UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses for the Middle Eastern Studies Program    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
This Catalog of Courses for the Middle Eastern Studies Program does not include any of the related "Topics Courses" that may be offered in a given semester. Check the class schedule for the Middle Eastern Studies Program for those special courses.
Arabic
ARAB 1010Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.
ARAB 1016Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1020Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice. Prerequisite: ARAB 1010 or equivalent.
ARAB 1026Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 or equivalent.
ARAB 116Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 126Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 6.00)
New Course in Arabic
ARAB 2010Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2016Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequistes: ARAB 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.
ARAB 2020Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2026Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
ARAB 216Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2250Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (1.50)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
Course was offered Summer 2016, Summer 2015, Summer 2014
ARAB 226Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2260Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 2250 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2266Introduction to Levantine Arabic II (1.50)
This course is a continuation of ARAB 2256 and it intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: ARAB 2256
Course was offered Summer 2016, Summer 2015, Summer 2014
ARAB 256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
Course was offered Summer 2016, Summer 2015, Summer 2014
ARAB 266Introduction to Levantine Arabic-II (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First year Arabic and ARAB 0256/2256
ARAB 3010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ARAB 3020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARAB 3230Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or instructor permission.
ARAB 3240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 3310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 3330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 3340Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 3330 or permission of instructor.
ARAB 3559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2011
ARAB 3672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 3810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4010Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4020Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context.
ARAB 4120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 4230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 4450The Other in Premodern Arabic Sources (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course explores the unduly studied corpus of Arabic writings that describes the encounters with and perception of the Other. Much effort will be devoted to investigate medieval and early modern Arab-Muslim views of the Other in a cross-generic selection of non-religious Arabic prose such as travelogues, diplomatic memoirs, captivity reports, marvels, folktales, literary debates/boasting, and poetry. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARAB 4559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014
ARAB 4993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent Study in Arabic
ARAB 5010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 5240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 5310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 5330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 5410Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5420Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 4010 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
ARAB 5810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5830Topics in Arabic Prose I (3.00)
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 5840Topics in Arabic Prose II (3.00)
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5830 or instructor permission.
ARAB 5850Media Arabic (3.00)
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5530 and 5540, or ARAB 3010/5010 and 3020/5020, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARAB 5870Media Arabic II (3.00)
A survey of print and electronic media, news and news reports, analysis, commentaries from or about the Arab world, intended to increase students' familiarity with the language used in news as reported in Arabic-media venues.  Prerequisite:  ARAB 5850, completion of ARAB 5530 and 5540 or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARAB 6559New course in Arabic (3.00)
This course is to allow 6000-level new courses to be taught for one semester
ARAB 6672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 7120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 8559New Course in Arabic (3.00)
New Course in Arabic Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARAB 8993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent Study in Arabic.
Arabic in Translation
ARTR 2500Taboo and the Arabic Novel (3.00)
This class introduces the contemporary Arabic novel as it deals with religious and social taboo. The course surveys major works of Arabic literature that generated confrontations with the State, readers, or religious movements. It looks at the reception of texts in the Arabic world, the texts' intersection with social and political taboos, and the problems of censorship and confiscation of artistic work. Texts include work by Naguib Mahfouz.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARTR 3245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARTR 3290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.
ARTR 3350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 3390Love, Alienation, and Politics in the Contemporary Arabic Novel (3.00)
Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.
ARTR 3490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 3559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
ARTR 5245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
In this course we will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene. We will organize the course around selected readings from a variety of premodern Arabic jocular, culinary and erotological literature available in English translations.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARTR 5290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). No knowledge of Arabic is required. Taught in English.
ARTR 5350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 5490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 5559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation.
Hebrew
HEBR 1010Introduction to Modern Hebrew I (4.00)
An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. By the end of this sequence students have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and they are able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation. Includes material on Israeli culture, history, and politics.
HEBR 1016Intensive Introductory Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 1020Introduction to Modern Hebrew II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Prerequisite: HEBR 1010.
HEBR 1026Intensive Introductory Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 116Intensive Introductory Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1016.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 126Intensive Introductory Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1026.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 1410Elementary Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
HEBR 1420Elementary Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
HEBR 2010Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4.00)
Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, and their occurrence in texts which deal with modern Israeli culture and values. These texts, which include excerpts from newspapers and fiction, introduce 600 new words and expose the learner to political and other issues of modern Israel. Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2016Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 & 1026 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 2020Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2026Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016, 1026 & 2016 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 216intensive intermediate Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 2016.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 226Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR2026.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 2410Intermediate Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 1420 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2420Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 2410 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 3010Advanced Modern Hebrew I (3.00)
This course focuses on the conjugation of weak, or hollow verbs, and the passive of all conjugations. It also continues the study of subordinate clauses with special attention to adverbial clauses and their use. Texts for the course, which form the basis for class discussion in Hebrew and exercises in Hebrew composition, are drawn from various genres. Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 3020Advanced Modern Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 4993Independent Study in Hebrew (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent study for advanced students of Hebrew. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
HEBR 8993Independent Study in Hebrew (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Students whose proficiency in Modern Hebrew has already reached the advanced level, or alternatively students who for their research focus on Hebrew Literature in translation, will pursue an independent study that will focus on the reading and interpretation of texts, as well as the analysis of media. Prerequisite: HEBR 3010
Hebrew in Translation
HETR 2300Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation (3.00)
This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2010
HETR 3559New Course in Hebrew Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
The course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Hebrew Translation.
