UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses for the Linguistics Program    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
American Studies
AMST 2460Language in the U.S. (3.00)
Through diverse academic/theoretical readings and spoken, written, and visual material, students will learn to analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments as related to critical linguistic and cultural analysis of primary and secondary source material. This course examines complex relationships among American language and cultural practices, American history, race, gender, and class ideologies, and social identities.
Course was offered Spring 2016
AMST 2462Language & New Media (3.00)
This course investigates the interactional relationship between language and American society with a focus on New Media contexts. More specifically, it considers how language both shapes and is shaped by society in email, texting, Facebook, blogging, online gaming, YouTube, and more. Through an interdisciplinary approach, students examine how social constructions are created by, and are realized in New Media genres.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
Anthropology
ANTH 2400Language and Culture (3.00)
Introduces the interrelationships of linguistic, cultural, and social phenomena with emphasis on the importance of these interrelationships in interpreting human behavior. No prior knowledge of linguistics is required.
ANTH 2410Sociolinguistics (3.00)
Reviews key findings in the study of language variation. Explores the use of language to express identity and social difference.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
ANTH 2420Language and Gender (3.00)
Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language.
ANTH 2430Languages of the World (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
An introduction to the study of language relationships and linguistic structures.  Topics covered the basic elements of grammatical description; genetic, areal, and typological relationships among languages; a survey of the world's major language groupings and the notable structures and grammatical categories they exhibit; and the issue of language endangerment. Prerequisite: One year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.
ANTH 2440Language and Cinema (3.00)
Looks historically at speech and language in Hollywood movies, including the technological challenges and artistic theories and controversies attending the transition from silent to sound films. Focuses on the ways that gender, racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed through the representation of speech, dialect, and accent. Introduces semiotics but requires no knowledge of linguistics, or film studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Summer 2015, Fall 2014
ANTH 2470Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities (3.00)
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with MEST 2470.
ANTH 2559New Course in Anthropology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
New course in the subject of anthropology.
ANTH 3450Native American Languages (3.00)
Introduces the native languages of North America and the methods that linguists and anthropologists use to record and analyze them. Examines the use of grammars, texts and dictionaries of individual languages and affords insight into the diversity among the languages.
ANTH 3455African Languages (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
An introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax); the classification of African languages; the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory; language and social identity; verbal art; language policy debates; the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with MEST 3470. Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ANTH 3480Language and Prehistory (3.00)
This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics and discusses the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory.
ANTH 3490Language and Thought (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Language and Thought
ANTH 3541Topics in Linguistics (3.00)
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with linguistics.
ANTH 4420Theories of Language (3.00)
Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ANTH 5401Linguistic Field Methods (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Investigates the grammatical structure of non-European language on the basis of data collected in class from a native speaker. A different language is the focus of study each year.
ANTH 5410Phonology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
An introduction to the theory and analysis of linguistic sound systems. Covers the essential units of speech sound that lexical and grammatical elements are composed of, how those units are organized at multiple levels of representation, and the principles governing the relation between levels.     
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
ANTH 5440Morphology (3.00)
An overview of morphological theory within the generative paradigm. Covers notions of the morpheme, theories of the phonology-syntax interface (e.g., lexical phonology, prosodic morphology, optimality theory), and approaches to issues arising at the morphology-syntax interface (e.g., inflection, agreement, incorporation, compounding).
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ANTH 5470Language and Identity (3.00)
In anthropology, where identity has become a central concern, language is seen as an important site for the construction of, and negotiation over social identities. In linguistics, reference to categories of social identity helps to explain language structure and change. This seminar explores the overlap between these converging trends by focusing on the notion of discourse as a nexus of cultural and linguistic processes.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2010
ANTH 5480Literacy and Orality (3.00)
This course surveys ethnographic and linguistic literature on literacy, focusing on the social meanings of speaking vs. writing (and hearing vs. reading) as opposed communicative practices, looking especially at traditionally oral societies.
Course was offered Fall 2014
ANTH 5490Speech Play and Verbal Art (3.00)
This graduate-level seminar seeks to understand variation in language (and its significance for social relations and social hierarchies) by focusing on forms of language that are aesthetically valued (whether as powerful or as poetic) in particular communities. The course assumes some familiarity both with technical analysis of language and anthropological perspectives on social formations.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2012
ANTH 5541Topics in Linguistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Topics to be announced prior to each semester, dealing with linguistics.
