UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Women, Gender, and Sexuality    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
African-American and African Studies
AAS 2224Black Femininities and Masculinities in the US Media (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course, taught as a lower-level seminar, will address the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of 'Blackness' in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.
AAS 3000Women and Religion in Africa (3)
This course examines women's religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women
AAS 4500Advanced Seminar in African-American and African Studies (3)
Reading, class discussion, and research on a special topic in African-American and African Studies culminatiing in the composition of a research paper. Topics change from term to term, and vary with the instructor. Primarily for fourth-year students but open to others.
Anthropology
ANTH 2420Language and Gender (3)
Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language.
ANTH 3105Love and Romantic Intimacies (3)
This course offers an introduction to recent anthropological scholarship on romance to examine how intimate relationships shape human experiences. Through readings and films, we investigate the increasingly popular idealization of "companionate marriages," in which spouses are ideally linked by affection. Our examples include queer and straight experiences, and a diversity of racial, cultural, classed, and gendered representations.
ANTH 3129Marriage, Mortality, Fertility (3)
Explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures.
Arabic
ARAB 4230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
History of Art
ARTH 3491Women Photographers and Feminist Aesthetics (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course explores the question of whether there might be something called a 'feminist aesthetics.' We look at the work of a handful of women photographers, and read criticism about photography, to leverage our exploration into feminist aesthetics. The course works within the frame of feminist discourse. It presents the work of a small number of photographers whose work we will interpret in conjunction with readings in criticism and theory.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Arabic in Translation
ARTR 3350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3)
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Chinese in Translation
CHTR 3840Writing Women in Modern China (3)
This seminar focuses on works of fiction from modern China that articulate womanhood from a variety of perspectives. In addition to women writers (Qiu Jin, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Chen Ran, Zhu Tianxin), male writers such as Xu Dishan, Mao Dun, and Lao She who devote unusual attention to feminine subjectivity are also included. Familiarity with Chinese culture and society and literary analysis are preferred, but not required.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2012
CHTR 5840Writing Women in Modern China (3)
This seminar focuses on works of fiction from modern China that articulate womanhood from a variety of perspectives. In addition to women writers (Qiu Jin, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Chen Ran, Zhu Tianxin), male writers such as Xu Dishan, Mao Dun, and Lao She who devote unusual attention to feminine subjectivity are also included. Familiarity with Chinese culture and society and literary analysis are preferred, but not required. Students enrolled in the 5000 level course will be required to use some Chinese language materials.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2012
Classics
CLAS 3040Women and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (3)
This course focuses on women's roles and lives in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students are introduced to the primary material (textual and material) on women in antiquity and to current debates about it. Subjects addressed will include sexual stereotypes and ideals, power-relations of gender, familial roles, social and economic status, social and political history, visual art, medical theory, and religion. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/classics/.
Comparative Literature
CPLT 3750Women, Childhood, Autobiography (3)
Cross-cultural readings in women's childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects.
Drama
DRAM 2080Circus in America (3)
Introduces the circus as a form of American entertainment. Focuses on its development, growth, decline, and cultural influences.
Education-Human Services
EDHS 2891Issues Facing Adolescent Girls (4)
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop their leadership skills through involvement in academic service learning. Students will explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs middle school girls with college women for a year. Offered on the Undergraduate and Graduate levels. Graduate level requires additional readings and assignments.
EDHS 5891Issues Facing Adolescent Girls (3)
This course provides an opportunity for students to develop their leadership skills through involvement in academic service learning. Students will explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs middle school girls with college women for a year. Offered on the Undergraduate and Graduate levels. Graduate level requires additional readings and assignments.
German in Translation
GETR 3750Women, Childhood, Autobiography (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Cross-cultural readings in women's childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at: http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.
History-South Asian History
HISA 3121History of Women in South Asia (3)
Surveys the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.
History-United States History
HIUS 3150Salem Witch Trials: History and Literature (3)
The seminar will examine the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692 and enable students to work with all the original sources. Prerequisites: Restricted to Religious Studies, American Studies, English, SWAG, and History Majors.
