UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Catalog of Courses for Psychology    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Psychology
PSYC 1010Introductory Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Overview of psychology from both the natural science and social science perspectives. Topics include biological bases of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, learning, motivation, thought, maturational and developmental changes, individual differences, personality, social behavior, and abnormal psychology. In some terms an optional one credit discussion section (graded S/U) is offered. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.
PSYC 1559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 2100Introduction to Learning (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes the concepts, problems, and research methodology in the study of processes basic to learning and motivation.
PSYC 2150Introduction to Cognition (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Cognition is the activity of knowing: the acquisition, organization, and use of knowledge. Emphasizing fundamental issues, this course introduces such basic content areas in cognitive psychology as perception, memory, language, cognitive development, and philosophy of science. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.
PSYC 2200A Survey of the Neural Basis of Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
After an overview of brain organization and function, the course examines what we know about the physiological bases of several behaviors including sensation and perception, learning, memory, sleep development, hunger, thirst, and emotions. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.
PSYC 2210Animal Minds (3.00)
Studies animal behavior considered from an evolutionary and ecological perspective. Topics include the basic mechanisms of evolution of social behavior in animals with particular emphasis upon mating systems; ecological constraints on modes of animal communication; and quantitative analysis of social communication.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
PSYC 2220Principles of Psychobiology (4.00)
An enriched section of PSYC 2200 that includes laboratory demonstrations, group discussions and individual projects. Enrollment is limited to 20 first- and second-year students who demonstrate outstanding aptitude and interest in this area. When offered, applications are available from the instructor at times publicized in the list of course offerings distributed by the psychology department. Three lecture hours plus discussion section. Credit is not given for both PSYC 2200 and PSYC 2220.
PSYC 2300Introduction to Perception (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Study of selected topics in perception, particularly visual perception; the role of stimulus variables, learning and motivation of perception. Optional 1 credit laboratories are offered. Prerequisite: Mathematics at least up to trigonometry recommended.
PSYC 2301Introduction to Perception Laboratory (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Optional 1 credit laboratory.
PSYC 2400Introduction to Personality Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the major approaches, methods, and findings in the field of personality psychology. Topics include sex-typing, identification and observational learning, frustration and aggression, stress, anxiety, defense, self-control, altruism, self-concepts, authoritarianism, achievement motivation, and sensation-seeking. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend.
PSYC 2500Topics in Psychology (3.00)
This course covers a variety of special topics in the field of psychology.
Course was offered Summer 2012
PSYC 2559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
Course was offered Spring 2017
PSYC 2600Introduction to Social Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys major topics in social psychology, including personal perception and social cognition, attitudes and persuasion, interpersonal influence, interpersonal attraction, and helping relationships. Considers research theory and applications of social psychology. Three lecture hours plus optional discussion sections.
PSYC 2601Introduction to Social Psychology Discussion (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Optional one-credit discussion section.
PSYC 2700Introduction to Child Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the biological, cognitive and social development of the child. Topics include the child's emotional, perceptual, and intellectual development; and the development of personality and socialization. Students can participate in an optional discussion section. An optional weekly review session is offered for those who wish to attend. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 strongly recommended, top students will be fine without it.
PSYC 2701Introduction to Child Psychology Discussion Section (1.00)
Optional discussion section for Psych 2700.
PSYC 2900Teaching Methods for Undergrad Teaching Assistants (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This teaching methods course will help undergraduate teaching assistants integrate learning theory and effective student engagement practices to their teaching. They will learn about how to teach statistics, learn about experimental design and methods, and various pedagogical issues related to lab computer use and using R software in the learning process.
PSYC 3005Research Methods and Data Analysis I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. This course is required for majors and minors and is the first part of a two-part series (3005-3006). Prerequisites: One of the following MATH 1190, 1210, 1212, 1220, 1310, 1320, APMA 1090 or 1110 are required with a grade of C- or higher.
PSYC 3006Research Methods and Data Analysis II (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A continuation of discussion of research methods in psychology, including computer-controlled experimentation, integrated with computer-based exploratory data analysis, and elementary statistical analysis. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 3005 with a grade of C or higher; may not be taken concurrently with PSYC 3005.
PSYC 3110Psychology of Language (3.00)
Introduces the cognitive psychology of language focusing on language as a cognitive process. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or 2150 or instructor permission.
PSYC 3115Psychology of Art (3.00)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the application to visual art, sculpture and film of research and theories developed in the fields of perceptual, cognition, emotion, personality theory and social psychology.
