UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog for Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages and Cultures    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Arabic
ARAB 1010Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.
ARAB 1016Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1020Elementary Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice. Prerequisite: ARAB 1010 or equivalent.
ARAB 1026Intensive Introductory Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 or equivalent.
ARAB 116Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 126Intensive Introductory Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 1559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 6.00)
New Course in Arabic
ARAB 2010Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2016Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequistes: ARAB 1016 & 1026 or equivalent.
ARAB 2020Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning. Prerequisite: for ARAB 2010: ARAB 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission; for ARAB 2020: ARAB 2010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2026Intensive Intermediate Arabic (4.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisites: ARAB 1016 , 1026 & 2016 or equivalent.
ARAB 216Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2250Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (1.50)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
ARAB 226Intensive Intermediate Arabic (0.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic intermediate level expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
ARAB 2260Conversational Arabic (3.00)
Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 2250 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 2266Introduction to Levantine Arabic II (1.50)
This course is a continuation of ARAB 2256 and it intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: ARAB 2256
ARAB 256Introduction to Levantine Arabic-I (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First Year Arabic
ARAB 266Introduction to Levantine Arabic-II (0.00)
This course intends to introduce the students to colloquial Levantine Arabic by enabling them to communicate in Levantine Arabic, the colloquial spoken in Syria, Lebanon, the Holy Land, and Western Jordan Prerequisite: First year Arabic and ARAB 0256/2256
ARAB 3010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ARAB 3020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Arabic group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARAB 3230Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or instructor permission.
ARAB 3240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 3310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 3330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 3340Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 3330 or permission of instructor.
ARAB 3559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2011
ARAB 3672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 3810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4010Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 4020Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context.
ARAB 4120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 4230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 4245Readings in Classical Arabic Prose (3.00)
Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential "Arab" literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage.
Course was offered Fall 2017
ARAB 4450The Other in Premodern Arabic Sources (3.00)
This course explores the unduly studied corpus of Arabic writings that describes the encounters with and perception of the Other. Much effort will be devoted to investigate medieval and early modern Arab-Muslim views of the Other in a cross-generic selection of non-religious Arabic prose such as travelogues, diplomatic memoirs, captivity reports, marvels, folktales, literary debates/boasting, and poetry. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARAB 4559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2009
ARAB 4993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Arabic
ARAB 5010Advanced Arabic I (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5020Advanced Arabic II (3.00)
The goal of this course is to increase the student's knowledge of the Arabic language and culture via a communicative-based approach, meaning that though the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5230Love, War, and Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writings (3.00)
In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARAB 5240Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (3.00)
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: ARAB 3230 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAB 5245Readings in Classical Arabic Prose (3.00)
Students will gain insight and learn to appreciate some of the most influential 'Arab' literary figures and some of the most celebrated classical Arabic prose masterpieces. Students will also broaden their critical and comparative perspectives with regard to some of the most important literary and cultural issues related to the overall poetics and politics of the Arabic-Islamic heritage.
Course was offered Fall 2017
ARAB 5310Introduction to the Arab World and Its Languages (3.00)
A general survey of the linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural, and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Attention given to the Arabic language, family, gender relations, the Arab experience in the U.S., Arab American relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arab art and music.
ARAB 5330Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I (3.00)
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith. Prerequisite: ARAB 2020 or higher, or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARAB 5410Advanced Arabic III (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5420Advanced Arabic IV (3.00)
The main goal at this stage is to reach a superior level of Modern Standard Arabic with due attention paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing in addition to culture. Acquisition of more advanced grammatical structures will take place primarily through directed in-class drilling, coupled with an emphasis on the functional use of language through communication in context. Prerequisites: ARAB 4010 or equivalent, or instructor permission
ARAB 5559New Course in Arabic (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Arabic.
ARAB 5810Modern Arabic Fiction (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students are introduced to twentieth-century Arabic fiction, and to the varied genres of prose including letters, memoirs, short stories, travelogues, and novels. Topics include autobiography, war and nation construction, fantasy, and political and sexual identity crises. Students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism, and learn to analyze texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5830Topics in Arabic Prose I (3.00)
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays. Prerequisite: ARAB 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5840Topics in Arabic Prose II (3.00)
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5830 or instructor permission.
ARAB 5850Media Arabic (3.00)
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 5530 and 5540, or ARAB 3010/5010 and 3020/5020, or instructor permission.
ARAB 5870Media Arabic II (3.00)
A survey of print and electronic media, news and news reports, analysis, commentaries from or about the Arab world, intended to increase students' familiarity with the language used in news as reported in Arabic-media venues.  Prerequisite:  ARAB 5850, completion of ARAB 5530 and 5540 or permission of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARAB 6559New course in Arabic (3.00)
This course is to allow 6000-level new courses to be taught for one semester
ARAB 6672Advanced Arabic Grammar (3.00)
In this course students will develop a mastery of core items relevant to Modern Standard Arabic grammar, a mastery which will enable them to produce discreet, sophisticated sentences, as well as to compose paragraphs and essays, all while utilizing the grammar points covered in this class. Those interested in taking this course are required to have completed ARAB 2020 or equivalent, or to receive approval of instructor.
ARAB 7120Introduction to Arabic Drama (3.00)
This course introduces students to modern Arabic drama from the early pioneers' period in the 20th century to the contemporary era. We will study different forms of this genre including: musicals, traditional, experimental, feminist, and social drama. Further, students become acquainted with different schools of modern Arabic literary criticism and learn to analyze dramatic texts using critical analysis and specific theoretical terminology. Prerequisites: ARAB 5830 or 5840, or instructor's permission.
ARAB 8559New Course in Arabic (3.00)
New Course in Arabic Prerequisite: ARAB 3020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARAB 8993Independent Study in Arabic (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent Study in Arabic.
