UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog for the Computer Science Program    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Computer Science
CS 1010Introduction to Information Technology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
How computers create, preserve, manipulate and communicate information and the concepts and tools used to that end. Units include how computers work, web technologies, creating web pages, algorithms and logic, basic programming, and solving problems with spreadsheets. Students will learn to recognize computational problems and develop basic skill sets to solve future problems in their discipline of study. No prior programming experience required. Not intended for students expecting to do further work in CS. Cannot be taken for credit by students in SEAS or Commerce.
CS 1110Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. No previous programming experience required. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1111Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students should have some experience with programming. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1112Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students must have no previous programming experience. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1113Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Special domain topics and materials will differ by section and semester. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1120Introduction to Computing: Explorations in Language, Logic, and Machines (3.00)
This course is an introduction to the most important ideas in computing. It focuses on the big ideas in computer science including the major themes of recursive definitions, universality, and abstraction. It covers how to describe information processes by defining procedures using the Scheme and Python programming languages, how to analyze the costs required to carry out a procedure, and the fundamental limits of what can be computed.
CS 1501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00)
Student led special topic courses which vary by semester.
CS 1511Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
Course was offered Fall 2017
CS 2102Discrete Mathematics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include finite and infinite sets, elementary combinatorial problems, and graph theory. Development of tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems. Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112 or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2110Software Development Methods (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A second course in computing with an emphasis on modern software development and principles central to computer science. Topics include software requirements, testing, object-oriented design, abstraction, encapsulation, recursion, and time-complexity. Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2150Program and Data Representation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces programs and data representation at the machine level. Data structuring techniques and the representation of data structures during program execution. Operations and control structures and their representation during program execution. Representations of numbers, arithmetic operations, arrays, records, recursion, hashing, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and related concepts. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and CS 2110, both with grades of C- or higher.
CS 2190Computer Science Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Provides cultural capstone to the undergraduate experience. Students make presentations based on topics not covered in the traditional curriculum. Emphasizes learning the mechanisms by which researchers and practicing computer scientists can access information relevant to their discipline, and on the professional computer scientist's responsibility in society. The course requires second-year standing in the CS BS major for enrollment. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2110, both with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2330Digital Logic Design (3.00)
Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Cross-listed as ECE 2330.
CS 2501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 2910CS Education Practicum (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An overview of computer science education for undergraduate students. Topics include ethics, diversity, tutoring and teaching techniques, and classroom management. Students enrolled in this course serve as a teaching assistant for a computer science course as part of their coursework.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
CS 2993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. This version of Independent Study is appropriate for students who have not completed CS 2150.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017
CS 3102Theory of Computation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces computation theory including grammars, finite state machines, pushdown automata, and Turing machines. Prerequisites: CS 2102 and CS 2110 both with grades of C- or higher
CS 3205HCI in Software Development (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Human-computer interaction and user-centered design in the context of software engineering. Examines the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction. Includes evaluating a system's usability based on well-defined criteria; user and task analysis, as well as conceptual models and metaphors; the use of prototyping for evaluating design alternatives; and physical design of software user-interfaces, including windows, menus, and commands. Prerequisite: CS 2110 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 3240Advanced Software Development Techniques (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes modern software engineering practice for multi-person projects; methods for requirements specification, design, implementation, verification, and maintenance of large software systems; advanced software development techniques and large project management approaches; project planning, scheduling, resource management, accounting, configuration control, and documentation. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 3330Computer Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes the organization and architecture of computer systems hardware; instruction set architectures; addressing modes; register transfer notation; processor design and computer arithmetic; memory systems; hardware implementations of virtual memory, and input/output control and devices. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher. CS 2330 recommended. Students may not receive credit for both CS 3330 and ECE 3430. CPE majors cannot use this course to fulfill their program of study.
CS 4102Algorithms (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the analysis of algorithms and the effects of data structures on them. Algorithms selected from areas such as sorting, searching, shortest paths, greedy algorithms, backtracking, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming. Data structures include heaps and search, splay, and spanning trees. Analysis techniques include asymtotic worst case, expected time, amortized analysis, and reductions between problems. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2150 with grades of C- or higher, and APMA 1090 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1310.
