UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog for the Materials Science and Engineering Department    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Engineering Physics
EP 6950Supervised Project (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated.
EP 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
EP 7000Graduate Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Weekly seminars for graduate students in Engineering Physics offered every semester. All resident EP graduate students enroll each semester.
EP 7592Special Topics in Engineering Physics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced-level study of selected problems in engineering physics. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
EP 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
Course was offered Spring 2010, Fall 2009
EP 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
EP 8970Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's students.
EP 8999Master's Degree Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
EP 9970Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral students.
EP 9999Ph.D. Dissertation Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Formal record of commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Materials Science and Engineering
MSE 2010Materials That Shape Our Civilization (3.00)
A general review of structure, properties, methods of production, uses and world supply of the materials on which present and past civilizations have been based, including materials used in heavy industry, construction, communications, energy production, and medicine as well as textiles and naturally-occurring organic materials. Cross-listed as EVSC 2010.
MSE 2090Introduction to the Science and Engineering of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The collective properties of the materials in an engineering structure often dictate the feasibility of the design. Provides the scientific foundation for understanding the relations between the properties, microstructure, and behavior during use of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Develops a vocabulary for the description of the empirical facts and theoretical ideas about the various levels of structure from atoms, through defects in crystals, to larger scale morphology of practical engineering materials.
MSE 2500Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Special topic courses in Materials Science and Engineering
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
MSE 3050Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials (3.00)
Demonstrates how the interplay of thermodynamic driving forces and kinetics of mass transfer defines the formation of complex microstructures in real materials. The course begins with an overview of classical thermodynamics and applies the thermodynamic concepts to the analysis of phase equilibrium and phase transformations in one-component systems and binary solutions. Students learn how to read, analyze and even construct phase diagrams from thermodynamic data. The second part of the course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of kinetic phenomena in materials, with the focus on diffusion and phase transformations. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 or instructor permission.
MSE 3060Structures and Defects of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Basic materials structure concepts are developed, include bonding and crystallography. The structure-property paradigm is illustrated through discussion of the frequently anisotropic properties of crystalline solids, such as elastic moduli, thermal expansion, magnetic properties, and the piezoelectric effect. Descriptions of important defects in crystalline solids, from point defects, to dislocations, to interfaces are introduced along with the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern their interactions and roles during materials processing, such as annealing, aging, and sintering. Applications are made to a broad range of materials, from structural alloys to so-called "smart materials" used in sensors and actuators. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 and APMA 2120 or instructor permission.
MSE 3080Corrosion, Batteries and Fuel Cells (3.00)
Includes basic electrochemical principles, terminology, definitions and examples of corrosion, batteries and fuel cells, as well as the thermodynamics and kinetic principles of electrochemistry applied to corrosion, batteries and fuel cells. Discusses the eight forms of corrosion and various battery and fuel cell systems. Provides instruction on the various corrosion mitigation methods such as cathodic protection, inhibitors, and coatings as well as design issues in corrosion, batteries and fuel cells at the materials science and engineering level. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 or instructor permission.
MSE 3081Corrosion, Batteries, and Fuel Cells Laboratory (1.00)
Provides instruction in standard corrosion, battery and fuel cell experimental methods that demonstrate the instrumentation of corrosion, battery and fuel cell testing and some of the ways to evaluate these electrochemical systems. Standard experiments involving cathodic protection, anodic protection, inhibitors, and simple examples of batteries and fuel cells. MSE 3080 may be taken without the lab, but MSE 3081 may not be taken without the lecture.
MSE 3101Materials Science Investigations (3.00)
The course amplifies topics covered in introductory materials science through laboratory demonstration and experimentation. An understanding of modern instruments and experimental techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy is gained through lecture and laboratory experience. Experimental determination of the processing, structure, property relationship is emphasized. Laboratory report writing skills are developed. Prerequisite: MSE 2090
MSE 3610Aerospace Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces physical-chemical-microstructural-mechanical property relations for aerospace materials. Metal, polymer, ceramic, and composite material systems are covered. Topics include strength, fracture, corrosion, oxidation/corrosion, materials selection, phase diagrams, kinetics of phase change, and materials processing. Case studies include materials for aero turbine engines and ultralight structures.
