UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses for the Medical School    
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These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Biomedical Sciences
BIMS 5410Computational Methods in Diabetes and Endocrinology (4.00)
A focused introduction to contemporary quantitative methods applied to basic and clinical diabetes and endocrine research. Topics may include the clinical blood glucose optimization problems of diabetes, history of quantifying characteristics of T1DM and T2DM, error-grid analysis, behavioral determinants of T1DM control, risk analysis of blood glucose data, use of self-monitoring blood glucose data for evaluation of patients' glycemic control, stochastic modeling of blood glucose fluctuations, network modeling of blood glucose dynamics, and analysis of continuous monitoring data. Prerequisites: consent of advisor.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
BIMS 5550Neural Development and Regeneration (2.00)
This course will cover basic principles and current research topics concerning neural development and regeneration. Sections will focus on gene regulatory and signal transduction networks involved in early neural development and later events refining regional specificity within the brain. Topics will include neuronal plasticity, neural stem cells, developmentally-based neuronal diseases, and issues concerning regeneration of the nervous system.
BIMS 5559New Course in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biomedical sciences.
Course was offered Summer 2010
BIMS 6000Core Course in Integrative Biosciences (10.00)
This course is designed to equip students with core concepts and fundamental skill sets needed for biomedical research. It combines traditional didactic lectures with small group and individual learning activities, problem solving exercises, workshops, and hands-on analyses of data sets. The course emphasizes the integration of topics spanning the fields of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, and genetics.
BIMS 6559New Course in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biomedical sciences.
BIMS 7100Research Ethics (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Beginning in 1989, the National Institutes of Health introduced a requirement that institutions provide a program of instruction in the responsible conduct of research (NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts, Volume 18, Number 45, 1989). This was later expanded to require that all fellows on NIH training grants should receive instruction in the responsible conduct of research. The requirement does not specify a particular format or curriculum. However, recommendations are made that several areas should be covered in the instruction: conflict of interest, responsible authorship, policies for handling misconduct, policies regarding the use of human and animal subjects, and data management. This course is designed to help student consider each of these areas and therein formulate an understanding of responsible conduct in research.
BIMS 7559New Course in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biomedical science.
BIMS 8001Personalized Healthspan Care (PHC)--the Future of Medicine (2.00)
The course focuses on the importance and scientific basis of holistic approaches to personalized healthspan care (healthy living and wellbeing). The course will cover the basic aspects and contemporary understanding of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, and the most effective interventions of prevention. Interactive discussion, problem solving, and literature review of relevant topics.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
BIMS 8030Current Topics in Genome Sciences (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Each week, a UVA faculty member or guest lecturer will summarize current work in their area of research. The emphasis in these lectures will be on high-throughput genomic and bio-informatic approaches to elucidating the mechanisms of pathogenesis in human disease and disease models.
BIMS 8066Cardiovascular Physiology (3.00)
An intense six-week course emphasizing autonomic pharmacology, and basic principles of cardiovascular function. This will be integrated into the Medical Physiology course and supplemented by weekly meetings with Cardiovascular faculty. Prerequisites are cell biology and biochemistry.
BIMS 8082From Idea to Innovation: The Pathway from Basic Science Research to Product (1.00)
This one-credit course will teach students the basic translational research pipeline for product development, starting with a basic science finding or concept. We will cover the role of translational research in scientific discovery, discuss patenting and intellectual property protection, highlight examples of start-up companies and how they came into being, practice networking, and learn about FDA approval and manufacturing design controls.
Course was offered Spring 2011
BIMS 8091CVRC Seminars (1.00)
CVRC Seminars
BIMS 8092CVRC Seminars (1.00)
CVRC Seminars
BIMS 8121Skeletal Health and Disease (2.00)
The biological structure of skeletal tissues, the role of growth factors in mesenchymal cell signaling and differentiation, tissue regeneration and genetic diseases will be presented by experts in the field. Recent publications will be assigned to participating postdoctoral fellows and senior graduate students for in depth discussion of major discoveries and technological advances in the molecular and cellular biology of skeletal tissues. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
BIMS 8122Skeletal Health and Disease (2.00)
The biological structure of skeletal tissues, the role of growth factors in mesenchymal cell signaling and differentiation, tissue regeneration and genetic diseases will be presented by experts in the field. Recent publications will be assigned to participating postdoctoral fellows and senior graduate students for in depth discussion of major discoveries and technological advances in the molecular and cellular biology of skeletal tissues. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
BIMS 8131Topics in the Molecular Basis of Human Disease (2.00)
A series of joint lectures by basic and clinical scientists that focus on the clinical context of a specific biomedical problem and the contemporary research that has resulted in major advances and treatment of the disease. Students participate in workshops on grantsmanship with coincident feedback on student's specific aims from faculty experts.
BIMS 8132Topics in the Molecular Basis of Human Disease (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A series of joint lectures by basic and clinical scientists that focus on the clinical context of a specific biomedical problem and the contemporary research that has resulted in major advances and treatment of the disease. Students participate in workshops on grantsmanship with coincident feedback on student's specific aims from faculty experts.
BIMS 8151MSTP Journal Club (2.00)
Modern lit. in MolMed for MD/PhD trainees. Faculty select 2 rsch papers illustrating methods and avenues in molec. and cellular underpinnings of human disease. Students read and understand papers in-advance, present background and results, interpretation, and background info. from secondary sources to illustrate current understanding; preparing others for discussion. Grade is based on level of participation and understanding of materials.
Course was offered Spring 2011
BIMS 8171M.D./Ph.D. Research in Progress Colloquium (1.00)
The Research in Progress Colloquium is a series of research seminars and short talks by students in our combined M.D./Ph.D. Program. The major goals of the course are to familiarize students with key research areas of importance for training as physician scientists, and to develop the student's presentation skills. Students are required to give a minimum of one oral presentation per year to their fellow students and to selected faculty members who have expertise in the area of presentation. Students also are required to attend presentations of other students and to participate in group discussions. In addition to research presentations by students, there will also be presentations by faculty members in areas of significance for training of physician scientists. Grading (S/U) will be based on the quality of the students' presentation, as well as the extent of their participation in group discussions.