PSYC 3210Psychobiology Laboratory (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Develops skills necessary for the study of neural bases of behavior, such as brain dissection, electrophysiology, histology, behavioral analysis, and genetic/epigenetic analyses. Emphasis is on mastering contemporary techniques used in neuroscience research and effective, professional written presentation of research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200 or 4200 or BIOL 3050; PSYC 3005 recommended.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
PSYC 3215Biological Models of Cognition (3.00)
Examines animal models that have been developed to study neurobiological mechanisms of cognition. Topics to be covered include goal-directed learning, decision-making, navigation, action selection, motivation, working memory and addiction. Each section will cover a specific cognitive process, the development and validation of animal models to study this process and a discussion of identified neurobiological mechanisms.
PSYC 3220Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (3.00)
This course will examine the neural basis of learning and memory. We will study brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow these systems to acquire and store information. The course will begin with a historical overview of learning and memory research in psychology and transition into modern studies in behavioral neuroscience.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
PSYC 3235Introduction to Epigenetics (3.00)
This course is a didactic, mechanistic exploration of epigenetics; we will discuss all epigenetic modifications known to date, the processes through which they are established and modified and their impact on the cell and organism.
PSYC 3410Abnormal Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces psychopathology with a focus on specific forms of abnormal behavior: depression, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and personality disorders. (In some terms, an optional 1-credit discussion section is available.) Prerequisite: Six credits of psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 3425History of Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Survey of the origins of psychology from the early philosophers to the current time.
Course was offered Spring 2016
PSYC 3430Psychology of Aging (3.00)
Seminar on current topics in gerontology, using multiple levels of analysis to understand developmental changes across late adulthood. Covers issues regarding biological, psychological and sociological aspects of the aging process, emphasizing cognitive changes and their underlying neurobiology. Prerequisite: 9 credit hours of psychology or instructor permission; recommended courses include PSYC 2200, 3005, and 3210 or 4200.
PSYC 3435Educational Psychology (3.00)
Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies, and proposed reforms for American education. Prerequisites: PSYC 2150 and 2700 required.
PSYC 3440Child Psychopathology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Overview of the description, cause and treatment of various psychological disorders of childhood. Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 recommended.
PSYC 3445Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is designed to provide an overview of the academic and clinical activities within the field of clinical psychology. Theories, research, psycho therapeutic approaches, and critical professional issues will be explored.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
PSYC 3460Psychological Study of Children, Families, and the Law (4.00)
Can psychology research and theory inform the law as it relates to children and families? This course provides an overview of the issues emphasizing psychological knowledge and its present and possible future contributions. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours. Prerequisite:Six credits in psychology.
PSYC 3480Adolescence: Theory and Development (3.00)
Course focus: 1) Background and theories of adolescence, 2) contributions to adolescence from: puberty, intellectual growth, and identify formation, 3) contexts of adolescence: the family situation, peer groups, school, and culture, 4) special topics of adolescence; religious, moral, and sexual development, sex roles, career planning (and achievement), disorders (drugs, delinquency, depression, suicide, etc.). Prerequisite: PSYC 2700 or 6 hours in Psychology.
PSYC 3485The Science & Lived Experience of Autism I (3.00)
This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.
PSYC 3490Infant Development (3.00)
Infancy is the time of life during which enormous changes take place- newborns are very different from the inquisitive, walking and talking 2-year-old. The following lines of development during the first two years are traced in detail: motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Environmental influences, including parental behavior are considered, as well as the effect the infant has on caregivers. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010.
PSYC 3495The Science & Lived Experience of Autism II (3.00)
This year-long, interdisciplinary seminar will explore how well the science of autism captures the experience of those living with autism and their families. Students will critically evaluate research in psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, and education, and they will work together with members of the autism community to identify new research questions that reflect the interests and concerns of the people who are most affected by autism science.
PSYC 3500Special Topics in Psychology (3.00)
Seminars on special and current topics in psychology.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PSYC 3559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 3590Research in Psychology (2.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. S/U grading. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.
PSYC 3870Seminar for Distinguished Majors (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics include the design of independent research projects, ethical considerations in research, computer applications, and preparation for a career in psychology. S/U grading. Prerequisite: Acceptance in Psychology or CogSci Distinguished Majors Program. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 4970 or COGS 4970.