Arabic in Translation
ARTR 2500Taboo and the Arabic Novel (3.00)
This class introduces the contemporary Arabic novel as it deals with religious and social taboo. The course surveys major works of Arabic literature that generated confrontations with the State, readers, or religious movements. It looks at the reception of texts in the Arabic world, the texts' intersection with social and political taboos, and the problems of censorship and confiscation of artistic work. Texts include work by Naguib Mahfouz.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARTR 3245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
In this course, we will venture into the fascinating words and worlds of premodern Arab-Islamic leisure and pleasure. We will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
ARTR 3290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.
ARTR 3350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 3390Love, Alienation, and Politics in the Contemporary Arabic Novel (3.00)
Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.
ARTR 3490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 3559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015
ARTR 5245Arabic Literary Delights (3.00)
In this course we will focus specifically on the literary representation of and socio-cultural/theosophical debate on humor, pleasantry, wit, frivolity, eating, feasting, banquets crashing, dietetics, erotology, aphrodisiacs, sexual education and hygiene. We will organize the course around selected readings from a variety of premodern Arabic jocular, culinary and erotological literature available in English translations.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
ARTR 5290Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). No knowledge of Arabic is required. Taught in English.
ARTR 5350Introduction to Arab Women's Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab Feminism.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARTR 5490Arab Cinemas (3.00)
The course will concentrate on cinemas of Egypt, the Maghrib (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) as well as Syrian and Palestinian films. It will examine major moments in the history of these cinemas and the political developments that have inevitably had a major influence on filmmaking in the region.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARTR 5559New Course in Arabic in Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
This course is meant to work with students on major works of Arabic literature in English translation.
Bengali
BENG 1010Elementary Bengali I (4.00)
This course is designed for the students whose mother tongue is not Bengali and whose language skill is in novice level however want an effective progress in all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. At the end of the semester students are expected to recognize Bengali alphabets (including combined letters), to speak with simple and everyday words, and to read and write simple sentences.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
BENG 1020Elementary Bengali II (4.00)
This course is designed for students who already have some elementary knowledge of the Bengali language (typically those who have taken BENG 1010) and want an effective, comprehensive approach to learn Bengali that will enable them to make fast, solid progress in all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the completion of this course, students will be able to carry on real conversations in social situations. Prerequisite: BENG 1010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
BENG 1559New Course in Bengali (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Bengali.
Course was offered Fall 2009
BENG 2010Intermediate Bengali I (4.00)
Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Bengali. BENG 2010 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Bengali speakers. Four class hours. Followed by BENG 2020. Prerequisites: BENG 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
BENG 2020Intermediate Bengali II (4.00)
Further develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Bengali. BENG 2020 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Bengali speakers. Four class hours. Prereq: C or better in BENG 2010, or instr. permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
BENG 2559New Course in Bengali (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Bengali.
Course was offered Spring 2010
BENG 3559New Course in Bengali (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in teh subject of Bengali.
Course was offered Fall 2009
BENG 4993Independent Study in Bengali (1.00 - 3.00)
For independent study of the Bengali language guided by an instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Hebrew
HEBR 1010Introduction to Modern Hebrew I (4.00)
An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. By the end of this sequence students have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and they are able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation. Includes material on Israeli culture, history, and politics.
HEBR 1016Intensive Introductory Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 1020Introduction to Modern Hebrew II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HEBR 1010.
HEBR 1026Intensive Introductory Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in basic oral expression, listening comprehension, elementary reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills at the intermediate level. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 116Intensive Introductory Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1016.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 126Intensive Introductory Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 1026.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 1410Elementary Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
HEBR 1420Elementary Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
HEBR 2010Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4.00)
Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, and their occurrence in texts which deal with modern Israeli culture and values. These texts, which include excerpts from newspapers and fiction, introduce 600 new words and expose the learner to political and other issues of modern Israel. Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2016Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016 & 1026 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 2020Intermediate Modern Hebrew (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HEBR 1020 with grade of C or above, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2026Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (3.00)
This intensive course begins with instruction in intermediate level oral expression, listening comprehension, reading and writing, and continues with further development of these four skills. Part of the Summer Language Institute. Prerequisite: HEBR 1016, 1026 & 2016 or equivalent
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 216intensive intermediate Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR 2016.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 226Intensive Intermediate Hebrew (0.00)
This is the non-credit option for HEBR2026.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Summer 2013, Summer 2012
HEBR 2410Intermediate Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 1420 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 2420Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR 2410 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 3010Advanced Modern Hebrew I (3.00)
This course focuses on the conjugation of weak, or hollow verbs, and the passive of all conjugations. It also continues the study of subordinate clauses with special attention to adverbial clauses and their use. Texts for the course, which form the basis for class discussion in Hebrew and exercises in Hebrew composition, are drawn from various genres. Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 3020Advanced Modern Hebrew II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HEBR 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HEBR 4993Independent Study in Hebrew (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study for advanced students of Hebrew. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
HEBR 8993Independent Study in Hebrew (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students whose proficiency in Modern Hebrew has already reached the advanced level, or alternatively students who for their research focus on Hebrew Literature in translation, will pursue an independent study that will focus on the reading and interpretation of texts, as well as the analysis of media. Prerequisite: HEBR 3010
Hebrew in Translation
HETR 2300Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation (3.00)
This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2010
HETR 3559New Course in Hebrew Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
The course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Hebrew Translation.
Course was offered Fall 2009
Hindi
HIND 1010Elementary Hindi-Urdu (4.00)
Introductory training in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Hindi and Urdu.
HIND 1020Elementary Hindi-Urdu (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HIND 1010.
HIND 1060Accelerated Elementary Hindi (4.00)
This course is designed for heritage students who have some prior, informal proficiency in Hindi. Students work on their listening and speaking skills and achieve basic reading and writing skills so that they can handle simple written texts and converse appropriately on day-to-day situations with grammatical accuracy and suitable vocabulary.
HIND 2010Intermediate Hindi (4.00)
Introduction to various types of written and spoken Hindi; vocabulary building, idioms and problems of syntax; and conversation in Hindi. Prerequisite: HIND 1020 or equivalent.
HIND 2020Intermediate Hindi (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HIND 2010 or equivalent.
