquium in Pre-1700 European History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2011
HIEU 4512Colloquium in Post-1700 European History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic. Frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students will prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See History DUS.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
HIEU 4559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 4591Topics in Pre-1700 European History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIEU 4592Topics in Post-1700 European History (3.00)
TTopics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIEU 4993Independent Study in European History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIEU 5001Dark Age Greece (3.00)
Examines the structural, political, and conceptual rise of the Greek polis and explores other aspects of the archaeology, art, history, and literature of the 'iron age' and early archaic period (1000-600 BC) in Greece. Prerequisite: HIEU 2031 or equivalent
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2012
HIEU 5011Late Archaic Greece (3.00)
Examines the history of Greece in the late archaic age down to the end of the Persian wars. Prerequisite: HIEU 2031 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013
HIEU 5013The Early Medieval Mediterranean (3.00)
This course examines the Mediterranean world from AD 700 -1000, exploring aspects of its political, economic and cultural history. Trade and communication, the movement of goods, ideas and people will all come under scrutiny. Students will engage with historical and archaeological scholarship together with extensive primary sources (in translation) from the period. Prerequisite: HIEU 2061 or equivalent and/or HIEU 3141, HIEU 3131 or equivalent.
HIEU 5021Greece in the Fifth Century (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examination of the political, diplomatic, and social history of Greece from the end of the Persian Wars in 479 b.c. to the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404/3 b.c. Investigates the origins, course, and importance of the latter war, the major watershed in classical Greek history. Prerequisite: HIEU 2031 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
HIEU 5031Greece in the Fourth Century (3.00)
Advanced course in Greek history that examines in detail the social and economic history of Greece from the end of the Peloponnesian War in 404 b.c. to the defeat of the Greek city-states at Chaeronea in 338. Prerequisite: HIEU 2041 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2011
HIEU 5051Roman Empire (3.00)
Studies the founding and institutions of the Principate, the Dominate, and the decline of antiquity. Prerequisite: HIEU 2041 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2010
HIEU 5061Roman Imperialism (3.00)
Examines Roman transmarine expansion to determine how and why it happened, and what consequences it had, both in Rome and abroad. Prerequisite: HIEU 2041 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2012
HIEU 5062Philosophy and Theory of History (3.00)
Course surveys tradition of 'philosophy of history' (ca. 1860--1960s) but focuses on the more recent genre of 'theory of history' (late 1960s/70s--present), which responds to recent historical genres and to new problems related to narrative, memory, trauma, counterfactuality, etc. Emphasis is on linking theory to specific historical and meta-historical instances (e.g., Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem, Friedlander's Nazi Germany and the Jews, 'trut
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
HIEU 5082Modernity and History (3.00)
Surveys a range of philosophers and other writers who have reflected on the role of history in modern life. Prerequisite: Upper class standing or above, with one or more courses in relevant theory
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2009
HIEU 5141Thucydides (3.00)
A team-taught course reading Thucydides in ancient Greek, with attention to his style, the structure of his work, its literary qualities, and scholarly controveries about the author. Meets twice a week: one session to read the text together in the Greek, and the other to consider the historical and historiographical issues to which the text gives rise, with readings in modern scholarly literature.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIEU 5302Nationality, Ethnicity, and Race in Modern Europe (3.00)
Colloquium on how categories of human identity have been conceived, applied, and experienced in Western and Eastern Europe from 1789 to the present. Topics include the construction of identities, national assimilation, inter-confessional conflict, colonialism, immigration, and the human sciences. Prerequisite: One course in modern European history or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
HIEU 5312Era of the World Wars, 1914-1945 (3.00)
A study of the major countries of Europe in the era 1914-1945, with special attention to international relations, and political, economic, and social developments. Most suitable for third- and fourth- year students with some background in European history and for graduate students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
HIEU 5352The British Economy Since 1850 (3.00)
Studies the structure, performance and policy in the British economy since 1850, focusing on the causes and consequences of Britain's relative economic decline. Cross listed as ECON 5352.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014
HIEU 5559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
HIEU 5662Nineteenth-Century Russian Intellectual History (3.00)
Readings and discussion of seminal Russian intellectuals and their ideas under the later Romanov Tsars. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
HIEU 5871Early Modern Europe Seminar (3.00)
This course is a specialized seminar in early modern European historiography. As a result, it focuses on a broad reading list that covers as many subjects, regions, and methodologies as possible. The course is divided by theme, rather than region, and covers such topics as social control, Scientific Revolution, women and gender, and global Christianity.
HIEU 5882Modern Europe, 1750-1890 (3.00)
This course aims to expose graduate and advanced undergraduates students to the grand narrative of modern European history and, simultaneously, to provide them with insight into the latest historiographical trends and emerging conceptual conventions in this research field.
HIEU 5892Europe since 1890 (3.00)
A discussion course on key topics in the transnational history of Modern Europe since 1890. A capstone for majors in the field, it is also open to others. Topics include old and new ways of doing history, Imperialism, World War I, postwar capitalism and its critics, Communism and Fascism, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, the Cold War, the path toward European Union, the Welfare State, German Reunification, and the end of the Cold War.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
HIEU 7001Colloquium in Medieval European History (3.00)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period before the eighteenth century and structured around central themes in medieval history.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
HIEU 7002Colloquium in Early Modern European History (3.00)
The second semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period before the eighteenth century and structured around central themes in early modern European history.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2010
HIEU 7003Colloquium in Modern European History I (3.00)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence of graduate colloquia introducing students to the major themes in European history and historiography in the period from the eighteenth century to the present and structured around central themes in European history between c. 1750 and c. 1870.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIEU 7013Anthropology of Ancient Greece (3.00)
A survey of anthropological methods useful for the study of the past: simultaneously an economic introduction to the Great Books of anthropology, to a prominent aspect of contemporary classical scholarship, and to the opportunities and problems presented by using the methods of one field to illuminate another.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2011
HIEU 7014Ancient History (3.00)
Introduces non-literary materials of use to the historian in correcting and/or amplifying the literary record, including inscriptions, papyri, coins, etc.
HIEU 7071Fragmentary Roman Historians (3.00)
This class reads the many fragments of Roman Republican historians and learns how to analyze them from three perspectives: linguistic (including textual problems); literary; and historical. Why did early Romans, many of them active statesmen and generals, write history? What themes are perceptible in their surviving fragments? What was the historical context of the author, and what was the historical contribution of his work?
Course was offered Fall 2011
HIEU 7211The Renaissance (3.00)
Studies European politics and society from the commercial revolution to Cateau Cambresis.
HIEU 7261Early Modern England (3.00)
Readings and discussion on special topics in the period 1485 to 1760.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2009
HIEU 7301History of Science (3.00)
Introduces the historiography of science, and especially to new approaches which integrate the history of the natural and social sciences into intellectual, social, political, and economic history.
HIEU 7471European Economic History (3.00)
Intensive reading and discussion of topics in European economic history.
Course was offered Fall 2013
HIEU 7559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 7782History of Human Rights (3.00)
A survey of the new field of human rights historiography, focusing on the growth of the academic discipline, current debates, and future directions for research.
HIEU 8011Ancient History (3.00)
Topics to be chosen by the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIEU 8452Twentieth Century Europe (3.00)
In this graduate seminar on Europe in the twentieth century students are asked to produce in the course of the semester an original work (25-30 pages long) based on primary sources. They will develop an argument, place it within the historiography and relevant methodologies, fine the relevant sources, and craft a narrative. The course covers all countries in Europe. The focus of the course is directed to exploration in cultural history.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2010
HIEU 8461Twentieth-Century Europe and Russia (3.00)
For students working in any geographical area of 20th-century Europe. Topics selected by students in consultation with instructor. Helps students begin research for M.A. theses and doctoral dissertations.
HIEU 8559New Course in European History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of European History.
HIEU 8642Soviet Domestic and Foreign Policy (3.00)
Offered as required.
HIEU 9021Philosophy and Theory of History (3.00)
In the last 25 years the philosophy and theory of history has been revitalized, with three vibrant international journals now publishing and thought-provoking books and articles appearing every year. This tutorial will quickly cover the classic literature and issues in the field and, more intensively, the recent literature. Emphasis will be on those segments of the literature most relevant to envisaged dissertation themes.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEU 9022History of Ideas-Intellectual History: Modern Europe (3.00)
This tutorial focuses on European-sourced conceptions and theories, with an emphasis on modernity in the broades senses. Characteristically, students will negotiate with the instructor a set of themes and texts to consider, e.g., notions of knowledge, interpretation, labor, identity, civil society, revolution.. These should be related to the student's projected dissertation area.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEU 9023Tutorial in the History of the Modern British Empire (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This graduate-level tutorial introduces the major themes, debates, and methods of historical writing on the British Empire from around 1750. It is intended particularly, though not exclusively, as field preparation for the general examination. Topics include the uses of expert knowledge, the peculiarities of settler colonialism, the lure of liberalism as imperial ideology, and the role of violence.
HIEU 9024Tutorial in the History of Modern Britain (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial introduces the major themes, debates, and methods of historical writing on modern Britain. It is intended particularly, though not exclusively, as field preparation for the general examination. Topics include the domestic ramifications of war and empire, the expanding reach of the state and the market, the adaptability of tradition, the contradictions of liberalism, and the meanings of modernity.
HIEU 9025Tutorial in the Late Roman Republic (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial will cover the most tumultuous period in Roman Republican history, that which stretches from 133 BC to the establishment of Octavian (Augustus) as the first emperor in 27 BC.