History-Middle Eastern History
HIME 1501Introductory Seminar in Middle East History (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.
HIME 1559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History
HIME 2001History of the Middle East and North Africa, C 500-1500 (4.00)
Explores the history of the Middle East and North Africa from late antiquity to the rise to superpower status of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century. Topics include the formation of Islam and the first Arab-Islamic conquests; the fragmentation of the empire of the caliphate; the historical development of Islamic social, legal, and political institutions; science and philosophy; and the impact of invaders (Turks, Crusaders, and Mongols).
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
HIME 2002History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1500-Present (3.00)
As a continuation of HIME 201 (which is not a prerequisite), this course surveys the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa, i.e., the region stretching from Morocco to Afghanistan, and from the Balkans and Anatolia to the Arabian Peninsula. Topics include the main political configurations of the area from the birth of Islam until the Mongol aftermath; the rise of the 'gunpowder Empires' of the 16th century; the Ottoman and Safavid (Iran) states; and the modern nation-state systems of the present century, ca. 1980. The dominant political, religious, economic, social, and cultural features of Middle Eastern peoples and societies are examined, as are relationships between the region and other parts of Eurasia, particularly Western Europe.
HIME 2012Palestine 1948 (3.00)
This course explores the dramatic war of 1948 in Palestine from the UN partition resolution of November 29, 1947 to the cease-fire agreements in early 1949. It covers the political, military progression of the war, within international and decolonization contexts, while paying special attention to the two major outcomes of the war and how they came about: Jewish independence and Palestinian dispossession.
HIME 2559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 3191Christianity and Islam (3.00)
Studies Christianity in the Middle East in the centuries after the rise of Islam.
HIME 3192From Nomads to Sultans: the Ottoman Empire, 1300-1700 (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A survey of the history of the Ottoman Empire from its obscure origins around 1300 to 1700, this course explores the political, military, social, and cultural history of this massive, multi-confessional, multi-ethnic, inter-continental empire which, at its height, encompassed Central and Southeastern Europe, the Caucasus, the Middle East, and North Africa.
HIME 3559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 3571Arab History at the Movies (3.00)
This interdisciplinary course uses cinema as a vehicle to introduce students without a knowledge of Arabic to the perspectives of Arab peoples on their own history. Includes popular movies on the rise of Islam, Crusades, World War I, colonialism, modern city life, women's liberation,war, terrorism. Students read relevant history and learn critical theory on collective memory, propaganda, modernity, revolution, and gender.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
HIME 4501Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History (4.00)
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
HIME 4511Colloquium in Middle East History (4.00)
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topics of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.
HIME 4559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
HIME 4591Topics in Middle Eastern History (3.00)
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
HIME 4993Independent Study in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.
HIME 5052World War I in the Middle East (3.00)
World War I set the stage for many conflicts in the 20th-century Middle East. This course examines the last attempt to build a pluralistic, constitutional realm under the Ottoman empire; how that world crumbled in the Balkan wars and Great War; the Young Turks' relations with Germany; Lawrence of Arabia and the Arab Revolt; the Armenian genocide; women and peasants' suffering; the Balfour Declaration and start of the Palestine conflict.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
HIME 5053Slavery in the Middle East and Ottoman Empire (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course explores the practice of slavery in its various forms in the Middle East and North Africa from pre-Islamic times through the abolition of the slave trade in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire. Topics include: sources of slaves and the slave trade; manumission; the social and legal position of slaves in Islamic societies; the slave-soldier phenomenon; captivity and ransom; gender and race; and the movement towards abolition. Prerequisite: Graduate students and advanced undergraduates with previous study of the Middle East.
Course was offered Spring 2017
HIME 5559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
Course was offered Spring 2015
HIME 7011History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 570-1500 (3.00)
Introduces the history and historiography of the medieval Middle East and North Africa (areas from Morocco to Iran) from the period immediately preceding the rise of Islam until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to political, social, economic, and cultural evolution of the regions and peoples situated in arid and semi-arid zones stretching from Gibraltar to the Oxus River. After surveying the general contours of the field, and isolating the principal scholarly approaches to it, the course proceeds chronologically, starting with the Byzantine and Sassanian Empires in the 6th century and concluding with assessment of the Turkic-Mongolian impact upon the historical configuration of the regions. Prerequisite: HIME 2001.