CS 4240Principles of Software Design (3.00)
Focuses on techniques for software design in the development of large and complex software systems. Topics will include software architecture, modeling (including UML), object-oriented design patterns, and processes for carrying out analysis and design. More advanced or recent developments may be included at the instructor's discretion. The course will balance an emphasis on design principles with an understanding of how to apply techniques and methods to create successful software systems. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4330Advanced Computer Architecture (3.00)
Provides an overview of modern microprocessor design. The topics covered in the course will include the design of super-scalar processors and their memory systems, and the fundamentals of multi-core processor design. Prerequisite: CS 2150 and CS 3330 with grades of C- or higher
CS 4414Operating Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes process communication and synchronization; resource management; virtual memory management algorithms; file systems; and networking and distributed systems. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher, and CS 3330 or ECE 3430 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include basic dependability concepts and attributes, fault models and effects, combinatorial and state-space modeling, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software fault tolerance, checkpointing and recovery, reliable networked systems, error detection techniques, and experimental dependability evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: APMA 3100 or APMA 3110; CS 3330 or ECE 4435 (co-requisite); ECE 3430 (preferred). A working knowledge of programming is required for homework and mini projects.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
CS 4444Introduction to Parallel Computing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the student to the basics of high-performance parallel computing and the national cyber-infrastructure. The course is targeted for both computer science students and students from other disciplines who want to learn how to significantly increase the performance of applications. Prerequisites: CS 2110 with grade of C- or higher, CS3330 or ECE 3430 with a grade of C- or higher, APMA 3100 and APMA 3110.
CS 4457Computer Networks (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in communication networks for upper-level undergraduate students. Topics include the design of modern communication networks; point-to-point and broadcast network solutions; advanced issues such as Gigabit networks; ATM networks; and real-time communications. Cross-listed as ECE 4457. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or ECE 3430
CS 4458Internet Engineering (3.00)
An advanced course on computer networks on the technologies and protocols of the Internet. Topics include the design principles of the Internet protocols, including TCP/IP, the Domain Name System, routing protocols, and network management protocols. A set of laboratory exercises covers aspects of traffic engineering in a wide-area network. Prerequisite: CS 4457 with a grade of C- or better.
CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies annually, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the department. Similar to CS 5501 and CS 7501, but taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 4610Programming Languages (3.00)
Presents the fundamental concepts of programming language design and implementation. Emphasizes language paradigms and implementation issues. Develops working programs in languages representing different language paradigms. Many programs oriented toward language implementation issues. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4620Compilers (3.00)
Provides an introduction to the field of compilers, which translate programs written in high-level languages to a form that can be executed. The course covers the theories and mechanisms of compilation tools. Students will learn the core ideas behind compilation and how to use software tools such as lex/flex, yacc/bison to build a compiler for a non-trivial programming language. Prerequisite: CS2150 with grade of C- or higher. CS3330 recommended.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
CS 4630Defense Against the Dark Arts (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Viruses, worms, and other malicious software are an ever-increasing threat to computer systems. There is an escalating battle between computer security specialists and the designers of malicious software. This course provides an essential understanding of the techniques used by both sides of the computer security battle. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or above.
CS 4640Programming Languages for Web Applications (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Presents programming languages and implementations used in developing web applications. Both client and server side languages are presented as well as database languages. In addition, frameworks that enable interactive web pages are discussed as well as formatting languages. Language features and efficiencies including scoping, parameter passing, object orientation, just in time compilation and dynamic binary translation are included. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4710Artificial Intelligence (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces artificial intelligence. Covers fundamental concepts and techniques and surveys selected application areas. Core material includes state space search, logic, and resolution theorem proving. Application areas may include expert systems, natural language understanding, planning, machine learning, or machine perception. Provides exposure to AI implementation methods, emphasizing programming in Common LISP. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4720Mobile Application Development (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Mobile computing devices have become ubiquitous in our communities. In this course, we focus on the creation of mobile solutions for various modern platforms, including major mobile operating systems. Topics include mobile device architecture, programming languages, software engineering, user interface design, and app distribution. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4730Computer Game Design (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools used in the development of modern 2-D and 3-D real-time interactive computer video games. Topics covered in this include graphics, parallel processing, human-computer interaction, networking, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4740Cloud Computing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Investigates the architectural foundations of the various cloud platforms, as well as examining both current cloud computing platforms and modern cloud research. Student assignments utilize the major cloud platforms. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4750Database Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the fundamental concepts for design and development of database systems. Emphasizes relational data model and conceptual schema design using ER model, practical issues in commercial database systems, database design using functional dependencies, and other data models. Develops a working relational database for a realistic application. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grades of C- or higher.