HIEU 9026Tutorial in Early Modern British History (3.00)
Considers developments in the British Isles and its nascent empire in the 16th and 17th centuries. Focuses on historiography of the Reformation and persistent religious conflicts, the causes and nature of the Civil Wars, and the origins of empire.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEU 9027Tutorial in English Legal History (3.00)
Considers key ideas and practices in English law from the late medieval period. Attention given to institutions, their development, and their interaction. Legal change will be studied in its social, political, and economic contexts. Also explores transformations in English law as it moved across a burgeoning empire.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEU 9028Tutorial in British Legal and Political Thought (3.00)
Considers major texts in legal and political thought of the 17th and 18th centuries. Focuses on canonical works by thinkers such as Hobbes, Harrington, Sidney, Locke, Smith, and Blackstone. Texts will be appoached from within their historical contexts.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIEU 9029Tutorial in the History of Reformation Europe (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys the history and historiography of European Christianity c. 1450-1650.
HIEU 9030Tutorial in the History of Early Modern Europe (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores the history and historiography of Europe, c. 1450-1750. It provides a broad introduction to early modern society and culture, with particular emphasis on the transformations that reshaped Europe in this period, such as the emergence of the early modern state, the division of Christendom, and global exploration.
HIEU 9031Tutorial in Anglo-Saxon History (3.00)
This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the study of Anglo-Saxon England from the fifth to the eleventh centuries, its historiography and the range of methodologies and disciplinary approaches applied to its analysis. The class is intended to be timely and comprehensive. Archaeology, material culture and the close analysis of key primary sources and attendant scholarship will all be addressed.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIEU 9032Tutorial in Modern Jewish History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial explores the major historiographical literature of modern jewish history, with an emphasis on core themes of political, cultural, and religious patterns, issues of periodization, and the question of its relationship to other fields of modern history.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
HIEU 9033Tutorial in European Economic History (3.00)
A graduate tutorial devoted to close analysis of key issues in European Economic History.
Course was offered Spring 2017
History-Latin American History
HILA 1501Introductory Seminar in Latin American History (3.00)
Intended for first- or second-year students, this course introduces the study of history. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major history.
HILA 1559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 2001Colonial Latin America, 1500-1824 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces major developments and issues in the study of Latin American history from Native American societies on the eve of the Spanish Conquest to the wars of national independence in the early 19th century.
HILA 2002Modern Latin America, 1824 to Present (3.00)
Introduces the history of Latin America from national independence in the early 19th century to the present.
HILA 2110Latin American Civilization (3.00)
Latin American Civilization
HILA 2201The History of the Caribbean (3.00)
The History of the Caribbean
HILA 2559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 3031Mexico From Conquest to Nation (3.00)
Studies Mexican history from 1519 to 1854, emphasizing Spanish/Indian relations, problems of periodization in cultural, economic, and social history, the state and the church in public life, the significance of national independence, and regional variation in all of these subjects.
HILA 3032Mexico, Revolution and Evolution, 1854 to Present (3.00)
Studies Mexican history since the wars of reform in the 1850s. The Revolution, 1910-1920, its origins and meaning for modern Mexico, is the centerpiece. Topics include political ideas, church and state, the growth of nationalism and the state, economic changes, urbanization, land reform, and the intractable problem of inequality in the 20th century.
HILA 3051Modern Central America (3.00)
Studies the history of Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador from 19th century fragmentation, oligarchic, foreign, and military rule, to the emergence of popular nationalisms.
HILA 3061History of Modern Brazil (3.00)
Explores Brazilian history from Independence to the present day. Through an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, the course examines the legacy of slavery, the importance of popular culture, and debates over national identity in the making of a distinctively ambiguous Brazilian 'modernity,' broadly understood.
HILA 3071History of Colonial Brazil (3.00)
This three-hundred level class will provide students from the History department with the intellectual tools to understand the History of early Brazil in a comparative and transnational way. The class places Brazil in the broader context of Atlantic, underlining contacts with Africa and establishing comparisons with other colonial experiences throughout the Atlantic from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HILA 3111Public Life in Modern Latin America (3.00)
Introduces the forces shaping the emerging nations of Latin America since independence, emphasizing the dynamic reproduction of hierarchies that correspond to the patrimonial, aristocratic, and populist legitimization of social, cultural, and political relations in city life.
HILA 3201History of the Caribbean, 1500-2000 (3.00)
The Caribbean is a region of the Atlantic world bounded by Central America and the north of South America, and by an arc of islands which runs from Trinidad in the south, to the Bahamas in the north, and Cuba in the west. This course surveys its history from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with special emphasis on the Anglophone territories. It is at the same time an introduction to the intellectual history of the region, since readings are chosen almost exclusively from within its traditions.
HILA 3559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 4501Seminar in Latin American History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. Seminar work results primarily in the preparation of substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HILA 4511Colloquium in Latin American History (4.00)
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HILA 4559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 4591Topics in Latin American History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
Course was offered Spring 2010
HILA 4701The Inquisition in Spain and Latin America (3.00)
Explores the history of the ecclesiastical court dedicated to the eradication of heresy in early modern Spain, its impact on culture, religion and social behavior. History majors may submit written work and write exams in English; Spanish majors are expected to write in Spanish. Cross-listed with SPAN 4701. Prerequisite:At lest on 4000 level Spanish course.
HILA 4993Independent Study in Latin American History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HILA 5559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 7001Colonial Latin America (3.00)
A readings course open to graduate students with a reading knowledge of Spanish.
HILA 7559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
HILA 8559New Course in Latin American History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Latin American History.
History-Middle Eastern History
HIME 1501Introductory Seminar in Middle East History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIME 1559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History
HIME 2001History of the Middle East and North Africa, C 500-1500 (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores the history of the Middle East and North Africa from late antiquity to the rise to superpower status of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century. Topics include the formation of Islam and the first Arab-Islamic conquests; the fragmentation of the empire of the caliphate; the historical development of Islamic social, legal, and political institutions; science and philosophy; and the impact of invaders (Turks, Crusaders, and Mongols).
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
HIME 2002History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1500-Present (3.00)
As a continuation of HIME 201 (which is not a prerequisite), this course surveys the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa, i.e., the region stretching from Morocco to Afghanistan, and from the Balkans and Anatolia to the Arabian Peninsula. Topics include the main political configurations of the area from the birth of Islam until the Mongol aftermath; the rise of the 'gunpowder Empires' of the 16th century; the Ottoman and Safavid (Iran) states; and the modern nation-state systems of the present century, ca. 1980. The dominant political, religious, economic, social, and cultural features of Middle Eastern peoples and societies are examined, as are relationships between the region and other parts of Eurasia, particularly Western Europe.
HIME 2012Palestine 1948 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores the dramatic war of 1948 in Palestine from the UN partition resolution of November 29, 1947 to the cease-fire agreements in early 1949. It covers the political, military progression of the war, within international and decolonization contexts, while paying special attention to the two major outcomes of the war and how they came about: Jewish independence and Palestinian dispossession.
HIME 2559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
Course was offered Fall 2009
HIME 3191Christianity and Islam (3.00)
Studies Christianity in the Middle East in the centuries after the rise of Islam.
HIME 3192From Nomads to Sultans: the Ottoman Empire, 1300-1700 (3.00)
A survey of the history of the Ottoman Empire from its obscure origins around 1300 to 1700, this course explores the political, military, social, and cultural history of this massive, multi-confessional, multi-ethnic, inter-continental empire which, at its height, encompassed Central and Southeastern Europe, the Caucasus, the Middle East, and North Africa.
HIME 3559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 3571Arab History at the Movies (3.00)
This interdisciplinary course uses cinema as a vehicle to introduce students without a knowledge of Arabic to the perspectives of Arab peoples on their own history. Includes popular movies on the rise of Islam, Crusades, World War I, colonialism, modern city life, women's liberation,war, terrorism. Students read relevant history and learn critical theory on collective memory, propaganda, modernity, revolution, and gender.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
HIME 4501Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History (4.00)
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
HIME 4511Colloquium in Middle East History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topics of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIME 4559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 4591Topics in Middle Eastern History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
HIME 4993Independent Study in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIME 5052World War I in the Middle East (3.00)
World War I set the stage for many conflicts in the 20th-century Middle East. This course examines the last attempt to build a pluralistic, constitutional realm under the Ottoman empire; how that world crumbled in the Balkan wars and Great War; the Young Turks' relations with Germany; Lawrence of Arabia and the Arab Revolt; the Armenian genocide; women and peasants' suffering; the Balfour Declaration and start of the Palestine conflict.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
HIME 5053Slavery in the Middle East and Ottoman Empire (3.00)
This course explores the practice of slavery in its various forms in the Middle East and North Africa from pre-Islamic times through the abolition of the slave trade in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire. Topics include: sources of slaves and the slave trade; manumission; the social and legal position of slaves in Islamic societies; the slave-soldier phenomenon; captivity and ransom; gender and race; and the movement towards abolition. Prerequisite: Graduate students and advanced undergraduates with previous study of the Middle East.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIME 5559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIME 7011History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 570-1500 (3.00)
Introduces the history and historiography of the medieval Middle East and North Africa (areas from Morocco to Iran) from the period immediately preceding the rise of Islam until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to political, social, economic, and cultural evolution of the regions and peoples situated in arid and semi-arid zones stretching from Gibraltar to the Oxus River. After surveying the general contours of the field, and isolating the principal scholarly approaches to it, the course proceeds chronologically, starting with the Byzantine and Sassanian Empires in the 6th century and concluding with assessment of the Turkic-Mongolian impact upon the historical configuration of the regions. Prerequisite: HIME 2001.
HIME 7021History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 1500-Present (3.00)
Introduces the history and historiography of the early modern and modern Middle East and North Africa from the period of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires until the emergence of a system of nation-states in the 20th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the region. Prerequisite: HIME 2001, 2002, or HIME 7011.