BIMS 8172MD/PhD Research in Progress Colloquium (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Research in Progress Colloquium is a series of research seminars and short talks by students in our combined M.D./Ph.D. Program. The major goals of the course are to familiarize students with key research areas of importance for training as physician scientists, and to develop the student's presentation skills. Students are required to give a minimum of one oral presentation per year to their fellow students and to selected faculty members who have expertise in the area of presentation. Students also are required to attend presentations of other students and to participate in group discussions. In addition to research presentations by students, there will also be presentations by faculty members in areas of significance for training of physician scientists. Grading (S/U) will be based on the quality of the students' presentation, as well as the extent of their participation in group discussions.
BIMS 8191Biotechnology Rsch Seminars (1.00)
This weekly research-in-progress student series will be overseen by the Biotechnology Training Program Director or Co-Director. Trainees will present their research results or a related journal article on a round robin basis involving a single presenter per session. To ensure that trainees learn how to prepare research or journal presentations, a training program mentor will be scheduled to meet with a trainee one week before the presentation for rehearsals. This weekly research-in-progress student series will be overseen by the Biotechnology Training Program Director or Co-Director. Trainees will present their research results or a related journal article on a round robin basis involving a single presenter per session. To ensure that trainees learn how to prepare research or journal presentations, a training program mentor will be scheduled to meet with a trainee one week before the presentation for rehearsals.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
BIMS 8193Biotechnology Industrial Externship (1.00)
A one to four month training experience at participating Biotechnology Training Program host companies or facilities. Students contribute to host company research projects, offer ideas and interact with company/facility officials. Student performance is graded by the hosting company official using a standardized form. Externship occurs within 2 years of entering the Biotechnology Training Program
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
BIMS 8194Biotechnology Industrial Externship (1.00)
A one to four month training experience at participating Biotechnology Training Program host companies or facilities. Students contribute to host company research projects, offer ideas and interact with company/facility officials. Student performance is graded by the hosting company official using a standardized form. Externship occurs within 2 years of entering the Biotechnology Training Program
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
BIMS 8195Biotech Industrial Externship (3.00)
A two to three month training experience at a biotechnology or pharmaceutical company. BTP or non-BTP students contribute to host company research projects, offer ideas and interact with company officials. Student performance is graded by the hosting company official using a standardized form (http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1742633/UVa-Biotech-Externship-Evaluation). Externship occurs within 2 years of entering the BTP.
Course was offered Summer 2018
BIMS 8380Basics of Study Design and Practical Statistics (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course format will include: lecture, web-based learning, group discussions, and practical laboratory exercises with stats software. Students will learn the basics of typical study designs and practical use of common statistical methods. Students will apply learning to reinforce skills and achieve practical competence in: identification of design and statistical resources, experimental design, evaluation of results, and data interpretation.
BIMS 8382Introduction to Biomedical Data Science (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course introduces methods, tools, and software for reproducibly managing, manipulating, analyzing, and visualizing large-scale biomedical data. Specifically, the course introduces the R statistical computing environment and packages for manipulating and visualizing high-dimensional data, covers strategies for reproducible research, and culminates with analysis of data from a real RNA-seq experiment using R and Bioconductor packages.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
BIMS 8401The Essentials of Translational Science (2.00)
The Translational Science Course is designed to prepare graduate students to engage in cutting-edge basic science discovery; understand proof-of-concept research and industrial designed experiments; innovate and invent; create valuable intellectual properties; optimize patent enablements and claims; interact with regulatory agencies; champion entrepreneurship and commercialization activities; and enhance societal impact of basic research.
BIMS 8559New Course in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biomedical science.
BIMS 8993Non-topical Research: Visiting Research Graduate Traineeship Program (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is for visiting research students participating in the BIMS Visiting Research Graduate Trianeeship Program (VRGTP). Students in this course are dual enrolled in their home institution and will participate in research for a minimum of 4 semesters. The research will assist them in completing their degree at their home institution. Non-degree students.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Summer 2018
BIMS 8995Topical Research: Research in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course introduces students to biomedical research. Students conduct one or more research projects of limited scope under the direction of faculty and lab members. It is open only to graduate students in Biomedical Sciences (BIMS).
BIMS 8998Non-Topical Research: Research in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 12.00)
This course introduces students to biomedical research. Students conduct one or more research projects of limited scope under the direction of faculty and lab members. It is open only to graduate students in Biomedical Sciences (BIMS).
BIMS 9559New Course in Biomedical Sciences (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of Biomedical Sciences.
BIMS 9998Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Preparation for Doctoral Research prior to completion of candidacy examination.
BIMS 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation following advancement to PhD candidacy.
Biochemistry
BIOC 5050Biochemistry Projects (3.00 - 12.00)
Open only to graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. Introduces biochemical research. Students conduct two or more research projects of limited scope under the direction of staff members.
BIOC 5051Biochemistry Projects (2.00 - 9.00)
Open only to graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. Introduces biochemical research. Students conduct two or more research projects of limited scope under the direction of staff members.
BIOC 5080Computer Analysis of DNA and Protein Sequences (4.00)
Surveys computer methods for analyzing DNA and protein sequences. Discusses analytical methods, including DNA and protein sequence comparisons; recognition of patterns in DNA and protein sequences; finding genes; protein structure prediction; analyzing protein 3-D structure; and constructing evolutionary trees. Prerequisite: MICR 8010 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
BIOC 5559New Course in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biochemistry and molecular genetics.