CS 4753Electronic Commerce Technologies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
History of Internet and electronic commerce on the web; case studies of success and failure; cryptographic techniques for privacy, security, and authentication; digital money; transaction processing; wired and wireless access technologies; Java; streaming multimedia; XML; Bluetooth. Defining, protecting, growing, and raising capital for an e-business. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4760Network Security (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course covers the principles of secure network communications and the application of network security. Topics include: attack types, attack surfaces, attack phases, network security devices.(a)symmetric key encryption, cryptographic hash function, authentication/identification techniques, key distribution, and data integrity assurance. Also, currently used security mechanisms and protocols will be discussed.
CS 4810Introduction to Computer Graphics (3.00)
Introduces the fundamentals of three-dimensional computer graphics: rendering, modeling, and animation. Students learn how to represent three-dimensional objects (modeling) and the movement of those objects over time (animation). Students learn and implement the standard rendering pipeline, defined as the stages of turning a three-dimensional model into a shaded, lit, texture-mapped two-dimensional image. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a C- or better.
CS 4820Real Time Rendering (3.00)
Examines real-time rendering of high-quality interactive graphics. Studies the advances in graphics hardware and algorithms that are allowing applications such as video games, simulators, and virtual reality to become capable of near cinematic-quality visuals at real-time rates. Topics include non-photorealistic rendering, occlusion culling, level of detail, terrain rendering, shadow generation, image-based rendering, and physical simulation. Over several projects throughout the semester students work in small teams to develop a small 3-D game engine incorporating some state-of-the-art techniques. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CS 4810
CS 4840Computer Animation (3.00)
Introduces both fundamental and advanced computer animation techniques. Discusses such traditional animation topics as keyframing, procedural algorithms, camera control, and scene composition. Also introduces modern research techniques covering dynamic simulation, motion capture, and feedback control algorithms. These topics help prepare students for careers as technical directors in the computer animation industry and assist in the pursuit of research careers. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CS 4810
CS 4970Capstone Practicum I (3.00)
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Under the practicum track, students will take two 3-credit courses, CS 4970 and CS 4971. These courses would form a year-long group-based and project-based practicum class. There would be an actual customer, which could be either internal (the course instructor, other CS professors, etc.) or external (local companies, local non-profits, etc.). Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4971Capstone Practicum II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track and is the continuation from CS 4970. Under the practicum track, students will take two 3-credit courses, CS 4970 and CS 4971. These courses would form a year-long group-based and project-based practicum class. There would be an actual customer, which could be either internal (the course instructor, other CS professors, etc.) or external (local companies, local non-profits, etc.). Prerequisite: CS 4970
CS 4980Capstone Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Students will seek out a faculty member as an advisor, and do an independent project with said advisor. Instructors can give the 3 credits across multiple semesters, if desired. This course is designed for students who are doing research, and want to use that research for their senior thesis. Note that this track could also be an implementation project, including a group-based project. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. The study is often either a thorough analysis of an abstract computer science problem or the design, implementation, and analysis of a computer system (software or hardware). Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4998Distinguished BA Majors Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Required for Distinguished Majors completing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. An introduction to computer science research and the writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis. Prerequisites: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher and CS BA major status.
CS 5010Programming and Systems for Data Science (3.00)
The objective of this course is to introduce basic data analysis techniques including data analysis at scale, in the context of real-world domains such as bioinformatics, public health, marketing, security, etc. For the purpose of facilitating data manipulation and analysis, students will be introduced to essential programming techniques in Python, an increasingly prominent language for data science and "big data" manipulation. Prerequisite: CS 1110, Math 1310 or APMA 1110, Math 3351 or APMA 3080, Math 3100, APMA 3010 or APMA 3110
CS 5012Foundations of Computer Science (3.00)
Provide a foundation in discrete mathematics, data structures, algorithmic design and implementation, computational complexity, parallel computing, and data integrity and consistency for non-CS, non-CpE students. Case studies and exercises will be drawn from real-world examples (e.g., bioinformatics, public health, marketing, and security). Prerequisite: CS 5010, CS 1110 or equivalent, Math 1210 or equiv, Math 3351 or equiv, Math 3100 or equiv.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
CS 5014Computation as a Research Tool (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is an introduction to programming for students who will be using computational methods for their research but are not computer science or computer engineering students. No previous programming experience is required. We use a multi-language/multi-domain approach. The first part of the course covers basic programming concepts for a given language. The last third of the course splits into domain specific tracks of interest to students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
CS 5487Real-Time Systems (3.00)
This course presents the underlying theory, concepts, and practice for real-time systems, such as avionics, process control, space travel, mobile computing and ubiquitous computing. The goals of the course include: introducing the unique problems that arise when time constraints are imposed on systems, identifying basic theory and the boundary between what is known today and what is still research, stressing a systems integration viewpoint in the sense of showing how everything fits together rather than presenting a collection of isolated solutions, and addressing multiprocessing and distributed systems. This course also presents some of the basic results from what might be called the classical technology of real-time computing and presents these results in the context of new applications of this technology in ubiquitous/pervasive computer systems. Prerequisite: CS 3330 and CS 4414, knowledge of C or C++, or instructor permission.