HIME 7031Colonialism and Nation-Building in the Arab World (3.00)
Debate on the effects of European colonial rule has been revived in the decade since the United States occupied Iraq. We W engage the debate by studying the effect of foreign rule on one region, the Arab world: French and British colonization of Algeria and Egypt in the long 19th-century; the League of Nations' mandates in Syria and Iraq after World War I; and finally Americans' effort to rebuild the Iraqi state since 2003. Prerequisite: One prior course on colonialism or on Arab history
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIME 7559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIME 9023Tutorial in the History of the Medieval Middle East and North Africa (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial surveys the historiography of the medieval Middle East and North Africa (broadly construed), from pre-Islamic Arabia through the Ottoman conquest of the Mamluk Sultanate, which reunified the eastern half of the Mediterranean for the first time in a millennium. Readings introduce the major dynasties between Iberia and Central Asia, from the Umayyads to the Ottomans, and the seminal texts that have shaped the field.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIME 9024Tutorial in Ottoman History (3.00)
This tutorial surveys the history and historiography of the Ottoman Empire from its obscure origins in the fourteenth century up to the period of reforms known as the Tanzimat beginning in the first half of the nineteenth century. Readings introduce the major historiographical debates and trends in the field and cover the political, military, institutional, social, and cultural history of the Empire.
Course was offered Spring 2017
History-South Asian History
HISA 1501Introductory Seminar in South Asia (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HISA 1559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian History
HISA 2001History and Civilization of Classical India (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the major elements of South Asian civilization, from the Stone Age to 1200, including the Indus Valley, Vedic literatures, Buddhism, Jainism, Epic traditions, the caste system, Mauryan and Guptan Empires, and devotional Hinduism.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
HISA 2002History and Civilization of Medieval India (3.00)
Studies the social, political, economic and cultural history of South Asia from 1200 to 1800, from the Turkic invasions through the major Islamic dynasties, especially the Mughal Empire, to the establishment of English hegemony in the maritime provinces.
HISA 2003History of Modern India (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys 200 years of Indian history from the mid-18th century to the present, focusing on the imperial/colonial encounter with the British Raj before Independence, and the social and political permutations of freedom in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka since.
HISA 2559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
HISA 3001History of Muslim India (3.00)
Studies the nature of Islamic political dominance in a non-Muslim society; Turko-Afghan and Mughal political institutions; art, letters and learning under the Delhi Sultanate, regional rulers and Mughals; and religious and cultural life during the Muslim period in South Asia.
HISA 3002India From Akbar to Victoria (3.00)
Studies the society and politics in the Mughal Empire, the Empire's decline and the rise of successor states, the English as a regional power and their expansion, and social, economic and political change under British paramountcy, including the 1857 Revolt.
HISA 3003Twentieth-Century South Asia (3.00)
Surveys 100 years of Indian history, defining the qualities of the world's first major anti-colonial movement of nationalism and the changes and cultural continuities of India's democratic policy in the decades since 1947.
HISA 3004India's Partition: Literature, Culture, Politics (3.00)
India's Partition and its far-reaching consequences may be productively studied from several different perspectives. This course juxtaposes select novels, films, contemporary writings, and some secondary sources to reflect on a few of the big questions thrown up by this event. These include the place of minorities in the subcontinent and the changing nature of center-state relations in the subcontinent after 1947.
Course was offered Fall 2014
HISA 3111Social and Political Movements in Twentieth-Century India (3.00)
Considers the relationships between land, people, and politics in modern South Asia.
HISA 3121History of Women in South Asia (3.00)
Surveys the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.
HISA 3559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
HISA 4501Seminar in South Asia (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HISA 4511Colloquium in South Asia (4.00)
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HISA 4559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
HISA 4591Topics in South Asian History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HISA 4993Independent Study in South Asia (1.00 - 3.00)
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.
HISA 5021Historiography of Early Modern South Asia (3.00)
Analyzes historical sources and historians of political systems in Muslim India until the rise of British power.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2012
HISA 5101Economic History of India (3.00)
Studies regional economic systems prior to European penetration; the establishment and growth of European trading companies in the 17th and 18th centuries; commercialization of agriculture; the emergence of a unified Indian economy in the 19th century; and industrialization and economic development in the 20th.
HISA 5559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
Course was offered Fall 2014
HISA 7111Peasant Movements in Modern India (3.00)
Considers agrarian relationships and the economic conflict in those relations that give rise to peasant movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. Discussions are based on texts concerned with peasant societies.
HISA 7559New Course in South Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
HISA 8061Social History of Modern India (3.00)
Research and writing utilizing gazetteers, settlement reports, censuses, and other sources.
HISA 8111Peasant Movements in Modern Indian History (3.00)
A workshop seminar on peasant movements in modern India, Bengla Desh, and Pakistan utilizing original documents.
HISA 8559New Course in South Asian History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian history.
History-General History
HIST 1501Introductory Seminar in History (3.00)
Introduction to the study of history intended for first- and second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussion, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIST 1559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 2001Many Worlds: A History of Humanity Before Ca 1800 (4.00)
This is the first in a two-semester sequence of lecture courses in world history. It presents a balanced historical perspective on the many separate worlds (cultures, civilizations) in which people lived before modernity and globalization became prominent in the nineteenth century. The historical perspective highlights human experiences shared in all world eras and areas, from largest to smallest, by stressing recurring processes of change.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
HIST 2002The Modern World: Global History since 1760 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a survey course in modern world history. It covers a period in which the main historical questions about what happened, and why, more and more involve global circumstances, global beliefs about those conditions, and global structures to solve problems. This course can therefore be an essential foundation for other courses dwelling on particular regions or nations.
HIST 2011History of Human Rights (3.00)
This course surveys the modern history of human rights, focusing on political, legal, and intellectual trends from the late 18th century to the present.
Course was offered Fall 2012
HIST 2012History of Communism (3.00)
A comparative, global history of communism: from the rise of Marxism in the nineteenth century, to the establishment of Marxist-Leninist regimes across the globe in the twentieth century, to the collapse of communism in the 1980s.
HIST 2050World History (3.00)
This course will trace the relationship between humankind and the world in which he/she lives.
HIST 2051History of the Modern World (3.00)
This course will use paradigms from which to extrapolate models for understanding the world as a whole. Topics include early exploration, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution, the great Muslim empires, Western colonialism, World War I, the rise of fascism and communism, World War II and the postcolonial world. We will pay particular attention to those areas we will be visiting.
HIST 2060History of Christianity II (3.00)
Survey of Christianity in the Medieval, Reformation, and Modern Periods.
HIST 2062Global Environmental History (3.00)
This course examines the relationship between humanity and the global biosphere from the prehistoric era to present. Focus will be given to the modern era by placing environmental transformations at the center of the history of globalization. Topics will include industrialization, energy, pandemics, invasive species, warfare, climate change, land development, and conceptions of environment, health, and disease. d nature in Sri Lanka, and Mao's was against nature in postcolonial China, etc.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Spring 2010
HIST 2150Global Environmental History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course examines global ecological connections throughout time and offers a narrative of environmental history that is more inclusive of regions outside of Europe and North America such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. It explores the relationship between humans and their environments over the course of history and places special emphasis on the past century of ecological change and what has recently been called the Anthropocene.
HIST 2151History of U.S.-Latin American Relations in the 20th Century (3.00)
The course traces the history of U.S. relations with Latin America in the 20th century, with a special emphasis on the role U.S. intelligence played in making policy decisions.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
HIST 2201Technology in World History (3.00)
Surveys how cultures have developed technology from the earliest times to the end of the twentieth century. Includes both western and non-western cultures and explores how different cultures have used technology to produce economic abundance, social order, and cultural meaning. No technical or scientific expertise required.
Course was offered Fall 2012
HIST 2210Epidemics, Pandemics, and History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Covers epidemic diseases such as plague, cholera, smallpox, tuberculosis, malaria, and AIDS in world history since 1500.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
HIST 2212Maps in World History (3.00)
This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of cartography that ranges across the globe from oldest surviving images of pre-history to GIS systems of the present day. It approaches map history from a number of disciplinary perspectives, including the history of science, the history of cartography, critical theory and literary studies, anthropology, historical geography, and spatial cognition and wayfinding.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIST 2559New Course in General History (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 3041The British Empire in the 18th Century (3.00)
Surveys the history of the First British Empire to 1815, with concentration on the 18th century and on the loss of the American Colonies as a breaking point. Explores problems inherent in the imperial relationship between Mother Country and colonies and is an introduction to studies in colonialism and imperialism as they relate to the histories of England, early America, the West Indies, and South Asia and Africa.
HIST 3050Modern Imperialism: The British and American Experience (3.00)
This course examines the patterns of development of Great Britain and the United States as international powers. It illustrates their differences and similarities, what they have to tell us about the role of dependency on great power status, and the effects these had on their politics, economics and societies, as well as the countries with which they became involved.
HIST 3111Technology and Cross-Cultural Exchanges in Global History (3.00)
An interdisciplinary, historical exploration of the globalization of sociotechnical systems over the past 500 years. How have various cultures responded to imported technologies and the organizations and values that accompany them? What can this teach us about our own "technological ideology" today?
Course was offered Fall 2011
HIST 3112Ecology and Globalization in the Age of European Expansion (3.00)
Grounded in the field of environmental history, this course examines the ways in which environmental changes and perceptions of nature have interacted with socio-economic structures and processes associated with the expansion of Europe since the 15th century.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
HIST 3152The Cold War, 1945-1990 (3.00)
This class investigates the global rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union during the second half of the twentieth century. The class will explore major global events such as the division of Europe, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the spread of the cold war into the developing world, the revolutions of 1989, and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
HIST 3162War and Society in the Twentieth Century (3.00)
This class will explore the impact of war upon society during the twentieth century, including World Wars I and II; conflicts in Korea and Vietnam; wars of national liberation and decolonization; and small-scale 'counter-insurgency' conflicts. Topics covered include: popular mobilization for war;civil liberties in wartime; civilian casualties; the ethics of violence; genocide; technology; and cultural production in wartime societies.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2012
HIST 3201History, Museums, and Interpretation (3.00)
Overview of the issues and challenges involved in historical interpretation at public history sites, primarily in the United States. Includes a review of general literature on public history, exploration of diverse sources frequently used, and analysis of some recent public history controversies.