HIUS 3611Gender & Sexuality in AM, 1600-1865 (3)
Studies the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
HIUS 3612Gender & Sexuality in America, 1865 to Present (3)
Studies the evolution of women's roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
Japanese in Translation
JPTR 3020Survey of Modern Japanese Literature (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This is an introductory course to Japanese literary traditions from the late 19th century to the present. By reading a broad range of writings including political accounts, fictional narratives and poetic prose, the course examines how a variety of writing practices contributed to the production of modern Japanese literature. No knowledge of Japanese is required.
JPTR 3290Feminine Fictions in Japanese Court Literature (3)
This seminar will take up the world's earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2013
JPTR 5020Survey of Modern Japanese Literature (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This is an introductory course to Japanese literary traditions from the late 19th century to the present. By reading a broad range of writings including political accounts, fictional narratives and poetic prose, the course examines how a variety of writing practices contributed to the production of modern Japanese literature. No knowledge of Japanese is required.
JPTR 5290Feminine Fictions in Japanese Court Literature (3)
This seminar will take up the world's earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Spring 2017, Fall 2013
Media Studies
MDST 3306Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in the Teen Film (3)
The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?
MDST 3409LGBTQ Issues in the Media (3)
This course will explore the complex cultural dynamics of LGBTQ media visibility, along with its social, political, and psychological implications for LGBTQ audiences. It explores four domains: (1) the question of LGBT media visibility (2) the complex processes of inclusion, normalization, and assimilation in popular culture (3) media industries and the LGBT market (4) the relationship between digital media, LGBT audiences, and everyday life.
MDST 4107Feminism and the Public Sphere (3)
This class will examine the normative basis of the public sphere and critiques of its current structure and ask: What would a more inclusive vision of political participation and communication look like? In attempting to build an answer, we will examine a number of works on communication ethics, politics and media, with an emphasis on feminist and queer scholarship.
Course was offered Fall 2013
MDST 4110Gender Non-Conformity in Media Culture (3)
As one of the primary cultural drivers of common sense, shared values, and political ideology, media are certainly influential storytellers. This course creates space for considering media's role in articulating and fashioning the limits and possibilities of gender identity. We will pay particular attention to representations of gender non-conformity in popular culture such as female masculinity, male femininity, and transgender subjectivity.
Course was offered Spring 2015
MDST 4200Sex and Gender Go to the Movies (3)
This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.
Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
MESA 2360Women and Social Media in the Middle East and South Asia (3)
Women in the Middle East and South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to them. This course examines women's use of social media in five selected countries -Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan - and investigates how it simultaneously enables and limits women's empowerment.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
Persian in Translation
PETR 3320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PETR 5320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
Philosophy
PHIL 3780Reproductive Ethics (3)
The focus of the course will be the exploration of various moral, legal and policy issues posed by efforts to curtail or enhance fertility through contraception, abortion, and recent advances in reproductive technology. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.virginia.edu/philosophy/. Prerequisite: One prior course in ethics from any department.
Politics-Comparative Politics
PLCP 3350Gender Politics in Comparative Perspective (3)
Focuses on the state and how power is gendered in the developing world. Topics include feminist methods and concepts, women in the military, nationalism, women's movements, quotas, citizenship and globalization. Cross-listed with SWAG 3350.
PLCP 4840Gender Politics in Africa (3)
Investigates the ways social structures and institutions shape gender in sub-Saharan Africa, with an emphasis on the state. Topics include gender in the pre-colonial and colonial era, contemporary African women's movements, women in politics, development, HIV/AIDS and sexuality.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
Politics-Political Theory
PLPT 4200Feminist Political Theory (3)
Studies modern and contemporary feminist theories of political life. Prerequisite:  One previous course in political theory or instructor permission.
Psychology
PSYC 4603Psychology of Sexual Orientation (3)
Overview of research and theory related to sexual orientation across the lifespan from the standpoint of the social sciences. Topics include conceptualization of sexual identities, origins and development of sexual orientation, sexual identity formation and disclosure. Selected issues such as couple relationships, employment and careers, parenthood, and aging are also explored, since they may be affected by sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Third- or fourth-year psychology major
Religion-African Religions
RELA 3000Women and Religion in Africa (3)
This course examines women's religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women.
Religion-Buddhism
RELB 3150Seminar in Buddhism and Gender (3)
This seminar takes as its point of departure Carolyn Bynum's statements: "No scholar studying religion, no participant in ritual, is ever neuter. Religious experience is the experience of men and women, and in no known society is this experience the same." The unifying theme is gender and Buddhism, exploring historical, textual and social questions relevant to the status of women and men in the Buddhist world from its origins to the present day.