PSYC 3970Research on Affective Forecasting (3.00)
This is a hands-on course in which students participate in ongoing research on affective forecasting, or the way in which people make predictions about their emotional reactions to future events. Students will serve as research assistants to the faculty member & graduate students to help with all phases of the research--design experiments, research its theoretical underpinnings, collect data, analyze the data, attend lab meetings.
PSYC 3980Research in Psychology (2.00)
An original experimental project is undertaken in which each student is responsible for the design and operation of the experiment. Prerequisite: 14 credits of psychology and instructor permission.
PSYC 4001Controversies in Human Sexuality (3.00)
Various controversial topics in human sexuality will be explored. Students will read articles from the popular press, the web, and academic journal articles to critically evaluate an issues involving human sexuality.
PSYC 4002How Animals Perceive the World: Evolution of Sensory Systems (3.00)
This course will be divided into topics based on animal's behaviors and how the sensory systems support these behaviors, ranging from perceiving prey to communication within and between species. This class will rely heavily on the theory of evolution and will concentrate mainly on the visual system.
Course was offered Summer 2010
PSYC 4005Adv Res Mthds & Data Analysis I: Mathematical Foundations of Quant Psyc (4.00)
This class will cover foundations of linear algebra, randomness, probability theory, principal component analysis, complexity theory, hypothesis testing and power, structural equation models, maximum likelihood. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence (PSYC 4005 and PSYC 4006) of advanced data analysis and research methods classes.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012
PSYC 4006Adv Res Mthds & Data Analysis II: Statistical Analysis and Advanced Design (4.00)
This class covers advanced statistical procedures, including t-tests, ANOVA, regression and multiple regression, general linear models, item response theory models, distribution-free tests, and simulation. Research methods and designs for experimental and correlational studies will be covered. This course is the second of a two-semester sequence (PSYC 4005 and PSYC 4006) of advanced data analysis and research methods classes.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
PSYC 4105Cognitive Psychology and American Education (3.00)
Psychologists have studied the processes of learning and thinking for over 100 years, and theoreticians have attempted to apply that knowledge to K-12 education for almost that long. This course will use information from cognitive psychology to examine: major steams of thought in pedagogy; data patterns in student achievement and in teacher effectiveness; subject-specific teaching strategies, and proposed reforms for American education. Prerequisite: PSYC 2150.
PSYC 4109Acquisition of Syntax in Language Development (3.00)
This course investigates the acquisition of syntax in language development from empirical and theoretical perspectives. Questions about what it means to know language and how language is acquired will be explored in depth, along with discussions involving acquisition/development of language, which will include sign language and development of homesigned "language".
PSYC 4110Psycholinguistics (3.00)
Topics include psychological and linguistic theory; experimental and empirical studies of linguistic usage; development of language in infants and children; cross-cultural studies of linguistic usage; and the biology of language.
PSYC 4111Language Development and Disorders (3.00)
Course will focus on language and cognitive development in persons with disabilities. Among the populations examined will be children with autistic disorder, children with Williams syndrome, deaf children, developmentally dysphasic children, adults with aphasia, and children with severe mental retardation. In addition to spoken language development, the course will examine the acquisition of sign communication skills. Prerequisite: 4th year psychology or cognitive science major status. Must have completed PSYC 3005 and PSYC 3006.
PSYC 4112Psychology and Deaf People (3.00)
This course will consider the psychological development and psychosocial issues of deaf people. Topics covered will include cognition, education, hearing and speech perception, impact of family interaction and communication approaches, influence of etiology/genetics, language development, literacy, mental health, social and personality development, interpersonal behavior, and current trends.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
PSYC 4115Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores cultural influences on identity development, family systems, linguistics, engagement with educational and community agencies, and resilience within the Deaf community. The interaction of culture, identity and language will be highlighted and applied to future trends for groups within the Deaf community, such as children of Deaf adults, GLTB community members, ethnic minority groups, women, and persons with disabilities. Prerequisites: Psychology major/minor, 4th year. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
PSYC 4120Psychology of Reading (3.00)
Analyzes the critical psychological experiments which have influenced the way that psychologists consider topics in reading, such as text comprehension, parsing, and sentence processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 3005
PSYC 4125Psychology of Language (3.00)
Psychology of Language
PSYC 4130Risk and Resilience Among Marginalized Adolescents (3.00)
This course will cover risk factors facing urban, economically disadvantaged adolescents of color, as well as assets and resources these youth can employ to thrive in the face of risk. Students will use relevant theories, academic research studies, and various forms of media to discuss issues of risk and resilience within this population.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PSYC 4150Cognitive Processes (3.00)
Explores, in depth, the life of the mind. Topics may include pattern recognition; observational skills; remembering; language and thought; categorization; the nature of similarity; discovery and invention; problem and puzzle solution; animal cognition; and views of intelligence in humans and machines. Prerequisite: Twelve credits of psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 4155Autism: From Neurons to Neighborhoods (3.00)
In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will discuss recent research on autism at multiple levels (biological, cognitive, social) and from multiple perspectives (autistic individuals, scientists, disability studies scholars, families, schools, community/government organizations).
