UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Catalog of Courses for Physics    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Physics
PHYS 1010The Physical Universe (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
In this class you will get a chance to explore the scientific wonders of the universe. Topics vary each semester but generally include: motion, energy, waves, electricity, magnetism, sound, light, relativity, atomic structure, molecules, quantum physics, the nucleus, chemistry, meteorology, geophysics, the solar system, stars, and cosmology. PHYS 1010 requires limited math, but has wide applications like electronics, wifi, rockets, satellites, nuclear reactors, lasers, climate change, earthquakes, the tides, eclipses, plate tectonics, fossil fuels, telescopes, solar energy, and the origin of universe. PHYS 1010 is for non-science majors. Premedical and pre-dental students should take PHYS 2010, 2020.
PHYS 1020The Physical Universe II (3.00)
For non-science majors. Covers physical science topics including chemistry, meteorology, geophysics, solar system, stars, and cosmology. Limited math, but with wide applications like periodic table, climate change, earthquakes, plate tectonics, fossil fuels, telescopes, solar energy, origin of universe. 1010 and 1020 may be taken in any order. Pre-medical and pre-dental students should take PHYS 2010, 2020
PHYS 1050How Things Work (3.00)
For non-science majors. Introduces physics and science in everyday life, considering objects from our daily environment and focusing on their principles of operation, histories, and relationships to one another. 1050 is concerned primarily with mechanical and thermal objects, while 1060 emphasizes objects involving electromagnetism, light, special materials, and nuclear energy. They may be taken in either order.
PHYS 1060How Things Work (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For non-science majors. Introduces physics and science in everyday life, considering objects from our daily environment and focusing on their principles of operation, histories, and relationships to one another. 1050 is concerned primarily with mechanical and thermal objects, while 1060 emphasizes objects involving electromagnetism, light, special materials, and nuclear energy. They may be taken in either order.
PHYS 1090Galileo and Einstein (3.00)
For non-science majors. Examines how new understandings of the natural world develop, starting with the ancient world and emphasizing two famous scientists as case studies. Galileo was the first to make subtle use of experiment, while Einstein was the first to realize time is not absolute and that mass can be converted to energy.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
PHYS 1110Energy on this World and Elsewhere (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The subject of energy will be considered from the perspective of a physicist. Students will learn to use quantitative reasoning and the recognition of simple physics restraints to examine issues related to energy that are of relevance to society and the future evolution of our civilization. Prerequisite: Physics and math at high school level.
PHYS 1150Powerful Ideas in Physical Science (4.00)
Covers several main ideas in physical science including matter, sound, heat and energy, force and motion, electricity and magnetism, and light and optics, using a hands-on conceptual learning approach. Students work in cooperative learning groups throughout the course. The course includes experiments and examples suitable for teachers of elementary students.
PHYS 1210The Science of Sound and Music (3.00)
Studies the basic physical concepts needed to understand sound. Aspects of perception, the human voice, the measurement of sound, and the acoustics of musical instruments are developed and illustrated.
PHYS 1425General Physics I: Mechanics, Thermodynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
First semester of introductory physics for engineers and scientists. Classical mechanics, including vector algebra, particle kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum, conservation laws, rotational dynamics, oscillatory motion, gravitation, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory of gases. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: APMA 1090 or MATH 1310; corequisite: PHYS 1429.
PHYS 1427General Physics I (4.00)
Covers the same material as PHYS 1425, with certain topics treated in greater depth. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: Rodman scholar status.
PHYS 1429General Physics I Workshop (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A required two-hour workshop accompanying PHYS 1425, including laboratory and tutorial activities. Corequisite: PHYS 1425.
PHYS 1559New Course in Physics (1.00 - 4.00)
New course in the subject of physics.
PHYS 1610Introductory Physics I:Mechanics & Special Relativity (4.00)
First semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include kinematics and Newton's laws with vector calculus; frames of reference; energy and momentum conservation; rotational motion; special relativity. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Corequisite: MATH 1310.