HIME 7021History and Historiography of the Middle East, ca. 1500-Present (3.00)
Introduces the history and historiography of the early modern and modern Middle East and North Africa from the period of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires until the emergence of a system of nation-states in the 20th century. Primarily a readings-and-discussion colloquium devoted to the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the region. Prerequisite: HIME 2001, 2002, or HIME 7011.
HIME 7031Colonialism and Nation-Building in the Arab World (3.00)
Debate on the effects of European colonial rule has been revived in the decade since the United States occupied Iraq. We W engage the debate by studying the effect of foreign rule on one region, the Arab world: French and British colonization of Algeria and Egypt in the long 19th-century; the League of Nations' mandates in Syria and Iraq after World War I; and finally Americans' effort to rebuild the Iraqi state since 2003. Prerequisite: One prior course on colonialism or on Arab history
Course was offered Spring 2013
HIME 7559New Course in Middle Eastern History (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Middle Eastern History.
Course was offered Spring 2012
HIME 9023Tutorial in the History of the Medieval Middle East and North Africa (3.00)
This tutorial surveys the historiography of the medieval Middle East and North Africa (broadly construed), from pre-Islamic Arabia through the Ottoman conquest of the Mamluk Sultanate, which reunified the eastern half of the Mediterranean for the first time in a millennium. Readings introduce the major dynasties between Iberia and Central Asia, from the Umayyads to the Ottomans, and the seminal texts that have shaped the field.
Course was offered Fall 2016
Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
MESA 1000From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia (3.00)
Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.
MESA 2010Literatures of South Asia and the Middle East (3.00)
An introductory course in non-Western literatures that emphasizes genres with no clear Western equivalents. The reading list varies, but the texts, read in translation, usually come from Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil and Urdu.
MESA 2110Intro to Middle East / South Asia Film History (3.00)
"Transnational Circuits of Cinema: An Introduction to Middle East - South Asia Film History" - Since its very inception as a traveling fairground attraction, cinema has been a globally-circulating medium. This course begins in the moment of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East - South Asia genealogies of filmmaking.
MESA 2300Crossing Borders: Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
A survey of the deep cultural, religious, political and economic historical relationship between the Middle East and South Asia, suggesting we need to understand the two "regions" comprehensively and comparatively.
MESA 2350Women and Media in the Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
In this course we will study depictions and images of women in news media in selected countries (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, India, Pakistan) as well as in the American media. We will especially compare images of women in mainstream news media with those available in online media channels or social news networks. We will also examine the changing status of women journalists worldwide, with a special focus on their role in the Arab Spring.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MESA 2360Women and Social Media in the Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
Women in the Middle East and South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to them. This course examines women's use of social media in five selected countries -Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan - and investigates how it simultaneously enables and limits women's empowerment.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MESA 2559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New course in Middle Eastern and South Asian studies.
MESA 2700Recent Revolutions in the Islamic World (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This introductory course surveys recent revolutionary movements sweeping across the Islamic World, from North Africa, the Middle East into Asia, including the "Arab Spring." Key course questions include: Why rebel? Why now? What for? How? Are they spreading, failing, or being 'hijacked?' What roles have external actors played? What would Jefferson think?
MESA 3010Men and Women of South Asia and the Middle East (3.00)
Focuses on literature of South Asia and the Middle East (Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women; includes poetry and prose from ancient to modern times.
MESA 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
This course provides an introduction to the peoples, cultures, and histories of the Middle East through an examination of language-use. We focus on Israel/Palestine--and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic--as a microcosm for the region as a whole. Readings present ethnographic, linguistic, and literary perspectives on language, identity, and the general processes of SELF/OTHER constructions in contexts of political and military confrontation. Prerequisites: previous coursework in Anthropology, Linguistics, or Middle East Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2015
MESA 3559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
MESA 3650Introduction to Linguistic Typology (3.00)
Human languages appear on the surface to be very different from one another. Closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function.
MESA 4559New Course in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies (3.00)
New Course (or Topic) in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016
MESA 4991Four-Year Major Seminar (3.00)
Required capstone course that studies the Middle East and South Asia from a diversity of perspectives--languages, literatures, anthropology, history, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: fourth-year standing, major in Middle Eastern Studies or in South Asian Studies
MESA 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent study in a special field under the direction of a faculty member in MESALC. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MESA 4998Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis (0.00)
Thesis research under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.
MESA 4999Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis II (6.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Thesis composition under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.
