UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Catalog of Courses for Slavic    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Polish
POL 1210Introduction to Polish Language (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces students to the essentials of Polish grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
POL 1220Introduction to Polish Language (3.00)
Introduces students to the essentials of Polish grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: POL 1210 or instructor permission.
POL 2210Intermediate Polish Language (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Second-year continuation of POL 1210, 1220. Prerequisite: POL 1210, 1220 and instructor permission.
POL 2220Intermediate Polish Language (3.00)
Second-year continuation of POL 1210, 1220. Prerequisite: POL 1210, 1220 and instructor permission.
POL 3000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (1.00 - 10.00)
Russian
RUSS 1010First-Year Russian (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces Russian grammar with emphasis on reading and speaking. Class meets five days per week plus work in the language laboratory. To be followed by RUSS 2010, 2020.
RUSS 1016Intensive Introductory Russian (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
RUSS 1020First-Year Russian (4.00)
Introduces Russian grammar with emphasis on reading and speaking. Class meets five days per week plus work in the language laboratory. To be followed by RUSS 2010, 2020. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in RUSS 1010.
RUSS 1026Intensive Introductory Russian (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 or equivalent.
RUSS 1030Russian Language Study in Russia (2.00)
In this course, students will begin or continue their study of the Russian language. Students will be placed at the appropriate level and will be taught by instructors at UVA's partner institutions in Moscow and St. Petersburg. At either the beginning or intermediate level, the course includes reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Aimed to give students as high a level of proficiency in spoken and written Russian as possible.
RUSS 116Intensive Introductory Russian (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for RUSS 1016.
RUSS 126Intensive Introductory Russian (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2026.
RUSS 2010Second-Year Russian (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes practice in speaking and writing Russian and introduction to Russian prose and poetry. Class meets four days per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020 (with grade of C- or better) or equivalent.
RUSS 2016Intensive Intermediate Russian (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.
RUSS 2020Second-Year Russian (4.00)
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes practice in speaking and writing Russian and introduction to Russian prose and poetry. Class meets four days per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in RUSS 2010.
RUSS 2026Intensive Intermediate Russian (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: RUSS 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
RUSS 216Intensive Intermediate Russian (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2016.
RUSS 226Intensive Intermediate Russian (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for RUSS 2026.
RUSS 3000Russian House Conversation (1.00)
Russian House Conversation
Course was offered Spring 2017
RUSS 3010Third-Year Russian (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes intensive oral practice through reports, dialogues, guided discussions; composition of written reports and essays; readings in literary and non-literary texts. Class meets three hours per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 2010, 2020 or equivalent with a grade of C or better.
RUSS 3020Third-Year Russian (3.00)
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes intensive oral practice through reports, dialogues, guided discussions; composition of written reports and essays; readings in literary and non-literary texts. Class meets three hours per week, plus work in the language laboratory. Prerequisite: RUSS 2020 with a grade of C or better.
RUSS 3030Intermediate Conversation (1.00)
Two hours of conversation practice per week. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020, or equivalent. RUSS 2020 is strongly recommended.
RUSS 3040Applied Russian Phonetics (3.00)
Examines the sound system of the Russian language with special attention to palatalization, vowel reduction, sounds in combination, and the relationship of sound to spelling. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020.
RUSS 3050Russian Word Formation (3.00)
Examines the sound system, lexicon, and word formative processes of the Russian literary language. Prerequisite: RUSS 1020
RUSS 3060Russian for Business (3.00)
Russian for oral and written communication in business situations. Prerequisite: RUSS 2020.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2009
RUSS 3500Topics in Russian Language & Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected Topics in Russian Language and Literature
RUSS 4010Fourth-Year Russian (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes oral practice, extensive reading, and work in Russian stylistics. Prerequisite: RUSS 3010, 3020 with a grade of C or better.
RUSS 4020Fourth-Year Russian (3.00)
Continuation of Russian grammar. Includes oral practice, extensive reading, and work in Russian stylistics. Prerequisite: RUSS 4010 with a grade of C or better.
RUSS 4500Topics in Russian Language & Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected Topics in Russian Language and Literature
RUSS 4520Vvedenie V Russkuiu Literaturu (3.00)
Introduction to Russian literary studies. Reading and analysis of literary works in the original. Texts are selected from classical and contemporary literature. Topic varies. All readings and discussion in Russian. Course is open to advanced students of Russian and heritage speakers.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2012
RUSS 4990Senior Honors Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Required of honors majors in Russian language and literature and Russian and East European studies.