HIND 2060Accelerated Intermediate Hindi (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is designed for heritage students who have some prior, informal proficiency in Hindi. Students work on their listening and speaking skills and achieve basic reading and writing skills so that they can handle simple written texts and converse appropriately on day-to-day situations with grammatical accuracy and suitable vocabulary.
HIND 3010Advanced Hindi Readings I (3.00)
Readings are drawn from areas of particular interest to the students involved, and include readings from various disciplines. Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent or instructor permission.
HIND 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For students residing in the Hindu group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
HIND 3020Advanced Hindi II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent or instructor permission.
HIND 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Hindu group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
HIND 3230Readings in Hindi (3.00)
Advanced readings in modern standard Hindi and possibly in medieval Hindi, depending on the interests of the students. Prerequisite: HIND 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HIND 3240Readings in Hindi (3.00)
Advanced readings in modern standard Hindi and possibly in medieval Hindi, depending on the interests of the students. Prerequisite: HIND 3020/5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HIND 4993Independent Study in Hindi (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent Study in Hindi
HIND 5010Advanced Hindi I (3.00)
Readings are drawn from areas of student interest and include readings from various disciplines. Restricted to area studies majors and minors. Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent or instructor permission.
HIND 5020Advanced Hindi II (3.00)
Readings are drawn from areas of student interest and include readings from various disciplines. Restricted to area studies majors and minors. Prerequisite: HIND 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
HIND 8993Independent Study in Hindi (1.00 - 3.00)
Restricted to area studies majors and minors.
Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
MESA 1000From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia (3.00)
Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.
MESA 2010Literatures of South Asia and the Middle East (3.00)
An introductory course in non-Western literatures that emphasizes genres with no clear Western equivalents. The reading list varies, but the texts, read in translation, usually come from Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil and Urdu.
MESA 2110Intro to Middle East / South Asia Film History (3.00)
"Transnational Circuits of Cinema: An Introduction to Middle East - South Asia Film History" - Since its very inception as a traveling fairground attraction, cinema has been a globally-circulating medium. This course begins in the moment of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East - South Asia genealogies of filmmaking.
Course was offered Fall 2017
MESA 2300Crossing Borders: Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
A survey of the deep cultural, religious, political and economic historical relationship between the Middle East and South Asia, suggesting we need to understand the two "regions" comprehensively and comparatively.
MESA 2350Women and Media in the Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
In this course we will study depictions and images of women in news media in selected countries (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, India, Pakistan) as well as in the American media. We will especially compare images of women in mainstream news media with those available in online media channels or social news networks. We will also examine the changing status of women journalists worldwide, with a special focus on their role in the Arab Spring.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MESA 2360Women and Social Media in the Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
Women in the Middle East and South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to them. This course examines women's use of social media in five selected countries -Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan - and investigates how it simultaneously enables and limits women's empowerment.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MESA 2559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New course in Middle Eastern and South Asian studies.
MESA 2700Recent Revolutions in the Islamic World (3.00)
This introductory course surveys recent revolutionary movements sweeping across the Islamic World, from North Africa, the Middle East into Asia, including the "Arab Spring." Key course questions include: Why rebel? Why now? What for? How? Are they spreading, failing, or being 'hijacked?' What roles have external actors played? What would Jefferson think?
MESA 3010Men and Women of South Asia and the Middle East (3.00)
Focuses on literature of South Asia and the Middle East (Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women; includes poetry and prose from ancient to modern times.
MESA 3110Sustainable Environments Middle East and South Asia (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
From arid cities to irrigated fields, hot deserts to high mountains, the Middle East and South Asia encompasses a range of environments for thinking through the relationships between nature and society, people and animals, human and nonhuman worlds.
MESA 3120Classics of Islamic Literature: Islamic Mystical Writing (3.00)
This course surveys the classics of Islamic mystical writing, spanning from the Middle East to South Asia and the Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Indian vernacular languages. With an eye to both form and content, we will examine the literary productions - both poetry and prose - of some of the most influential Sufi figures in Islamic history, including Rabi`a, Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Hafiz, Khusrow, Bulleh Shah, and others. Readings in English translation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
MESA 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
This course provides an introduction to the peoples, cultures, and histories of the Middle East through an examination of language-use. We focus on Israel/Palestine--and the contact between Hebrew and Arabic--as a microcosm for the region as a whole. Readings present ethnographic, linguistic, and literary perspectives on language, identity, and the general processes of SELF/OTHER constructions in contexts of political and military confrontation. Prerequisites: previous coursework in Anthropology, Linguistics, or Middle East Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2009
MESA 3559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
MESA 3650Introduction to Linguistic Typology (3.00)
Human languages appear on the surface to be very different from one another. Closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function.
MESA 4559New Course in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies (3.00)
New Course (or Topic) in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016
MESA 4991Four-Year Major Seminar (3.00)
Required capstone course that studies the Middle East and South Asia from a diversity of perspectives--languages, literatures, anthropology, history, politics, and religion. Prerequisite: fourth-year standing, major in Middle Eastern Studies or in South Asian Studies
MESA 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study in a special field under the direction of a faculty member in MESALC. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MESA 4998Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis (0.00)
Thesis research under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.
MESA 4999Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies Senior Thesis II (6.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Thesis composition under the direction of a MESALC faculty member serving as thesis advisor and a second faculty member serving as second reader. The second faculty member may be from outside MESALC. Prerequisite: DMP major and instructor permission.
MESA 5110Transnational Circuits of Cinema, Middle East-South Asia Film History (3.00)
This course begins in the era of early cinema and proceeds through the contemporary moment, with a focus on Middle East -- South Asia genealogies of filmmaking. Its emphasis remains on the quintessentially transnational histories (parallels, intersections, circuits) of these cinemas - e.g., the centrality of popular Egyptian cinema within the Arab world; the prolific circulation of Hindi cinema across and beyond South Asia.