PHYS 1620Introductory Physics II:Gravitation, Oscillations, Waves & Thermodynamics (4.00)
Second semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include gravitation and Kepler's laws; harmonic motion; thermodynamics; wave motion; sound; optics. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1610; corequisite: MATH 1320.
PHYS 1660Practical Computing for the Physical Sciences (1.00)
This course teaches how to use the computer to solve quantitative problems. This involves learning the skills to write computer programs dedicated to certain tasks, to visualize data graphically, to use scientific software, and to learn other practical skills that are important for a future career in the sciences.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PHYS 1710Introductory Physics I: Classical mechanics, Waves, Thermodynamics (5.00)
First semester of the introductory physics sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include particle kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum conservation; rotational motion; fluid dynamics; thermodynamics; oscillatory motion; waves and sound. Four lecture hours, one discussion section hour. Corequisite: MATH 1320 or instructor permission
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PHYS 1720Introductory Physics II: Gravitation, Electricity & Magnetism, Optics (5.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Second semester of the introductory physics sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include gravitation; electricity & magnetism, and optics. Four lecture hours, one discussion section hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710 or PHYS 1425, MATH1320 Corequisite: MATH 2310
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PHYS 2010Principles of Physics I (3.00)
Physics 2010 and 2020 constitute a terminal course sequence covering the principles of mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. A working knowledge of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and trigonometry is essential. The PHYS 2010 - 2020 sequence does not normally serve as prerequisite for the courses numbered 3110 and above. Students who plan to take more physics should take PHYS 1610, 1620, 2610, 2620, or PHYS 2310, 2320, 2620. PHYS 2010, 2020, in conjunction with the laboratory PHYS 2030, 2040 satisfies the physics requirement of medical and dental schools. PHYS 2010 is prerequisite for 2020. Three lecture hours.
PHYS 2020Principles of Physics II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
PHYS 2010 and 2020 constitute terminal course sequence covering the principles of mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic, solid state, nuclear, and particle physics. A working knowledge of arithmetic, elementary algebra, and trigonometry is essential. The PHYS 2010 - 2020 sequence does not normally serve as prerequisite for the courses numbered 3110 and above. Students who plan to take more physics should take PHYS 1610, 1620, PHYS 2610, 2620 or PHYS 2310, 2320, 2620. PHYS 2010, 2020, in conjunction with the laboratory, PHYS 2030, 2040, satisfies the physics requirement of medical and dental schools. PHYS 2010 is prerequisite for 2020. Three lecture hours.
PHYS 2030Basic Physics Laboratory I (1.00)
Selected experiments in the different branches of physics are carried out and written up by the student. One two-hour exercise per week. Corequisite: PHYS 2010 or 2310. Premedical and pre-dental students should elect this course along with PHYS 2010; it is an option for others.
PHYS 2040Basic Physics Laboratory II (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Selected experiments in the different branches of physics are carried out and written up by the student. One two-hour exercise per week. Prerequisite: 2030; corequisite: PHYS 2010, 2020 or 2310, 2320. Premedical and pre-dental students should elect this course along with PHYS 2010, 2020; it is an option for others.
PHYS 2310Classical and Modern Physics I, II (4.00)
This was the first semester of a two-semester introduction to classical and modern physics for science majors, it has now been merged with PHYS 1425. It was a calculus-based treatment of the principles of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PHYS 2320Classical and Modern Physics I, II (4.00)
This was the second semester of a two-semester introduction to classical and modern physics for science majors, it has now been merged with PHYS 2415. It was a calculus-based treatment of the principles of electricity and magnetism, physical optics, elementary quantum theory, and atomic and nuclear physics.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 2415General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism, Optics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Second semester of introductory physics for engineers and scientists. Electrostatics, including conductors and insulators; DC circuits; magnetic forces and fields; magnetic effects of moving charges and currents; electromagnetic induction; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic oscillations and waves. Introduces geometrical and physical optics. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or MATH 1320.