RUSS 4993Independent Study (3.00)
May be repeated for credit.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RUSS 4998Senior Thesis in Russian Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For majors in Russian and East European studies, normally taken in the fourth year.
RUSS 4999Senior Thesis in Russian Studies (3.00)
For majors in Russian and East European studies, normally taken in the fourth year.
RUSS 5010Readings in the Social Sciences (3.00)
Based on a careful analysis of the social science texts, students are introduced to advanced topics in Russian morphology and syntax. Successful completion of the course enables students to read nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian non-fiction with minimal difficulty. Prerequisite: RUSS 3020 and instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RUSS 5030Advanced Russian I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A thorough review of Russian grammar. Prerequisite: RUSS 2010, 2020, and instructor permission.
RUSS 5032Advanced Russian Grammar: Syntax (3.00)
This course is a formal and systematic analysis of the basic syntactic structures of the contemporary Russian literary language with frequent comparison to English (and other, when possible) structures. The emphasis will be on data, not theoretical principles although the conventional theoretical machinery and language of syntax (phrase structure, complement, anaphora) will be used at all times in class and on assignments.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013
RUSS 5050Advanced Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Two hours of conversation practice per week. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: RUSS 3020.
RUSS 5080Methodology (3.00)
Course is designed as a combination of practical classroom procedures & techniques & the theoretical aspects of language teaching methodology. Active participation in unit & lesson planning will be accompanied by critical reading & further class discussion about the methods observed & current research on second language acquisition .The course is intended for advanced undergrad & grad students with at least four years of Russian language study.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
RUSS 5110The Rise of the Russian Novel, 1795-1850 (3.00)
Studies the development of the Russian novel in the first half of the 19th century. Focuses on the major contributions of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and Turgenev, and examines the social and literary forces that contributed to the evolution of the Russian novel. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
RUSS 5120Age of Realism, 1851-1881 (3.00)
Studies the works of Russia's most celebrated writers during the middle of the 19th century. Explores the many forms that 'realism' assumed in Russia at this time, and investigates how Russian writers responded to the calls of their contemporary critics to use literature to promote socially progressive ends.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
RUSS 5122Versions of Dostoevsky (3.00)
Reading Dostoevsky's fiction alongside the critical contexts in which it was produced and received, we'll consider many different versions of Dostoevsky. Texts include Poor Folk, Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, as well as Dostoevsky's critical and polemical writing.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RUSS 5124Tolstoy (3.00)
Tolstoy
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2010
RUSS 5140Russian Modernism (3.00)
Examines selected works by the leading writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Explores concepts of symbolism, acmeism, and futurism. Focuses on competing conceptions of literature that evolved in the 1920s until the establishment of the hegemony of socialist realism in the 1930s. Considers works written by Russian writers living in emigration.
RUSS 5150Russian Formalism and Structuralist Poetics (3.00)
Studies the theory and practice of literary critics. Focuses on the Russian Formalists and the relationship of their theories to those of later critics in America (New Criticism) and the current European Structuralists. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French, German, or Russian suggested.
RUSS 5160Russian Literature of the Soviet Era-1929-1988 (3.00)
Literature in the Soviet era has been compared to a "second government." This course explores Russian literature under Soviet totalitarianism and examines the concept of Socialist Realism and the process of harnessing literary art to serve the state's interests of creating the "new Soviet person." We also treat the all-important development of unofficial "underground" art and writers' strategies for bypassing the strictures of state control.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2010
RUSS 5175The Golden Age of Russian Poetry (3.00)
Studies works by Zhukovsky, Batiushkov, Pushkin, Lermontov, Baratynsky, Tiutchev, and others.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2013
RUSS 5176The Silver Age of Russian Poetry (3.00)
Studies the poetry of Blok, Akhmatova, Mandelshtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, and Mayakovsky. Includes symbolism, acmeism, and futurism.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
RUSS 5190Russian Drama and Theatre (3.00)
Studies works from Fonvizin to Shvarts with emphasis on the major plays of Gogol, Chekhov, and Gorky. Includes production theories of Stanislavsky, Meyerhold, and other prominent Russian directors.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RUSS 5350Russian and Soviet Film: Movies for the Masses (3.00)
An exploration of Soviet and Russian Cinema as artistic medium, industrial product, ideological and political tool, and meansof entertainment. This course devotes equal consideration to popular classics as well as the critically acclaimed masterpieces of russian film in order to engage questions of history theory, and aesthetics within broader cultural currents.