Religion-Christianity
RELC 3150Salem Witch Trials (3)
Salem Witch Trials
RELC 4610Sex and Morality (3)
A theological overview of Jewish and Christian reflection on proper sexual conduct in the United States, with specific emphasis on pre-marital sex, adoption, abortion, gay marriage, and the teaching of sex education in public schools.
Religion-Islam
RELI 2559New Course in Islam (3)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
Religion-Judaism
RELJ 2030Judaism, Roots and Rebellion (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
What does it mean to construct one's identity in dialogue with ancient texts and traditions? Can the gap between ancient and contemporary be bridged? Or must texts and traditions born of a remote time and place remain hopelessly irrelevant to contemporary life? This course explores these questions by examining the myriad ways that contemporary Jews balance the complexities of modern life with the demands of an ancient heritage.
RELJ 3390Jewish Feminism (3)
Jewish Feminism
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
South Asian Literature in Translation
SATR 3000Women Writing in India & Pakistan: 1947-Present (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
We will read and critique the fiction and poetry of culturally specific regions while reflecting on the assumption that experiences and identities are fundamentally gendered. We will explore issues associated with women writing in regional languages to writing in mainstream languages like Hindi, Urdu and English. We will also examine how the publication and dissemination of women's texts are related to the women movements in India and Pakistan. Prerequisite: Completion of First Writing Requirement
Slavic Folklore & Oral Literature
SLFK 2120Ritual and Family Life (3)
Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the rituals of birth, marriage, and death as practiced in 19th-century peasant Russia and in Russia today and the oral literature associated with these rituals. Topics include family patterns, child socialization and child rearing practices, gender issues, and problems of the elderly in their 19th century and current manifestations.
Sociology
SOC 2052Sociology of the Family (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Comparison of family organizations in relation to other social institutions in various societies; an introduction to the theory of kinship and marriage systems.
SOC 2320Gender and Society (3)
Gender and Society
SOC 3100Feminist Theory (3)
Feminist Theory offers a focused exploration of ways that late 20th Century and early 21st Century feminist theorists challenge, alter and deploy central concerns and paradigms of Western cultural assumption. Although Feminist Theory as a category incorporates interdisciplinary and global perspectives, the slant of this course is a focus on Western culture and Feminist Social Theory.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
SOC 3306Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in the Teen Film (3)
The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?
Course was offered Spring 2013
SOC 3450Women, Islam and Modernity (3)
The global Islamic revival is often considered an obstacle to gender equality. So how are we to understand women's involvement in Islamic movements? And what can these phenomena tell us about gender and modernity? This class will read ethnographic accounts of Muslim women in various parts of the world. We will discuss these ethnographies with an eye for how they speak to and challenge sociological theories of gender, identity, and globalization. Prerequisites: Student must have taken at least one course on gender, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
SOC 4200Sex and Gender Go To The Movies (3)
This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory. Prerequisite: six credits of Sociology or permission of instructor
Course was offered Spring 2014
SOC 4350Comparative Gender Stratification (3)
Examines gender stratification - the relative level of equality of men and women in a given group - in comparative and cross-historical perspective. Several theories are presented to explain the variations, from gender-egalitarian to highly patriarchal groups. Prerequisite: Six credits of Sociology or instructor permission.
SOC 5320Sociology of Gender (3)
This course will explore the social construction and consequences of gender, covering such topics as work, care, sexuality, identity, politics and inequality. Readings will include the classics as well as newer works in the field. Prerequisite: Graduate status; six credits in sociology or permission from the instructor.
Spanish
SPAN 4310Latin American Women Writers from 1900 to the Present (3)
Study of major Latin American women writers from 1900 to the present, including poets, essayists, playwrights, and fiction writers. Discussion will focus on the literary representation of issues related to gender and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.
SPAN 4620Hispanic Women Writers (3)
Examines writings by women authors of Spain and Latin America, using the texts as a basis for studying the evolving roles and paradigms of women in these societies. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
SPAN 4621Latin American Women Poets (3)
In this course we will read extensively from the poetry of the three most famous women poets of Latin America in the twentieth century: Uruguay's Delmira Agustini, Argentina's Alfonsina Storni, and Chile's Gabriela Mistral, the first Latin American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement
Course was offered Spring 2019, Fall 2014, Fall 2010
Women and Gender Studies
WGS 1510Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
Special Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality.