PSYC 4160Thinking About Thinking (3.00)
Thinking About thinking.
PSYC 4180Invention and Design (3.00)
Collaborative learning environment that enables students to understand the way in which technology is created and improved and to become better designers. Includes readings from psychology, history, computing, ethics, and engineering. Cross-listed as STS 2180. Prerequisite: ENWR 1510 or STS 1010 or instructor permission.
PSYC 4200Neural Mechanisms of Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. Prerequisite: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course & student must be 4th year psychology, neuroscience, or cognitive science major status. Students should have also taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210. PSYC 3210 is recommended.
PSYC 4250Brain Systems Involved in Memory (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. Prerequisite: Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course & student must be 4th year psychology, neuroscience, or cognitive science major status. Students should have also taken PSYC 2200 or PSYC 2210.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PSYC 4255Behavioral Epigenetics (3.00)
We will discuss basic concepts in epigenetics and the role these molecular modifications play in development, behavior, and disorder. Emphasis will be placed on landmark papers and the emerging role for the interaction of nature and nurture.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PSYC 4270Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (3.00)
This seminar examines the neural basis of learning and memory. We will study brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow these systems to acquire and store information. The course begins with a historical overview of learning and memory research in psychology and transition into modern studies in behavioral neuroscience.
PSYC 4275Exploring Neural Codes for Perception and Cognition (3.00)
Our perception of the world is constructed from the raw data sent by sensory nerves using a common currency called "spikes". When we see, we are not interpreting the pattern of light intensities that falls on our retina; we are interpreting spikes that million of cells send to the brain. In this course, I invite students to play the role of a hypothetical observer inside the brain, who use spikes to make inferences about the external world. Prerequisite: 3rd year PSYC major, PSYC 2220
PSYC 4290Memory Distortions (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Although memory is generally accurate, some illusions and distortions in remembering are unavoidable. We will review both neuroscience and cognitive research on a variety of different memory problems, ranging from relatively benign tip-of-the-tongue experiences to untrustworthy eye-witness testimony. Our ultimate goal will be to understand the neural basis and cognitive processes that contribute to these constructive memory phenomena.
PSYC 4300Theories of Perception (3.00)
Perception is the means by which we become aware of the world and of ourselves. This seminar presents an overview of theories about perception including the following perspectives: philosophy, physiology, Gestalt psychology, cognitive psychology, ecology, and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
PSYC 4315Psychology of Art (3.00)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to current research on the psychology of art. It is a broad course that does not only consider the research of psychologists. It draws on the writings of art historians, computer scientists, philosophers, and others. Enrollment Requirements: PSYC maj/min or COGS majors. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014
PSYC 4330Topics in Child Development (3.00)
Topics in Child Development
PSYC 4400Approaches to Quantitative Methods in Psychology (3.00)
Many psychological theories nowadays are formulated mathematically. In this course we will survey a variety of approaches to modeling in perception (such as signal detection theory), cognitive psychology (categorization learning) and social psychology. Prerequisites: 4th-yr in Psyc or Cog Sci maj/min. PSYC3005 & 3006 or equivalent. A calculus course and knowledge of a programming language. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course.
Course was offered Fall 2014
PSYC 4499Psychology and Law: Cognitive and Social Issues (3.00)
Examines issues for which cognitive and social psychology may be able to inform the legal system. Topics include eyewitness testimony, recovered memories, line-ups, expert testimony, jury selection, trial tactics, jury decision making, jury instructions, and the use of statistics in the courtroom. Prerequisite: PSYC 2150 or 2600; PSYC 3006.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PSYC 4500Special Topics in Psychology (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Psychology
PSYC 4559New Course in Psychology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 4580Directed Readings in Psychology (2.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Critical examination of an important current problem area in psychology.  May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 14 credits in psychology and instructor permission.               