Course was offered Fall 2017
MESA 5120Classics of Islamic Literature: Islamic Mystical Writing (3.00)
This course surveys the classics of Islamic mystical writing, spanning from the Middle East to South Asia and the Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and Indian vernacular languages. With an eye to both form and content, we will examine the literary productions -- both poetry and prose -- of some of the most influential Sufi figures in Islamic history, including Rabi'a, Ibn al-Farid, Rumi, Hafiz, Khusrow, Bulleh Shah, and others. Readings in English translation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
MESA 5559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016
MESA 6559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies (3.00)
New course in Middle Eastern and South Asian studies.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
MESA 8993Independent Study II (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent Study II
MESA 8995MA Research Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Required course for all candidates for the Master of Arts in Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies. During this course the final paper, required for the MA, is written. Includes instruction in research methodology, data analysis and a history of academic research on these areas.
MESA 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for MA Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
MESA 8999Non-Topical Research, MA (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
Middle Eastern Studies
MEST 1100Introduction to the Middle East (3.00)
Introduces Middle Eastern economy and environment, society, gender issues, history and politics, secularism-law-religion, languages and literatures, music and the visual arts. Emphasizes the Ottoman, colonial, and post-colonial periods.
MEST 2270Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East (3.00)
Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. Taught in English; no knowledge of Arabic is required.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
MEST 2470Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities (3.00)
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 2470.
MEST 2559New Course in Middle Eastern Studies (3.00)
New Course in Middle Eastern Studies
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014
MEST 2600Major Dimensions of Classical-Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (3.00)
Introducing the cultural dimensions of Classical and Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (600-1400 CE). We will study how Arabs approach their worldly life and pleasures through literature; organize their social domain by ethical-law; construct their spirituality and worldview through religion; react to nature by science; and attempt to resolve the internal and external inconsistencies of their culture through theology, philosophy and mysticism.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MEST 2610Major Dimensions of the Modern Arab World (3.00)
This class aims to develop an understanding of the global significance of the 330 million Arabs as the fourth largest community in the world and Arabic as the fifth largest spoken language in a historical and thematic manner from the Ottomans (1400 CE) to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2014
MEST 2620Aspects of Creativity in Arab-Islamic Heritage:Translated Classical Reading (3.00)
This course aims to expose students to samples of original translated texts from the creative heritage of the Arab-Islamic civilization
Course was offered Spring 2015
MEST 3110Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures (3.00)
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.
MEST 3470Language and Culture in the Middle East (3.00)
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 3470. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014
MEST 3559New Course in Middle Eastern Studies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
New course in Middle Eastern Studies.
MEST 4991Middle East Studies Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Middle East Studies Seminar
MEST 5110Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures (1.00 - 3.00)
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.
MEST 5270Culture & Society of Contemp. Arab Mid. East (3.00)
This course will address some of the religious, socio-political, and historical factors that have contributed to the shaping of the Arab Middle East and Arab identity(s) in the modern age. From the rise of Islam in the 7th century A.D., to the Ottoman Empire, to the colonial remapping of the Middle East during the period of the two World Wars,to the Gulf and Iraq wars, this course will help students gain an understanding of modern Arab culture.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
MEST 5559History of Persian Literature (3.00)
This course examines the tumultuous history of one of the richest literary traditions in the world. Persian literature addresses not only the many thematic concerns of literature (love, romance, mysticism, heroism, vindication, panegyric, media, political philosophy, etc.), but also the social and cultural backdrops that mirror and create it.
Course was offered Fall 2014
MEST 5620The Middle East in Ethnographic Perspective (3.00)
Survey of the anthropological literature on the Middle East & N. Africa. Begins historically with traditional writing on the 'middle east' and proceeds to critiques of this tradition and attempts at new ways of constructing knowledge of this world region. Readings juxtapose theoretical and descriptive work toward critically appraising modern writers' success in overcoming the critiques leveled against their predecessors.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MEST 6600Major Dimensions of Classical-Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (3.00)
Introducing the cultural dimensions of Classical and Medieval Arab-Islamic Civilization (600 - 1400 CE). We will study how Arabs approach their worldly life and pleasures through literature; organize their social domain by ethical-law; construct their spirituality and worldview through religion; react to nature by science; and attempt to resolve the internal and external inconsistencies of their culture through theology, philosophy and mysticism.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
MEST 6610Major Dimensions of the Modern Arab World (3.00)
This class aims to develop an understanding of the global significance of the 330 million Arabs as the fourth largest community in the world and Arabic as the fifth largest spoken language in a historical and thematic manner from the Ottomans (1400 CE) to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2014
MEST 6620Aspects of Creativity in Arab-Islamic Heritage:Translated Classical Reading (3.00)
This course aims to expose students to samples of original translated texts from the creative heritage of the Arab-Islamic civilization
Course was offered Spring 2015
Pashto
PASH 1010Elementary Pashto I (4.00)
Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 1010 and PASH 1020 enable students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., greeting, narrating, describing, ordering, comparing and contrasting, and apologizing). Five class hours per week. Followed by PASH 1020.
PASH 1020Elementary Pashto II (4.00)
Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 1010 and PASH 1020 enable students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., greeting, narrating, describing, ordering, comparing and contrasting, and apologizing). Five class hours per week. Followed by PASH 2010. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 1010, or permission of the instructor.
PASH 2010Intermediate Pashto I (4.00)
Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 2010 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Pashto speakers. Four class hours. Followed by PASH 2020. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 1020, or permission of the instructor.
PASH 2020Intermediate Pashto II (4.00)
Further develops the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Pashto. PASH 2020 enables students to successfully perform linguistic tasks that allow them to communicate in everyday situations (e.g., narrating present, past and future activities, and expressing hopes, desires, and requests). Students also read journalistic and literary selections designed for Pashto speakers. Four class hours. Prerequisites: C or better in PASH 2010, or permission of the instructor.
Persian
PERS 1010Elementary Persian (4.00)
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio-lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues.
PERS 1020Elementary Persian (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio-lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues. Prerequisite: PERS 1010 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 1060Accelerated Persian (4.00)
This course is designed for Persian heritage students who many know spoken language to some extent, but they have not been exposed to formal or written language. It covers two semesters of Elementary Persian; emphasizing reading and writing skills, and the grammar of the language.