HIST 3211History of Sexuality in the West (3.00)
Surveys changes in sexual behavior and attitudes in Europe and the United States since ancient times, with particular attention to the moment of major breaks. The politics of forming sexual norms and imposing them on society is also examined.
HIST 3221Zionism and the Creation of the State of Israel (3.00)
This course seeks to comprehend Israel's origins, development, and conflicts from the rise of Zionism to creation of the State of Israel in 1948. Major topics of discussion include the Jewish national movement and its ideological origins; the development of Jewish settlement in Palestine (the Yishuv); the origins of the conflict between Jews and Arabs in Palestine; the emergence of a Hebrew culture in Palestine; the struggle for statehood; and the war of 1948.
HIST 3231Exhibiting Jews: The Jewish Museum (3.00)
Explores Jewish museums as sites of cultural display that restore, preserve, and communicate the sacred. Topics will include: the culture of contemporary exhibits (i.e. the common topics reflected, the style and design of exhibits), the ways in which nationalism or regionalism affect the ways Jewishness is presented, and the comparative emphasis on history, religion, and art as Jewishness is presented, and the comparative emphasis on history, religion, and art as reflections of ethnographic, cultural, and/or aesthetic barometers for identity formation.
HIST 3281Genocide (3.00)
History of genocide and other forms of one-sided, state-sponsored mass killing in the twentieth century. Case studies include the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and the mass killings that have taken place under Communist regimes (e.g., Stalin's USSR, Mao's China, Pol Pot's Cambodia).
HIST 3301South Atlantic Migration (3.00)
An exploration of migrations and other related human movements as they have shaped the societies of the South Atlantic region of what is now the United States (FL-GA-SC-NC-VA on the mainland), and Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands in the Caribbean.
HIST 3352The First World War (3.00)
At the Great War's centennial, we take stock of how it shaped life in the 20th century for peoples around the globe. Movies, memoirs, government reports and other texts throw light on causes of the war, the human carnage of 1914-18, Woodrow Wilson's effort to end war forever with a League of Nations, the demise of liberalism and the rise of fascism and communism in postwar Europe, and the launch of anti-colonial movements in Asia and Africa.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIST 3371The Impact of Printing, 1450-1900 (3.00)
Studies the impact of the printing press on western European and American culture.
HIST 3411The Modern World, 1890-1943 (3.00)
This is the first half of a course about modern world history, selecting episodes beginning in the last decade of the 19th century and ending in the last decade of the twentieth. The second half of the course is offered in the spring. Each can be taken on their own. The approach of the course is to be selective, concentrating on particular places and times, on big ideas and fateful choices.
HIST 3412The Modern World, 1944-1991 (3.00)
This is the second half of a course about modern world history, selecting episodes beginning as the post-World War II world comes into view and ending in the early 1990s. The first half of the course is offered in the fall. Each can be taken on their own. The approach of the course is to be selective, concentrating on particular places and times, on big ideas and fateful choices.
Course was offered Spring 2010
HIST 3452The Second World War (3.00)
This course provides a survey of the greatest, most destructive war in human history. Perhaps 50 million people were killed in the Second World War, and the conflict reached every corner of the globe. Its political, social, and human consequences were vast and shape the world we live in today.
HIST 3500Bundle 44 Course (3.00)
HIST 3559New Course in General History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 3611Espionage and Intelligence in the 20th Century (3.00)
The course examines the role of intelligence and espionage in the 20th century. It compares and contrasts the U.S. effort with British and Soviet operations. It looks at the impact of technology on intelligence activities and its influence on policy decisions.
HIST 3775Americans in the Middle East (3.00)
This course offers a history of Americans' involvement in the Middle East and responses to them. Using new approaches to international history, we study 19th-century pilgrimages to the Holy Land, Wilsonian diplomacy, oil businesses, philanthropists, Zionists, spies in the Cold War, and finally the soldiers who fought the Iraq war. Students write a final paper based on research at the Library of Congress or National Archives.
Course was offered January 2015, Summer 2014
HIST 3854Reasoning from History (3.00)
This course reviews some common traps in historical reasoning and suggests ways of avoiding them.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIST 4400Topics in Economic History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Comparative study of the historical development of selected advanced economies (e.g., the United States, England, Japan, continental Europe). The nations covered vary with instructor. Cross-listed with ECON 4400.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIST 4501Major Seminar (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIST 4511Major Colloquium (4.00)
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquial prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2012
HIST 4559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIST 4591Topics in History (3.00 - 4.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIST 4592Topics in History (4.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIST 4890Distinguished Majors Program-Special Colloquium (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies historical approaches, techniques, and methodologies introduced through written exercises and intensive class discussion. Normally taken during the third year. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program.
HIST 4990Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar (0.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes problems in historical research. Preparation and discussion of fourth-year honors theses. Normally taken during the fourth year. Intended for students who will be in residence during their entire fourth year.  Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program.
HIST 4991Distinguished Majors Program-Special Seminar (6.00)
Analyzes problems in historical research.  Preparation and discussion of fourth-year honors theses.  Intended for Distinguished Majors who will have studied abroad in the fall of their fourth year. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the Distinguished Majors Program.
HIST 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors.
HIST 5002Global History (3.00)
Reading, discussion, and analysis of classic as well as contemporary works of scholarship on global history.
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIST 5031Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data (3.00)
The social scientific approach to historical inquiry, the formulation of theories, and their testing with historical data. Includes extensive directed readings in quantitative history and training in quantitative methods, sampling, the organization of a data-set, and data analysis. Prerequisite: Introductory course in statistics or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIST 5062Commerce, Culture, and Consumption in World History (3.00)
Explores the circulation of goods throughout the world in the early modern and modern periods, and its cultural implications and consequences. Readings approach trade from a number of standpoints, including commodities, traders, trade routes, media of exchange, and consumers. Most major world areas will be represented, but there will be particular emphasis on Europe and its commercial relations with non-European lands and peoples.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2010
HIST 5063Theory and/of History: Recent Perspectives (3.00)
The course examines theoretical perspectives relevant to the discovery and interpreting of historical phenomena. Topics include memory; identity; trauma; narrative; practices of inference; nation-state and trans-nationality; space; and the role of normative assumptions. Likely authors include B. Anderson, Bourdieu, Brubaker, Confino, Flyvbjerg, Geertz, Ginzburg, Kuhn, LaCapra, Megill, Moyn, J. C. Scott, J. W. Scott, Sewell, Weber, White. Prerequisites: Minimum admission standard: 3rd year undergrad. Undergrads must request permission and see the instructor before the class starts.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIST 5077Pius XII, Hitler, the US and World War II (3.00)
For the past forty years the role of Pius XII and the Vatican during World War II has been controversial. This seminar will look at that controversy and place it in the context of newly available archival material. The studnets will read severalbooks on both sides of the question and then present their own research papers, the topics of which will be chosen in consultation with the professor.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2012, Fall 2010
HIST 5092Multiculturalism in the Ottoman Empire (3.00)
Study of how a large empire governed a diverse population, between 1453 and 1918, from the perspective of concerns about recent nationalist, racial and ethnic conflicts in modern nation states. Course 1st examines how the Ottomans managed relations between ethnic and religious groups to 1750, then the reasons for increased communial conflicts after 1750, and their efforts to re-engineer relations among groups along liberal, constitutional lines.
HIST 5111Slavery in World History (3.00)
Historical study of  'slavery' from very early times through the nineteenth century, on a global scale (including ancient Mediterranean, Islamic world, Africa, Europe, and the Americas).
Course was offered Spring 2014
HIST 5559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 5621Genocide (3.00)
Readings and discussion of the history of genocide and other forms of one-sided, state-sponsored mass killing in the twentieth century.
HIST 5920History of Documentary Photography (3.00)
Examines the history of documentary photography, the work of some of the most significant documentary photographers of the past and the present, and the ethical and theoretical issues which surround documentary practice.
HIST 6559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 7001Approaches to Historical Study (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of historical approaches.
HIST 7002Graduate Colloquium on World History (3.00)
Introduces graduate students in History to the growing literature on world history, with emphasis on the epistemology of history, both the usual regional fields and history on broader scales. Supports the qualifying examination fields for the PhD. May be taken, with instructor approval, at any point in the graduate program.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIST 7011Atlantic World (3.00)
Introduces graduate students in all fields of history to their overlapping and complementing aspects in an Atlantic context from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. It distinguishes a historical epistemology significantly distinct from, but also integral to, any of its component fields. Thus it supports regional graduate history fields and dissertation research. It also orients students toward development of qualifications to meet the "world history" component of many current teaching positions. Graduate students in other departments may find the colloquium a useful enhancement to their primary academic agendas, as well as for reflection on the relationships of thinking historically to their own academic disciplines. ABDs are welcome to participate in the colloquium as a dissertation-writing workshop.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
HIST 7021History and Historiography of Empire (3.00)
This colloquium will consider how to think historically about empire in comparative and transnational context. We will depart from the nation-state as the fundamental unit of inquiry, looking instead to: flows of goods, people, biota and ideas across borders; the formation of networks of trade, identity and influence; the formation of communites in the interstices of global geography; empire as a pivot of international power.
HIST 7051Economic History (3.00)
Extensive directed readings on selected topics, covering both substantive historical literature and relevant theoretical works. Students must write a minimum of two papers during the term.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
HIST 7061Comparative Readings in British America and Latin America Before 1800 (3.00)
Graduate colloquium devoted to comparative readings in colonial Latin America and colonial British America, co-taught by specialists in each of the respective fields. Identifies broad areas of similarity and contrast in the settlement and development of the two colonial societies.
HIST 7071Methods in Social History (3.00)
A colloquium open to students in all fields and periods. Examines new approaches, methods, and subject matter in the broad area of social history.
HIST 7161Forced Migration, Genocide, and Human Rights: A Transnational History (3.00)
This course explores in a comparative, transnational approach the modern global history of forced migration, genocide, and human rights with special emphasis on problems of history, memory, and the links between the local, national, and global.