PSYC 4585Behavior Genetics (3.00)
This course will attempt to accomplish two basic goals. First, we will use the Plomin et al. text to establish a basic knowledge of genetics and its interaction with behavior. Second, we will use this knowledge to address some topics in behavioral genetics, using the Plomin et al. text and primary readings.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2013
PSYC 4600Attachment and Social Development (3.00)
This course will address the role of child-parent attachment relationships in human development.  We will read theory and research about attachment and its relation to other social developmental issues during infancy, childhood and adolescence, including topics such as temperament, maltreatment, peer relationships, and psychopathology.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2700 and PSYC 3006.
PSYC 4601Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3.00)
Overview of issues in clinical psychology including the scientific-practitioner model of training, reliability and validity of assessment techniques, validity of clinical judgment, and the effectiveness of psychological treatments. Prerequisite: PSYC 3410 and 3005.
PSYC 4602Women's Issues in Clinical Psychology (3.00)
Studies current research and historical perspectives on clinical psychology issues as they pertain uniquely to women. Topics vary and may include eating disorders, battered women, pregnancy, and aging. Prerequisite: PSYC 3410 and 3006 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PSYC 4603Psychology of Sexual Orientation (3.00)
Overview of research and theory related to sexual orientation across the lifespan from the standpoint of the social sciences. Topics include conceptualization of sexual identities, origins and development of sexual orientation, sexual identity formation and disclosure. Selected issues such as couple relationships, employment and careers, parenthood, and aging are also explored, since they may be affected by sexual orientation. Prerequisite: Third- or fourth-year psychology major
PSYC 4604Family Relations (3.00)
Furthers an understanding of family functioning and its impact on human development and the adjustment of family members. Emphasizes understanding family theories, research findings, and learning to apply frequently used strategies and methods in the study of family relations. Prerequisite: Upper level major or instructor permission.
PSYC 4605Research in Community Settings (3.00)
This course provides advanced undergraduate students with the opportunity to participate in a community-based research project with a local social service agency. We will investigate why low-income residents and agency personnel in communities are suspicious about researchers, how history and social science methods have contributed to the dynamics, and what this means for doing research in community settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 3006.
PSYC 4606Cognitive Biases in Anxiety and Related Disorders (3.00)
This course examines cognitive processing biases in anxiety and related disorders. To understand, for example, why a person with social anxiety sees only the one scowling face in a room full of smiles, we consider automatic processing of emotional information. The course critiques cutting-edge research on how these processes contribute to anxiety and related problems, and if it is important to change the processes to reduce psychopathology. Prerequisite: Psyc 3410. 4th year Psyc majors/minors or COGS majors . Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level class.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015
PSYC 4650Oppression and Social Change (3.00)
Oppression and Social Change focuses on an analysis of oppression, empowerment and liberation as defined within an ecological system perspective. Topics to be covered include discussion of racial, economic, sexual discrimination, individual and social alienation, and loss of self esteem. Moreover, the course considers the role of privilege in the maintenance of an oppressive schema. Prerequisite: PSYC (who have never taken another Psyc 4000-level course), AAS or WGS major and 4th Year or Instructor Permission. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.
PSYC 4670Psychology of the African-American Athlete (3.00)
Psychology of the African-American Athlete
PSYC 4682Mobile Technology in Mental Health Research (3.00)
This course provides an introduction to research design and computational methods for non-invasive mental health monitoring using mobile devices such as phones and wearable computing. Students will gain a practical understanding of mobile monitoring approaches as they relate to mental health. Topics include estimating health status (e.g. mood) through mobility data, application design, mobile data mining, and emerging issues in mental health.
Course was offered Spring 2017
PSYC 4690Self-Knowledge (3.00)
Self-knowledge is the focus of countless self-help books, magazine articles, and faddish therapies. In this course we will examine self-knowledge from a scientific perspective, based on research in social, personality, cognitive, and developmental psychology.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 4695Social Cognition and Social Change (3.00)
This class will examine how research on social cognition --how people think in a social context-- can be used to address a wide variety of personal and social problems. It will cover both basic research in social psychology and applied research designed to solve personal and social problems.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PSYC 4700Flourishing (3.00)
People are like plants:  if you get the conditions just right, they will usually flourish.  So what are those conditions?  We will examine the latest research in social and positive psychology on love, work happiness and virtue.  The course will involve several outside-of-class research projects and activities, including making yourself a better person.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2600
PSYC 4720Psychology of Morality and Politics (3.00)
Moral motives are all around us, but they are often hard to see because of our own moralism: we dismiss actions and people we disagree with as evil or misguided. The first part of this course will be a primer on moral psychology, including the evolutionary basis of human morality and its cultural diversity. Then we'll move on to politics, partisanship, and the culture war; then finally, to terrorism.