MSE 3670Materials for Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Applications (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course introduces the basics of materials interactions with electrons and electromagnetic radiation and describes the classes of materials that exhibit useful electronic, optical, magnetic, and superconductive properties. Particular attention will be devoted to the intrinsic (structure, chemistry) and extrinsic (processing, microstructure) material features that determine these properties. Examples of application of such materials in commercial electronic systems in common use are discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 recommended.
MSE 4055Nanoscale Science & Technology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Covers the basic phenomena exhibited by material structures at the scale of one hundred nanometers of less, and the applications to technology. The goal of the course is to provide students with fundamental physical principles which can be used to analyze nanoscale phenomena, the assembly of nanostructures, and their characterization. Different properties: electrical, mechanical, optical, etc. will be discussed in detail on the basis of quantum mechanics and the atomistic description of solids. The description will include the behavior of clusters, nanoparticles, graphene, carbon nanotubes, nanoporous material, and examples from the natural world (DNA, membranes, cells, mineral nanostructures). Different methods of fabrication of nanostructures will be covered, from self-assembly to direct writing with electron beams. The characterization of the microstructures by different methods will be described and compared. The course will give a broad view of current and potential applications, with consideration of economic an societal aspects of the technology. Prerequisite: Exposure to Quantum Mechanics (MSE 3670, PHYS 2320, PHYS 2620, or CHEM 3610) or instructor permission.
MSE 4210Materials Processing (3.00)
This course examines the fundamental principles of physics, chemistry, materials science, and manufacturing which underlie the making, shaping, and fabrication of engineering components from casting and deformation processing (e.g. rolling, extrusion, forging) of metals, to powder processing of metals and ceramics, to polymer injection molding, to thin-film processing and lithography relevant to microelectronic circuit fabrication. Prerequisite: MSE 3060 and co-requisite MSE 3050
MSE 4270Introduction to Atomistic Simulations (3.00)
Introduction to several classical atomic-level simulation techniques (molecular dynamics, Metropolis and kinetic Monte Carlo). The basic concepts, capabilities and limitations of the methods are discussed, an overview of the current state-of-the-art is provided, and examples of recent success stories are considered. The emphasis of the course is on getting practical experience in designing and performing computer simulations.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
MSE 4320Origins of Mechanical Behavior (3.00)
Develops understanding of material deformation and fracture in response to mechanical loading. Engineering and scientific principles are integrated in an approach that includes: (a) material property phenomenology,(b) test methods, (c) causal mechanisms at the atomic defect to microstructure scale, (d) governing continuum mechanics equations, and (e) problem solving. Plastic deformation and creep are understood based on elasticity theory and dislocation concepts. Fatigue and fracture are understood based on continuum fracture mechanics and microstructural damage mechanisms. Special Topics provide capstone descriptions of content, and engage the student with future challenges and opportunities. Prerequisite: MSE 3060 or MSE 2090 plus instructor permission.
MSE 4592Special Topics in Materials Science (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced undergraduate course on topics not normally covered in other course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the materials science and engineering field. Offerings are based on student and faculty interests.
MSE 4960Special Project in Materials Science and Engineering (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A fourth year project in MSE, under the supervision of a faculty member, is designed to give undergraduate students an application of principles learned in the classroom. The work may be experimental or computational, and the student is expected to become proficient in techniques used to process, characterize, or model materials. The project should make use of design principles in the solution of a problem. Six hours in lab per week, notebook. Prerequisite: 4th year standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor.