MESA 5120Classics of Islamic Literature: Islamic Mystical Writing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course surveys the classics of Islamic mystical writing, spanning from the Middle East to South Asia and the Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Indian vernacular languages. With an eye to both form and content, we will examine the literary productions ¿ both poetry and prose ¿ of some of the most influential Sufi figures in Islamic history, including Rabi'a, Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Hafiz, Khusrow, Bulleh Shah, and others. Readings in English translation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
MESA 5559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
MESA 6559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New course in Middle Eastern and South Asian studies.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
MESA 8993Independent Study II (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent Study II
MESA 8995MA Research Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Required course for all candidates for the Master of Arts in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies. During this course the final paper, required for the MA, is written. Includes instruction in research methodology, data analysis and a history of academic research on these areas.
MESA 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for MA Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
MESA 8999Non-Topical Research, MA (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
Middle Eastern Studies
MEST 1100Introduction to the Middle East (3.00)
Introduces Middle Eastern economy and environment, society, gender issues, history and politics, secularism-law-religion, languages and literatures, music and the visual arts. Emphasizes the Ottoman, colonial, and post-colonial periods.
MEST 2270Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East (3.00)
Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. Taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic is required.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
MEST 2470Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities (3.00)
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 2470.
MEST 2559New Course in Middle Eastern Studies (3.00)
New Course in Middle Eastern Studies
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014
MEST 2600Major Dimensions of Classical-Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (3.00)
Introducing the cultural dimensions of Classical and Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (600-1400 CE). We will study how Arabs approach their worldly life and pleasures through literature; organize their social domain by ethical-law; construct their spirituality and worldview through religion; react to nature by science; and attempt to resolve the internal and external inconsistencies of their culture through theology, philosophy and mysticism.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MEST 2610Major Dimensions of the Modern Arab World (3.00)
This class aims to develop an understanding of the global significance of the 330 million Arabs as the fourth largest community in the world and Arabic as the fifth largest spoken language in a historical and thematic manner from the Ottomans (1400 CE) to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2014
MEST 2620Aspects of Creativity in Arab-Islamic Heritage:Translated Classical Reading (3.00)
This course aims to expose students to samples of original translated texts from the creative heritage of the Arab-Islamic civilization
Course was offered Spring 2015
MEST 3110Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures (3.00)
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.
MEST 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3470. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014
MEST 3559New Course in Middle Eastern Studies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
New course in Middle Eastern Studies.
MEST 4991Middle East Studies Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Middle East Studies Seminar
MEST 5110Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures (1.00 - 3.00)
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.
MEST 5270Culture & Society of Contemp. Arab Mid. East (3.00)
This course will address some of the religious, socio-political, and historical factors that have contributed to the shaping of the Arab Middle East and Arab identity(s) in the modern age. From the rise of Islam in the 7th century A.D., to the Ottoman Empire, to the colonial remapping of the Middle East during the period of the two World Wars,to the Gulf and Iraq wars, this course will help students gain an understanding of modern Arab culture.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
MEST 5559History of Persian Literature (3.00)
This course examines the tumultuous history of one of the richest literary traditions in the world. Persian literature addresses not only the many thematic concerns of literature (love, romance, mysticism, heroism, vindication, panegyric, media, political philosophy, etc.), but also the social and cultural backdrops that mirror and create it.
Course was offered Fall 2014
MEST 5620The Middle East in Ethnographic Perspective (3.00)
Survey of the anthropological literature on the Middle East & N. Africa. Begins historically with traditional writing on the 'middle east' and proceeds to critiques of this tradition and attempts at new ways of constructing knowledge of this world region. Readings juxtapose theoretical and descriptive work toward critically appraising modern writers' success in overcoming the critiques leveled against their predecessors.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MEST 6600Major Dimensions of Classical-Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (3.00)
Introducing the cultural dimensions of Classical and Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (600 - 1400 CE). We will study how Arabs approach their worldly life and pleasures through literature; organize their social domain by ethical-law; construct their spirituality and worldview through religion; react to nature by science; and attempt to resolve the internal and external inconsistencies of their culture through theology, philosophy and mysticism.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MEST 6610Major Dimensions of the Modern Arab World (3.00)
This class aims to develop an understanding of the global significance of the 330 million Arabs as the fourth largest community in the world and Arabic as the fifth largest spoken language in a historical and thematic manner from the Ottomans (1400 CE) to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2014
MEST 6620Aspects of Creativity in Arab-Islamic Heritage:Translated Classical Reading (3.00)
This course aims to expose students to samples of original translated texts from the creative heritage of the Arab-Islamic civilization
Course was offered Spring 2015
Pashto
PASH 1010Elementary Pashto I (4.00)
Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 1010 and PASH 1020 enable students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., greeting, narrating, describing, ordering, comparing and contrasting, and apologizing). Five class hours per week. Followed by PASH 1020.