BIOC 8011Advanced Genetics (2.00)
This course focuses on genetic analysis as an experimental tool to study complex problems in biology. The course will incorporate genetic and functional genomic concepts using model organisms from yeast to mammals. The class combines lectures and discussions sessions, and are supplemented with readings and problems. Topics vary, but include areas of current interest to molecular, cell and developmental biologists. Prerequisite: BIMS 6000
Course was offered Spring 2013
BIOC 8012Chromatin I (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Chromatin course modules are designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of chromatin structure and function. In Chromatin I, the focus will be on chromatin structure and organization, nucleosome and chromatin remodeling factors, and the multiple histone modifying enzymes that regulate DNA-templated cellular functions such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair.
BIOC 8014Chromatin II (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Chromatin course modules are designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of chromatin structure and function. Chromatin II will focus on the functional aspects of chromatin organization and regulation. The course will meet two days a week, with time split between faculty presentations that introduce a topic and provide key information, and more interactive sessions that will involve discussions of primary literature. Prerequisite: Restricted to BIMS students or departmental approval required
BIOC 8130Colloquium (1.00)
Research seminars by invited guests and research personnel within the department. All biochemistry graduate students must attend.
BIOC 8131Colloquium (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Research seminars by invited guests and research personnel within the department. All biochemistry graduate students must attend.
BIOC 8140Applied Genomics (2.00)
This course will introduce current concepts in genomics, emphasizing the application of the latest approaches (methodology, techniques, tools, or software) to address research questions.
Course was offered Spring 2013
BIOC 8142Bioinformatics and Protein Structure (2.00)
The course provides an introduction to strategies for analyzing protein and DNA sequences at the genomic and metagenomic level. The course will focus on practical aspects of genome sequence analysis. Beginning with an introduction to Unix and Perl programming, the course will cover alignment algorithms and statistics, protein function prediction, and preliminary analysis of Next Generation sequence data. Prerequisite: Core Course or permission of instructor
Course was offered Spring 2013
BIOC 8145Bioinformatics and Functional Analysis of Genomes (2.00)
The class covers statistical and programming background as well as introduction to software tools for analysis of functional genomics data sets and will focus on analysis of high throughput sequence data including RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq. Students will also learn how to further summarize their data from a regulatory network perspective by performing TF-DNA motif, metabolic/signaling pathway and gene ontology (GO) analysis. Prerequisite: Bioinformatics and Protein Structure or permission of instructor
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013
BIOC 8150Biochemical Literature (1.00)
A continuing seminar based on papers in the current literature. Participation is required.
BIOC 8151Biochemical Literature (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A continuing seminar based on papers in the current literature. Participation is required.
BIOC 8559New Course in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject area of biochemistry and molecular genetics.
BIOC 9559New Course in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biochemistry and molecular genetics.
BIOC 9995Topical Research: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Topical Research
BIOC 9998Non-Topical Research: Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Non-Topical Research: Preparation for Doctoral Research
BIOC 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Bioethics
BIOE 5100Clinical Ethics (3.00)
Explores some of the major ethical issues that arise in clinical medicine and provides an introduction to methods used in the clinical and research settings to address these issues. Discussion of how the basic principles of biomedical ethics apply in specific clinical situations and an examination of the cases that demonstrate commonly encountered dilemmas
Course was offered Spring 2011
BIOE 5110Foundations of Bioethics (3.00)
Introduces the central problems and issues addressed by the field and the major concepts, methods, and ethical perspectives that bioethics brings to bear on these problems and issues.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
BIOE 8110Clinical Ethics (3.00)
Explores some of the major ethical issues that arise in clinical medicine and provides an introduction to methods used in the clinical and research settings to address these issues. Discussion of how the basic principles of biomedical ethics apply in specific clinical situations and an examination of the cases that demonstrate commonly encountered dilemmas.
BIOE 8559New Course in Bioethics (1.00 - 4.00)
New Course in the subject of Bioethics.
Biophysics
BIOP 5050Biophysical Literature (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A journal club. Students present recent research papers in biophysics and/or report on progress of their own research projects. Students learn how to effectively read, critique, and present science research progress.
BIOP 5559New Course in Biophysics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biophysics.
BIOP 7051Directed Reading (1.00 - 5.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Designed on an individual basis, students who have deficiencies in particular areas pertaining to biophysics will be advised by a faculty member to read texts in that area and will discuss the contents with the faculty mentor on a regular basis.
BIOP 7559New Course in Biophysics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biophysics.
BIOP 8010Special Topics in Biophysics (1.00)
A seminar series comprised of 45-minute informal talks given by students, faculty, and guest speakers.