MSE 6010Electronic and Crystal Structure of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Provides a fundamental understanding of the structure of crystalline and non-crystalline engineering materials from electronic to macroscopic properties. Topics include symmetry and crystallography, the reciprocal lattice and diffraction, quantum physics, bonding and band theory. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6020Defects and Microstructure in Materials (3.00)
Basic course designed to provide a foundation for correlating defect structure and microstructure with physical, mechanical and chemical properties of engineering materials. The fundamental properties of point, line and surface defects in ordered media will be formulated. The thermodynamics of point defects in various types of solids will be discussed as well as the geometry and mechanics of crystal dislocations and their role in crystal plasticity elucidated. The essential elements of microstructure will be characterized emphasizing the concepts of phase constitution, microconstituent, polycrystalline aggregate and multiphase materials. The concept of real materials embodying a hierarchy of structures is emphasized. The principles governing the genesis and stability of material structure at various levels will be discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 and MSE 6230.
MSE 6050Structure and Properties of Materials I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is the first of a sequence of two basic courses for first-year graduate students or qualified undergraduate students. Topics include atomic bonding, crystal structure, and crystal defects in their relationship to properties and behavior of materials (polymers, metals, and ceramics); phase equilibria and non-equilibrium phase transformation; metastable structures; solidification; and recrystallization. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
MSE 6060Structure and Properties of Materials II (3.00)
This is the second of a two-course sequence for the first-year graduate and qualified undergraduate students. Topics include diffusion in solids; elastic, anelastic, and plastic deformation; and electronic and magnetic properties of materials. Emphasizes the relationships between microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic behavior of materials. Prerequisite: MSE 6050 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
MSE 6080Chemical and Electrochemical Properties (3.00)
Introduces the concepts of electrode potential, double layer theory, surface charge, and electrode kinetics. These concepts are applied to subjects that include corrosion and embrittlement, energy conversion, batteries and fuel cells, electro-catalysis, electroanalysis, electrochemical industrial processes, bioelectrochemistry, and water treatment. Prerequisite: Physical chemistry course or instructor permission.
MSE 6120Characterization of Materials (3.00)
Provides a fundamental understanding of a broad spectrum of techniques utilized to characterize properties of solids. The methods used to assess properties are described through integration of the basic principles and application. Methods more amenable to analysis of bulk properties are differentiated from those aimed at measurements of local/surface properties. MSE 3670 or equivalent, or a solid state materials/physics course.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013
MSE 6130Transmission Electron Microscopy (3.00)
Emphasizes the fundamental principles of transmission electron microscopy and illustrates its capabilities for characterizing the internal structures of materials by diffraction, imaging and spectroscopic techniques; includes weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 or instructor permission.
MSE 6140Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (3.00)
Fundamental course on the principles governing the behavior of modern magnetic materials employed in technology from transformer materials to permanent magnets and magnetic recording media including such new areas as nanomagnetism. The approach integrates the basic physics of magnetism with the materials science paradigm of processing-structure-properties-performance. The subject matter is developed at a level to enable students to understand magnetism and magnetic materials at the forefront of the field and to readily read the current research and technological literature. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
MSE 6160Scanning Electron Microscopy and Related Techniques (3.00)
Covers the physical principles of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Laboratory demonstrations and experiments cover the operation of the SEM and EPMA. Applications of secondary and backscattered electron imaging, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, wave- analysis are applied to materials characterization. Laboratory experiments may include either materials science or biological applications, depending on the interests of the student. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6167Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Properties of Materials (3.00)
Explore the fundamental physical laws governing electrons in solids, and show how that knowledge can be applied to understanding electronic, optical and magnetic properties. Students will gain an understanding of how these properties vary between different types of materials, and thus why specific materials are optimal for important technological applications. Cross-listed as ECE 6167. Prerequisite: Some background in solid state materials and elementary quantum principles.