PASH 1020Elementary Pashto II (4.00)
Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 1010 and PASH 1020 enable students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., greeting, narrating, describing, ordering, comparing and contrasting, and apologizing). Five class hours per week. Followed by PASH 2010. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 1010, or permission of the instructor.
PASH 2010Intermediate Pashto I (4.00)
Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 2010 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Pashto speakers. Four class hours. Followed by PASH 2020. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 1020, or permission of the instructor.
PASH 2020Intermediate Pashto II (4.00)
Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 2020 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Pashto speakers. Four class hours. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 2010, or permission of the instructor.
Persian
PERS 1010Elementary Persian (4.00)
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio-lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues.
PERS 1020Elementary Persian (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio-lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues. Prerequisite: PERS 1010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 1060Accelerated Persian (4.00)
This course is designed for Persian heritage students who many know spoken language to some extent, but they have not been exposed to formal or written language. It covers two semesters of Elementary Persian; emphasizing reading and writing skills, and the grammar of the language.
Course was offered Spring 2016
PERS 2010Intermediate Persian (4.00)
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature. Prerequisite: PERS 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 2020Intermediate Persian (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature. Prerequisite: PERS 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3010Advanced Persian I (3.00)
This course is designed to introduce the students to the world of Persian prose literature. We will read a variety of prose genre. We will look at the semantics, morphology, and syntax and analyze the topic vis-à-vis these aspects. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2012
PERS 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Persian group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PERS 3020Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Selected readings from the works of major writers of the century. Discusses the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society. Improves reading ability in Persian and familiarizes students with Iran, its people, and its culture. Prerequisite: PERS 2020, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Persian group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PERS 3230Introduction to Classical Persian Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3240Introduction to Modern Persian Literature (3.00)
This course addresses the development of modern(ist) trends in Persian literature, emphasizing historical and socio-political factors. Exemplar modern poems, stories, and essays are read in the original, then explained and critically evaluated. Defines and discusses significant ideas, ideologies, movements, trends, milieus, social backgrounds, etc., out of which modern Persian literature emerged. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3559New Course in Persian (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian.
PERS 4240Advanced Readings in Sufi Texts (3.00)
A course designed to help advanced Persian language students develop skills in reading and understanding texts (both prose and poetry) on Persian Islamic mysticism (Sufism).
PERS 4991Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Persian
PERS 4993Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent study for advanced students of Persian. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PERS 5010Readings in Modern Persian Poetry (3.00)
Studies the works of major and some minor poets of the 20th century. The form and content of 'New Poetry' is discussed as distinguished features of 20th-century Persian poetry in contrast with those of classical Persian poetry. Emphasizes the themes of modern poetry as reflections of Iranian society. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PERS 5020Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction (3.00)
Examines the works of this century's major writers, focusing on the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society. Improves Persian reading ability and familiarity with Iran, its people, and its culture. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PERS 5230Introduction to Classical Persian Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equiv.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PERS 5559New Course in Persian (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
PERS 7559New Course in Persian (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
Course was offered Fall 2013
PERS 8993Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent study for advanced students of Persian. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Persian in Translation
PETR 3210Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.
Course was offered Fall 2011
PETR 3220Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PETR 3320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PETR 3322The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad (3.00)
This course focuses on the life and art of Forugh Farrokhzad in a spectrum of genres that includes poetry, travel narratives, literary criticism, essays, and films by and about her. Although from the beginning of her literary career, Farrokhzad was a daring, often irreverent explorer of taboo topics, she was also deeply rooted in the Iranian culture. We study the body of her work to better understand Iran in the 1950-60s
PETR 3340Poetics of Existentialist Persian Literature (3.00)
The existentialist literature of the Persian-speaking world has been a source of inspiration of poetics for the entire Middle East region. The objective of this course is the study of cognitive nuances embedded in the thematic and linguistic structure of Persian existentialist literature.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PETR 3342Life Narrative & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
While women's autobiography has attracted growing scholarly attention as an evolving literary form, sustained scholarly study of the genre has largely focused on women's autobiography in Europe and North America, with only a small group of isolated scholars addressing women's autobiography in Islamic societies in general and Iran in particular. This course studies the genealogy and evolution of the genre.
PETR 3559New Course in Persian Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic int he subject area of Persian Translation
PETR 5210Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.
Course was offered Fall 2011
PETR 5220Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PETR 5320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PETR 5322The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad (3.00)
This course focuses on the life and art of Forugh Farrokhzad in a spectrum of genres that includes poetry, travel narratives, literary criticism, essays, and films by and about her. Although from the beginning of her literary career, Farrokhzad was a daring, often irreverent explorer of taboo topics, she was also deeply rooted in the Iranian culture. We study the body of her work to better understand Iran in the 1950-60s
Course was offered Spring 2015
PETR 5559New Course in Persian Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian Translation
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2010
PETR 7559New Course in Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
New course in Persian Literature in translation.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Religion-Islam
RELI 1559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
RELI 2024Jewish-Muslim Relations (3.00)
Jewish and Muslim communities share a complex history of interaction, spanning from seventh-century Arabia to the present day, and including instances of collaboration as well as moments of violence. Our course examines this dynamic relationship through documentary and literary sources. We focus on points of contact between Muslims and Jews in contexts ranging from battlefields to universities, from religious discourse to international politics.