CS 5501Selected Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Content varies annually, depending on students' needs and interests. Recent topics included the foundations of computation, artificial intelligence, database design, real-time systems, Internet engineering, and electronic design automation. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015
CS 5787Security in Information Systems (3.00)
This course focuses on security as an aspect of a variety of software systems. We will consider software implementations of security related policies in the context of operating systems, networks, and data bases. Topics include: operating system protection mechanisms, intrusion detection systems, formal models of security, cryptography and associated security protocols, data base security, worms, viruses, network and distributed system security, and policies of privacy and confidentiality. Prerequisite: CS 3240 and either CS 4457 or CS 4414 or instructor permission.
CS 6160Theory of Computation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, formal computation and machine models, finite automata, pushdown automata, Turing machines, Church's thesis, reductions, decidability and undecidability, and NP-completeness. Prerequisite: CS 3102 or equivalent.
CS 6161Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3.00)
Analyzes concepts in algorithm design, problem solving strategies, proof techniques, complexity analysis, upper and lower bounds, sorting and searching, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, probabilistic algorithms, intractability and NP-completeness, transformations, and approximation algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 4102 or equivalent.
CS 6190Computer Science Perspectives (1.00 - 3.00)
This 'acclimation' seminar helps new graduate students become productive researchers. Faculty and visitors speak on a wide variety of research topics, as well as on tools available to researchers, including library resources, various operating systems, UNIX power tools, programming languages, software development and version control systems, debugging tools, user interface toolkits, word processors, publishing systems, HTML, JAVA, browsers, Web tools, and personal time management. Prerequisite: CS graduate student or instructor permission.
CS 6240Software Engineering (3.00)
Analyzes project management, software tools, requirements and specification methods; top-down, bottom-up, and data-flow design; structured programming, information hiding, programming language issues, and coding standards; software development environments, fault tolerance principles, and testing. Prerequisite: CS 3240 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
CS 6316Machine Learning (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is a graduate-level machine learning course. Machine Learning is concerned with computer programs that automatically improve their performance through experience. This course covers introductory topics about the theory and practical algorithms for machine learning from a variety of perspectives. Topics include supervised learning, unsupervised learning and learning theory. Prerequisite: Calculus, Basic linear algebra, Basic Probability and Basic Algorithm. Statistics is recommended. Students should already have good programming skills.
CS 6354Computer Architecture (3.00)
Study of representative digital computer organization with emphasis on control unit logic, input/output processors and devices, asynchronous processing, concurrency, and parallelism. Memory hierarchies. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or proficiency in assembly language programming.
CS 6415Performance Analysis of Communication Networks (3.00)
Analyzes the topologies arising in communication networks; queuing theory; Markov Chains and ergodicity conditions; theory of regenerative processes; routing algorithms; multi-access and random-access transmission algorithms; mathematical methodologies for throughput and delay analyses and evaluations; performance evaluation; performance monitoring; local area networks (LANs); interactive LANs. Cross-listed as ECE 6415. Prerequisite: CE/ECE 4457, APMA 3100, or instructor permission.
CS 6434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include basic dependability concepts and attributes, fault models and effects, combinatorial and state-space modeling, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software fault tolerance, checkpointing and recovery, reliable networked systems, error detection techniques, and experimental dependability evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of probability and computer architecture is required. A working knowledge of programming is required for homework and mini projects.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CS 6444Introduction to Parallel Computing (3.00)
Introduces the basics of parallel computing. Covers parallel computation models, systems, languages, compilers, architectures, and algorithms. Provides a solid foundation on which advanced seminars on different aspects of parallel computation can be based. Emphasizes the practical application of parallel systems. There are several programming assignments. Prerequisite: CS 3330, 4414, and 4610, or instructor permission.