PHYS 2419General Physics II Workshop (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A required two-hour workshop accompanying PHYS 2419, including laboratory and tutorial activities. Prerequisite: PHYS 2415.
PHYS 2559New Course in Physics (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Physics
PHYS 2610Introductory Physics III:Electromagnetism (4.00)
Third semester of a four-semester sequence for prospective physics and other science majors. Topics include electrostatics, circuits, electric and magnetic fields; electromagnetic waves. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 1620, 2310 or 1425; corequisite: MATH 2310.
PHYS 2620Modern Physics (4.00)
Introduction to quantum physics and relativity, with application to atomic structure, nuclear and elementary particle physics, condensed matter physics, and cosmology. Three lecture hours, one problem hour. Prerequisite: PHYS 2320, 2415, 1720, or 2610, and MATH 2310 or instructor permission.
PHYS 2630Elementary Laboratory I (3.00)
Elementary Lab for Physics Majors, 1st semester. Selected experiments in mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism and optics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710, 1720; or instructor permission.
PHYS 2640Elementary Laboratory II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Elementary Lab for Physics Majors, 1st semester. Selected experiments in mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism and optics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 1710, 1720, 2630; co-requisite: PHYS 2620; or instructor permission.
PHYS 2660Fundamentals of Scientific Computing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Applications of computers to solving basic problems in physical science. Introduction to programming, use of external libraries, and implementation of basic algorithms with focus on numerical methods, error analysis & data fitting. No previous computer experience is required. One Lecture & one lab session per week. Prerequisite: One semester of calculus and one semester of introductory physics (PHYS 1710, 1425, or 2010).
PHYS 3040Physics of the Human Body (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Application of basic physics principles to the functions of the human body: class discussions include physical motion, electrical properties of human body and neural signal transmission, learning and memory, thermal balance in the human body, blood circulation, lungs and breathing, and vision. Prerequisite: a semester of calculus and PHYS 2010 or PHYS 1425 or PHYS 1610, 1620. Corequisite: PHYS 2020 or PHYS 2415 or PHYS 2610 or instructor permission.
PHYS 3110Widely Applied Physics (3.00)
Applications of physical principles to a diverse set of phenomena: order of magnitude estimates, dimensional analysis, material science and engineering, astrophysics, aeronautics and space flight, communications technology, meteorology, sound & acoustics and fluid dynamics. Not all topics will be covered in every course. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission.
PHYS 3120Applied Physics: Energy (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Basic physics principles involved in energy production, distribution and storage: engines, generators, photosynthesis, fossil fuels, solar energy, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, geothermal, wind & hydro power, fuel cells, batteries, nuclear energy, and the power grid. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission. PHYS 3110 is not a prerequsite.
PHYS 3150Electronics Laboratory (3.00)
Analog and digital electronics for scientific applications, including the use of transistors, FET's, operational amplifiers, TTL, and CMOS integrated circuits. Six laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 2640 or 2040.
PHYS 3170Intermediate Laboratory I (3.00)
Approximately five experiments drawn from the major fields of physics. Introduces precision apparatus, experimental techniques, and methods of evaluating experimental results. Outside report preparation is required. Six laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 2640
PHYS 3180Intermediate Laboratory II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Approximately three to five experiments, selected in consultation with the instructor, emphasizing modern aspects. Outside library research and report preparation are required. Six laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 2640
PHYS 3190Advanced Laboratory (3.00)
Normally a single, semester-long experiment chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PHYS 3210Classical Mechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies treated with extensive use of vector calculus; includes the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, and PHYS 1720, or instructor permission.
PHYS 3250Applied Nuclear Physics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Applications of nuclear physics and nuclear energy: Introduction to nuclear physics, radioactivity, radiation standards and units, interaction of radiation with matter, accelerators, x-ray generators, detectors, biological effects, nuclear medicine, nuclear fission and reactors, nuclear fusion. Three lecture hours. (Y) Prerequisite: PHYS 2620 or instructor permission.
PHYS 3310Statistical Physics (3.00)
Includes temperature and the laws of thermodynamics; introductory treatments of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics; and applications of Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, and PHYS 2620, or instructor permission.