RUSS 5360Gulag: Graduate Studies in History and Literature (3.00)
From the Bolshevik Revolution to the end of the Soviet order, the only evidence of the Gulag available to the outside world, apart from the Soviet propaganda, were the testimonies of witnesses and survivors. Their stories functioned as the only available history, thus shedding an interesting light on the traditional distinctions between literature and history. In this course, students will examine the Gulag's history via lit and film.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
RUSS 5370Literature and Orthodoxy (3.00)
Explores literature, religion, and their creative intertwining in Russia and the traditionally Eastern Orthodox regions of Europe and Asia.
RUSS 5380Russian Postmodernism (3.00)
Examines the exciting developments in late-20th- and early-21st-century Russian literature and art.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2012
RUSS 5390The Russian Utopian Imagination (3.00)
This course explores Russian literature's many renderings of heaven on earth and their roots in folklore, religion, art, and political thought. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Russian
Course was offered Fall 2014
RUSS 5500Selected Topics in Russian Literature (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Typical topics in various years include Tolstoy, Russian literary journalism, and the mid-nineteenth century Russian novel. In some years open to students from other departments with no knowledge of Russian. May be repeated for credit.
RUSS 7010Proseminar in Russian Literature (3.00)
Required of all candidates for the M.A. degree.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
RUSS 7290Medieval and 18th-Century Russian (3.00)
Close reading of texts from the Kievan period to end of the 18th century.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
RUSS 7350Turgenev (3.00)
Study of the major works.
RUSS 7360Tolstoy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Study of the major works.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RUSS 7500Seminar in Russian Studies (3.00)
Advanced work on selected topics. A recent topic was 'utopian vision.' May be repeated for credit.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RUSS 7510Seminar in Russian Studies (3.00)
Advanced work on selected topics. A recent topic was 'utopian vision.' May be repeated for credit.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2010
RUSS 7850The Russian and West European Novel: 1790-1880 (3.00)
Studies the formation and development of the great Russian realistic novel. Emphasizes internal processes and West European influences.
RUSS 8210Advanced Structure of Russian: Phonology and Morphology (3.00)
Prerequisite: LNGS 3250 and instructor permission.
RUSS 8500Topics in Russian Language and Literature (3.00)
Could include Russian language, fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2013
RUSS 8999Master's Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research for and final preparation of M.A. thesis.
RUSS 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Russian in Translation
RUTR 2310UVA in Russia: Literary Places in Russia (4.00)
This course will take students to visit the places associated with literature -- writers' museums and the locations where they site their works -- in Moscow and St. Petersburg. Visiting and studying these places can teach us much about Russian literary works, their creators and their readers. We will read and explore the works of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov and other Russian writers.
RUTR 2320America Through Russian Eyes (3.00)
Changing Russian representations of America and American visions of Russia from revolution to post-communism (in literature, film, music and other forms of popular culture.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
RUTR 2330Russia and the Caucasus (3.00)
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the respective cultural histories of Armenia, Georgia, and Russia, relying heavily on literary and cinematic sources. We will also explore the more contemporary relationship between the Caucasus and Russia from the 19th century to the present.
RUTR 2340Russian Women's Literature (3.00)
Russia's literary tradition includes a rich vein of poetry, prose, and memoir written by women. This course examines works composed from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries; emphasis is on literature of the twentieth century and the contemporary period. This is primarily a literature class, but works are grounded in their historical and sociopolitical contexts. All readings are in English translation. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
Course was offered Fall 2010
RUTR 2350Russian and Soviet Film: Movies for the Masses (3.00)
An exploration of Soviet and Russian Cinema as artistic medium, industrial product, ideological and political tool, and meansof entertainment. This course devotes equal consideration to popular classics as well as the critically acclaimed masterpieces of russian film in order to engage questions of history theory, and aesthetics within broader cultural currents.For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
RUTR 2360Tales of Transgression (3.00)
This course examines how Russian writers engage with ethical questions ranging from lofty pursuits of freedom and the meaning of life to more prosaic issues of personal responsibility and happiness. In the context of literary analysis, we explore such conceptual terms describing human activity as love and justice, right and wrong, good and evil. Texts by Dostoevsky, Leskov, Tolstoy, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Olesha, and Petrushevskaya.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2012
RUTR 2400Russian Masterpieces (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies selected great works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century prose fiction.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RUTR 2450Art of Scandal: Literature and Culture in Society (3.00)
Studies works of art that caused major controversy and debate in Russia. Why did certain texts resonate more loudly than others in society? How did this dynamic change between the imperial and post-Soviet periods? Includes works of art in a variety of media: literature and criticism, modern painting, architecture, film and music.