RELI 2070Classical Islam (3.00)
Studies the Irano-Semitic background, Arabia, Muhammad and the Qur'an, the Hadith, law and theology, duties and devotional practices, sectarian developments, and Sufism.
RELI 2080Global Islam (3.00)
Global Islam traces the development of political Islamic thought from Napoleons invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the Arab Spring in 2010 and its aftermath in the Middle East.
RELI 2559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
RELI 3110Muhammad and the Qur'an (3.00)
Systematic reading of the Qur'an in English, with an examination of the prophet's life and work. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
RELI 3120Sufism: Islamic Mysticism (3.00)
This course will be a historical and topical survey of the development of Sufism from the classical Islamic period through the modern age, paying special attention to the interaction of ideas and the social and political contexts surrounding them.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011
RELI 3415Medieval Books and Scholars (3.00)
Colloquium on medieval books and scholars
RELI 3559New Course in Islam (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 3670Religion and Politics in Islam (3.00)
Historical and topical survey of the roots and genesis of the religion, and political conceptions operating in the Islamic world today.
RELI 3900Islam in Africa (3.00)
Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELA 3900. Prerequisite: RELA 2750, RELI 2070, RELI 2080, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
RELI 4559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
RELI 4560Advanced Topics in Islam (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Islam
RELI 5345People of the Book Under Islam (3.00)
Interfaith relations under Islam.
RELI 5380Islamic Biomedical Ethics (3.00)
Seminar will explore the foundations of religious ethics, ethical principles and rules developed by Muslim scholars to provide guidelines in medical practice and research in various cultural and political contexts.
RELI 5400Muslim Comparative Theologies: Sunni-Shi'i Creeds (3.00)
The seminar will undertake to study the comparative Sunni and Shi'ite theologies to underscore a historical development of Muslim creeds in the context of social and political conditions. The course will cover the development of Muslim theology in general and the Sunni and Shi'ite creeds in particular. Prerequisites: RELI 2070 or 2080
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELI 5420War and Peace in Islam: A Comparative Ethics Approach (3.00)
Studies Islamic notions of holy war and peace as they relate to statecraft and political authority in Muslim history.
RELI 5425Islamic Philosophy & Theology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course surveys the major developments within Islamic philosophy and theology from the classical to the early modern periods. Topics covered include the early theological schools (Ash'aris, Maturidis, Mu'tazilis), the transmission of Greek philosophy into Arabic, Peripatetic philosophy, Illuminationism, Shi'ite philosophy, and philosophical Sufism, concluding with the challenges faced by Islamic philosophy through the colonial and modern eras. This course has no prerequisites, but some previous experience in either Islamic studies or philosophy will be helpful.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELI 5540Seminar in Islamic Studies (3.00)
Topics in Islamic Studies
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2011
RELI 5559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 7100Islamic Religious Law (3.00)
Studies the sources and implications of the Islamic Religious Law (the Sharia). Prerequisite: RELI 2070 or RELC 5300.
RELI 7559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 8559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
Religion-Judaism
RELJ 1210Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Studies the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel in the light of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Emphasizes methods of contemporary biblical criticism. Cross listed as RELC 1210.
RELJ 1410Elementary Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
RELJ 1420Elementary Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1410 or the equivalent.
RELJ 1559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism
RELJ 1590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
RELJ 2030Introduction to Judaism (3.00)
Introduces the world view and way of life of classical Rabbinic Judaism.
RELJ 2040American Judaism (3.00)
Description and explanation of the diverse forms of Jewish religious life in America.
RELJ 2056Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition (3.00)
Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition/Judaism in Antiquity
RELJ 2061Judaism, Modernity, and Secularization (3.00)
This course attempts to develop the history and intellectual underpinnings of the Jewish experience of modernity and secularization. It will explore the variety of Jewish responses and adjustments to the modern world and their implications for present day Judaism in its many forms.
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 2230Jewish Spiritual Journeys (3.00)
Jewish Spiritual Journeys
RELJ 2240Jewish Ritual (3.00)
Jewish Ritual
RELJ 2300Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation (3.00)
This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2010
RELJ 2410Intermediate Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1420 or the equivalent.
RELJ 2420Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Readings in the prose narratives and poetry of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 2410 or the equivalent.
RELJ 2521Special Topics in Judaism (3.00)
Special Topics In Judaism.