PHYS 3420Electricity and Magnetism I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Systematic treatment of electromagnetic phenomena with extensive use of vector calculus, including Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, and PHYS 2610 or PHYS 2320, or instructor permission.
PHYS 3430Electricity and Magnetism II (3.00)
Includes Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves and their interaction with matter; interference, diffraction, polarization; waveguides; and antennas. Prerequisite: PHYS 3420.
PHYS 3559New Course in Physics (3.00)
Independent study supervised by a faculty member, culminating in a written report, essay, or examination. May be repeated for credit.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PHYS 3620Introduction to Condensed Matter Physics (3.00)
The course will examine basic principles of simple theories for metals, the basics of crystallography and crystal structures, the reciprocal space, lattice vibrations, elastic properties of solids, electronic band structure, impurities and defects, dielectric properties, magnetism and superconductivity. Prerequisite: PHYS 2620.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
PHYS 3650Quantum Physics I (3.00)
Includes quantum phenomena and an introduction to wave mechanics; the hydrogen atom and atomic spectra. Prerequisite: MATH 3255 (preferred) or MATH 3250, PHYS 2620; corequisite: PHYS 3210 or instructor permission.
PHYS 3660Quantum Physics II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Continuation of PHYS 3650. Intermediate quantum mechanics including perturbation theory; application to systems of current interest. Prerequisite: PHYS 3650.
PHYS 3820Topics in Physics-Related Research Areas (3.00)
Applies the principles and techniques of physics to related areas of physical or life sciences or technology with an emphasis on current research problems. (PHYS 3810 is not prerequisite to PHYS 3820.)
PHYS 3993Independent Study (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Individual study of topics in physics not normally covered in formal classes. Study is carried out under the tutelage of a faculty member with whom the requirements are agreed upon prior to enrollment. (S-SS) Prerequisite: Instructor permission
PHYS 3995Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
A research project on a topic in physics carried out under the supervision of a faculty member culminating in a written report. May be taken more than once. (S-SS) Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PHYS 5110Special Topics in Classical and Modern Physics (3.00)
Lectures on topics of current interest in physics research and pedagogy. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHYS 3420 or instructor permission.
PHYS 5160Introduction to String Theory (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course introduces a modern topic in theoretical high energy physics to an advanced undergraduate / beginner graduate student audience. Among the directions which are being explored are the physics of extra dimensions, and a unified treatment of gravity and electromagnetism in the context of string theory. Prerequisite: Physics 3210 (Classical Mechanics), 3430 (Electricity & Magnetism II) and 3660 (Quantum Mechanics II), or permission of the instructor.
PHYS 5190Electronics Lab (3.00)
Practical electronics for scientists, from resistors to microprocessors. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PHYS 5240Introduction to the Theory of General Relativity (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Reviews special relativity and coordinate transformations. Includes the principle of equivalence; effects of gravitation on other systems and fields; general tensor analysis in curved spaces and gravitational field equations; Mach's principle, tests of gravitational theories; perihelion precession, red shift, bending of light, gyroscopic precession, radar echo delay; gravitational radiation; relativisitic stellar structure and cosmography; and cosmology. Prerequisite: Advanced calculus through partial differentiation and multiple integration; vector analysis in three dimensions.
PHYS 5250Mathematical Methods of Physics I (3.00)
Discusses matrices, complex analysis, Fourier series and transforms, ordinary differential equations, special functions of mathematical physics, partial differential equations, general vector spaces, integral equations and operator techniques, Green's functions, group theory. Prerequisites: MATH 5210 and 5220 or instructor permission.
PHYS 5310Optics (3.00)
Includes reflection and refraction at interfaces, geometrical optics, interference phenomena, diffraction, Gaussian optics, and polarization. Prerequisite: PHYS 2320, 2415, 2610, or an equivalent college-level electromagnetism course; knowledge of vector calculus and previous exposure to Maxwell's equations.