Course was offered Spring 2016
PERS 2010Intermediate Persian (4.00)
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature. Prerequisite: PERS 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 2020Intermediate Persian (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature. Prerequisite: PERS 1020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3010Advanced Persian I (3.00)
This course is designed to introduce the students to the world of Persian prose literature. We will read a variety of prose genre. We will look at the semantics, morphology, and syntax and analyze the topic vis-à-vis these aspects. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent
PERS 3019Language House Conversation (1.00)
For students residing in the Persian group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PERS 3020Advanced Persian (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The goal of this course is to increase student's efficiency in reading modern texts; ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts, to poetry. although the students will be expected to learn grammatical structures emphasis will be placed on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context. Prerequisites: Persian 3010 or instructor's permission.
PERS 3029Language House Conversation (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For students residing in the Persian group in Shea House. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PERS 3230Introduction to Classical Persian Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3240Introduction to Modern Persian Literature (3.00)
This course addresses the development of modern(ist) trends in Persian literature, emphasizing historical and socio-political factors. Exemplar modern poems, stories, and essays are read in the original, then explained and critically evaluated. Defines and discusses significant ideas, ideologies, movements, trends, milieus, social backgrounds, etc., out of which modern Persian literature emerged. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
PERS 3559New Course in Persian (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian.
PERS 4240Advanced Readings in Sufi Texts (3.00)
A course designed to help advanced Persian language students develop skills in reading and understanding texts (both prose and poetry) on Persian Islamic mysticism (Sufism).
PERS 4991Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study in Persian
PERS 4993Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study for advanced students of Persian. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PERS 5010Readings in Modern Persian Poetry (3.00)
Studies the works of major and some minor poets of the 20th century. The form and content of 'New Poetry' is discussed as distinguished features of 20th-century Persian poetry in contrast with those of classical Persian poetry. Emphasizes the themes of modern poetry as reflections of Iranian society. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PERS 5020Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction (3.00)
Examines the works of this century's major writers, focusing on the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society. Improves Persian reading ability and familiarity with Iran, its people, and its culture. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PERS 5230Introduction to Classical Persian Literature (3.00)
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equiv.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PERS 5559New Course in Persian (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian.
PERS 7559New Course in Persian (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian. Prerequisite: PERS 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission
Course was offered Fall 2013
PERS 8993Independent Study in Persian (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study for advanced students of Persian. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Persian in Translation
PETR 3210Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.
Course was offered Fall 2011
PETR 3220Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PETR 3320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PETR 3322The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad (3.00)
This course focuses on the life and art of Forugh Farrokhzad in a spectrum of genres that includes poetry, travel narratives, literary criticism, essays, and films by and about her. Although from the beginning of her literary career, Farrokhzad was a daring, often irreverent explorer of taboo topics, she was also deeply rooted in the Iranian culture. We study the body of her work to better understand Iran in the 1950-60s
PETR 3340Poetics of Existentialist Persian Literature (3.00)
The existentialist literature of the Persian-speaking world has been a source of inspiration of poetics for the entire Middle East region. The objective of this course is the study of cognitive nuances embedded in the thematic and linguistic structure of Persian existentialist literature.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PETR 3342Life Narrative & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
While women's autobiography has attracted growing scholarly attention as an evolving literary form, sustained scholarly study of the genre has largely focused on women's autobiography in Europe and North America, with only a small group of isolated scholars addressing women's autobiography in Islamic societies in general and Iran in particular. This course studies the genealogy and evolution of the genre.
PETR 3559New Course in Persian Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic int he subject area of Persian Translation
PETR 5210Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.
Course was offered Fall 2011
PETR 5220Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PETR 5320Life Narratives & Iranian Women Writers (3.00)
This seminar examines life narratives and other forms of literary output by Iranian women writers. We will examine the ways these writers have desegregated a predominantly all-male literary tradition, as well as their arrival at the forefront of a bloodless social movement. Some of the genres to be investigated include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiographies, memoirs, and films.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PETR 5322The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad (3.00)
This course focuses on the life and art of Forugh Farrokhzad in a spectrum of genres that includes poetry, travel narratives, literary criticism, essays, and films by and about her. Although from the beginning of her literary career, Farrokhzad was a daring, often irreverent explorer of taboo topics, she was also deeply rooted in the Iranian culture. We study the body of her work to better understand Iran in the 1950-60s
Course was offered Spring 2015
PETR 5559New Course in Persian Translation (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of Persian Translation
PETR 7559New Course in Persian Literature in Translation (3.00)
New course in Persian Literature in translation.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Sanskrit
SANS 1010Elementary Sanskrit I (3.00)
Studies Sanskrit sounds, the Devanagari script, and basic grammar.
SANS 2020Elementary Sanskrit II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A continuation of SANS 1010. Prerequisite: SANS 1010. Note: The following six courses are all intermediate level Sanskrit courses. They are offered two-by-two in a three-year rotation.
SANS 3000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (1.00 - 10.00)
SANS 3012Selections from the Mahabharata (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Mahabharata, one of ancient India's major epics. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013
SANS 3014Selections from the Ramayana of Valmiki (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Ramayana of Valmiki, one of two major epics of ancient India, and the 'first poem' in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Fall 2017
SANS 3016Selections from the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva, the most important collection of story literature in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Fall 2014
SANS 3022The Bhagavadgita (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Bhagavadgita, a major religious text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013
SANS 3024Selections from the Upanisads (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 1020/5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Upanisads, a major spiritual text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
SANS 3026Selections from the Puranas (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the huge corpus of Puranic texts. Prerequisite: SANS 1020.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
SANS 4010Classical Plays and Poetry (3.00)
A close reading of theatrical and poetic works from the classical period of Sanskrit literature, approximately 150 BCE to 1200 CE.
SANS 4020Literary Theory (3.00)
A close reading of texts in South Asia's long history of literary theory. Texts readings include, but are not limited to, the Natyasastra, the Kavyalamkara of Bhamaha, the Kavyadarsa, the Kavyalamkara of Rudrata, the Sarasvatikanthabharana, the Kavyanusasana, the Kavyaprakasa, the Kavyalamakarasutravrtti, the Rasagangadhara, and the Dhvanyaloka.