Course was offered Fall 2011
HIST 7162Cultures of War: Readings in War and Society (3.00)
Reading and discussion of new trends in the field of War and Society.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012
HIST 7191History of Technology: Theory and Methods (3.00)
Examines the role of technology in both American history and world history. Readings introduce major issues and methodology. No technical or scientific expertise required.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
HIST 7231Topics in Environmental History (3.00)
Introduces students to the literature and methods of environmental history from a global perspective. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2010
HIST 7559New Course in History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 8001Master's Essay Writing (3.00)
Master's Essay Writing offers first-year doctoral students in History and those in the JD/MA program a workshop in which to discuss and develop an article-length work of original scholarship. Prerequisite: First-year history Ph.D. students or JD/MA students
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
HIST 8011Summer Research Seminar (3.00)
A general research seminar for students needing to meet seminar requirements for the M.A. or Ph.D. degrees during the nine-week summer session. Not open to degree candidates enrolled during the regular academic session. Prerequisite: Permission of the director of graduate studies or chair of the department.
HIST 8021Research Seminar in History (3.00)
This course offers graduate students an opportunity to research and write an article-length history research essay of publishable quality in any field. Research will be conducted with the guidance of the faculty dissertation adviser. A revised version of the essay can be submitted to fulfill the master's essay requirement for students in History. This course fulfills one of the two required research seminars for History graduate students. Prerequisite: Graduate students in History or permission of instructor
Course was offered Fall 2013
HIST 8211English Legal Thought (3.00)
Studies English legal thought in the nineteenth century, particularly the background, opinions, and conception of law held by Blackstone, Bentham, John Austin, Lord Eldon, Sir Henry Maine, Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, A.V. Dicey, and F.W. Maitland. (See School of Law listing.)
HIST 8212English Legal History (3.00)
Research seminar on topics of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English legal history. Limited (if necessary) to 18, and preference is given (if necessary) to those who have taken English Legal Thought.
HIST 8240Law: Comparative Contexts, to 1850 (3.00)
Research course on law in comparative, transnational, and imperial contexts, to 1850.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIST 8331Research Seminar in the History of Gender and Sexuality (3.00)
This research seminar is intended to provide students interested in the history of gender and sexuality or in women's history an opportunity to develop research directions for their dissertations. The seminar is comparative and will address themes relevant to different fields and time periods. We will spend the first half of the semester discussing shared readings and devote the rest of the semester to meetings to a final research paper.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIST 8451Twentieth-Century History: Europe and America (3.00)
A research seminar.
Course was offered Fall 2011
HIST 8501Forced Migration in the Modern World (3.00)
This course explores the problem of forced migration in the modern world, that is those events designed to create homogeneous nation states by violently removing thousands and at times millions of human beings. It looks at specific historical cases such as the Indian removal, Europe (1943-47), India/Pakistan (1947), and Palestine/Israel (1948), focusing on issue of war, decolonization, experience, human rights, and memory.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIST 8559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2010
HIST 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
HIST 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
HIST 9011The Practice of History (3.00)
A workshop on teaching at the college level. Prerequisites: Third-year history Ph.D. candidates
HIST 9012Dissertation Prospectus (3.00)
A workshop and seminar preparing the dissertation prospectus. Prerequisites: Third-year standing in the graduate program, or permission of the Graduate Committee
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIST 9021Tutorial in the History of the Human Sciences (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This graduate-level tutorial introduces the history of the human sciences in Western Europe and the United States since around 1800. Emphasizing anthropology, sociology, and the mind sciences (psychology, psychoanalysis, and psychiatry), we consider the intellectual as well as the institutional dimensions of how disciplines emerged; how they created new forms of power; how they affected old forms of power; and how they changed everyday life.
HIST 9022Tutorial in Global Legal History (3.00)
Considers key ideas and practices in global legal history, ca. 1500-1900. Explores the interaction of European law with non-European cultures as empires expanded; the development of the law of the sea; and early ideas and practices in the law of nations.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIST 9023Tutorial in Visual and Aural History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores the incorporation of images and sounds into historical research, focusing on historiography and methods.
HIST 9024Tutorial in Historical Digital Visualization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course is a practicum that designed to introduce students to digital tools for historical visualization, with an emphasis on geospatial visualization. It will introduce students to a variety of software tools for data visualization including MapScholar, Carto DB, Story Map, and SHIVA as they build their own research-based projects. It will include events and consulting sessions hosted by SHANTI the Scholars' Lab.
HIST 9025Tutorial in the History of Cartography (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is a global survey of maps and map making from pre-history to the present. It introduces students to the varied scholarly approaches to understanding the knowledge and practice behind representations of geographic space as well as the interpretation of maps, plans, and charts as objects of analysis. The content of this course can be tailored to times and places of particular interest to students.
HIST 9026Tutorial in 20th Century International History (3.00)
Readings in modern international history: topics will include war, peace-making, diplomacy, the role of non-governmental organizations in world politics, refugees, human rights, decolonization, and transnational ideologies.
Course was offered Fall 2015
HIST 9027Tutorial in Marx's Capital (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial will be a close reading of Capital vol. 1 with excerpts from Smith, Ricardo, and Malthus, as well as secondary sources on the texts. We will finish with historical & contemporary perspectives on Marx and Marxism. By the end students will be prepared to consider the quest of capitalist development outside the West, have a basis for continuing into cultural studies & post-colonial theory & the relationship between theory & history.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
HIST 9028The Indian Ocean, America, and Global History (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the historiography on the Indian Ocean in broad terms, placing it within the context of discussions on world history more broadly. It then looks more specifically on literature that has examined American forays into the Indian Ocean - a history of merchants, consuls, pirates, and diplomats, but also of families - and situates it within a broader conversation on the contours of global history.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIST 9275Legal History and the Scholarly Process I (1.00)
This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of new work in legal history. Students are required to attend the legal history workshop and the legal history writing group and to write a number of short reaction papers in response to the work presented by legal historians over the course of the year. There is no final exam. Through the class, students will engage with a variety of legal history scholars.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIST 9276Legal History and the Scholarly Process II (2.00)
This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of new work in legal history. Students are required to attend the legal history workshop and the legal history writing group and to write a number of short reaction papers in response to the work presented by legal historians over the course of the year. There is no final exam. Through the class, students will engage with a variety of legal history scholars.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIST 9559New Course in General History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of general history.
HIST 9960Readings in History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is a graduate-level adaptation of an undergraduate course in history. The graduate-level adaption requires additional research, readings, or other academic work established by the instructor beyond the undergraduate syllabus.
HIST 9961Supervised Reading and Tutorial (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Graduate study of the historiography of a particular topic or historical period, equivalent to a graduate-level colloquium course. Prerequisites: Approval of director of graduate studies or department chair.
HIST 9962General Exam Preparation (3.00)
In this course, students will prepare for the general examination under the guidance of a faculty examiner. During the course, the student will identify relevant readings; complete and review those readings; and explore the larger questions raised by those readings and their fields more generally.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
HIST 9963Legal History Workshop (3.00)
History PhD and JD/MA students taking this course will attend all meetings of both the Legal History Workshop and the Legal History Writing Group. They will read materials for all meetings and should participate by asking questions and offering comments as appropriate. In addition, students will present a thesis prospectus or master's essay for critique during the semester of enrollment.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014
HIST 9964Master's Essay Revision (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is intended for PhD candidates to revise their master's essays for publication under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty. It is typically taken in first semester of the second year of study.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
HIST 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
HIST 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
History-United States History
HIUS 1501Introductory Seminar in U.S. History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Several seminars are offered each term. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIUS 1559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIUS 2001American History to 1865 (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the development of the colonies and their institutions, the Revolution, the formation and organization of the Republic, and the coming of the Civil War.
HIUS 2002American History Since 1865 (4.00)
Studies the evolution of political, social, and cultural history of the United States from 1865 to the present.
HIUS 2051United States Military History 1600-1900 (3.00)
Military events and developments from the colonial period through the war with Spain in 1898. Major topics include the debate over the role of the military in a free society, the interaction between the military and civilian spheres, and the development of a professional army and navy.
HIUS 2052America and War Since 1900 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a course on war and the American experience during the last century-plus. It is a sequel to HIUS 2051, which covers U.S. military history from 1600 to 1900. This part of the course includes the how and why of traditional military history but goes further, tackling issues in intelligence or technology or economics -- from the rise of intelligence agencies to the growth of a military-industrial complex.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIUS 2061American Economic History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies American economic history from its colonial origins to the present. Cross-listed as ECON 2060.
HIUS 2071American Power and Energies - A History of the United States (3.00)
America today is a high-energy society. For over a century, the United States has also wielded vast economic, political, and military power. How do energy sources relate to social, corporate, or political power? This course examines that question across the history of the United States. It draws from political, business, technological, and environmental history to chart the growth, effects, and limits of power in its varied forms.
HIUS 2081Making the Machine Age: Technology in American Society, 1890-1990 (3.00)
Social history of American technology in the twentieth century. Primarily concerned with the interplay between society and technology. Historical perspectives on the causes of technological change and the ways in which technologies extend or upset centers of social power and influence.
HIUS 2121Political History of Housework (3.00)
Political History of Housework
HIUS 2401History of American Catholicism (3.00)
Historical survey of American Catholicism from its colonial beginnings to the present. Cross-listed as RELC 2401.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
HIUS 2559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIUS 2711American Environmental History (3.00)
Explores the historical relationship between people and the environment in North America from colonial times to the present. Topics include the role of culture, economics, politics, and technology in that relationship. Cross-listed as STS 2060. Prerequisite: First-year writing course (e.g., STS 1010, ENWR 1510).
HIUS 3011The Colonial Period of American History (3.00)
Studies the English background and the development of colonial institutions, political, social, economic and ecclesiastical.