MSE 6230Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Emphasizes the understanding of thermal properties such as heat capacity, thermal expansion, and transitions in terms of the entropy and the other thermodynamic functions. Develops the relationships of the Gibbs and Helmholtz functions to equilibrium systems, reactions, and phase diagrams. Atomistic and statistical mechanical interpretations of crystalline and non-crystalline solids are linked to the general thermodynamical laws by the partition function. Nonequilibrium and irreversible processes in solids are discussed. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6240Kinetics of Transport and Transformations in Materials (3.00)
An introduction to basic kinetic processes in materials and develops basic mathematical skills necessary for materials research. Students learn to formulate the partial differential equations and boundary conditions used to describe basic materials phenomena in the solid state including mass and heat diffusion in single- and two-phase systems, the motion of planar phase boundaries, and interfacial reactions. Students develop analytical and numerical techniques for solving these equations and apply them to understanding microstructural evolution. Prerequisite: MSE 6230.
MSE 6270Introduction to Atomistic Simulations (3.00)
Introduction to several classical atomic-level simulation techniques (molecular dynamics, Metropolis and kinetic Monte Carlo). The basic concepts, capabilities and limitations of the methods are discussed, an overview of the current state-of-the-art is provided, and examples of recent success stories are considered. The emphasis of the course is on getting practical experience in designing and performing computer simulations.
MSE 6310Nanomaterials (3.00)
Introduces relevant concepts governing the synthesis, science, and engineering of nanomaterials. Course modules cover the fundamental scientific principles controlling assembly of nanostructured materials; the types of nanomaterials that are extant; synthesis, measurement and computational tools; new properties at the nanoscale, and existing and emerging applications of nanomaterials.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
MSE 6320Deformation and Fracture of Structural Materials (3.00)
Deformation and fracture are considered through integration of materials science microstructure and solid mechanics principles over a range of length scales, emphasizing the mechanical behavior of metallic-structural alloys and electronic materials. Metal deformation is understood based on elasticity theory and dislocation concepts. Fracture is understood based on continuum fracture mechanics and microstructural damage mechanisms. Additional topics include fatigue, elevated temperature behavior, material embrittlement, time-dependency, experimental design, damage-tolerant life prognosis, small-volume behavior, and material property modeling. Prerequisite: MSE 4320, or BS in MSE, or MSE 6050, or permission of instructor for graduate students outside of MSE.
MSE 6340Physical Metallurgy of Transition-Element Alloys (3.00)
Reinforces fundamental concepts, introduces advance topics, and develops literacy in the major alloy systems. Emphasizes microstructural evolution by composition and thermomechanical process control. Topics include phase diagrams, transformation kinetics, martensitic transformation, precipitation, diffusion, recrystallization, and solidification. Considers both experimental and model-simulation approaches. Prerequisite: MSE 6060 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
MSE 6350Physical Metallurgy of Light Alloys (3.00)
Develops the student's literacy in aluminum and titanium alloys used in the aerospace and automotive industries. Considers performance criteria and property requirements from design perspectives. Emphasizes processing-microstructure development, and structure-property relationships. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Special Topics in Distance Learning
MSE 6592Topics in Material Science (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A study of special subjects related to developments in materials science under the direction of members of the staff. Offered as required under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 6640Thin Film Growth (3.00)
Students are exposed to materials issues concerning the relevant growth models, techniques, and characterization of thin films pertaining to metals, oxides, and semiconductor materials. Growth techniques including sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, and molecular beam epitaxy will be discussed in detail.
Course was offered Fall 2009
MSE 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 6995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Science or Master of Materials Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
MSE 7020Crystal Defect Theory (3.00)
Studies the nature and major effects of crystal defects on the properties of materials, emphasizing metals. The elasticity theory of dislocations is treated in depth. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 and 6020 or instructor permission.