RUTR 2460Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization (3.00)
No knowledge of Russian needed. Investigates 'being Russian' through the works of Russia's great writers, artists, architects, and composers. Focuses on the heroes, heroines, and villains, symbols, legends, and rituals central to Russian creativity.
RUTR 2470Understanding Russia: Symbols, Myths, and Archetypes of Identity (3.00)
This course explores different sources of Russian national identity from pre-Christian `Rus' to the present. We will investigate how the occidental and oriental elements blend into a unique Euro-Asian culture, nation, and world power. Our main aim is to provide an orientation to the symbolic world of Russian self-identification. We will employ the tools of the historian, geographer, psychologist, and student of literature and culture.
RUTR 2500Topics in Russian Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.
RUTR 2730Dostoevsky (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Dostoevsky.
RUTR 2740Tolstoy in Translation (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Tolstoy.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
RUTR 3340Books Behind Bars: Life, Lit, & Community Leadership (4.00)
Students will grapple in a profound and personal way with timeless human questions: Who am I? Why am I here? How should I live? They will do this, in part, by facilitating discussions about short masterpieces of Russian literature with residents at a juvenile correctional center. This course offers an integrated academic-community engagement curriculum, and provides a unique opportunity for service learning, leadership, and youth mentoring.
RUTR 3350Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the major works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. Emphasizes prose fiction. This course is a prerequisite for 5000-level literature courses. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
RUTR 3360Twentieth Century Russian Literature (3.00)
This course surveys Russian literature (prose and poetry) of the twentieth century. Readings include works by Soviet and émigré writers. All works are read in English translation.
RUTR 3370Russian Prose From 1881-1917 (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century Russian prose. Concentrates on evolution of Russian realism and rise of symbolist and ornamentalist fiction.
RUTR 3390Edens, Idylls, and Utopias in Russian Literature (3.00)
This course explores Russian literature's many renderings of heaven on earth and their roots in folklore, religion, art, and political thought.
Course was offered Fall 2014
RUTR 3400Nabokov (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the evolution of Nabokov's art, from his early Russian language tales to the major novels written in English.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RUTR 3500Topics in Russian Literature (3.00 - 6.00)
Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.
RUTR 3510Topics in Russian Literature (3.00 - 6.00)
Studies in English translation of selected authors, works, or themes in Russian literature. Topics in recent years were Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov. May be repeated for credit under different topics.
RUTR 3520Case Studies in Russian Literature (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. One great novel such as War and Peace or The Brothers Karamazov is studied in detail along with related works and a considerable sampling of critical studies.
RUTR 3559Russian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Russian Literature in Translation.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RUTR 3680The Russian Novel in European Perspective (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the evolution of the Russian novel, its thematic and structural features, from the early nineteenth century to the present.
RUTR 4559New Course in Russian Literature in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Russian in Translation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
Slavic
SLAV 1700Liberal Arts Seminar (1.00 - 3.00)
Seminar on selected topics in the field of Slavic studies designed primarily for first- and second-year students. Recent topics have included 'the arts in revolution,' 'war and peace,' and 'poetry writing: American and Russian perspectives'.
SLAV 1710Liberal Arts Seminar (1.00 - 3.00)
Seminar on selected topics in the field of Slavic studies designed primarily for first- and second-year students. Recent topics have included 'the arts in revolution,' 'war and peace,' and 'poetry writing: American and Russian perspectives'.
SLAV 2150Magic and Meaning (3.00)
Magic is the ineffable between categories. It is what we seek to understand and to control. It is also what we fear. In many senses, it is the essence of folklore. This course will examine the nature and the use of magic, both positive and negative, it will look at magic acts and magic people.
SLAV 2250The Dark Side of the 20th Century: Between Auschwitz & Gulag (3.00)
The twentieth century was a period of humanity's unprecedented progress as well as its greatest recorded downfall into barbarity, genocide, and mass oppression. This course enables students to study and reflect on the latter. Some questions will be asked in the course: How do we construct cultural memories of traumatic experiences? Why do we want to remember them? Do we?