HIUS 3012War and Empire in Colonial America (3.00)
This course examines colonial American warfare, imperial competition, and encounters with Native Americans with a special focus on historical geography and the history of cartography. We will debate ethical question relating to the expansion of European empires in North America and the Caribbean, including Indian land rights, the costs of slavery, the deportation of populations in wartime, and justifications for the American Revolution.
HIUS 3031The Era of the American Revolution (3.00)
Studies the growth of ideas and institutions that led to American independence, the creation of a union, and a distinct culture.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
HIUS 3051The Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1845 (3.00)
Studies the history of the United States during the early national and middle periods, including political, constitutional, social and economic developments as well as the westward movement.
HIUS 3071The Coming of the Civil War (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines the period from roughly 1815 to 1861 focusing on the interaction between the developing sectional conflict and the evolving political system, with the view of explaining what caused the Civil War.
HIUS 3072The Civil War and Reconstruction (3.00)
Examines the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction in detail and attempts to assess their impact on 19th century American society, both in the North and in the South.
HIUS 3081History of the American Deaf Community (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This new course will examine the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods and secondary sources. We will also view a few historical films. Prerequisite: none (though a previous class in History or ASL is recommended)
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013
HIUS 3111The United States in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900 (3.00)
Studies the transformation of American society under the impact of industrialization, from 1870 to 1900. Examines how capitalists, workers, farmers, and the middle class attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes and visions. Focuses on social and cultural experience and politics.
HIUS 3131The Emergence of Modern America, 1870-1930 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes the distinct characteristics of American modernity as they emerge in the period from the end of reconstruction to the Great Depression. Explores the creation of big business and large-scale bureaucratic organizations. Includes the first military-industrial complex of World War I, the invention of R & D, the growth of research universities, and the modern organization of knowledge. Describes the landscape of new large urban hinterlands; analyzes the difficult encounters of class, ethnicity, race, and gender both at home and at work; and studies the changing leisure patterns of a consumer culture.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2011
HIUS 3141Civil Society in Twentieth Century U.S. (3.00)
Tocqueville famously described the U.S. of the 1830s as a society of voluntary associaitons in a weak state. In the 21st century, commentators point instead to the weight of big government. How did a diverse American civil society of associations, churches, noprofit organizations, and philanthropic institutions approach the great conflicts of the twentieth century at home and abroad? What kind of partnership with government did they have?
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2010
HIUS 3150Salem Witch Trials: History and Literature (3.00)
The seminar will examine the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692 and enable students to work with all the original sources. Prerequisites: Restricted to Religious Studies, American Studies, English, SWAG, and History Majors.
HIUS 3151Modernizing, Moralizing and Mass Politics: US, 1900-1945 (3.00)
The development of modern America is explored by considering the growing interdependence between its politics, economy, culture, and social structure in the first half of the 20th century.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
HIUS 3161Viewing America, 1940 to 1980 (3.00)
Built around news reels, photographs, television, films, and reviews, this course explores how Americans viewed some of the major events and trends in the post-war period.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
HIUS 3162Digitizing America (3.00)
This class will explore the history of the United States from 1980 to the present through the lens of the information revolution that occurred during this period. We will examine the origins of the technological changes like the mainframe computer, merged media, the emergence of the internet, and the impact that they had on the economy, politics and social interaction.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012
HIUS 3171US Since 1945: People, Politics, Power (3.00)
Surveys post World War II U.S. politics uncovering the links between long range social and economic phenomenon (suburbanization, decline of agricultural employment, the rise and fall of the labor movement, black urbanization and proletarianization, economic society and insecurity within the middle class, the changing structure of multinational business) and the more obvious political movements, election results, and state policies of the last half century.
HIUS 3172America in Vietnam (3.00)
This course will cover the history of American involvement in Vietnam from 1945 through 1975. It will offer a detailed study of U.S. political, economic, cultural, and military policy through a wide range of scholarship on the U.S. engagement with Vietnam, focusing on the war's impact in Southeast Asia and in the United States.
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIUS 3173The Vietnam War in American Film (3.00)
This course will examine landmark films on the Vietnam War from the 1960s through the present. Lectures and discussion focusing on between 8 and 10 films, which students will watch as part of class, will explore the history and themes depicted in these films, highlighting directorial viewpoints, the contexts in which the films were produced and received, their historical accuracy, and their impact on the legacy of the war in American culture.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2016
HIUS 3182Politics of Health Care in America: History, Policy, and Society (3.00)
This course will examine the history of health care in the United States. The course will focus on the intersection of public policy with medical practice and institutional development, as well as on changes in societal conceptions of health. We will explore the role of physicians, patients, the state, the private sector, and hospitals and other institutions in the development and operation of the U.S. health care system.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIUS 3191American Jewish History (3.00)
This course examines the 350-year history of the Jewish people in colonial North American and the United States. It surveys the social, religious, cultural, and political life of Jews and the comparative dimension with other minority groups and Jewish communities across the world.
HIUS 3221Hands-On Public History (3.00)
This course introduces the issues and debates that have shaped public history as a scholarly discipline, but the focus of the course will be on the contemporary practice of public history. Students will all be awarded internships at local or regional historic sites, archives, museums, and databases for the duration of the semester. Readings and field trips will provide a foundation for students' hands-on engagement with public history.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIUS 3231Rise and Fall of the Slave South (3.00)
A history of the American South from the arrival of the first English settlers through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Cross-listed with AAS 3231. 
HIUS 3232The South in the Twentieth Century (3.00)
Studies the history of the South from 1900 to the present focusing on class structure, race relations, cultural traditions, and the question of southern identity.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2012
HIUS 3261The Trans-Mississippi West (3.00)
Studies economic, social, and cultural history of the Far West from the Mexican War to World War II. Focuses on continuity and change in the region's history and the social experience of its peoples from the era of conquest, migration, and settlement to the era of agribusiness, Hollywood, and national park tourism.
HIUS 3262Witnessing Slavery: Interpreting Slave Testimony in U.S. History (3.00)
Course examines the history of slaves and slavery in 18th and 19th century America as revealed by the testimony of slaves themselves. We will study the important roles slavery and changing notions of race have played in U.S. history, the enduring legacy of African culture , the dynamic agency of African Americans in the face of racism and violence, and how they developed their own notions of work, family, culture, community, and power.
Course was offered Spring 2014
HIUS 3281History of Virginia to 1865 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the development of colonial institutions as influenced by frontier conditions and British policy and culture. A survey of Virginia history from colonial times to 1865.
HIUS 3282History of Virginia Since 1865 (3.00)
Studies the social, economic, and political development of modern Virginia from the Civil War to present. Focuses on Virginia identity and institutions, race relations, and class structures.
HIUS 3301The History of UVa in the Twentieth Century (3.00)
Studies the local, regional, and national trends effecting higher education, relating these trends specifically to the University of Virginia. Students are active participants in recovering the institution's history through oral interviews with alumni, faculty, and administrators and through serious archival work.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIUS 3401Development of American Science (3.00)
Studies the history of the development of American science from the colonial period to the present, emphasizing the process of the professionalization of American science and on the relationships between the emergent scientific community and such concerns as higher education and the government.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
HIUS 3411American Business (3.00)
Surveys the rise of the modern corporate form of American business and an analysis of the underlying factors which shaped that development.
HIUS 3451History of Urban America (3.00)
Studies the evolution of the American city from colonial times to the end of the nineteenth century. Emphasizes both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.
HIUS 3452History of Urban America (3.00)
Studies the evolution of the American city from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasizes both the physical growth of the system of cities and the development of an urban culture, including comparisons with European and Asian cities.
HIUS 3453Work, Poverty, and Welfare: 20th Century U.S. Social Policy History (3.00)
The historical relationship between work, poverty, and the development of social policy in the United States during the 20th century, with a focus on the structure of the workplace, the role of the state, poverty, and the interaction of these and other factors in shaping social policy.
HIUS 3455History of U.S. Foreign Relations to 1914 (3.00)
Studies American foreign relations from colonial times to 1914.
HIUS 3456History of U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1914 (3.00)
Studies American foreign relations from 1914 to the present.
HIUS 3471History of American Labor (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys American labor in terms of the changing nature of work and its effect on working men, women, and children. Emphasizes social and cultural responses to such changes, as well as the organized labor movement.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
HIUS 3481American Social History to 1870 (3.00)
Topics include demographic change, the emergence of regional social orders, the shaping of American religion, the impact of the industrial revolution, and the development of important elites.
HIUS 3482United States Social History Since 1870 (3.00)
Topics include the development of a predominantly urban society, with particular emphasis on sources of stability, class and stratification, ethnic patterns, religious identities, social elites, and education.
HIUS 3491Rural Poverty in Our Time (3.00)
This course will use an interdisciplinary format and document based approach to explore the history of non-urban poverty in the US South from the 1930s to the present. Weaving together the social histories of poor people, the political history of poverty policies, and the history of representations of poverty, the course follows historical cycles of attention and neglect during the Great Depression, the War on Poverty, and the present.
HIUS 3523Disco and Disillusionment: The United States in the 1970s (3.00)
This lecture provides both a chronological and thematic approach to the history of 1970s America. Class will focus on significant shifts in American politics, culture, and society. The course will encourage us to think more deeply about the fate of liberalism in post-1960s America, the rise of ethnic identity and its impact on the rights revolution, gender and the politics of sexuality, religion and the rise of the South, Nixon and Watergate.
HIUS 3559New Course in United States History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIUS 3611Gender & Sexuality in AM, 1600-1865 (3.00)
Studies the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
HIUS 3612Gender & Sexuality in America, 1865 to Present (3.00)
Studies the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
HIUS 3621Coming of Age in America: A History of Youth (3.00)
This course will explore the historical experience of young people and the meaning of youth from the colonial period to the late twentieth century. We will analyze how shifting social relations and cultural understandings changed what it meant to grow up. Topics to be explored include work, family, sexuality, education, political involvement, and popular culture.