BIOP 8020Macromolecular Crystallography I (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course offers in depth coverage of theory and practical applications of X-ray diffraction methods to crystals of biological macromolecules and their complexes. Topics of the first module will cover molecular visualization, crystals and protein crystallization, X-ray diffraction, data collection, data quality, and data reduction. Prerequisite: BIOP 8201/8301, Biophysical Principles
BIOP 8021Macromolecular Crystallography II (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course offers in depth coverage of theory and practical applications of X-ray diffraction methods to crystals of biological macromolecules and their complexes. Topics of the second module will cover phase determination, electron density interpretation, refinement, and model validation. Case studies will be presented by the students. Prerequisite: BIOP 8020, Macromolecular Crystallography I
BIOP 8030Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Macromolecules I (2.00)
Exploration of magnetic resonance spectroscopy as it is applied to biopolymers. The first module will cover principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) will be covered, including basic principles, homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. Prerequisite: BIOP 8201/8301, Biophysical Principles
BIOP 8031Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Macromolecules II (2.00)
Exploration of magnetic resonance spectroscopy as it is applied to biopolymers. Data collection for structure determination, residual dipolar couplings, approaches to large systems, and the use of NMR to deduce information about the dynamic behavior of proteins will be covered. Finally, principles of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. Prerequisite: BIOP 8030, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Macromolecules I
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
BIOP 8040BiomolecElectron Microscopy I (2.00)
The course offers in depth coverage of theory and practical applications of electron microscopy methods in structure determination of biological macromolecules and their complexes. Topics : the history of electron microscopy, imaging and scattering, electron diffraction, CTF and new technologies. Prerequisite: BIOP 8201/8301, Biophysical Principles
BIOP 8042Biomolecular Electron Microscopy II (2.00)
The course offers in depth coverage of theory and practical applications of cryo-electron microscopy methods in determination biological macromolecules and their complexes. Topics of the second module will cover: sample preparation, cryo and negative staining techniques, tomography, single particle approaches and helical or 2D analyses. Students will complete problem sets with their own data. Prerequisite: BIOP 8040, Biomolecular Electron Microscopy I
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
BIOP 8130Structure-Function of Biological Membranes (2.00)
The course will provide in-depth assessment of the structure and function of biological membranes and membrane proteins. Emphasis will be placed on biophysical and approaches. The primary literature will be the main source of reading. The course will run as a colloquium with the instructors introducing a different topic at each session and students presenting relevant papers. Prerequisite: BIOP 8201/8301, Biophysical Principles
BIOP 8131Membrane Protein Structural Biology (2.00)
The course will provide in-depth assessment of the structural biology of membrane proteins. Emphasis will be placed on the methodologies of solving membrane protein structure. The primary literature will be the main source of reading. The course will run as a colloquium with the instructors introducing a different topic at each session and students presenting relevant papers. The students will create a grant proposal for the final project. Prerequisite: BIOP 8130, Structure-Function of Biological Membranes
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017
BIOP 8201Biophysical Principles I (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course will introduce students to some of the physical and chemical underpinnings of molecular biophysics. Physical principles will be discussed and related to how they govern biological systems and how they enable important biophysical techniques. Topics: Equilibrium thermodynamics: mean behavior of ensembles at equilibrium, and Biological fluctuations: deviations from the mean Prerequisite: BIMS 6000
BIOP 8301Biophysical Principles II (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course will introduce students to some of the physical and chemical underpinnings of molecular biophysics. Physical principles will be discussed and related to how they govern biological systems and how they enable important biophysical techniques. Topics: Molecules out of equilibrium: kinetic processes, enzymology, and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, and Statistical physics of heterogeneity Prerequisites: BIOP 8201, Biophysical Principles I
BIOP 8559New Course in Biophysics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biophysics.
Course was offered Fall 2013
BIOP 9559New Course in Biophysics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of biophysics.
BIOP 9995Biophysics Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Independent study, other than non-topical research, for course credits.
BIOP 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
BIOP 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral research, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Cell Biology
CELL 5559New Course in Cell Biology (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of cell biology.
CELL 5950Journal Survey in Cell & Developmental Biology (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Readings and oral presentations taken from the primary literature in Cell Biology and related fields.
CELL 7010Structure and Function of the Cell (5.00)
Surveys modern cell biology emphasizing the interrelationship between structure and function. Utilizes a combination of textbook readings and original literature. Emphasizes biological membranes, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, mitosis and cell cycle, cell signaling, and cancer.
CELL 7559New Course in Cell Biology (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of cell biology.
CELL 8030Advanced Gross Anatomy of the Human Body (1.00 - 12.00)
A laboratory demonstration/dissection course systematically reviewing the gross anatomy of the human body. Emphasizes the functional and surgical aspects of the morphology.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
CELL 8040Advanced Gross Anatomy of the Human Body (1.00 - 12.00)
Continuation of CELL 8030. Prerequisite: CELL 5020 or equivalent.
CELL 8101Introduction to Animal Development (2.00)
The course provides an introduction to Developmental Biology for graduate students entering with little or no prior coursework in Developmental Biology. The course will include both lectures and readings from the primary literature, with an emphasis on the experimental basis for our current understanding of developmental processes at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Prerequisite: Core Course
CELL 8201Molecular Mechanisms of Animal Development (2.00)
The course will cover the questions of the molecular mechanisms regulating the development of vertebrate and invertebrate embryos with a particular focus on the role of major signaling pathways such as Activin/Nodal, BMPs, FGFs, canonical Wnt/bcatenin, non canonical Wnt, Notch/Delta, in the control the major event controlling the development such as the definition of embryonic axes, cell identity/cell differentiation, cell proliferation.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
CELL 8202Cellular Mechanisms of Animal Development (2.00)
The course will cover the questions of the cellular aspects of the development of vertebrate and invertebrate embryos with focus on cellular mechanisms controlling the morphogenesis. This will include cell adhesion, cell polarity, cell movements (convergence extension, ingression, invagination, evagination, tubulogenesis, delamination), growth control during both early embryonic events, such as the gastrulation, and during organogenesis.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
CELL 8301Advanced Topics in Cell Biology (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
his module will cover topics not discussed in the Core Course and provide depth to topics covered in less detail. These will include, but are not limited to membrane biogenesis and trafficking, cytoskeleton dynamics and regulation, cell adhesion and motility, cell polarity, cell cycle control and regulation. The course will be primarily literature-based and emphasis will be placed on model systems, experimental design and data interpretation. Prerequisite: BIMS 6000
CELL 8401The Essentials of Translational Science (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Translational Science Course is designed to prepare graduate students to engage in cutting-edge basic science discovery; understand proof-of-concept research and industrial designed experiments; innovate and invent; create valuable intellectual properties; optimize patent enablements and claims; interact with regulatory agencies; champion entrepreneurship and commercialization activities; and enhance societal impact of basic research. Prerequisite: BIMS 6000 or equivalent
CELL 8450Effective Science Writing for Grants and Fellowships (2.00)
The ability to effectively communicate scientific concepts and justify proposed experiments are essential skills for biomedical researchers. The goals of this course are for trainees to learn and practice effective scientific proposal writing. The course will provide students with extensive peer and faculty mentoring in a workshop format as they each prepare an NIH NRSA-style fellowship application. Prerequisite: BIMS 6000
CELL 8650Colloquium in Developmental Biology (2.00)
Discusses selected topics related to growth, cell differentiation, organogenesis, and regeneration. Includes current topics in developmental biology as a basis for normal and abnormal development.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CELL 9030Research in Cell Biology (1.00 - 12.00)
Research in Cell Biology
CELL 9040Research in Cell Biology (1.00 - 12.00)
Research in Cell Biology
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CELL 9559New Course in Cell Biology (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of cell biology.