SLAV 2360Dracula (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An introduction to Slavic folklore with special emphasis on the origins and subsequent manifestations of vampirism. Western perceptions, misperceptions, and adaptations of Slavic culture are explored and explicated. The approach is interdisciplinary: folklore, history, literature, religion, film, disease and a variety of other topics.
SLAV 2500Topics in Slavic Literature and Culture (3.00)
Could include Polish, Czech, or Slovak fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
SLAV 2559Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
generic course number to be used when students are taking non-lecture based independent study with a faculty member
Course was offered Spring 2015
SLAV 3220The Spy in Eastern Europe (3.00)
The course will begin with a look at the root differences between Eastern Europe and the West followed by a brief sketch of their interface during the 20th century. Then, centering on case studies, which will serve as the basis of class discussion, the role of espionage both in reality and in perception in the process of information transfer during the Cold War will be studied. The cases will draw on CIA/KGB archival material, spies' memoirs, the press, fiction, and film. Group projects will center on technology and techniques of cryptography, covert operation, surveillance, and overt information gathering. Prerequisite: Knowledge of 20th century European history and permission of the instructor. Note: The following courses all require a reading knowledge of Russian, unless otherwise stated.
SLAV 3500Topics in Slavic Language & Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected Topics in Slavic Language and Literature.
SLAV 4500Topics in Slavic Literature and Culture (3.00)
Could include Polish, Czech, or Slovak fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
SLAV 5200Classics of Czech Literature and Culture (3.00)
An investigation of classics of modern Czech fiction and film. Some of the great works include Hasek (The Good Soldier Svejk), Nemcova (The Grandmother), Capek (the inventor of the word robot), Seifert's Nobel-winning poetry, Lustig (Children of the Holocaust), Kundera (The Unbearable Lightness of Being), Havel (The Power of the Powerless; The Garden Party), as well as great films like Closely Watched Trains and Firemen's Ball.
Course was offered Fall 2016
SLAV 5500Topics in Slavic Language and Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected Topics in Slavic Language and Literature.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
SLAV 5610Polish Literature (3.00)
A graduate-level survey of Polish literature from its Medieval beginnings to the contemporary period. Readings include Jan Kochanowski, Adam Mickiewicz, Juliusz Slowacki, Boleslaw Prus, Stefan Zeromski, Bruno Schulz, Witold Gombrowicz, Czeslaw Milosz, Tadeusz Rozewicz, Tadeusz Borowski, Wislawa Szymborska, Slawomir Mrozek, and others. Undergraduate students welcome with the permission by the instructor. All readings in English.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
SLAV 7500Topics in Slavic Language & Literature (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected Topics in Slavic Language and Literature
SLAV 8500Topics in Slavic Languages and Literatures (3.00)
Could include any Slavic languages, fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
SLAV 8620Seminar in Slavic Linguistics (3.00)
Seminar in Slavic Linguistics Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
SLAV 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
SLAV 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
SLAV 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
SLAV 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Slavic Folklore & Oral Literature
SLFK 2010Introduction to Slavic Folklore (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Surveys Russian and Ukrainian oral folklore, including folktales, legends, incantations, laments, epics, and other songs. Discusses theories and functions of oral folklore and compares and contrasts Russian and Ukrainian genres with their American counterparts. Focuses on cultural beliefs and attitudes expressed in oral folklore in Russia, Ukraine, and America.
SLFK 2030Terror and Taboo in Russian Childlore (3.00)
Children are exposed frequently to sex, violence, and other questionable material in such genres as lullabies, folk tales, jokes, rhymes, and ghost stories. Through application of contemporary folklore and psychological theories, students examine Russian and American children's folklore to determine their functions in socialization. Focuses on comparison of patterns of cultural identity to identity construction.
SLFK 2040Story and Healing (4.00)
Explores the concept of healing from a variety of different perspectives including healing of the self, community, and nation. Examines how myth, epic, fairy tales, and other genres provide a means to reach such healing, or how they may describe or depict the process of healing. Emphasizes the folk literature of Russians, Ukrainians, and the indigenous tribes of Siberia, considering oral traditions of other cultures as a point of comparison.
SLFK 2110Tale and Legend (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the folktale traditions of the Eastern Slavs, primarily the Russians and the Ukrainians. Covers theories of folk prose narrative and discusses the relationship between folktales and society, and folktales and child development. Topics include related prose narrative forms, such as legend, and related forms of child socialization, such as folk children's games.