Course was offered Summer 2018, Summer 2017
WGS 2100Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
An introduction to gender studies, including the fields of women's studies, feminist studies, LGBT studies, & masculinity studies. Students will examine historical movements, theoretical issues, & contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to issues of inequality & to the intersection of gender with race, class, sexuality, & nationalism. Topics will vary according to the interdisciplinary expertise & research focus of the instructor.
WGS 2106Introduction to LGBTQ Studies (3)
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) Studies. We will study historical events and political, literary, and artistic figures and works; contemporary social and political issues; the meaning and development of sexual and gender identities; and different disciplinary definitions of meaning and knowledge.
WGS 2224Black Femininities and Masculinities in Media (3)
Addresses the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of "Blackness" in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.
WGS 2300Women and Gender in the Deaf World (3)
Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture.
Course was offered Fall 2017
WGS 2400Gender Death & Dying (3)
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to exploring ways that gender and sexuality impact death and dying. Aries' The Hour of Our Death and Seremetakis' The Last Word will be brought into conversation with Malson and Ussher's work on anorexia and Crimp's and Owen's theorizing representations of AIDS. We will explore photography's role in "capturing" the image of death, from 19th c. spirit photographs to 20th c. documentaries.
WGS 2450Gender and Environmental Justice (3)
Examines different ways of integrating gender into environmental analysis and organizing around the world, with a focus on power and links to race/class/nation. Topics include women's leadership in environmental movements; ecofeminism vs. feminist environmentalism; gendering of ecological knowledge and restoration; the impact of gendered divisions of labor on ecology; environmental violence; unequal health impacts; intimacy and sustainability.
Course was offered Fall 2014
WGS 2500Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
Special Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.
WGS 2559New Course in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
The course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of women, gender & sexuality
WGS 2600Human Sexualities (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Examines human sexuality from psychological, biological, behavioral, social, and historical perspectives. Topics include sexual research and theoretical perspectives, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual health, intimacy, communication, patterns of sexual response and pleasure and sexual problems and therapies. Course will also include examination of the development of sexuality and the intersections of other identities, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexuality and the law, sexual assault, and other social issues in sexuality.
WGS 2848Reproductive Technology (3)
This course will focus on issues in technology and reproduction from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. We will examine critical perspectives on science, power, gender, and inequality as they influence cultural constructions of reproductive processes such as pregnancy, childbirth, infertility, and debates about the enhancement and limitation of human fertility. Prerequisite: Course in WGS, ANTH, Bioethics preferred
Course was offered Spring 2014
WGS 2891Issues Facing Adolescent Girls (4)
Students will explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP). As we delve into theory and research on adolescent development, effective mentoring practices, and leadership development, students will test their theoretical knowledge and its application by serving as a Big Sister to an area middle school girl. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
WGS 2893Fostering Leadership in Women and Girls I (3)
This seminar is designed to support the YWLP (Young Women Leaders Program) group facilitators as leaders of YWLP mentoring groups. The content of instruction and discussion will focus on facilitation skills, small group development, and other topics relating to group dynamics, with particular attention to issues related to promoting leadership among adolescent girls and college women. There is an emphasis placed on multicultural issues.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
WGS 2894Gender, Body Image and Social Activism (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
What is the relationship between body image and identity? How does one affect, constrain, and inform the other? The development of body image is a complex process influenced by messages we receive from family, friends, peers, health care practitioners, teachers, and mass media to name a few. Messages are also constructed and interpreted differently depending on one's gender, race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and ableism.
WGS 2897Gender Violence and Social Justice (3)
Introduction to dynamics of gender-based violence, the political and cultural structures that perpetuate it, and avenues for achieving social justice. Students will think critically about the (largely) domestic impact of this violence, and develop a practical understanding of how it intersects with other forms of oppression, by applying theory to real-world problems through experiential learning projects in the community and at the University.
WGS 2898Sexual Violence Prevention on Campus: Theory and Practice (3)
This course is open to undergraduate students who wish to reduce gender-based violence through peer education and engagement. This course will introduce students to various theories on the causes of gender-based violence as well as evidence-based intervention strategies, including public health approaches to violence prevention, and effective program planning.