HIUS 3641American Indian History (3.00)
From the post-Ice Age migrations to the Americas to current developments in tribal sovereignty, this survey course will include such topics as mutually beneficial trade and diplomatic relations between Natives and newcomers; the politics of empire; U.S. expansion; treaties and land dispossession; ecological, demographic, and social change; pan-Indian movements; and legal and political activism. 
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
HIUS 3651Afro-American History to 1865 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of black Americans from the introduction of slavery in America to the end of the Civil War.
HIUS 3652Afro-American History Since 1865 (3.00)
Studies the history of black Americans from the Civil War to the present.
HIUS 3654Black Fire (3.00)
This course examines the history and contemporary experiences of African Americans at the University of Virginia from the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the present era.
HIUS 3671History of the Civil Rights Movement (3.00)
Examines the history of the southern Civil Rights movement. Studies the civil rights movement's philosophies, tactics, events, personalities, and consequences, beginning in 1900, but concentrating heavily on the activist years between 1955 and 1968.
HIUS 3752The History of Early American Law (3.00)
Studies the major developments in American law, politics, and society from the colonial settlements to the Civil War. Focuses on legal change, constitutional law, legislation, and the common law from 1776 to 1860.
HIUS 3753The History of Modern American Law (3.00)
Studies the major developments in American law, politics, and society from the era of Reconstruction to the recent past. Focuses on legal change as well as constitutional law, legislation, and the common law.
HIUS 3756American Legal Thought since 1880 (3.00)
A survey of American legal thought from Holmes to Posner. Emphasizes theories of property, contract, tort, corporations and administrative law in Legal Realism, Legal Process Jurisprudence, Law and Economics, and Critical Legal Studies.
Course was offered Spring 2014
HIUS 3851Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States to 1865 (3.00)
Analyzes the traditions of thought and belief in relation to significant historical events and cultural changes from the 17th century to the Civil War.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
HIUS 3852Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States since 1865 (3.00)
Analyzes the main traditions of thought and belief in the relationship to significant historical events and cultural changes from the Civil War to the present.
HIUS 3853From Redlines to Subprime: Race and Real Estate in the US (3.00)
Course examines the relationship of race, real estate, wealth, and poverty in the 20th c. US. Readings focus on the role homeownership and residential location played in shaping educational options, job prospects, living expenses, health, quality of life, and ability to accumulate wealth; the impact of federal policies and industry practices on patterns of residential racial segregation; and struggles for integration and equal access.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIUS 4160History Behind the Headlines (4.00)
This course takes advantage of the nationally known academic experts, journalists, and policy-makers who come through UVa's Miller Center of Public Affairs each week. Based on the work of these visiting scholars, students will consider the historical background of some of our most pressing policy and public affairs issues. Assignments will include extensive weekly readings, a few short op-eds, and a lengthy original research essay.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
HIUS 4260Voices of the Civil War (3.00)
This course uses the writings of participants to examine major themes relating to the American Civil War. Assigned texts will illuminate, among other topics: (1) Why the war came; (2) How it evolved from a struggle for Union to one for Union and emancipation; (3) How the conflict affected civilians on both sides; (4) Why soldiers fought; and (5) How men and women on each side remembered the war and how those memories influence current perceptions.
HIUS 4501Seminar in United States History (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIUS 4511Colloquium in United States History (4.00)
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIUS 4559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2011
HIUS 4591Topics in United States History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors on an equal basis.
HIUS 4993Independent Study in United States History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Enrollment is open to majors or non-majors. Note: These courses are open only to Human Biology majors.
HIUS 5022Economic Culture in Early America (3.00)
This discussion-based colloquium, open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, examines economic life in colonial and Revolutionary America. Our readings--on topics that include market agriculture, transatlantic commerce, and the slave trade--will features works of history that describe economic behaviors and, at the same time, interpret production, trade, and consumption in cultural terms.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIUS 5081Turning Points in U.S. History: Micro-Analytic Methods (3.00)
The course has two main objects. The first is to linger over several turning points in the history of the United States. The second is work on `micro-analytic' methods to use in studying such critical episodes.
HIUS 5559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
Course was offered Fall 2010
HIUS 6010Settlement of Am West, ca 1848-1900 (1.00)
This course will examine the settling of the American West. Roughly 5 decades the course covers are some of the most turbulent in Am History-the Civil War, Indian Wars, and coming of railroads and millions pouring into land across the Mississippi.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIUS 6011Learning History (1.00)
This course is the 2nd in a series which will explore what it means to be a teacher leader in history education. There are 3 goals 1) planning and implementation successful history learning experiences, 2) continuing conversation about sharing effective instructional approaches, 3) introduction to observing instruction/reflecting on instruction.
Course was offered Summer 2011
HIUS 6012Responding to Crises of Modernity: the US in the Progressive Era (1.00)
This course will explore how industrilization, urbanization, immigration, and technological changes of the late 19th and early 205h centruies led to a strong and diverse wave of reform in the roughly 2 decades preceding US entry into WWI. This course is restricted to Center for the Liberal Arts students.
HIUS 6014The Progressive Era, the New Deal and the Transformation of American Democ (1.00)
This course will explore the first 4 decades of the 20th centruy, when a diverse array of government officials, academics, social activitists, and crusading journalists instigated changes in the ideas, institutions, and policies that shaped American politics
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIUS 6015Leadership in History (1.00)
This course is the third in a series that will explore what it means to be a teacher leader in history education
HIUS 6016Hearing the Civil Rights Movement (1.00)
This course explores key moments in the civil rights movement through sound and film recordings, related to them.
HIUS 6017The Other Liberalism: The United States in Vietnam (1.00)
This course will cover the history of American involvement in Vietnam from 1945 thru 1975
HIUS 6018America and the Sixties (1.00)
This course will address those events and people crucial to understanding 1960's America. From the promise of a Kennedy presidency to the Great Society of Lyndon B. Johnson to the quagmire of the Vietnam War, participants will consider not only American participation in Vietnam, but the impetus behind the war to eradicate poverty, and the important people, orgs, and battles in the cursade to end racial and social injustice.
HIUS 6019The Paradox of Prosperity (1.00)
This course will explore how the growth of America into a dynamic nation was fraught with paradoxes and how paradox ironically inspired Americans from a variety of fields and walks of life to believe they could meet and conquer any challenge which might emerege.
HIUS 6029Cold War Battle for Hearts and Minds (1.00)
The seminar will explore the internationa, intellectual, idealogical and cultural aspects of superpower struggle that consumed much of the 20th Century. It will trace East-West competition from roots to WWII and extends study past 1991 into Cold War World.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIUS 6030Voices of the Civil Rights Movement (1.00)
Explores key moments in Civil Rights Movement thru sounds and fil recording related to them. Among topcs are rhetoric of Rev King Jr. residencies of Kennety, Johnson and Nixon and reaction from the White House to severl civil rights crises.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIUS 6031The Origins of the US Welfare State (1.00)
Explore emergence and development of U.S. welfare state. Assess meaning of term "welfare state" in an American context: what counts as part of the welfare state, who is included in its benefits, and what rights--and obligations--does it suggest?
HIUS 6032Methods Teaching (1.00)
Provides teachers with overview of effective approaches to planning and implementing successful history learning experiences for students. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between educational theory and development of practical teaching techniques for every day use in the classroom.
Course was offered Summer 2011
HIUS 6033Collaboration and Identity in Early America (1.00)
Participants will study the question of America from the founding and through the legacy of Jamestown and examine the collaborative effort that went into the formulation of America's founding documents, the Declaration of Independence and Constitution.
Course was offered Summer 2011
HIUS 6034Meeting Challenges of World History Survey (1.00)
This short course will alert teachers of social studies in all grades to resources and approaches on which they might draw, considered in context of the intellectual challenges of transcending the, inevitably modern (and thus implicity euro-centric) approaches to the subject that will prevail in available materials.
HIUS 6035The Progressive Era and the Reform Impulse (1.00)
This course will explore how the Progressive Era brought together diverse groups of people who sought to address and redeem the injustices of the Gilded Age and reform an America that marginalized many of its citizens, including, women, blacks, and the poor.
HIUS 6036Methods Course in Teaching History (1.00)
This class provides teachers with an overview of effective approaches to planning and implementing successful history learning experiences for students. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between educational theory and the development of practical teaching techniques for every day use in the history classroom.
HIUS 6037Methods Course in Teaching History (1.00)
This class provides teachers with an overview of effective approaches to planning and implementing successful history learning experiences for students. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the relationship between educational theory and the development of practical teaching techniques for every day use in the history classroom.
HIUS 6038The Executive Branch and National Policy (1.00)
This course will explore the impact of the executive branch on domestic and foreign policy making in the United States with an emphasis on developments during 1960s. It will focus on a range of topics, including health, care, civil rights and the war in Vietnam. In addition to exploring executive policy making in these areas, it will also address interactions between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches.
HIUS 7002Introductory Colloquium in American History (6.00)
American history from 1607 to the present, emphasizing various approaches and current problems in recent historiography.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIUS 7021Comparative Cultural Encounters in North America, 1492-1800 (3.00)
This course examines Spanish, French, Dutch, and British encounters with the native peoples of North America during the initial centuries of colonization: 1492-1800. It combines the "Atlantic" approach to early America with a "Continental" approach that accords dynamism and agency to native peoples in their interplay with colonizers.
Course was offered Spring 2016
HIUS 7031Colonial British America (3.00)
This colloquium offers an introduction to themes, regions, and debates in the history of colonial and Revolutionary America. It will focus on colonization, development, and cultural encounter in early North America, West Indies, and the Atlantic World in the early modern period, ca. 1600-1800, from a variety of historical approaches.
HIUS 7041The Early American Republic, 1783-1830 (3.00)
Reading and discussion in national political history from 1789 to 1815.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
HIUS 7051Antebellum America (3.00)
Studies selected problems and developments in the period 1830-1860 through reading and discussion.