CELL 9995Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research (3.00 - 12.00)
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
CELL 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research
CELL 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Medicine
MED 6400Summer Medical Research Internship (0.00)
The projects are typically basic research in the biomedical sciences with the program¿s goals including development of a cadre of diverse individuals who can carry the basic science research discoveries into the clinical realm for the betterment of the human condition.
Course was offered Summer 2018
MED 6513Social Issues in Medicine I (0.00)
This exploratory course covers social issues in medicine. Students will recognize and analyze the interrelationships between socio-cultural environments and the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease. Students will also identify and nurture values that characterize a professional and humanistic practice of medicine and an ethic of service.
MED 6514Social Issues in Medicine II (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
During this course students will recognize and analyze the interrelationships between socio-cultural environments and the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease. Students will also identify and nurture values that characterize a professional and humanistic practice of medicine and an ethic of service.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
MED 7100Foundations of Clinical Medicine 1A (0.00)
FCM-1 aims to develop history taking, relationship building, physical examination, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic reasoning skills through case-based exercises. The course runs concurrently with and is integrated into MCM and Organ Systems. FCM-1 consists primarily of small group sessions led by physician coaches and non-physician co-mentors engaging patients, standardized patients, and simulation to introduce and foster clinical skills.
Course was offered Fall 2018
MED 7101Foundations of Clinical Medicine 1B (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
FCM-1 aims to develop history taking, relationship building, physical examination, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic reasoning skills through case-based exercises. The course runs concurrently with and is integrated into MCM and Organ Systems. FCM-1 consists primarily of small group sessions led by physician coaches and non-physician co-mentors engaging patients, standardized patients, and simulation to introduce and foster clinical skills.
MED 7102Foundations of Clinical Medicine 1C (0.00)
FCM-1 aims to develop history taking, relationship building, physical examination, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic reasoning skills through case-based exercises. The course runs concurrently with and is integrated into MCM and Organ Systems. FCM-1 consists primarily of small group sessions led by physician coaches and non-physician co-mentors engaging patients, standardized patients, and simulation to introduce and foster clinical skills.
MED 7421Patient Student Partnership 1A (0.00)
Students are assigned a chronically ill patient that they will follow until fall of their fourth year. There will be developmentally appropriate assignments for students to complete with their patient. The FCM faculty coach will monitor student progress with their patient-student doctor relationship. Major goals of the program are building doctor-patient relationships, observing trajectory of illness, and professional identity formation.
Course was offered Fall 2018
MED 7422Patient Student Partnership 1B (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Students are assigned a chronically ill patient that they will follow until fall of their fourth year. There will be developmentally appropriate assignments for students to complete with their patient. The FCM faculty coach will monitor student progress with their patient-student doctor relationship. Major goals of the program are building doctor-patient relationships, observing trajectory of illness, and professional identity formation.
MED 7423Patient Student Partnership 1C (0.00)
Students are assigned a chronically ill patient that they will follow until fall of their fourth year. There will be developmentally appropriate assignments for students to complete with their patient. The FCM faculty coach will monitor student progress with their patient-student doctor relationship. Major goals of the program are building doctor-patient relationships, observing trajectory of illness, and professional identity formation.
MED 7720Clinical Performance Development III (0.00)
CPD runs concurrently with and is integrated into MCM and Organ Systems. CPD consists primarily of clinical case studies which students solve in small group tutorials led by physicians. Students work one-to-one with physicians to develop their skills in taking medical histories and conducting physical exams with patients, standardized patients and in simulations.
MED 7751Integrated Systems I (0.00)
Comprised of: Cells to Society; Foundations of Medicine; Cells, Tissue and Mechanism of Disease; & Microbes and the Immune System. CTS is structured around one disease process and shows how the care of the patient raises questions in multiple domains. FoM introduces communication and ethical issues important for patient care. CTMD emphasizes cell and tissue function. MIS connects anatomy, physiology, pharmacology & pathology with clinical skills.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
MED 7752Integrated Systems II (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This semester Block is comprised of three components and continues the Integrated Organ Systems as described above. It begins with Musculoskeletal and Integument followed by Gastroenterology and ends with Mind, Brain and Behavior.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
MED 7753Integrated Systems III (0.00)
This semester Block further expands on Integrated Organ Systems as above and is comprised of five components: Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Renal, Endocrine and Reproductive Medicine as well as Hematology.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
MED 8000TUVA Transfer Credit (1.00 - 12.00)
For students in the dual degree program JD/MD.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017
MED 8642Internal Medicine Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
As active members of the health care delivery teams in inpatient and outpatient venues, students will have appropriately supervised responsibilities for their patients. Students will obtain clinical histories, perform physical examinations, and provide initial and ongoing documentation on their patients.
MED 8643Ambulatory Internal Medicine (0.00)
In Ambulatory Internal Medicine students will strengthen skills in outpatient care, including diagnosis, observation, consultation, treatment, intervention, and rehabilitation services.
MED 8645Geriatric Medicine Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Students will be paired with a primary geriatric physician mentor and be responsible for a panel of patients at a skilled nursing facility. Students will work with a variety of geriatric health professionals as part of the interdisciplinary care team.
MED 8646Obstetrics and Gynecology (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The OB/GYN clerkship encompasses primary care women's health, normal labor and obstetric complications, benign and malignant gynecologic conditions, and basic surgical technique.