Course was offered Spring 2019
WGS 3105Issues in LGBTQ Studies (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) Studies. We will study historical events and political, literary and artistic figures and works; contemporary social and political issues; the meaning and development of sexual and gender identities; and different disciplinary definitions of meaning and knowledge.
WGS 3110Queer American History (3)
Course focuses on 20th century history of LGBTQ activism, but will include formation of heterosexual and homosexual identities and historical constructions of sexual practices prior to the 1900s. From 20th c. the course will focus on the Homophile Movement, Gay Liberation, and ACT UP, among other activist movements. Although primary emphasis will be placed on historical activism, contemporary movements regarding LGBTQ-rights will be included.
Course was offered Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2017
WGS 3115Work, Women's Work and Women Workers in South Asia (3)
What is 'work'? Are women seen as 'workers'? Are there women who do not 'work'? What is the history of paid, less paid, and unpaid work? This course focuses on new trends in the relationship between gender, class and work; and will reveal emerging possibilities in knowledge and practice through changes or reversal in the gender order and its impact on work and its relationship with capital.
Course was offered Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Fall 2017
WGS 3140Border Crossings: Women, Islam and Literature in the Middle East and North Africa (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
A focus on a bloodless, non-violent revolution that is shaking the foundation of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, a revolution with women writers at the forefront.  An examination of the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres that includes folklore, novel, short story, poetry, biography, autobiography, and essay. Prerequisite: Previous 2000 level course in the humanities or social sciences.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2012
WGS 3200Women, Gender and Sports (3)
This course traces the history of American female athletes from the late 1800s through the early 21st century. We will use gender as a means of understanding the evolution of the female athlete, and will also trace the manner by which issues of class and race inform sportswomen's journeys over time, particularly with regard to issues of femininity and homophobia.
WGS 3210Gender, Sport and Film (3)
This course will examine how film has portrayed women's sports and female athletes. We will explore how well the film industry has documented the history of women's sports, issues important to female athletes such as race, sexuality, equality and issues of femininity, and we will look to see how well these productions stack up against films portraying male athletes and men's sports.
WGS 3220Global Perspectives on Gender & Sport (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course will examine female athletes from a global perspective, comparing and contrasting their experiences, and placing them in historical perspective. Among the topics considered will be the Olympic Games, Chinese sports schools, the post-apartheid athletic landscape of South Africa, and Iranian women athlete's struggle against clothing restrictions.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
WGS 3230Gender and the Olympic Games (3)
In ancient Greece, women risked death if they even attended the Olympic Games. As Pierre de Coubertin looked to revive the games in 1896, he thought women better suited to cheering on the male victors, than to competing themselves. This course will explore women's early participation in the Olympic Games, the pressures upon Olympic sportswomen to be feminine, and the important intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation.
Course was offered Fall 2019, Summer 2018, Fall 2017
WGS 3240Gender, Race and Sport: A History of African American Sportswomen (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Explore the intersection of gender and race in sport, specifically examining the African-American female experience in sport. This course will ask students to consider whether sport was (and continues to be) the great equalizer for both African-American sportsmen and sportswomen, and to evaluate their portrayals (or lack thereof) in both the white and black media.
WGS 3306Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in the Teen Film (3)
The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?
WGS 3340Transnational Feminism (3)
This course places women, feminism, and activism in a transnational perspective, and offers students the opportunity to examine how issues considered critical to the field of gender studies are impacting women's lives globally in contemporary national contexts. We will look closely at how violence, economic marginality, intersections of race and gender, and varied strategies for development are affecting women in specific geographical locations.
WGS 3350Gender in Comparative Perspective (3)
This course examines how different countries "do" gender, exploring the political, social and economic construction of sexual difference. Our focus will be on how power is gendered and its effects on women and men in the developing world. We begin with a theoretical discussion of patriarchy, gender and feminist methods. Continuing to draw upon these theoretical debates, the course then investigates a series of issues, including gender and state formation in the Middle East, women's political participation in India and South Africa, feminist and women's movements in Latin America and Uganda, and globalization in South East Asia.
Course was offered Fall 2012
WGS 3370Feminism in America,1910-Present (3)
This course will explore the history of feminism in America from the 1910s to the present day. We will examine the various philosophies and strategies of people who have allied themselves with the feminist movement as well as those who have opposed it. We will ask how activists imagined sexual equality and what reforms-political, legal, economic, cultural, or psychological-they proposed.