ANTH 7400Linguistic Anthropology (3.00)
An advanced introduction to the study of language from an anthropological point of view. No prior coursework in linguistics is expected, but the course is aimed at graduate students who will use what they learn in their own anthropologically-oriented research. Topics include an introduction to such basic concepts in linguistic anthropology as language in world-view, the nature of symbolic meaning, language and nationalism, universals and particulars in language, language in history and prehistory, the ethnography of speaking, the nature of everyday conversation, and the study of poetic language. The course is required for all Anthropology graduate students. It also counts toward the Theory requirement for the M.A. in Linguistics.
ANTH 7420Theories of Language (3.00)
Survey of modern schools of linguistics, both American and European, discussing each approach in terms of historical and intellectual context, analytical goals, assumptions about the nature of language, and relation between theory and methodology.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ANTH 7450Native American Languages (3.00)
Surveys the classification and typological characteristics of Native American languages and the history of their study, with intensive work on one language by each student. Some linguistics background is helpful.
ANTH 7455African Languages (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
An introduction to the linguistic diversity of the African continent, with focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include linguistic structures (sound systems, word-formation, and syntax); the classification of African languages; the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory; language and social identity; verbal art; language policy debates; the rise of "mixed" languages among urban youth. Taught concurrently with ANTH 3455.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ANTH 7470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Language and Culture in the Middle East
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ANTH 7480Language and Prehistory (3.00)
This course covers the basic principles of diachronic linguistics (the study of how languages change over time) and the uses of linguistic data in the reconstruction of prehistory. Considered is the use of linguistic evidence in tracing prehistoric population movements in demonstrating contact among prehistoric groups and in the reconstruction of daily life. To the extent that the literature permits, examples and case studies will be drawn from the Mayan language area of Central America, and will include discussion of the pre-Columbian Mayan writing system and its ongoing decipherment. Fulfills the comparative-historical requirement for Linguistics graduate students.
ANTH 7541Topics in Sociolinguistics (3.00)
Analyzes particular aspects of the social use of language. Topics vary from year to year.
American Sign Language
ASL 4750Topics in Deaf Studies (3.00)
Examines such topics as American deaf history; ASL linguistics; deaf education; cultural versus pathological views of deaf people; controversies over efforts to eliminate sign language and cure deafness; ASL poetry and storytelling; deafness in mainstream literature, film, and drama; deafness and other minority identities; and the international deaf community.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
Classics
CLAS 3300Introduction to Indo-european Linguistics (3.00)
Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single "proto-language," called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source?
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
CLAS 3350Language and Literature of the Early Celts (3.00)
This introduction to the Celtic inhabitants of Gaul and Britain unites two approaches, one literary, one linguistic. First, we will compare descriptions of the Celts found in Greek and Latin authors with readings of Celtic literature in translation, notably Ireland's great prose epic, the Táin Bó Cúailnge. Second, we will explore how the Celtic languages work, focusing on the basics of Old Irish as well as touching on Middle Welsh and Gaulish.
Course was offered Fall 2014
CLAS 5300Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics (3.00)
Languages as superficially different as English, Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit in fact all developed from a single "proto-language," called Proto-Indo-European. This course will explore the following questions: What was this proto-language like? How do we know what it was like? By what processes did it develop into the various daughter languages? How can we trace words as diverse as wit, idea, video, and Veda back to a common source?
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
Education-Human Services
EDHS 4030Speech and Hearing Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The course examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual and acoustic aspects of voice, speech and hearing. The course leads the student into the fascinating world of new applications in daily life, in business, and especially in education and clinical work.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
EDHS 4300Psycholinguistics & Communication (3.00)
This course focuses on the psychological processes that underlie the acquisition and the use of language. There is an emphasis on the interaction between linguistic skills and other cognitive skills. Topics include learnability, microgenesis of speech, bilingualism and variation, and a psycholinguistic approach to breakdowns (i.e., language pathology).
EDHS 5020Introduction to Speech and Hearing Science (3.00)
Examines principal concepts and procedures for the study of physiologic, perceptual, and acoustic aspects of voice, speech, and hearing. Prerequisite: EDHS 5010 and 5050.