PHYS 5320Fundamentals of Photonics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
This course is designed to provide an understanding of the physics that underlies technologies such as lasers, optical time/frequency standards, laser gyros, and optical telecommunication. Covers the basic physics of lasers and laser beams, nonlinear optics, optical fibers, modulators and optical signal processing, detectors and measurements systems, and optical networks. Prerequisite: PHYS 5310 or instructor permission.
PHYS 5420Statistical Mechanics II (3.00)
Discusses thermodynamics and kinetic theory, and the development of the microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles. Includes Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, techniques for handling interacting many-particle systems, and extensive applications to physical problems. Prerequisite: PHYS 3310, PHYS 3650 and Instructor Permission.
PHYS 5559New Course in Physics (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
New course in the subject of physics
Course was offered Spring 2017
PHYS 5620Solid State Physics (3.00)
This course will study various phenomena in condensed matter physics, including crystallography, basic group theory, x-ray and neutron diffraction, lattice vibrations, electrons in a metal, electronic band theory, electrons under an external magnetic field, semiconductors, magnetism and superconductivity. Not only the topics but also the theoretical and experimental techniques that are covered in this course are essential for PhD students as well as advanced Undergraduate students in Physics, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering to excel in their research career. Prerequisite: PHYS 3650 (Quantum Mechanics I) or an equivalent course
PHYS 5630Computational Physics I (3.00)
A review of computational methods for differentiation, integration, interpolation, finding zeroes, extrema, etc. proceeding to a concentration on numerical solutions of differential equations, basic spectral analysis, numerical methods for matrices and Monte Carlo simulation applied to problems in classical and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2660; pre- or corequisite: PHYS 3210 and PHYS 3650, or instructor permission.
PHYS 5640Computational Physics II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Advanced topics in computational physics including numerical methods for partial differential equations, Monte Carlo modeling, advanced methods for linear systems, and special topics in computational physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 5630, or instructor permission.
PHYS 5720Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (3.00)
Studies subatomic structure; basic constituents and their mutual interactions.
PHYS 5820Introduction to Nanophysics (3.00)
An introduction to rapidly-evolving ideas in nanophysics. Covers the principles involved in the fabrication of nanosystems and in the measurement of phenomena on the nanoscale. Concepts necessary to appreciate applications in such areas as nano-electronics, nano-magnetism, nano-mechanics and nano-optics, are discussed. Prerequisite: One course each in undergraduate-level quantum mechanics and statistical physics or instructor permission; knowledge of introductory-level wave mechanics and statistical mechanics; applications of Schroedinger equation, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 5993Physics Colloquium (2.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
First and second year students enrolled in the Physics PhD program are required to take Physics Colloquium in their first and second years of study.
PHYS 6030Energy in the 21st Century (3.00)
Learn how we produce, distribute, and consume energy including not only fossil fuels and nuclear, but also renewable energy like solar, wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass/biofuel, and fuel cells. Learn about the developments in science and technology that allow us to shape our future energy options. This is a course about Energy for K-12 teachers. No physics or math prerequisite courses are required.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
PHYS 6050How Things Work I (3.00)
This course considers objects from our daily environment. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or instructor permission.
PHYS 6060How Things Work II (3.00)
This course considers objects from our daily environment. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or instructor permission.
PHYS 6090Galileo and Einstein (3.00)
This course examines how new understanding of the natural world developed from the time of Galileo to Einstein taking the two famous scientists as case studies. This may be a distance learning course intended for in-service science teachers with lectures, homework and exams conducted via the internet. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or instructor permission.
PHYS 6110Physical Science for Teachers (3.00)
Laboratory-based course providing elementary and middle school teachers hands-on experience in the principles and applications of physical science. Not suitable for physics majors; no previous college physics courses are assumed. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and presently (or intending to be) a K-8 teacher.