CS 6456Operating Systems (3.00)
Covers advanced principles of operating systems. Technical topics include support for distributed OSs; microkernels and OS architectures; processes and threads; IPC; files servers; distributed shared memory; object-oriented OSs; reflection in OSs; real-time kernels; multiprocessing; multimedia and quality of service; mobile computing; and parallelism in I/O. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in OS; CS 6354 or instructor permission.
CS 6501Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Course content varies by section and is selected to fill timely and special interests and needs of students. See CS 7501 for example topics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 6610Programming Languages (3.00)
Examines modern and non-imperative languages, the theoretical techniques used to design and understand them, and the implementation techniques used to make them run. Topics include functional languages, object-oriented languages, language safety and classification of errors, type systems, formal semantics, abstraction mechanisms, memory management, and unusual control-flow mechanisms. Example languages include Standard ML, Modula-3, CLU, Scheme, Prolog, and Icon. Prerequisite: CS 4610 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
CS 6620Compilers (3.00)
Study of the theory, design, and specification of translation systems. Translation systems are the tools used to translate a source language program to a form that can be executed. Using rigorous specification techniques to describe the inputs and outputs of the translators and applying classical translation theory, working implementations of various translators are designed, specified, and implemented. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
CS 6750Database Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Studies new database systems, emphasizing database design and related system issues. Explores advanced topics such as object-oriented and real-time database systems, data warehousing, data mining, and workflow. Makes use of either commercial or research database systems for in-class projects. Prerequisite: CS 4750 or equivalent.
CS 6840Computer Graphics (3.00)
Analyzes display devices, line and circle generators; clippings and windowing; data structures; 2-D picture transformations; hidden line and surface algorithms; shading algorithms; free form surfaces; color graphics; 3-D picture transformation. Cross-listed as ECE 6435. Prerequisite: Knowledge of C/C++.
CS 6890Industrial Applications (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A graduate student returning from Curricular Practical Training can use this course to claim one credit hour of academic credit after successfully reporting, orally and in writing, a summary of the CPT experience to his/her academic advisor.
Course was offered Fall 2017
CS 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7457Computer Networks (3.00)
Analyzes network topologies; backbone design; performance and queuing theory; data-grams and virtual circuits; technology issues; layered architectures; standards; survey of commercial networks, local area networks, and contention-based communication protocols; encryption; and security. Course equivalent to ECE 7457. Prerequisite: CS 6456 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
CS 7501Selected Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Content varies based on the interest and needs of students. Topics may include safety critical systems, parallel processing, information retrieval, data communications, computer networks, real-time computing, distributed multimedia systems, electronic commerce, and advanced combinatorics and graph theory.. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 7620Advanced Compilers (3.00)
Study of advanced compilation techniques with a focus on code generation and optimization techniques, advanced execution environments, and compilation of emerging programming languages. Prerequisite: CS 6160 and 6610, or equivalent.
CS 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7995Supervised Project Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research for the Master of Computer Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CS 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
CS 8501Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Special Topics in Computer Science
CS 8524Topics in Software Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A special topics course in software engineering. Topics are determined by the individual instructor, but might include software reliability; engineering real-time systems; managing large software projects; resource estimation; validation and verification; or advanced programming environments. Prerequisite: CS 6240 or instructor permission.
CS 8535Topics in Computer Architecture (3.00)
Studies selected advances in the architecture of computer systems. May include distribution processor systems, memory hierarchies, and secondary storage management schemes. Prerequisite: CS 6354 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
CS 8561Topics in Programming Languages (3.00)
Studies selected advanced topics in design, definition, and implementation of programming languages. Typical recent topics: parallel language design; formal semantics of programs. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: CS 6610 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2010
CS 8575Topics in Database Systems (3.00)
Analyzes the implementation of database systems, concurrent and distributed access, backup, and security; query languages and optimization of query access; multi-attribute dependencies and retrieval. Data warehousing and web-based data systems are explored. Prerequisite: CS 6750 or instructor permission
CS 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students who are teaching assistants.
CS 8999Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
CS 9999Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.