MSE 7080Advanced Electrochemistry (3.00)
A highly-specialized course detailing specific subject matter in the areas of corrosion of stainless steel, cyclic voltammetry, and the adsorption of hydrogen on and diffusion of hydrogen through Palladium. Associated experimental methods are discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 6080
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
MSE 7130Advanced Electron Microscopy (3.00)
Emphasis placed on the applications of advanced techniques of transmission and scanning electron microscopy to modern research problems in materials science and engineering. Microdiffraction and microanalysis, lattice imaging, and convergent beam diffraction in TEM and STEM are treated. In SEM, quantitative probe analysis techniques and back scattered electron imaging and channeling are covered. Prerequisite: MSE 6130 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
MSE 7140Physics of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Basic course dealing with the physical principles governing the thermal, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of engineering materials. The approach integrates the fundamentals of materials science with essential concepts in solid state and condensed matter physics. Special attention is given to understanding the nature of the crystalline state and wave-particle diffraction with a strong emphasis on the reciprocal lattice concept. Thermal properties are approached by discussing the Einstein and Debye solids and the concept of lattice waves and phonons. The elements of Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics are reviewed leading to the development of an electron theory of solids. The concepts of Fermi surface and Fermi energy, Brillouin zones, valence and conduction bands are discussed extensively. The atomic origin of magnetism and magnetic effects in solids are analyzed as well as magnetic hysteresis and technical magnetic properties. The fundamental electrical and magnetic properties of superconductors are discussed including the new high Tc ceramic materials. Prerequisite: MSE 6140 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2011
MSE 7220Surface Science (3.00)
Analyzes the structure and thermodynamics of surfaces, with particular emphasis on the factors controlling chemical reactivity of surfaces; adsorption, catalysis, oxidation, and corrosion are considered from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Modern surface analytical techniques, such as Auger, ESCA, and SIMS are considered. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2010
MSE 7240Diffusional Processes in Materials (3.00)
An introduction to elasticity theory, the thermodynamics of stressed crystals, and diffuse interface theory with application to understanding microstructural evolution in bulk materials and thin films. Prerequisite: MSE 6230, 6240.
MSE 7320Deformation and Fracture of Materials (3.00)
Emphasizes the roles of defects, state of stress, temperature, strain rate, and environment on macroscopic mechanical behavior of materials, as well as nano-to-micro scale modeling of such responses. The first half of the course considers dislocation theory with application to understanding materials plasticity, strengthening mechanisms and creep. The second half develops tools necessary for advanced fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Linear and nonlinear continuum fracture mechanics principles are developed and integrated with microscopic plastic deformation and fracture mechanisms. Topics include cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, environmental cracking and micromechanical modeling of governing properties. Prerequisite: MSE 6320 or AM/MAE/APMA 6020 or CE 6720 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2011
MSE 7340Phase Transformations (3.00)
Includes the fundamental theory of diffusional phase transformations in solid metals and alloys; applications of thermodynamics to calculation of phase boundaries and driving forces for transformations; theory of solid-solid nucleation, theory of diffusional growth, comparison of both theories with experiment; applications of thermodynamics and of nucleation and growth theory to the principal experimental systematics of precipitation from solid solution, the massive transformations, the cellular and the pearlite reactions, martensitic transformations, and the questions of the role of shear in diffusional phase transformations. Prerequisite: MSE 6230 or comparable thermodynamics.
MSE 7555Advanced Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Distance Learning
MSE 7570Materials Processing (3.00)
Discusses scientific and technological bases of material processing. Examines solidification, deformation, particulate and thermomechanical processing from a fundamental point of view and discusses their current technological applications. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 7592Advanced Topics in Materials Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An advanced level study of special topics related to developments in materials science. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 7820Materials Science Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Broad topics and in-depth subject treatments are presented. The course is related to research areas in materials science and involves active student participation.
MSE 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 7995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Doctor of Philosophy degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Fall 2011
MSE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
MSE 8970Graduate Teaching Instruction-M.S. (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's students.
MSE 8999Masters Degree Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MSE 9970Graduate Teaching Instruction-Ph.D. (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral students.
MSE 9999PHD Dissertation Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.