PHYS 6200Topical Physical Science (1.00)
A series of one-credit science courses of interest to K-12 teachers, as well as the general public. These courses are offered anywhere in the state as needed through School of Continuing and Professional Studies regional centers. The courses are designed to meet Virginia's SOLs and consist of lectures, demonstrations, and many hands-on science activities. Current course topics include Sound, Light & Optics, Aeronautics and Space, Electricity, Meteorology, Magnetism, Heat & Energy, Matter, and Force & Motion. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 6205Physical Science for K-8 Teachers: Meteorology (1.00)
The basis of meteorology will be investigated.Topics include temperature measurements, air flow, pressure, density, elements of the atmosphere, heat transfer and radiation, greenhouse effect, ozone layer, humidity, and atmospheric optics. Satellite and weather maps will be studied. Whenever possible, laboratory experiments will be done to demonstrate weather phenomena and concepts.
PHYS 6251Light and Optics I (1.00)
This course focuses on concepts in light and optics I covering topics such as light rays, images, shadows, reflection and refraction and is designed to be taken by inservice K-5 teachers . The material is introduced from a historical perspective The course is unique in that it requires students to complete and write-up 5 light and optics experiments. Prerequisites: undergraduate degree or permission from instructor.
PHYS 6252Light and Optics II (2.00)
This course focuses on concepts in optics and light II covering topics such as light rays, images, shadows, reflection, refraction, disperson, color, and lenses, and is designed to be taken by inservice grades 6-10 teachers . The material is introduced from a historical perspective The course is unique in that it requires students to complete and write-up 10 light and optics experiments at home. Prerequisites: undergraduate degree or permission from instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 6253Light and Optics III (3.00)
This course focuses on concepts in light and optics III covering topics such as light rays, images, shadows, reflection, refraction, disperson, color, and lenses, interference, polarization, and diffraction and is designed to be taken by inservice grades 11-12 teachers. The material is introduced from a historical perspective The course is unique in that it requires students to complete and write-up 15 light and optics experiments at home. Prerequisites: undergraduate degree or permission from instructor.
PHYS 6262Electricity and Magnetism II (2.00)
This course focuses on concepts in electricity, magnetism, and energy covering topics such as static electricity, circuits, batteries, motors, generators, and thermal, chemical, solar, wind, and electromagnetic energy transfer activities. It is a hands-on activities course done online at home or summer workshop by science teachers of grades 3-12. A kit is purchased and supplemented by low cost materials. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
PHYS 6263Electricity and Magnetism (1.00 - 3.00)
This course focusses on concepts in electricity and magnetism covering topics such as static electricity, charging by friction and induction, resistors, capacitors, DC circuits, Faraday and Lenz's law activities. It is a hand-on activities course done at home by science teachers of grades 6-10. A kit composed of the electrical and magnetic materials is purchased and supplemented by low cost materials from home. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Degree or Permission from Instructor
PHYS 6310Classical and Modern Physics I (3.00)
A comprehensive study of physics using some calculus and emphasizing concepts, problem solving, and pedagogy. This course series is intended for in-service science teachers, particularly middle school physical science and high school physics teachers. This course can be used for crossover teachers who wish to obtain endorsement or certification to teach high school physics. This is a required course for the M.A.P.E. degree. This course is typically taught for 4 weeks in the summer with a daily two-hour lecture and two-hour problem session. Problem sets continue for three months into the next semester. Motion, Kinematics, Newton's laws, energy and momentum conservation, gravitation, harmonic motion, waves, sound, heat, and fluids. . Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
PHYS 6320Classical and Modern Physics II (3.00)
A comprehensive study of physics using some calculus and emphasizing concepts, problem solving, and pedagogy. This course series is intended for in-service science teachers, particularly middle school physical science and high school physics teachers. This course can be used for crossover teachers who wish to obtain endorsement or certification to teach high school physics. This is a required course for the M.A.P.E. degree. This course is typically taught for 4 weeks in the summer with a daily two-hour lecture and two-hour problem session. Problem sets continue for three months into the next semester. Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, electrostatics, electric fields, capacitance, inductance, circuits, magnetism, and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
PHYS 6330Classical and Modern Physics III (3.00)