SANS 4030Philosophical Texts I (3.00)
A close reading of texts in these philosophical traditions of South Asia: Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Sankhya, Yoga and Vaisesika.
SANS 4040Philosophical Texts II (3.00)
A close reading of texts in these philosophical traditions of South Asia: Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Sankhya, Yoga and Vaisesika.
SANS 4051Vedic Texts I (3.00)
A close reading of Vedic texts. Readings may come from the four Samhita texts, the Brahmanas, or the Aranyakas.
SANS 4052Vedic Texts II (3.00)
A close reading of Vedic texts. Readings may come from the four Samhita texts, the Brahmanas, or the Aranyakas.
SANS 4053Texts in the Science and Philosophy of Grammar I (3.00)
A close reading of texts in the linguistic tradition of Panini. Text readings include, but are not limited to, the Mahabhasya, the Kasika, the Paribhasendusekhara, and the Siddhantakaumudi, each with its many commentaries.
SANS 4054Texts in the Science and Philosophy of Grammar II (3.00)
A close reading of texts in the linguistic tradition of Panini. Text readings include, but are not limited to, the Mahabhasya, the Kasika, the Paribhasendusekhara, and the Siddhantakaumudi, each with its many commentaries.
SANS 4993Independent Study In Sanskrit (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is meant to give students training in advanced Sanskrit
SANS 6010Elementary Sanskrit I (3.00)
A study of sounds of Sanskrit, the Devanagari script and the basic grammar. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
SANS 6012Selections from the Mahabharata (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Mahabharata, one of ancient India's major epics. Prerequisite: SANS 5020 and graduate standing.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013
SANS 6014Selections from the Ramayana of Valmiki (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Ramayana of Valmiki, one of two major epics of ancient India, and the 'first poem' in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 5020 and graduate standing.
SANS 6016Selections from the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Kathasaritsagara of Somadeva, the most important collection of story literature in Sanskrit. Prerequisite: SANS 5020 and graduate standing.
Course was offered Fall 2014
SANS 6020Elementary Sanskrit II (3.00)
A continuation of SANS 5010. Prerequisite: SANS 5010 or instructor permission. Note: The following six courses are all intermediate level Sanskrit courses. They are offered two-by-two in a three-year rotation.
SANS 6022The Bhagavadgita (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce students' knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary and to introduce the Bhagavadgita, a major religious text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 5020 and graduate standing.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013
SANS 6024Selections from the Upanisads (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the Upanisads, a major spiritual text of ancient India. Prerequisite: SANS 5020.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
SANS 6026Selections from the Puranas (3.00)
A second-year course focusing on developing reading fluency in Sanskrit. Selections are chosen to reinforce student's knowledge of grammar from SANS 5020, to expand vocabulary, and to introduce the huge corpus of Puranic texts. Prerequisite: SANS 5020.
Course was offered Spring 2016
SANS 7030Philosophical Texts I (3.00)
A close reading of texts in these philosophical traditions of South Asia: Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Sankhya, Yoga and Vaisesika.
SANS 7040Philosophical Texts II (3.00)
A close reading of texts in these philosophical traditions of South Asia: Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Sankhya, Yoga and Vaisesika.
SANS 7051Vedic Texts I (3.00)
A close reading of Vedic texts. Readings may come from the four Samhita texts, the Brahmanas, or the Aranyakas. Prerequisite: At least two courses from SANS 5012-5026.
Course was offered Fall 2011
SANS 7052Vedic Texts II (3.00)
A close reading of Vedic texts. Readings may come from the four Samhita texts, the Brahmanas, or the Aranyakas. Prerequisite: SANS 7051, a Sanskrit reading course in Religious Studies, or at least three courses from SANS 5012-5026.
SANS 7053Texts in the Science and Philosophy of Grammar I (3.00)
A close reading of texts in the linguistic tradition of Panini. Text readings include, but are not limited to, the Mahabhasya, the Kasika, the Paribhasendusekhara, and the Siddhantakaumudi, each with its many commentaries. Prerequisite: at least two courses from SANS 5012-5026.
SANS 7054Texts in the Science and Philosophy of Grammar II (3.00)
A close reading of texts in the linguistic tradition of Panini. Text readings include, but are not limited to, the Mahabhasya, the Kasika, the Paribhasendusekhara, and the Siddhantakaumudi, each with its many commentaries. Prerequisite: SANS 7053, a Sanskrit reading course in Religious Studies, or at least three courses from SANS 5012-5026.
SANS 8993Independent Study in Sanskrit (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent Study in Sanskrit.
South Asian Studies
SAST 1100Introduction to South Asia (3.00)
Introduces South Asian economy and environment, caste and society, gender issues, history and political science, secularism-law-religion, philosophy, languages and literatures, theater-music-dance, and visual arts. Emphasizes the colonial and post colonial periods.
SAST 1300Under the Colonized-Gaze: British Empire and its Indian Subjects (3.00)
This course focuses on writings by Indians (mainly Bengali writers) during the colonial period to examine the existing relational nature between the colonizer (the British) and the colonized (Indians). In doing so the course also focuses on the wider significance of Bengali writings how they encapsulated discourses on nation, race and gender.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
SAST 1559New Course in South Asian Studies (3.00)
The course will focus in on the period since 1990, when India took dramatic steps to reform its economic policies and re-set its relationships with other world powers. Students will be introduced to a wide range of initiatives taking place in a variety of public and privates sectors, and be encouraged through focused case studies to learn about opportunities for them to discover their own interests, possibly by studying in India with the UVa.
Course was offered Spring 2015
SAST 1600India in Global Perspective (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The course will not be a conventional "introduction" to India which customarily emphasizes cultural history. Though there will be a short section at the beginning of the course that provides an overview of India's history, we will quickly move, after 6 class meetings, to the post-independence era, and focus in on the period since 1990, when India took steps to reform its economic policies and re-set its relationships with other world powers
Course was offered Spring 2017
SAST 2050Classics of Indian Literature (3.00)
A survey of the foundational, formative and paradigmatic classic texts of the Indian Vedic, Buddhist, Jain, Hindu, Islamic and Sikh religio-literary-cultural traditions.