Education-Curriculum, Instruction, & Special Ed
EDIS 7842Teaching ELLs: Theory, Policy & Practice (3.00)
This course is designed to provide you with an overview to key issues related to the education of linguistic minorities (labeled "English Language Learners," or "ELLs") in K-12 settings in the United States. We will explore second language acquisition theory, language policy, pedagogical approaches, and the practices of ELLs and their teachers. Prerequisite: Curry Graduate
Course was offered Fall 2016
English-Language Study
ENLS 3030History of the English Language (3.00)
Studies the development of English word forms and vocabulary from Anglo-Saxon to present-day English. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
English-Medieval Literature
ENMD 5010Introduction to Old English (3.00)
Studies the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.
French
FREN 3030Phonetics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Reviews pronunciation, phonetics, and phonology for undergraduates. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 or equivalent.
FREN 4020History of the French Language (3.00)
Surveys the main currents of the French language in its development from the earliest to present times. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3030 or the equivalent or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2011
FREN 4509Seminar in French Linguistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Topics of specific interest to faculty and advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: FREN 3030, 3031, and one 4000-level course in French.
Linguistics
LING 1559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 2500English as a Global Language (3.00)
This course examines the rise of English, its progress towards filling the need for a global language and the reasons why English has been adopted in this role. We shall pay particular attention to the role English plays in the countries we visit on this voyage as well as its competition with prestigious national and local languages.
LING 2559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 3400Structure of English (3.00)
Introduces students to the descriptive grammar of English and methods of reasoning about linguistic structure. Covers units of sound and phonemic transcriptions, word building and inflectional forms, lexical categories, basic sentence types, common phrase and clause patterns, and syntactic transformations.
LING 3500Language Death (3.00)
Languages are living organisms in the sense that they are constantly being passed on to the succeeding generation. When this transmission from one generation to the next fails, it is only a matter of time before the last speaker of the language dies, which also spells the death of the language in question. This course sets to examine why and how languages die and what measures can or should be taken to reverse it.
LING 3559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics
LING 4559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 4993Independent Study in Linguistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Conducted by students under the supervision of an instructor of their choice.
LING 4994Linguistics Internship (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
In this course students will work closely with a professor on an ongoing research project.
LING 4995Supervised Research in Linguistics (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Conducted by students under the direction of an instructor of their choice.
LING 4998Distinguished Major Thesis (0.00)
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Linguistics faculty member. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Linguistics.
LING 4999Distinguished Major Thesis (6.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a Linguistics faculty member. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Linguistics.
LING 5090Teaching English as a Second Language (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Studies the theory, problems, and methods in teaching English as a second language, with attention to relevant areas of general linguistics and the structure of English. Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 and instructor permission.
LING 5101ESL Teaching Practicum: Language (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Through this course, students focus on the topic of language in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. Prerequisite: 3250
LING 5102ESL Teaching Practicum: Culture (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Through this course, students focus on the topic of culture in ESL, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours. Prerequisite: 3250
LING 5103ESL Teaching Practicum: Writing (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Through this course, students focus on the topic of writing in an L2, while gaining experience in the practice of English-language teaching to international students, faculty, and staff at the University. This experience is an excellent opportunity to gain teaching experience under the supervision of an experienced mentor. For every 1 hour of credit, students must meet with an instructor for 5 classroom & practice 33 hours.
LING 5409Acoustic Phonetics (3.00)
In this course on phonetics, students will explore the acoustic properties of different segment types, formants, pitch, intensity, spectra, and voice pulsing, among other phenomena. The emphasis is on parameters that influence speech intelligibility, the correlates of language variation (comparison between languages, effects of dialects), as well as some aspects of phonetic pathology. Prerequisites: LNGS 3250 or Instructor Permission
Course was offered Summer 2013
LING 5569New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 6010Between Two Cultures, Between Two Languages (2.00)
Virginia teachers examine the relationship of language to culture and the motivational differences between native and non-native speakers learning standard English.
LING 6559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 7400Structure of English (3.00)
This course provides students with a foundation in the grammar of the English language. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, with a focus on structural analysis. Students will gain confidence in discussing the form, function, & usage of linguistic structures. These topics will also be related to the teaching & tutoring of English as a second language including error correction & feedback which will be reflected in advanced final papers.
LING 8559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
LING 8998Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Preparation for Master's Research, no thesis director.