A comprehensive study of physics using some calculus and emphasizing concepts, problem solving, and pedagogy. This course series is intended for in-service science teachers, particularly middle school physical science and high school physics teachers. This course can be used for crossover teachers who wish to obtain endorsement or certification to teach high school physics. This is a required course for the M.A.P.E. degree. This course is typically taught for 4 weeks in the summer with a daily two-hour lecture and two-hour problem session. Problem sets continue for three months into the next semester. Geometric and physical optics, relativity, and modern physics. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
PHYS 6350Curriculum Enhancement I (3.00)
A laboratory sequence normally taken concurrently with PHYS 6310, 6320, 6330, respectively. It includes experiments with sensors that are integrated with graphing calculators and computers and other experiments using low cost apparatus. This course is typically held in the summer for four weeks and is extended into the next semester creating an activity plan. The laboratories utilize best teaching practices and hands-on experimentation in cooperative learning groups. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Summer 2013, Summer 2011
PHYS 6360Curriculum Enhancement II (3.00)
A laboratory sequence normally taken concurrently with PHYS 6310, 6320, 6330, respectively. It includes experiments with sensors that are integrated with graphing calculators and computers and other experiments using low cost apparatus. This course is typically held in the summer for four weeks and is extended into the next semester creating an activity plan. The laboratories utilize best teaching practices and hands-on experimentation in cooperative learning groups. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Summer 2013, Summer 2010
PHYS 6410Physics Teaching Pedagogy (3.00)
A course in the pedagogy of teaching secondary school physics. This may be a distance-learning course intended for in-service teachers desiring to teach secondary school physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 6310, 6320, 6330, 6350, and 6360, or instructor permission. Not suitable for physics majors.
PHYS 6513Topics in Physical Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Small classes studying special topics in physical science using cooperative teaching in a laboratory setting. Hands-on experiments and lecture demonstrations allow special problems to be posed and solved. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree or instructor permission.
PHYS 6993Independent Study (3.00 - 6.00)
A program of independent study for in-service science teachers carried out under the supervision of a faculty member culminating in a written report. A typical project may be the creation and development of several physics demonstrations for the classroom or a unit activity. The student may carry out some of this work at home, school, or a site other than the University. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and instructor permission.
PHYS 7010Theoretical Mechanics I (3.00)
The statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Discusses the methods of generalized coordinates, the Langrangian, Hamilton-Jacobi equations, action-angle variables, and the relation to quantum theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 3210 and MATH 5220.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PHYS 7210Statistical Mechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Discusses thermodynamics and kinetic theory, and the development of the microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles. Includes Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, techniques for handling interacting many-particle systems, and extensive applications to physical problems.
PHYS 7410Electricity and Magnetism I (3.00)
A consistent mathematical account of the phenomena of electricity and magnetism; electrostatics and magnetostatics; macroscopic media; Maxwell theory; and wave propagation. Prerequisite: PHYS 7250 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PHYS 7420Electricity and Magnetism II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Development of the theory of special relativity, relativistic electrodynamics, radiation from moving charges, classical electron theory, and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHYS 7420 or instructor permission.
PHYS 7559New Advanced Topics Course in Physics (3.00)
New course in the subject of Physics. May be repeated for credit.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PHYS 7610Quantum Theory I (3.00)
Introduces the physical basis of quantum mechanics, the Schroedinger equation and the quantum mechanics of one-particle systems, and stationary state problem. Prerequisite: Twelve credits of 3000-level physics courses and MATH 5210, 5220, or instructor permission.
PHYS 7620Quantum Theory II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Includes angular momentum theory, techniques of time-dependent perturbation theory, emission and absorption of radiation, systems of identical particles, second quantization, and Hartree-Fock equations. Prerequisite: PHYS 7610 or instructor permission.
PHYS 7995Independent Study (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Independent research supervised by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
PHYS 8220Fundamentals of Photonics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Studies nonlinear optical phenomena; the laser, sum, and difference frequency generation, optical parametric oscillation, and modulation techniques. Prerequisite: PHYS 5310 and exposure to quantum mechanics.