Course was offered Spring 2016
WGS 3409LGBTQ Issues in the Media (3)
This course will explore the complex cultural dynamics of LGBTQ media visibility, along with its social, political, and psychological implications for LGBTQ audiences. It explores four domains: (1) the question of LGBT media visibility (2) the complex processes of inclusion, normalization, and assimilation in popular culture (3) media industries and the LGBT market (4) the relationship between digital media, LGBT audiences, and everyday life.
Course was offered Summer 2016
WGS 3440Gender and Multiculturalism (3)
Introduces current multiculturalism and feminist scholarship, prompting students to make connections between ideas from a wide variety of disciplines, such as history, sociology, anthropology, literature, art history, area studies, and more. Students will be required to complete an in-depth research final project for the course.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
WGS 3450Gender and Architecture (3)
As a visual art, architecture as an object projects a specific image; as a spatial art it affects individual and group interaction/engagement with the built environment. Through the lenses of gender and race we will examine human relationships to architecture - as designers, patrons, and users in the public and the private realm and across a broad range of temporal and geographic boundaries.
Course was offered Fall 2013
WGS 3495Incarcerated Women (3)
This course centers on the increasing number of women and juvenile girls who are incarcerated in the United States, and the now more than one million women under some form of correctional supervision in America. We will also explore such areas as feminist approaches to women and crime, racialized representations of criminality, and the impact of gender, race, and class on the criminal justice system.
WGS 3500Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.
WGS 3559New Course in Women, Gender and Sexuality (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subjects of women, gender and sexualities.
WGS 3611Gender and Sexuality in the United States, 1600-1865 (3)
This course explores the significance of gender and sexuality in the territory of the present-day U.S. during the period from the first European settlements to the Civil War.
Course was offered Fall 2019, Fall 2013
WGS 3612Gender and Sexuality in the United States, 1865-Present (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course explores the significance of gender and sexuality in the territory of the present-day U.S. during the period from the Civil War to the present.
WGS 3621Coming of Age in America: A History of Youth (3)
This course will explore the historical experience of young people and the meaning of youth from the colonial period to the late twentieth century. We will analyze how shifting social relations and cultural understandings changed what it meant to grow up. Topics to be explored include work, family, gender, sexuality, education, political involvement, and popular culture.
WGS 3625Cultures, Spaces, and Worldviews of International Aid (3)
The main focus of this class is the culture and values of development practitioners, and how these shape ideas of development itself. It explores the interconnected processes, relationships, and spaces through which development practitioners and planners learn, live , work, and encounter (or not) people who are the targets of development plans and interventions.
WGS 3680Eve's Sinful Bite: Foodscapes in Women's Writing Culture and Society (3)
This course explores how Italian women writers have represented food in their short stories, novels and autobiographies in dialogue with the culture and society from late nineteenth century to the present. These lectures will offer a close reading of the symbolic meaning of food in narrative and the way it intersects with Italian women's socio-cultural history, addressing issues of gender, identity and politics of the body.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017
WGS 3750Women, Childhood, Autobiography (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Cross-cultural readings in women's childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Fall 2015
WGS 3770Women Writers: Women on Women (3)
This course focuses on women writers from any era who address the topic of femininity: what it means or implies to be a woman.
Course was offered Fall 2016
WGS 3800Queer Theory (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Introduces students to some key & controversial theoretical texts that make up the emerging field of queer theory. The approach will be interdisciplinary, w/ an emphasis on literary, social, & aesthetic criticisms that may shift according the instructor's areas of expertise. Active reading & informed discussion will be emphasized for the often unseen, or submerged, aspects of sexuality embedded in cultural texts, contexts, & litterateurs.
WGS 3810Feminist Theory (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course provides an overview of the historical bases and contemporary developments in feminist theorizing and analyzes a range of theories on gender, including liberal, Marxist, radical, difference, and postmodernist ideas. We explore how feminist theories apply to contemporary debates on the body, sexuality, colonialism, globalization, transnationalism incorporating analyses of race, class, national difference and cross-cultural perspectives.