SAST 2060Bollywood Dreams: Indian Cinema (3.00)
Survey of Indian (particulary Hindi-language) cinema from ca. 1910 to the present, concentrating on films made after independence (1947).
Course was offered Fall 2011
SAST 2200Delhi: The Gateway to India (3.00)
The course utilizes the ever changing map of India's capital and its seven cities to introduce medieval, pre-modern and modern India. Delhi is a microcosm of India's history. It is also home to India's most important government and cultural institutions. A visit to the Mughal city of Agra (Taj Mahal) and the Rajput 'capital', Jaipur is included.
SAST 2559New Course in South Asian Studies (3.00)
New course in South Asian studies.
SAST 2700Indian Politics and Society (3.00)
The course provides an overview of key issues in the study of contemporary Indian politics. Particular attention is paid to the successes and challenges of Indian democracy. The course examines the historical background to the establishment of democracy; the evolution of political institutions and processes, and foreign and economic policy; and contemporary identity politics (including gender, religion and caste). Cross-listed with PLCP 2700.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
SAST 2800The World According to South Asia (3.00)
This course approaches South Asia and its cultural diversity from the inside out, rather than from an `other' centered, western viewpoint. This course is not about the history of South Asia. It is about understanding the contemporary cultural milieu 'the world as seen reflexively and reflectively through a South Asian lens. We will be reading and discussing almost exclusively South Asian voices' opinions and perceptions.
Course was offered Spring 2015
SAST 3300The Pleasures of Bollywood: Melodrama, Realism, Mythos (3.00)
This class will focus on cinema produced by the industry in Mumbai, popularly called Bollywood. Topics will include the relationship between fiction and documentation, between melodrama and realism, music and affect. Students will be taught the tools of film analysis and will be expected to watch and unpack films each week. They will also be expected to consider films in the social, political and economic contexts in which they were made.
SAST 3400Pop Culture in S. Asia: Advertising, Visual Aesth., Posters & Photography (3.00)
This course will examine popular visual aesthetics in South Asia. We will look at the aesthetics of visual culture from the 19th century to the present. Students will be trained to consider popular culture, to think about the relationship between high art forms such as painting and multi-media and the more seemingly mundane aesthetics of press photography, posters, billboards, teaching posters, etc., and the new spate of financial advertising.
Course was offered Spring 2011
SAST 3450The Languages of South Asia (3.00)
An examination of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of South Asian languages from typological, social, and historical perspectives. No knowledge of a South Asian language or linguistics is required.
SAST 3559New Course in South Asian Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian studies.
SAST 3640Women & Politics in S Asia (3.00)
This course examines the role of women in politics in the countries of South Asia (including India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan) from the colonial to the modern period. Particular attention is paid to issues of democracy and authoritarian rule; identity politics (including religion, nationalism, and caste); political institutions and processes; and political violence. Cross-listed with PLCP 3640.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
SAST 3701Business and Banking in South Asia (3.00)
South Asia, the region which stretches from Afghanistan to Burma and down to Sri Lanka, has been the center of thousands of years of trade and finance. In this course we will investigate the early history of this vast flow through the following: the highlights of the history of business and banking, trade and finance from about 1500 B.C to the early European merchant adventurers , the worlds and cultures that were implicated in that history.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
SAST 4559New Course in South Asian Studies (3.00)
New Course in South Asian Studies
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2010
SAST 4991South Asian Studies Capstone Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is the fourth-year capstone seminar for students majoring in South Asian Studies. This course will draw on the multidisciplinary interests of the students who participate to create a collaborative and collegial environment in which to investigate some of the foundational concepts and categories involved in the construction of "South Asia" as unified area of academic discourse.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
SAST 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent Study course
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
SAST 5300The Pleasures of Bollywood: Melodrama, Realism, Mythos (3.00)
This class will focus on cinema produced by the industry in Mumbai, popularly called Bollywood. Topics will include the relationship between fiction and documentation, between melodrama and realism, music and affect. Students will be taught the tools of film analysis and will be expected to watch and unpack films each week. They will also be expected to consider films in the social, political and economic contexts in which they were made.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2010
SAST 5400Popular culture in South Asia: Advertising, visual aesthetic, posters (3.00)
The course will look at the aesthetics of visual culture from the 19 th to the contemporary period. Students will be trained to consider popular culture, to think about the relationship between high art forms such as painting, photography and multi-media and the more seemingly mundane aesthetics of press photography, posters and billboards, teaching posters, commercial art and advertising, and the new spate of financial advertising.
Course was offered Spring 2011
SAST 5559New Course in South Asian Studies (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of South Asian studies.
Course was offered Fall 2010
SAST 6701Business and Banking in South Asia (3.00)
South Asia, the region which stretches from Afghanistan to Burma and down to Sri Lanka, has been the center of thousands of years of trade and finance. In this course we will investigate the early history of this vast flow through the following: the highlights of the history of business and banking, trade and finance from about 1500 B.C to the early European merchant adventurers , the worlds and cultures that were implicated in that history.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
SAST 7450The Languages of South Asia (3.00)
An examination of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of South Asian languages from typological, social, and historical perspectives. No knowledge of a South Asian language or linguistics is required.
South Asian Literature in Translation
SATR 2000Introduction to South Asian Literature (3.00)
Surveys classical to contemporary South Asian languages (e.g., Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, Urdu) and literature translated into, or written in, English.