MED 8648Pediatrics (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Exposure to pediatric inpatients, ambulatory pediatric patients, children with developmental problems and/or chronic diseases such as nutritional problems, babies in the newborn nursery, acutely ill children, and one or more pediatric subspecialty outpatient clinics.
MED 8649Surgical Specialties Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Surgical Specialty Clerkship rotations are clinical experiences where the student becomes a member of specialty surgical teams and applies general surgical principles [medical knowledge, professionalism, communication skills, practice-based learning] integral to the diagnosis and management of patients. These rotations include neurosurgery, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, otolaryngology, plastic surgery and urology.
MED 8650Surgery (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The surgery clerkship will provide medical students with an exposure to common surgical problems ahd the basic clinical decision-making skills in this patient population applicable to their future practice. The curriculum will be taught by a combination of didactic and clinical teaching.
MED 8652Psychiatry (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The fundamentals of psychiatric assessment and the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric illness, including the common medical and neurological disorders that relate to the practice of psychiatry.
MED 8655Family Medicine Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The clinical skills, knowledge, problem-solving skills, and professional attitudes necessary to assess and care for patients in the family practice setting.
MED 8657Emergency Medicine Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The clerkship introduces basic skills and important concepts of acute and emergency care. Students perform histories, physical exams, selection and interpretation of diagnostic tests, and write-ups of undifferentiated patients learning the diagnostic approach to acute medical and surgical presentations. Students learn the decision-making process and admission criteria involved in triaging patients and coordination of heathcare system interfaces.
MED 8658Peri-Operative Medicine Clerkship (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The clerkship emphasizes patient safety and quality care and important concepts within the environment of the operating rooms, pre-operative and post-operative setting. Interactive group didactic sessions augment individual rotations, incorporating basic science principles with clinical practice; including interprofessional education. The clerkship focuses on skills and tasks related to: pre- and post-operative evaluation.
MED 8671Clinical Electives (0.00)
Clinical elective rotations for medical students.
MED 8672Neurology (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Develops knowledge in fundamental neurological concepts. Builds competence in pertinent history-taking and examination skills to support recognition and initial management of neurological problems and emergencies. Based in small groups, students are expected to demonstrate self-directed learning.
MED 8673Clinical Medicine (0.00)
Clinical medicine clerkship rotations for medical students.
MED 8674Geo Med Summer Program (0.00)
Cross-cultural medical experiences for medical students.
MED 8675Summer Research (0.00)
Medical students participate in arranged research projects.
MED 8676Summer Primary Care Preceptorship (0.00)
Medical students participate in arranged primary care experiences.
MED 8677Introduction to Generalist Medicine (0.00)
Medical students participate in arranged medical experiences.
MED 8678MSTP Summer Program (6.00)
Medical students participate in arranged laboratory experiences.
MED 8679Pre-Clinical Remediation (0.00)
Medical students requiring remediation participate in proscribed activities.
MED 8680MD/MBA Summer Program (0.00)
For medical students in the dual degree program MD/MBA.
MED 8698Research (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Research
MED 8699Special Studies (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Special Studies
MED 9669Electives Program I (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
There are 13 rotations between the end of the core clerkships and graduation. Students must earn 28 elective credits, in addition to a 4-credit Advanced Clinical Elective (ACE), and DxRx: Health Care Policy (1 week) and Basic Science for Careers (3 weeks).
MED 9670Electives Program II (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
There are 13 rotations between the end of the core clerkships and graduation. Students must earn 28 elective credits, in addition to a 4-credit Advanced Clinical Elective (ACE).
MED 9671Electives Program III (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
There are 13 rotations between the end of the core clerkships and graduation. Students must earn 28 elective credits, in addition to a 4-credit Advanced Clinical Elective (ACE).
MED 9680DxRx: Health Care Policy (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course provides an overview of the key health policy issues that will shape medical practice in the coming decades, including the financing and strucutre of health care delivery and government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, CDC policies, FDA regulations. Its goal is to challenge students to critically analyze current policy, economic and legal issues and prepare them to be leaders in the on-going debates about health care reform.
MED 9690Internship Readiness Course (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The Internship Readiness Course is a required 2-week course in which fourth-year students will review and practice common in-hospital acute care clinical scenarios, bedside procedures and surgical skills, and communication techniques. Students are assigned to one of four subspecialty tracks according to their planned residency specialty: Acute Care/Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery or Obstetrics/Gynecology..
Microbiology
MICR 8006Continuing Colloquium in Microbiology (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Critical analysis of current research areas in microbiology and related fields. Central topics will be covered seriatim by the staff. Students will present in rotation their analyses of pertinent scientific literature. Two conference hours per week.
MICR 8040Fundamentals in Cancer Biology (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course examines the molecular basis of cancer and how environmental and hereditary factors cooperate to elicit the transformed phenotype and promote cancer progression. It is team taught by both basic scientists and clinical faculty, providing students with an introduction to clinical presentation, progression, and outcomes; genetic/cellular/tissue drivers of oncogenesis and metastasis; and therapeutic challenges for the treatment of cancer
MICR 8042Advanced Topics in Cancer (2.00)
This course will cover contemporary topics relevant to the detection and treatment of solid tumors and hematopoietic cancers. These include, but are not limited to, clinical trials, metabolism and cancer, cancer stem cells, cancer biomarkers, systems and networks in cancer. Students will attend organ-based tumor boards, which expose the students to the team-based approach for individualizing treatments that is practiced in the UVA Cancer Center. Prerequisite: MICR 8040 and MICR 8044.