WGS 3814Gender, Sexuality, Identity in Premodern France (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course will explore religious, social, scientific and legal views on gender, sexuality and identity that may extend from medieval through early modern Europe with an emphasis on the French tradition. Readings will include literary texts and cultural documents as well as current scholarship on questions of sexuality, gender, and identity politics
Course was offered Spring 2019, Spring 2018
WGS 3993Independent Study (1 - 4)
Independent Study
WGS 4050Senior Seminar in Women, Gender and Sexuality: Embodiment (3)
This senior seminar explores ways that people inhabit "gender" and "sexuality" (as compounded with race and class relations), using the lens of philosophically distinct forms of embodiment: sensory, energetic, laboring, colonized, commodified, liberated, aestheticism, trans, agnostic, desiring, bio-intimate, and posthuman. Readings integrate theory with ethnography and include material on how the body has figured in social struggle. Prerequisite: WGS 2100; WGS major , WGS 2nd major, or WGS minor
Course was offered Spring 2013
WGS 4101Issues in Women's Autobiographies (3)
This course focuses on women's autobiographical texts and the diverse ways authors explore issues surrounding identity, power, and resistance in their narratives. We will read compelling accounts of imprisonment, reservation life, political detention, and more, while closely examining women's participation in ongoing struggles for social justice.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
WGS 4110Gender Non-Conformity in Media Culture (3)
As one of the primary cultural drivers of common sense, shared values, and political ideology, media are certainly influential storytellers. This course creates space for considering media's role in articulating and fashioning the limits and possibilities of gender identity. We will pay particular attention to representations of gender non-conformity in popular culture such as female masculinity, male femininity, and transgender subjectivity.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015
WGS 4140Beyond the Gap: Gender and Political Behavior (3)
This course will consider the theoretical place of gender in American politics. We will also take up a number of topics, including the unavoidable gender gap, the role of masculinity and femininity in conditioning our perceptions of issues and political candidates, the ways gender, politics, and society have interacted historically, and the ways race and gender (and class) interact in conditioning political behavior. Prerequisite: At least one course either on gender or on political behavior.
WGS 4200Sex and Gender Go to the Movies (3)
This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.
WGS 4350Comparative Gender Stratification (3)
Examines gender stratification - the relative level of equality of men and women in a given group - in comparative and cross-historical perspective. Several theories are presented to explain the variations, from gender-egalitarian to highly patriarchal groups. (IR) Prerequisites: WGS or SOC course
WGS 4360Body Politics and the Body Politic (3)
This seminar places feminist and non-feminist debates about body politics beauty standards, racialization and color politics, transgender movements, body modification, work discipline, commodification, torture, cyborgs, and new corporeal technologies--in the context of a wider universe of political and philosophical writing on embodiment. Students will be introduced to culturally and historically diverse bodies. Prerequisite: 4th year WGS majors, WGS 2nd majors and WGS minors or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2014
WGS 4420Women and Education (3)
Course will examine the roles women have played and continue to play as students, scholars, and leaders in American educational institutions. 
Course was offered Spring 2015
WGS 4425Gender & Nationalism in Islamic Cultures (3)
Course will provide an overview of the politics of gender and nationalism in the Middle East. Among the topics we will examine are gendered discourses and practices of nation-states; gendered constructions of national identity; gendered violence; women's engagement in politics, state power, social movements and civil society; women's activism, state feminism, and Islamic feminism; and the state regulations of sexuality, family, and citizenship.
WGS 4430Gender & Nationalism in the Middle East (3)
An overview of the politics of gender and nationalism in the Middle East. We will examine the ways in which nationalism articulates with gender and sexuality. What are the implications of gendered constructions of national identity? How are the discourses of nation-states gendered? How does the state regulate sexuality, family, and citizenship? What are the effects of nationalist discourses on the emergence of new masculinities and femininities?
WGS 4500Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
Offered
Spring 2020
Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.
WGS 4559New Course in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of studies of women and gender.
WGS 4610LGBTQ Communities: Race, Class, Gender (3)
This course examines the historical and continuing role of LGBTQ communities in U.S. society. Topics covered will include changes that have taken place over time, LGBTQ-rights as a social movement, and homelessness as an LGBTQ-rights issue. Particular emphasis will be placed on power relations in LGBTQ communities, including the role of racism, classism, and sexism.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
WGS 4620Black Feminist Theory (3)
This course critically examines key ideas, issues, and debates in contemporary Black feminist thought. With a particular focus on Black feminist understandings of intersectionality and womanism, the course examines how Black feminist thinkers interrogate specific concepts including Black womanhood, sexual mythologies and vulnerabilities, class distinctions, colorism, leadership, crime and punishment, and popular culture.