SATR 2010Remembering India's Partition through Literature and Poetry (3.00)
The readings for this course have been put together with the premise that literature, even that which is written at the height of nationalist struggles, does not relate the exact same story that nationalism does. The readings for this course present a view of pre-partition and post-partition India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, especially through the novels of Muslim South Asian writers like Abdullah Hussein and Intezar Hussain.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2010
SATR 2110Cultural Translation: Travel Writing in South Asia (3.00)
Travel writing is among the oldest forms of literature, especially in Asia. This course explores depictions of the Indian sub-continent by travel writers from Buddhist pilgrims to Arab geographers to colonial and post-colonial writers.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
SATR 2300Colonial and Postcolonial Bengali Literature in Translation (3.00)
This course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of Bengali literature as it has developed through the colonial and postcolonial periods. This course critically examines the questions of western literary influences on Bengali literature and their successful/unsuccessful appropriations/adoptions by Bengali writers.
Course was offered Fall 2010
SATR 3000Women Writing in India & Pakistan: 1947-Present (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
We will read and critique the fiction and poetry of culturally specific regions while reflecting on the assumption that experiences and identities are fundamentally gendered. We will explore issues associated with women writing in regional languages to writing in mainstream languages like Hindi, Urdu and English. We will also examine how the publication and dissemination of women's texts are related to the women movements in India and Pakistan. Prerequisite: Completion of First Writing Requirement
SATR 3010Colors of Loneliness: Literature of Diasporic Imagination (3.00)
An upper-level undergraduate seminar on South Asian Literature translated into or written in English that focuses on dislocation both metaphorical and temporal and how the filters of time and memory operate on imagination creating 'fictions.'
Course was offered Spring 2012
SATR 3110Modern Urdu-Hindi Literature (3.00)
This upper level course will comprise readings that will cover a broad spectrum of what constitutes the "modern" in Urdu and Hindi Literature. The course will track the historical beginning of Urdu-Hindi as a language, its development as a literary language and the complexities of the divide form one to two distinct languages: modern Hindi and modern Urdu.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Fall 2009
SATR 3280Poetry of Passionate Devotion:The Ghazal (3.00)
In this course we will read selections from some of the best classical Urdu and Persian lyric poetry. we will learn about the conventions of love in Urdu literary culture and the poetics of the ghazal in general. We will explore the different possibilities of interpretation: how the line between sacred and profane love (ishq) is often blurred, the relationship of poetry to mystical inspiration and so on.
SATR 3300Literature & Society in South Asia: Breaking the Cast(e) (3.00)
Dalit literature is perhaps the most remarkable literary movement to emerge in post-independence India. It is the voice of the most marginalized section of India's population, those formerly known as untouchables. Until the advent of Dalit literature, the lives of Dalits had seldom been recorded in Indian literature. We will read fictional and non-fictional narratives of Dalit writers, and watch films to visualize and comprehend their lives. Prerequisite: SATR 7300 (graduate section)
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
SATR 3559New Course in South Asian Literature in Translation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
New Course in South Asian Literature in Translation
Course was offered Spring 2010
SATR 3700Medieval Indian Literature: Vernacular and Bhakti Revolution (3.00)
This course explores the classic authors and texts of the Indian pre-modern literary period 700 - 1650 CE, which saw the rise of devotional Hinduism, the arrival of Islam in India and its fundamental influence on Indian literature, and the use of vernacular - regional languages in literature.
SATR 5110Modern Urdu-Hindi Literature (3.00)
This upper level course will comprise readings that will cover a broad spectrum of what constitutes the "modern" in Urdu and Hindi Literature. The course will track the historical beginning of Urdu-Hindi as a language, its development as a literary language and the complexities of the divide form one to two distinct languages: modern Hindi and modern Urdu.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Fall 2009
SATR 6700Medieval Indian Literature: Vernacular and Bhakti Revolution (3.00)
This course explores the classic authors and texts of the Indian pre-modern literary period 700 - 1650 CE, which saw the rise of devotional Hinduism, the arrival of Islam in India and its fundamental influence on Indian literature, and the use of vernacular - regional languages in literature.
SATR 7300Literature & Society in South Asia: Breaking the Cast(e) (3.00)
Dalit literature is perhaps the most remarkable literary movement to emerge in post-independence India. It is the voice of the most marginalized section of India's population, those formerly known as untouchables. Until the advent of Dalit literature, the lives of Dalits had seldom been recorded in Indian literature. We will read fictional and non-fictional narratives of Dalit writers, and watch films to visualize and comprehend their lives.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
Urdu
URDU 1559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 1000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2016
URDU 2010Intermediate Urdu (4.00)
Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax; and conversation. Prerequisite: for URDU 2010: HIND 1020 or equivalent.
URDU 2020Intermediate Urdu (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: for URDU 2020: URDU 2010 or equivalent.
URDU 3010Advanced Urdu I (3.00)
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
URDU 3020Advanced Urdu II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Pre-requisites: URDU 2020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
URDU 3300Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil (3.00)
This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations. Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.
URDU 3559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 3000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2011
URDU 4993Independent Study in Urdu (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent Study in Urdu
URDU 5010Advanced Urdu I (3.00)
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission.
URDU 5020Advanced Urdu II (3.00)
This course is designed to expand and to consolidate the structures the student has learned through URDU 2020 by reading original Urdu texts, ranging from literary prose fiction to news media excerpts to poetry (both classical and modern). We will discuss these texts in Urdu in class, and the students will be responsible for a series of short essays throughout the semester in Urdu pertaining both to the texts and to other topics. Prerequisites: URDU 2020 or instructor permission
URDU 6559New Course in Urdu (3.00)
This course is to allow 6000-level new courses in Urdu to be taught for one semester.
Course was offered Fall 2011
URDU 7300Readings in Urdu Poetry: An Ongoing Mahfil (3.00)
This course will introduce advanced Urdu and Hindi students to some of the finest poetry in Urdu. Those who cannot read the Urdu script will have the option of reading the texts in Devanagari (the Hindi script). Some of the poets we will read are Mir, Ghalib, Dagh and Faiz. Course work will include brief analytical papers, as well as in-class presentations. Prerequisites: URDU 3010 or 3020; or HIND 3010 or 3020; or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2014
URDU 8993Independent Study in Urdu (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study in Urdu language and/or literature. Prerequisite: URDU 5010 or 5020 or equivalent, or instructor permission.