SLFK 2120Ritual and Family Life (3.00)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the rituals of birth, marriage, and death as practiced in 19th-century peasant Russia and in Russia today and the oral literature associated with these rituals. Topics include family patterns, child socialization and child rearing practices, gender issues, and problems of the elderly in their 19th century and current manifestations.
SLFK 2130Magic Acts (3.00)
Because associative thinking is often done outside of awareness, this course seeks to make it conscious by looking at magic practices in cultures different from our own. Specifically, students will examine east Slavic (Russian and Ukrainian) magic in its various forms. They will then look at phenomena closer to our own culture. Experimentation is part of this course. Its purpose will not be to ascertain whether magic 'works.' It will try to determine, and then describe, how associative thinking works and how people feel when they use this type of thinking.
SLFK 2140Ritual and Demonology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies Russian and Ukrainian folk belief as it manifests itself in daily life. Examines how Russian and Ukrainian peasants lived in the 19th century, and how this effects both living patterns and attitudes today. Includes farming techniques, house and clothing types, and food beliefs. Covers the agrarian calendar and its rituals such as Christmas and Easter, the manipulation of ritual in the Soviet era, and the resurgence of ritual today. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
SLFK 4993Independent Study in Slavic Folklore (1.00 - 3.00)
For students wishing to pursue independent reading and research in Russian folklore or the folklore of other Slavic cultures. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
SLFK 5500Topics in Slavic Folklore (1.00 - 3.00)
For students wishing to pursue independent reading and research in Russian Folklore or Folklore of Slavic culture.
Slavic in Translation
SLTR 2000Eastern Europe through Literature and Film (3.00)
This course examines a series of Eastern European literary works and films as insights into cultural responses to major historical and intellectual challenges in Eastern Europe from the outbreak of World War II to the present. The course will also explore the role of cultural media (literature and film) in motivating and mythologizing historical events in Eastern Europe. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://artsandsciences.virginia.edu/slavic/courses.html.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
SLTR 2993Independent Study in East European Literature in Translation (1.00 - 6.00)
Examines a series of Eastern European literary works and films as insights into cultural responses to major historical and intellectual challenges in Eastern Europe from the outbreak of World War II to the present. Explores the role of cultural media in motivating and mythologizing historical events in Eastern Europe. (IRY)
SLTR 3200Poland: History and Culture (3.00)
This course takes students through more than 1000 years of Poland's history and culture. Explorations of literature, art, film, and music, as well as key historic events and biographies, will provide students with unique insight in the main sources of Polish identity, its central values, challenges, myths, symbols, and preoccupations in a larger European context. All materials in English.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2013
SLTR 3300Facing Evil in the Twentieth Century: Humanity in Extremis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The 20th century will most likely remain one of the most puzzling periods in human history, in which amazing progress was coupled with unprecedented barbarity of modern totalitarian regimes. The course helps students untangle this paradox by exploring a series of memoirs by survivors and perpetrators, as well as scholarly essays, films, and other cultural statements.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
SLTR 3500Topics in Slavic in Translation (3.00)
Could Include Polish, Czech, or Slovak fiction, poetry, drama, or culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Course was offered Fall 2016
SLTR 4200Robots and Rebels in Czech Literature and Culture (3.00)
An investigation of classics of modern Czech fiction and film. Some of the great works include Hasek (The Good Soldier Svejk), Nemcova (The Grandmother), Capek (the inventor of the word ¿robot¿), Seifert¿s Nobel-winning poetry, Lustig (Children of the Holocaust), Kundera (The Unbearable Lightness of Being), Havel (The Power of the Powerless; The Garden Party), as well as great films like ¿Closely Watched Trains¿ and ¿Firemen¿s Ball.¿
SLTR 5500Topics in Slavic in Translation (1.00 - 3.00)
Selected topics in Slavic in Translation.
Serbo-Croatian
SRBC 1210Introduction to Serbian or Croatian Language (3.00)
Introduces students to the essentials of Serbian or Croatian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.
SRBC 1220Introduction to Serbian or Croatian Language (3.00)
Introduces students to the essentials of Serbian or Croatian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.
Ukrainian
UKR 1210Introduction to Ukrainian Language (3.00)
Introduces students to the essentials of Ukrainian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.
UKR 1220Introduction to Ukrainian Language (3.00)
Introduces students to the essentials of Ukrainian grammar with emphasis on speaking and reading. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; some knowledge of Russian recommended.