PHYS 8320Statistical Mechanics II (3.00)
Further topics in statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: PHYS 8310.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012
PHYS 8420Atomic Physics (3.00)
Studies the principles and techniques of atomic physics with application to selected topics, including laser and microwave spectroscopy, photoionization, autoionization, effects of external fields, and laser cooling. Prerequisite: PHYS 7620 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
PHYS 8450Computational Physics II (3.00)
Linear algebra and large sparse matrix methods applied to partial differential equations, with applications to 1+1 and 2+1 dimensional Schrodinger equations. The use of lattice gauge theory methods for introducing electromagnetic fields on a grid, and applications to the quantum theory of conductivity and the integer quantum Hall effect. Application of Monte Carlo simulation methods to statistical mechanical systems, quantum mechanics, and quantum field theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 5630 or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2010
PHYS 8610Condensed Matter Theory I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
The description and basic theory of the electronic properties of solids including band structure, electrical conduction, optical properties, magnetism and super-conductivity. Prerequisite: PHYS 7620 or instructor permission.
PHYS 8630Introduction to Field Theory (3.00)
Introduces the quantization of field theories, including those based on the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations. Derives perturbation theory in terms of Feynman diagrams, and applies it to simple field theories with interactions. Introduces the concept of renormalization. Prerequisite: PHYS 7620.
PHYS 8640Modern Field Theory (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Applies field theory techniques to quantum electrodynamics and to the renormalization-group description of phase transitions. Introduces the path integral description of field theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 8630.
PHYS 8710Nuclear Physics I (3.00)
Discusses nuclear theory and experiment from the modern perspectives of the fundamental theory of the strong interaction: Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
PHYS 8750Elementary Particle Physics I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Introduction to the Standard Model of Electroweak and Strong Interactions, to be followed by physics beyond the Standard Model, including aspects of Grand Unification, Supersymmetry, and neutrino masses.
PHYS 8880Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (3.00)
Studies the quantum theory of light and other boson fields with a special emphasis on the nonclassical physics exemplified by squeezed and entangled quantum states. Applications to quantum communication, quantum computing, and ultraprecise measurements are discussed. Prerequisite: PHYS 7610 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
PHYS 8999Master Thesis Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
PHYS 9010Introduction to Physics Research I (1.00)
Workshops given by UVA Physics faculty describing their research. Restricted to Arts and Sciences graduate students in Physics only
PHYS 9020Introduction to Physics Research II (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
Workshops given by UVA Physics faculty describing their research.
PHYS 9030Teaching Science in Higher Education (1.00)
This STEM teaching course will help graduate TAs integrate learning theory and effective student engagement practices into their teaching. GTAs will participate in guided discussions to relate recommendations from the education literature to their classroom experiences. Assignments will include learning activities, such as teaching observations & reflections, and designing interventions to assist students with difficult topics/skills.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PHYS 9410Atomic and Molecular Seminar (3.00)
Atomic and Molecular seminars given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PHYS 9420Atomic and Molecular Seminar (3.00)
Studies the principles and techniques of atomic physics with application to selected topics, including laser and microwave spectroscopy, photoionization, autoionization, effects of external fields, and laser cooling. Prerequisite: PHYS 7620 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 9610Condensed Matter Seminar (3.00)
Condensed Matter seminar given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PHYS 9620Condensed Matter Seminar (3.00)
Condensed Matter seminar given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 9710Nuclear Physics Seminar (3.00)
Nuclear Physics seminar given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PHYS 9720Nuclear Physics Seminar (3.00)
Nuclear Physics seminar given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 9810High Energy Physics Seminar (3.00)
High Energy Physics seminars given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PHYS 9820High Energy Physics Seminar (3.00)
High Energy Physics seminars given by invited speakers from outside and within UVA. Restricted to Arts and Sciences Physics graduate students only.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PHYS 9998Pre-Qual Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For students who have not passed the Qualifying exam for doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
PHYS 9999PhD Thesis Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.