RELJ 2559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Judaisim.
RELJ 2590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3030Jesus and the Gospels (3.00)
This course focuses on Jesus of Nazareth as an historical figure, that is, as he is accessible to the historian by means of historical methods. Our most important sources of information on Jesus are the canonical Gospels, and so much of the course will involve reading and attempting to understand these texts. We will attempt to reconstruct at least the broad outlines of Jesus activity and teachings, keeping in mind the limits of our sources.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
RELJ 3052Responses to the Holocaust (3.00)
Responses to the Holocaust
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
RELJ 3070Beliefs and Ethics after the Holocaust (3.00)
Examines how theologians and ethicists have responded to the human catastrophe of the Nazi Holocaust, 1933-45. Readings include twentieth-century reflections on the Holocaust, and previous Jewish and Christian responses to catastrophe from Biblical times through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century pogroms in eastern Europe. Prerequisite: Any religious studies, history, or philosophy course, or instructor permission.
RELJ 3080Israeli Fiction in Translation (3.00)
Israeli Fiction in Translation
RELJ 3085The Passover Haggadah: A Service Learning Course (3.00)
The Passover Haggadah cultivates sensitivity for the plight of the stranger, and we will study how it came about and how it has been used as a template for rituals of social activism on behalf of oppressed peoples, and in particular, of refugees. In volunteer placements in the community, UVA students will work with individuals who have have found refuge in Cville. Together, they will collaborate on designing haggadahs and community seders.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
RELJ 3090Israelite Prophecy (3.00)
This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel. We will read in translation most of the stories from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament about prophets (Moses, Deborah, Samuel, Elijah, Elisha), as well as the books attributed to prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and The Twelve). Each primary text will be considered in its historical, cultural, and political contexts.
RELJ 3100Medieval Jewish Thought (3.00)
This course introduces the medieval Jewish intellectual tradition (9th-13th centuries) in its cultural and historical context. We will explore key themes such as the nature of God, prophecy, exile, the status of Scripture, the history of religions, and the quest for spiritual perfection. Readings will be drawn from philosophical, theological, exegetical, pietistic and mystical texts, including works from Saadia Gaon, Judah Halevi, and Maimonides.
Course was offered Spring 2016
RELJ 3170Modern Jewish Thought (3.00)
This course offers an introduction into the major themes of Modern Jewish Thought.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
RELJ 3220Judaism and Zionism (3.00)
Studies the complex relationship between Judaism the sacred tradition of the Jews and Zionism the modern ideology of Jewish national revival.
RELJ 3292The Book of Job & Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELJ 3300The Jewish Mystical Tradition (3.00)
Historical study of the Jewish mystical tradition, emphasizing the persistent themes of the tradition as represented in selected mystical texts.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELJ 3310Jewish Law (3.00)
Studies the structure and content of Jewish law in terms of its normative function, its historical background, its theological and philosophical principles, and its role in contemporary society both Jewish and general.
RELJ 3320Judaism: Medicine and Healing (3.00)
Judaism: Medicine and Healing
RELJ 3330Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change (3.00)
Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change
RELJ 3340Jewish Medical Ethics (3.00)
Jewish Medical Ethics
RELJ 3350Judaism and Ethics (3.00)
An exploration of ethical thinking using the resources of the Jewish tradition.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3360Judaism and Christianity (3.00)
Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship.
RELJ 3370Modern Movements in Judaism (3.00)
Studies the modern religious movements in Judaism including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, as well as Zionism, both secular and religious, with an emphasis on their theological and philosophical assertions and historical backgrounds.
RELJ 3372German Jewish Culture and History (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history & thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.
RELJ 3390Jewish Feminism (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Jewish Feminism
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
RELJ 3430Women in Judaism (3.00)
Women in Judaism
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 3475Judaism and Science (3.00)
A study of the place of science in Judaism, focusing of the example of creation. Topics include: The Genesis story in plain sense, historical scholarship, rabbinic commentary and Jewish philosophy; The Big Bang through the history of Jewish reasoning; Newton and Modern Jewish Humanism; Quantum Physics and the Logic of Scripture; Science in modern and contemporary Jewish thought and belief; Judaism and the environment.
RELJ 3490Jewish Weddings (3.00)
As we study the ritual of the Jewish wedding ceremony from antiquity to the present day, we will see how notions about marriage, gender relations, and the normative family are displayed and challenged. In particular, we will be investigating the establishment of innovations in the contemporary Jewish weddings (traditional, liberal, same-sex and interfaith) in America and Israel.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
RELJ 3559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Judaism.