HIUS 7071Civil War and Reconstruction (3.00)
Studies selected problems and developments through reading and discussion.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
HIUS 7072Civil War And The Constitution (3.00)
This course will examine the constitutional history of the United States from 1845 to 1877, paying attention to how the U.S. Constitution shaped the Civil War, and also to how the war left its mark on the Constitution.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIUS 7082Foundational Texts of the 19th Century US (3.00)
This course will acquaint students with foundational texts relating to 19th-Century U.S. history. The primary goal is to provide a sound understanding of books, essays, and other documents that often are mentioned but too seldom read carefully. The readings will convey crucial insights into the political, social, cultural, military, and economic history of the century--though they are not intended to offer comprehensive coverage of the era.
HIUS 7101Early American Military History (3.00)
Introduces the military history of the American colonies and the U.S. between 1689-1815. Topics include the history of early conflicts with the Indians; the colonial wars; the American Revolution; and the War of 1812. Explores the significance of warfare for the emerging republican culture of the U.S., focusing on the social contexts of war as these have been revealed in the 'new military history.'
HIUS 7131The Emergence of Modern America, ca. 1870-ca. 1930 (3.00)
Studies the distinctive characteristics of American modernity as they emerged in the period from the end of reconstruction to the 1930s. Concentrates on the interplay between large national changes and local life as America became a world power. Investigates the reciprocal relations between society and politics, social organization and science and technology, large-scale bureaucratic organizations and the changing class structure, culture, and ideology.
HIUS 7141America Since 1930 (3.00)
Studies the rise and fall of domestic liberalism and the political economy that sustained it.
HIUS 7231The American South Before 1900 (3.00)
Surveys major themes and interpretations of the American South, especially 19th century.
HIUS 7232The South Since 1900 (3.00)
A colloquium on selected themes in 20th century southern history.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2012
HIUS 7261American Political Development in Action (3.00)
Readings drawn from the leading works in this field that span history, political science, and sociology. Students will also attend colloquia where works in progress will be presented by leading scholars.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2012
HIUS 7451Urban History (3.00)
Reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources focused on different topics annually.
HIUS 7471American Labor History (3.00)
Readings and discussion on U.S. working class, including its institutions, consciousness, social composition, politics.
HIUS 7481Approaches to Social History (3.00)
Study of the relationships between social history and other disciplines through readings and discussions about broad interpretative problems in 19th and 20th century American society.
HIUS 7559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
HIUS 7611Women's History (3.00)
Readings and discussion on selected topics in the history of women in the U.S.
HIUS 7621Topics in United States Gender History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This colloquium will survey foundational and cutting-edge scholarship on the social construction of femininity and masculinity in U.S. history, from the colonial era to 1900. We will explore how gender conventions take shape, and how they are perpetuated and contested. Our readings reconsider key events in women's and gender history such as the Salem witch trials and Seneca Falls convention.
Course was offered Fall 2015
HIUS 7641The American West Since 1850 (3.00)
This is a graduate readings seminar in which students will become familiar with the major issues in the history of the American West including, but not limited to, American Indians, the environment, and the federal presence in the region.
HIUS 7651The History of United States Foreign Relations (3.00)
Colloquium on selected themes and topics in the history and historiography of U.S. foreign relations.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2009
HIUS 7652Constitutional History I: From the Revolution to 1896 (3.00)
The history and historiography of American constitutional development from the revolution to 1896.
HIUS 7653Constitutional History II: The Twentieth Century (3.00)
The history and historiography of American constitutional development in the context of social, political, and cultural change in the twentieth century.
Course was offered Fall 2014
HIUS 7654Civil Rights from Plessy to Brown (3.00)
Studies in the role of law and lawyering in the political, social, and cultural history of civil rights struggles from 1896 to 1954.
HIUS 7655American Legal History (3.00)
Intensive study along topical and chronological lines of the ways in which fundamental legal forms (federalism or property or contract) have shaped (and been shaped by) American politics and society from the eighteenth century to the recent past.
HIUS 7656Crime & Punishment in American History (3.00)
Studies in the history of American criminal justice
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
HIUS 7657Colloquium in Modern US History -- Conservatism and the Right (3.00)
Studies selected aspects and problems in the history of American thought.
HIUS 7658Nineteenth-Century American Social and Cultural History (3.00)
Reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources.
HIUS 7659Twentieth Century US Cultural Hisory (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This readings course introduces graduate students to the theory, methods, and historiography of cultural history through a survey of key texts in twentieth century US history.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011
HIUS 8002Topics in United States Political History Since 1840 (3.00)
Graduate seminar to facilitate research papers on aspects of U.S. political history since 1840.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIUS 8021Research Seminar in Early American History (3.00)
This course offers JD/MA and PhD students an opportunity to research and write an article-length research essay of publishable quality on a topic in the history of early America, ca. 1500-1877. Research will be conducted with the guidance of the intended dissertation adviser. A revised version of essay can be submitted to fulfill the master's essay requirement for students in U.S. History.
HIUS 8022Research Seminar in Modern American History (3.00)
This course offers MA/JD and PhD students an opportunity to research and write an article-length research essay of publishable quality on a topic in the history of modern America, ca. 1877-present. Research will be conducted with the guidance of the dissertation adviser. A revised version of the essay can be submitted to fulfill the master's essay requirement of students in U.S. History. Prerequisite: PhD students History or permission of instructor
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
HIUS 8041The Age of Jefferson (3.00)
Intensive study of different aspects of problems of this period of American history by means of discussions, readings, and research papers.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIUS 8051Antebellum America (3.00)
Research on selected topics in the period 1830-1860.
HIUS 8141American History, 1929-1945 (3.00)
A research seminar in which students write a major paper on some aspect of American history during this period. Prerequisite: Graduate status; at least one upper-division undergraduate course, including this period or a relevant graduate course.
HIUS 8230The Nineteenth-Century South (3.00)
Research on selected topics in the history of the American South during the eras of slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the New South.
Course was offered Spring 2011
HIUS 8235Topics in Modern Southern History (3.00)
A research seminar. Prerequisite: HIUS 7232 or instructor permission.
HIUS 8451The History of United States Foreign Relations (3.00)
A research seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2010
HIUS 8559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2010
HIUS 8755American Legal History (3.00)
Directed research in selected areas of American legal history.
HIUS 8756Lawyers in American Public Life (3.00)
Reading and biographical research on the legal profession and the role of lawyers in American government and politics since 1789.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIUS 9021Tutorial in Transnational US History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Seminar rethinks United States history (18th century-present) by moving beyond the geographical boundaries of the nation. Thematic readings focus on way in which transnational and comparative scholarship is reshaping American historiography. Our goal is to better understand how assumptions and certainties of 'America' have been called into question by transnational history. Course is intended to help prepare students for general exams.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIUS 9022Tutorial in the History of American Capitalism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduction to the history and historiography of capitalism in the United States. Readings span 18th century to the present with attention to the development of markets, labor, business, consumption and welfare.The course gives special attention to how historians have framed the central debates in American economic life. This course is designed to prepare graduate students for examination in the field of Capitalism in the United States.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
HIUS 9023Tutorial in Early American History to 1763 (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course examines the historiography of colonial British America and the Atlantic world from the late sixteenth century through the late eighteenth century. It surveys scholarship on the imperial and Atlantic contexts of early modern colonization and focuses on the regional histories of settlement and development in North America and the Caribbean with a special focus on Native Americans and African Slavery.
HIUS 9024Tutorial in US Enviornmental History (3.00)
This course will survey the history and historiography of environmental policy and ecological change in the 20th century United States, with a focus on governmental and societal response to disaster, and the dynamic relationship between public understanding of health and environmental risks and emergence of new technologies.
HIUS 9025Tutorial in Post-World War II U.S. Political History (3.00)
This course will survey the history and historiography of American politics and political economy from 1945 to the present. Readings and meetings will address major themes in American political history, including: liberalism and conservatism, education, housing, suburbanization and the urban crisis, racial inequality, and the culture wars.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
HIUS 9027Tutorial in Foundational Texts in 19th-Century United States History (3.00)
This course acquaints students with foundational texts relating to 19th-Century U.S. history. The primary goal is to provide a sound understanding of books, essays, and other documents that often are mentioned but too seldom read carefully. The readings will convey crucial insights into political, social, cultural, military, diplomatic, and economic history .
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
HIUS 9028Reading Alexis de Tocqueville (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Reading Democracy in America in depth, which US historians will want to do. European history graduate students will also want to explore either Tocqueville's Recollections of the 1848 revolution or The Ancien Regime and the Revolution.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
HIUS 9029Tutorial in Civil Rights Movement History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will survey the history and historiography of the civil rights movement in America. Readings and meetings will address major themes in the history and legacy of the Black Freedom Struggle.
Course was offered Fall 2016
HIUS 9030Tutorial in Race, Religion, the Law and the Struggle for Justice in the US (3.00)
This course examines the ways in which the U.S. legal system and American religion have shaped and challenged African Americans¿ conceptions of freedom and justice in the United States from the post-emancipation period to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIUS 9070Tutorial in Civil War and Reconstruction (3.00)
A course devoted to the era of the American Civil War with emphasis on the period 1861-1865. The lecture portion of the course will address such questions as why the war came, why the United States won, and how the war affected various elements of American society. The seminar portion of the tutorial will examine 15 books. Each student will write a 25-page historiographical essay on a topic to be determined in consultation with the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIUS 9559New Course in United States History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
Course was offered Fall 2016
Medieval Studies
MSP 3501Exploring the Middle Ages (3.00)
Discussion and criticism of selected works of and on the period. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.
Course was offered Fall 2015
MSP 3559New Course in Medieval Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
MSP 3801Exploring the Middle Ages (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discussion and criticism of selected works of and on the period. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.
MSP 4559New Course in Medieval Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of United States history.
MSP 4801Seminar in Medieval Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For advanced students dealing with methods of research in the field. Taught by different members of the medieval faculty.