MICR 8044Cancer Signaling and Therapeutics (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course is a follow-up to Fundamentals in Cancer Biology. It examines hormonal regulation and signal transduction pathways in breast cancer and leukemia/lymphoma. Clinical and basic science faculty again team up to provide students with a comprehensive view of clinical aspects (early detection, diagnosis, epidemiology, prognosis, treatment, and prevention) and experimental strategies that reveal basic mechanisms underlying these diseases. Prerequisite: Fundamentals in Cancer Biology
MICR 8200Building Blocks of the Immune System (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This module will cover the different components of the adaptive and innate arms of the immune system with a focus on development and molecular pathways regulating these processes. Prerequisite: Previous Immunology class or permission of the instructor
MICR 8202Integration and Diversification of the Immune System (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This module will cover how the diverse components of the immune system are integrated and how this integration influences further maturation and differentiation of elements of the immune system under physiological and patho-physiological conditions. This will include responses to different types of pathogens. Prerequisite: Building Blocks of the Immune System
MICR 8204Current Topics in Immunology (2.00)
The module will cover in depth selected contemporary topics in molecular and cellular immunology. Sessions are discussion-based and facilitated by faculty. Students will learn how to critically evaluate primary literature and to clearly present scientific information. Prerequisite: MICR 8200: Building Blocks of the Immune System and MICR 8203: Integration and Diversification of the Immune System or equivalent.permission.
MICR 8341Biological Threats and Public Health (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course will cover the science and policies governing the study of select agents, and emerging infectious diseases. Topics will include, but are not limited to pathogen characteristics, regulatory requirements, recognition and detection of intentional and natural outbreaks, emergency preparedness and interfaces with public health.
MICR 8400Molecular Principles of Bacteriology and Virology (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This foundational module will cover fundamentals of the biology of bacteria and viruses. Bacteriology topics to be discussed include bacterial physiology, genetics, and gene regulation, and how these and other features impact drug discovery and pathogenesis. Virology topics to be discussed include virus structure and assembly, viral replication, viral genetic regulation, virus/immune interactions, and applications of viruses in 21st century.
MICR 8401Microbial Pathogenesis (2.00)
The class provides a comprehensive study of pathogenic microbes and their unique and conserved mechanisms of virulence. Prerequisite: Core Course and Molecular Principles of Bacteriology and Virology
MICR 8402Microbial Pathogenesis Proposal Preparation (2.00)
This course will discuss the grant process including applications for federal and foundation grants, proposal writing and submissions, and grant reviews. A research proposal (based loosely on guidelines for NIH postdoctoral fellowship grant application) on a selected topic in Microbial Pathogenesis will be developed by each student (or student teams). Prerequisite: MICR 8400 and MICR 8401. Please contact course director Isabelle Derre (id8m@virginia.edu) to discuss potential exemptions.
MICR 8410Advanced Topics in Virology (2.00)
This module will cover in depth selected advanced contemporary topics in virology. This year¿s focus will be the current topics on virus-host cell interactions. Sessions will be based on published primary literature and will be discussions facilitated by the faculty. Students will learn how to critically evaluate the primary literature and to clearly present scientific information. Prerequisite: MICR 8400 and instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
MICR 9995Research in Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Research in microbiological related disciplines, e.g. cancer, immunology, bacteriology, virology, infectious diseases, cell signaling, nuclear transport, host-pathogen interactions, gene expression, etc.
MICR 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Pathology
PATH 8050Colloquium in Human Disease Research (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
(Formerly PRPR) The purpose of this course is to introduce new graduate students to the scientific literature in human disease, and to give them experience in interpreting, discussing, and presenting both research publications and their own progress on research projects. Enrollees will be expected to present at least one research literature report each semester.
PATH 8060Rotation in Diagnostic and Interventional Medicine (4.00)
A four-week rotation in several facets of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology. These rotations will expose students to clinical problems and hands-on techniques such as tissue procurement, processing, and diagnosis. Students will attend Clinical Conferences in which cases of human diseases related to the students' areas of thesis research are discussed. This rotation will allow students to discuss their thesis research with faculty members to further refine their ideas. Students are encouraged to select one of these faculty members to serve on their Graduate Committee.
PATH 8130Topics in the Molecular Basis of Human Disease I (2.00)
A series of joint lectures by basic and clinical scientists that focuses on the clinical context of a specific biomedical problem and the contemporary research that has resulted in major advances and treatment of the disease. Note: Students may take part II before part I of this course.
PATH 8140Topics in the Molecular Basis of Human Disease II (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This is a series of joint lectures by basic and clinical scientists that focuses on the clinical context of a specific biomedical problem and the contemporary research that has resulted in major advances and treatment of the disease. Note: Students may take part II before part I of this course. This is a series of joint lectures by basic and clinical scientists that focuses on the clinical context of a specific biomedical problem and the contemporary research that has resulted in major advances and treatment of the disease.
PATH 8280Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology (2.00)
This course will review clinical conditions caused by aberrant performance of the immune system, including their clinical presentations and consequences. Students will appreciate the pathological and immune dysfunction responsible for each disease and important areas of contemporary immune research that address critical components of each disease's pathogenesis. Students will propose, delineate, and critique a focused research plan. Prerequisite: MICR 8040: Fundamentals in Cancer Biology, MICR 8200: Building Blocks of the Immune System, and MICR 8203: Integration and Diversification of the Immune System
PATH 8300Tumors and the Immune System (2.00)
This module will allow students to gain comprehensive understanding of the extensive interactions between the immune system and neoplasia. The course will focus on discussion of contemporary literature. Students with interests in either cancer biology or immunology are encouraged to register.
PATH 8320Historical Perspectives in Cancer Research (2.00)
The course will cover various aspects of the history of cancer research. The textbook for the course will the "The Emperor of all Maladies: A Biography of Cancer" by Siddhartha Mukherjee. Discussion of the material in this book will be supplemented by critical examination of the "classic" literature followed by consideration of how the same problem/question today.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
PATH 8440Pathology Projects (3.00 - 12.00)
Research rotation projects for medical or graduate students with an interest in Pathology.