RELJ 3590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3615Joseph, Esther, Daniel: Biblical Novels (3.00)
The finest narratives in ancient Judaism - stories about Joseph, Esther, Daniel - describe an exiled hero, who delivers his or her people against all odds; related literature includes Ruth, Tobit, Judith, Joseph & Asenath. This course examines the literary, historical, theological significance of these works and common themes: exile, restoration, extraordinary women, coincidence, human agency, the remote deity, the vindication of the underdog.
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELJ 3830Talmud (3.00)
Talmud
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2012
RELJ 3910Women and the Bible (3.00)
Surveys passages in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELC 3910. Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.
RELJ 4559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Judaism.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
RELJ 4570Advanced Topics in Judaism (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Judaism
RELJ 4590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
RELJ 4591Topics Modern Jewish History (3.00)
This topical course will explore topics in modern Jewish history, from 1948 to the present day.
RELJ 4950Senior Seminar in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course introduces and examines the origins and development of Jewish Studies with emphasis on its interdisciplinary character. Requirements include active class participation and a significant research paper based on a topic of the student's choice. This course is required of all fourth-year Jewish Studies majors. It is also open to all interested students with permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
RELJ 5048Philo of Alexandria and Hellenistic Judaism (3.00)
An indepth inquiry into the writings and thought of Philo of Alexandria (ca. 20 BCE-50 CE)
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 5050Judaism in Antiquity (3.00)
Description and analysis of representative systems of Judaic religion which flourished in Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia from 505 BCE to 600 CE.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RELJ 5065Jewish History, Meta-History, Counter History (3.00)
The course discusses models of history, meta-history, counter history, and anti-history in modern Jewish thought. Readings from Heinrich Graetz, Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, A.J. Heschel, Leo Strauss, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 5100Theology and Ethics of the Rabbis (3.00)
This course explores theological and ethical themes in classical rabbinic literature (c. 200-600 CE). Focus is on gaining fluency in textual and conceptual analysis. Questions examined include: How is the relationship between God, humans generally and the people Israel specifically, imagined? What is evil and how is it best managed? What is the nature of one's obligation to fellow human beings? How does one cultivate an ideal self?
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELJ 5105Religion and Culture of the Rabbis (3.00)
An examination of religion and culture of the rabbinic movement (c. 70-600 CE) in the social and cultural contexts of Greco-Roman antiquity. Among the issues to be examined: rituals and institutions of the rabbis, social organizations within the rabbinic movement, engagement with other sectors of Jewish and gentile society.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 5165Scripture and Philosophy in Judaism and Beyond (3.00)
What happened when classical Jewish traditions of study and learning encountered the Hellenic traditions of philosophy? This course examines instances of encounter between philosophy and Jewish text learning throughout Jewish history, from the days of Philo to today, focusing on contexts of history, text-reading and hermeneutics. The second half of the course will explore implications for studies in Christianity and Islam.
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELJ 5210Mishnah Seminar (3.00)
This course trains students to read Mishnah in the original language. Primary emphasis will be on giving students tools to decode the text and set the text in its appropriate historical and cultural contexts. Special attention will be paid to literary and legal aspects of the text. The Mishnah will also compared with parallels from contemporary compositions (the Tosephta and midrash halakhah). Secondary readings will expose students to the range
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELJ 5291The Book of Genesis and Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the book of Genesis (with attention to its literary artistry, compositional history, and theological issues) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2012
RELJ 5292The Book of Job & Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation. Prerequisite: One course on biblical scholarship is required; knowledge of Hebrew and/or Greek is preferred, but, if not, then admission by instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELJ 5385The Song of Songs (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A seminar on the biblical Song of Songs (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELJ 5559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism
RELJ 5950Midrashic Imagination (3.00)
Midrashic Imagination
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELJ 7559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RELJ 8559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism.
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 8880Biblical and Jewish Palestinian Aramaic (3.00)
Introduces the Aramaic language, intended especially for New Testament graduate students. Emphasizes mastery of the grammar and syntax of Official or Imperial Aramaic and especially Middle Aramaic (second century b.c.e. to second century c.e.).
Urdu
URDU 1559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 1000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2016
URDU 2010Intermediate Urdu (4.00)
Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax; and conversation. Prerequisite: for URDU 2010: HIND 1020 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
URDU 2020Intermediate Urdu (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Prerequisite: for URDU 2020: URDU 2010 or equivalent.
URDU 3010Advanced Urdu I (3.00)
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
URDU 3020Advanced Urdu II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
URDU 3300Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil (3.00)
This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations. Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2013
URDU 3559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 3000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2011
URDU 4993Independent Study in Urdu (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Urdu
URDU 5010Advanced Urdu I (3.00)
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission.
URDU 5020Advanced Urdu II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission
URDU 6559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 6000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2011
URDU 7300Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil (3.00)
This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations. Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014
URDU 8993Independent Study in Urdu (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent study in Urdu language and/or literature. Prerequisite: URDU 5010 or 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.