LING 8999MA Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For Master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
LING 9010Directed Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Special Areas Students should choose electives in one or more of the following areas: anthropology, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and Cultures, comparative Latin and Greek, English language study, Germanic linguistics, Indic linguistics, philosophy, psychology, Romance linguistics, Slavic linguistics.
LING 9559New Course in Linguistics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of linguistics.
General Linguistics
LNGS 2220Black English (3.00)
Introduces the history and structure of what has been termed Black English Vernacular or Black Street English. Focuses on the sociolinguistic factors that led to its emergence, its present role in the Black community, and its relevance in education and racial stereotypes.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
LNGS 3250Introduction to Linguistic Theory and Analysis (3.00)
Introduces sign systems, language as a sign system, and approaches to linguistics description. Emphasizes the application of descriptive techniques to data. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
LNGS 5000Linguistic Principles in Language Pedagogy (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Provides prospective language teachers with background in descriptive and theoretical linguistics, thus helping them to make informed pedagogical decisions, set realistic pedagogical goals, and read scholarship in pedagogy of the type that appears in relevant scholarly journals (e.g. The Modern Language Journal). Considers trends in Second Language Acquisition and the relevance thereto of Applied Linguistics in recent years.
LNGS 7010Linguistic Theory and Analysis (3.00)
Linguistic Theory and Analysis
Middle Eastern Studies
MEST 2470Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities (3.00)
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 2470.
MEST 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3470. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014
Psychology
PSYC 4110Psycholinguistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.
PSYC 4111Language Development and Disorders (3.00)
Course will focus on language and cognitive development in persons with disabilities. Among the populations examined will be children with autistic disorder, children with Williams syndrome, deaf children, developmentally dysphasic children, adults with aphasia, and children with severe mental retardation. In addition to spoken language development, the course will examine the acquisition of sign communication skills. Prerequisite: 4th year psychology or cognitive science major status. Must have completed PSYC 3005 and PSYC 3006.
PSYC 4120Psychology of Reading (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 3005
PSYC 5310Developmental Psycholinguistics (3.00)
Examines current research and theoretical models of children's language acquisition. Topics include typically developing children's acquisition of spoken language skills, and the development of communication skills in deaf, autistic, and other groups of children with language disabilities.
PSYC 5355Neurobiology of Speech and Language (3.00)
An overview of the neural systems underlying production and perception of vocal signals, with a focus on animal models and their application to human communication. Course activities will emphasize discussion and critical review of the primary literature.
Course was offered Fall 2016
Russian
RUSS 5030Advanced Russian I (3.00)
A thorough review of Russian grammar. Prerequisite: RUSS 2010, 2020, and instructor permission.
RUSS 5032Advanced Russian Grammar: Syntax (3.00)
This course is a formal and systematic analysis of the basic syntactic structures of the contemporary Russian literary language with frequent comparison to English (and other, when possible) structures. The emphasis will be on data, not theoretical principles although the conventional theoretical machinery and language of syntax (phrase structure, complement, anaphora) will be used at all times in class and on assignments.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013
Slavic
SLAV 8500Topics in Slavic Languages and Literatures (3.00)
Could include any Slavic languages, fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Spanish
SPAN 3000Phonetics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 3200Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 4200History of the Language (3.00)
Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2011
SPAN 4202Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3.00)
Prerequisite: SPAN 3200 and 3010, or 3000 and 3010, or departmental placement.
SPAN 4203Structure of Spanish (3.00)
This is an advanced introduction to the study of fundamental aspects of the sound and grammatical systems of the Spanish language. The course will start by analyzing present-day (syllable, word and phrase) structures of the language and it will progress toward a more detailed examination of some of the linguistic processes and changes involved in the development of those structures. Prior coursework in linguistics is expected. Pre-requisites: SPAN 3015 Phonetics and SPAN 3200 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
SPAN 4210History of the Spanish Language II (3.00)
The course examines the development of the Spanish language through texts produced from the Middle Ages to the present day. The main goal will be the interpretation of individual texts as a source of linguistic data and the analysis of language in its cultural, social and historical context. Including texts from Latin American and Spain, the commentary will cover the analysis of phonological, grammatical and lexical aspects. Prerequisites: SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200
SPAN 4530Special Topics Seminar: Language (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 and 3300, or departmental placement; instructor permission.
SPAN 7220History of the Language (3.00)
The development of the Spanish language from its origins.