PATH 8460Seminars in Human Disease and Molecular Medicine (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Weekly presentations from speakers within and outside of UVA presenting descriptions, problems, and cur-rent approaches to diagnosis, molecular basis, and treatment of human disease. Presentations will usually contain both clinical and laboratory research, though occasionally reports of disease model systems will be presented.
PATH 8470Readings in Molecular Medicine (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Modern lit. in MolMed for MD/PhD trainees. Faculty select 2 rsch papers illustrating methods and avenues in molec. and cellular underpinnings of human disease. Students read and understand papers in-advance, present background and results, interpretation, and background info. from secondary sources to illustrate current understanding; preparing others for discussion. Grade is based on level of participation and understanding of materials.
PATH 8640Clinical Oncology for Basic and Translational Scientists (1.00)
This is a 6-week seminar course designed to present an overview of selected aspects of the clinical cancer diagnosis and care by cancer practitioners. Selected vignettes demonstrating issues and technologies will be presented, together with a discussion of cutting edge approaches and current problems confronting clinicians and patients. There will also be an emphasis on investigator-clinician collaborations.
PATH 8920Topics in Human Disease Literature (1.00)
This course presents the opportunity to participate in a weekly journal club on selected topical research areas of relevance to the student's interests. Areas of participation include cancer, signal transduction, transcription and differentiation, immunology, infectious disease, reproduction, and neuropathology.
PATH 9995Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Original research on approved problems.
PATH 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Dissertation research credit for students who have completed their advancement to candidacy.
Pharmacology
PHAR 7010Seminar in Pharmacology (1.00)
Recent developments in pharmacology are presented by outside speakers at weekly intervals to faculty, staff and students. Students may participate by meeting with the speaker during the day of the seminar. One hour weekly during both the first and second semesters.
PHAR 7020Seminar in Pharmacology (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Recent developments in pharmacology are presented by outside speakers at weekly intervals to faculty, staff and students. Students may participate by meeting with the speaker during the day of the seminar. One hour weekly during both the first and second semesters.
PHAR 8110Pharmacology Literature (1.00)
A continuing seminar based on papers in the current literature. Required participation by departmental faculty, fellows, and graduate students. One hour per week.
PHAR 8120Pharmacology Literature (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
A continuing seminar based on papers in the current literature. Required participation by departmental faculty, fellows, and graduate students. One hour per week.
PHAR 8140Tutorial in Pharmacology (1.00)
Students meet for one hour per week with assigned tutors and discuss, in depth, problems related to pharmacology. 
PHAR 9001Survey of Pharmacology, Part 1 (2.00)
The course will cover the major classes of therapeutically relevant drugs, and how they work at the molecular and cellular levels. The major topics include: general principles, chemical mediators, drugs affecting major organ systems and chemotherapy of infectious and malignant disease. Prerequisite: PHY 8040 and PHY 8041 or Instructor Permissions
PHAR 9002Survey of Pharmacology, Part 2 (2.00)
The course will cover the major classes of therapeutically relevant drugs and how they work at the molecular and cellular levels. The major topics include: general principles, chemical mediators, drugs affecting major organ systems, and chemotherapy of infectious and malignant disease. Prerequisite: PHAR 9001
PHAR 9003Molecular Targets (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Course goals are to instruct students in the molecular targets popular for medicines and the strategies used for target validation and to help students develop effective written and oral presentation skills. Students will prepare and present an NIH R21-style grant proposal integrated with faculty-led case studies, class discussions, mock study sections and lectures.
PHAR 9004Discovering Drugs (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
This course delves into technologies and concepts that guide drug discovery. Students will prepare and present an NIH R21-style grant proposal to develop effective written and oral presentation skills. By integrating faculty-led case studies, class discussions, lectures and mock study sections students will learn how to drug their favorite molecular target.
PHAR 9500Special Topics in Pharmacology (1.00 - 12.00)
Special Topics in Pharmacology
PHAR 9995Research in Pharmacology (1.00 - 12.00)
Original research on approved problems.
PHAR 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Physiology
PHY 8011Seminar in Physiology (2.00)
Topics of current interest in physiology and related sciences are presented and discussed.
PHY 8012Seminar in Physiology (2.00)
Topics of current interest in physiology and related sciences are presented and discussed.
PHY 8040Physiology A (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course will integrate background cellular and molecular knowledge into organ systems and whole animal, function. It is intended to provide the ability to integrate knowledge at the molecular level into function, the foundation of translational-based research. The physiology to be covered will include the nervous system, metabolism and endocrine systems.
PHY 8041Physiology B (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The course will integrate background cellular and molecular knowledge into organ systems and whole animal, function. It is intended to provide the ability to integrate knowledge at the molecular level into function the foundation of translational-based research. Specifically, the physiology to be covered will include the heart, vasculature, kidney, GI, and muscle. Requisites: PHY 8040 or permission of instructor
PHY 8052Vascular Biology A (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The class covers the broad range of vascular biology from the basic science to clinical implications. The class integrates new methods in the field and relationships to heart function. Prerequisite: PHY 8040
PHY 8053Vascular Biology B (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
The class covers the broad range of vascular biology from the basic sciences to the clinical implications. In addition, the class integrates new methods in the field and relationships to heart function. Prerequisite: PHY 8040 and PHY 8052
PHY 8092Directed Readings in Physiology (1.00 - 3.00)
Readings in particular fields of physiology under supervision of the instructor.
PHY 8100Extreme Physiology (2.00)
The course focuses on aspects of human physiology observed during extreme environmental conditions. This includes: effects of gravity (e.g., space) on human physiology; effects of marathon running on human physiology, as well as high altitude and deep sea diving. These extremes will be discussed with an eye towards better understanding homeostatic and pathological human physiology.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2014
PHY 9995Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
Directed research on an approved problem in physiology.
PHY 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
PHY 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2019
For doctoral dissertation.