Course was offered Fall 2019, Fall 2018
WGS 4650Gender, Poetry & Mindfulness (3)
The course integrates mindfulness training with interpretation of art, literature, and writing. Course material is global in scope, incorporating diverse works from Urdu poetry to Japanese haikus, including texts and mindfulness exercises from Tibet. Students will practice mindfulness to enhance their understanding of writers' and artists' personal, historical, cultural, and gender perspectives.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
WGS 4655Early Modern Theater: The Drama of Marriage (3)
Course will investigate marriage as represented on the early modern European stage. Italian, Spanish, French and English plays comprise our subject matter. We'll consider the legal, social, and cultural history of matrimony to background our study of the stageworks; we will analyze scripts and performances to learn how dramatic and theatrical convention intersected w/ marital institution and negotiations, onstage and off. Taught in English.
Course was offered Spring 2017
WGS 4700Men and Masculinities (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
Typically, men are dealt with in a way that casually presents them as representative of humanity. This course addresses the various ways that men are also 'gendered,' and can be the subject of inquiries of gender, sexuality, inequality, and privilege in their own right. Prerequisite: Students need to have completed a WGS course.
WGS 4750Global History of Black Girlhood (3)
This course will allow students to explore the new scholarship on black girlhood. Scholars working on the history of black girls in the US, Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa have created a vibrant new field of black girl studies. Combining insights from black feminism and the history of childhood, these scholars have centered black girls' experience as a means of reframing our understanding of citizenship, labor, and creativity.
Course was offered Spring 2018, Spring 2017
WGS 4800Gender-Based Violence (3)
Offered
Spring 2020
This course begins by investigating how scholars from a wide array of disciplines define gender-based violence (GBV), its prevalence, causes, and consequences. Next, we focus on several areas where gender -based violence is pervasive, such as universities, poor neighborhoods, during war, and in the global economy. The final section of the course examines responses to GBV by health care providers, feminists, and governments. Prerequisite: 3rd or 4th year student
WGS 4998Women, Gender & Sexuality Senior Thesis I (3)
Majors in Women, Gender and Sexuality (WGS) are encouraged to become Distinguished Majors. Students complete a two-semester written thesis (approximately 40-60 pages in length) in their fourth year under the supervision of a WGS faculty member. The thesis allows students to pursue their own interests in depth and have the intellectual satisfaction of defining and completing a sustained project. Please see your WGS advisor for more information. Prerequisites: WGS Major, WGS 2nd Major
WGS 4999Women, Gender & Sexuality Senior Thesis II (3)
Majors in Women, Gender and Sexuality (WGS) are encouraged to become Distinguished Majors. Students complete a two-semester written thesis (approximately 40-60 pages in length) in their fourth year under the supervision of a WGS faculty member. The thesis allows students to pursue their own interests in depth and have the intellectual satisfaction of defining and completing a sustained project. Please see your WGS advisor for more information. Prerequisite: WGS Major, 2nd Major
WGS 5140Advanced Border Crossings: Women, Islam, & Lit. in Middle East & N. Africa (3)
A focus on a bloodless, non-violent revolution that is shaking the foundation of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, a revolution with women writers at the forefront. An examination of the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres that includes folklore, novel, short story, poetry, biography, autobiography, and essay. This course section is for graduate students only. Prerequisites: Instructor Consent Required
Course was offered Fall 2015
WGS 5500Gender, Sexuality, and Education Course Topic(s) (3)
Education topic courses offered on a semster-to-semester basis. Please see the WGS website for specific approved sections.
Course was offered Fall 2018, Fall 2013
WGS 7500Approaches to Gender and Sexuality Studies (3)
An introduction to contemporary feminist and queer theories, intended for graduate students. Offers a survey of contemporary feminist and queer epistemology, subject formation, ethics, and politics, as well as a grounding in the methods of feminist and queer theory. What is a woman? What is sex? What is gender? What is sexuality? These and related questions are discussed from multidisciplinary perspectives.
Course was offered Fall 2019, Fall 2018
WGS 7559New Course in Women, Gender & Sexuality (1 - 4)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of women, gender & sexuality.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016