Course was offered Fall 2010
PSYC 4750Social Stigma (3.00)
Examines the subjective experience of individuals whose social identity or social group memberships make them a target of prejudice.  We will examine research and theory pertaining to how individuals interpret prejudice, how they cope with prejudice, and how prejudice affects their self-evaluations and behavior.  A social psychological approach to understanding this problem will be emphasized.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 2600
Course was offered Spring 2013
PSYC 4755Social Neuroscience (3.00)
A broad perspective on the expanding field of social neuroscience. A. Topics include but are not limited to social perception, social cognition, person perception, theory of mind, attitudes, and interpersonal processes. Emphasis on understanding the reciprocal interaction between brain function and everyday social behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200 or BIOL 3050.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
PSYC 4870The Minority Family: A Psychological Inquiry (3.00)
Examines the current state of research on minority families, focusing on the black family. Emphasizes comparing 'deficit' and 'strength' research paradigms. Prerequisite: PSYC 3006 and at least one course from each of the following groups: PSYC 2100, 2150 or 2300, and PSYC 2400, 2700 or 2600, and students in the Afro-American and African studies or studies in women and gender programs.
PSYC 4910Undergraduate Internship Programs Seminar (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An internship placement arranged by the supervising faculty. Students work 10 to 20 hours per week in various community agencies, such as health care delivery, social services, or juvenile justice. Requires written reports, as well as regular class meetings with supervising faculty in order to analyze the internship experience, engage in specific skill training, and discuss assigned readings. Apply in February of third year. Prerequisite: Fourth-year psychology major with at least 14 credits in psychology, and instructor permission. S/U grading.
PSYC 4920Undergraduate Internship Programs Seminar (4.00)
An internship placement arranged by the supervising faculty. Students work 10 to 20 hours per week in various community agencies, such as health care delivery, social services, or juvenile justice. Requires written reports, as well as regular class meetings with supervising faculty in order to analyze the internship experience, engage in specific skill training, and discuss assigned readings. Apply in February of third year. Required Labs. Requisites: Fourth-year psychology major with at least 14 credits in psychology and instructor permission.
PSYC 4930Undergraduate Internship Program Supplement (2.00)
Provides students in certain placements with the opportunity for a more in-depth and extensive internship program year. Background: some placements (e.g., with courts) demand 20 hours per week of field experience rather than the 10 in PSYC 4910, 4920. Simultaneous enrollment in this course provides appropriate credits for the additional 10 hours of field work. Corequisite: PSYC 4910, 4920; and instructor permission. S/U grading.
PSYC 4940Undergraduate Internship Program Supplement (2.00)
Provides students in certain placements with the opportunity for a more in-depth and extensive internship program year. Background: some placements (e.g., with courts) demand 20 hours per week of field experience rather than the 10 in PSYC 4910, 4920. Simultaneous enrollment in this course provides appropriate credits for the additional 10 hours of field work. Corequisite: PSYC 4910, 4920; and instructor permission. S/U grading.
PSYC 4970Distinguished Major Thesis (0.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology. Enrollment Requirement: You are required to register for PSYC 3870.
PSYC 4980Distinguished Major Thesis (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A two-semester course in which the student prepares a thesis under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. The thesis may be based on empirical research conducted by the student or a critical review or theoretical analysis of existing findings. Prerequisite: Participants in the Distinguished Majors Program in Psychology.
PSYC 5025Wise Interventions: Social Psychology for Public Policy (3.00)
We will explore classic and contemporary psychological interventions aimed at improving human welfare. Specifically, we will examine the role of psychological factors in health and healthcare, the workplace, education, intergroup relations, and other domains. Theory, empirical evidence, policy implications, and policy implementation will be emphasized through weekly assignments and discussions.
PSYC 5035Leading and Managing Diverse Groups (3.00)
This course will focus on interpersonal, organizational, and societal factors leaders must negotiate to lead effectively in socially diverse environments. Students will be exposed to cases and empirical research that will enable them to (1) develop well-articulated positions on diversity-related issues and (2) form strategies to promote sustainable settings for productive exchange among diverse groups of individuals.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PSYC 5160Emotion and Cognition (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The cognition-emotion seminar covers the connection between thinking and feeling in two ways.  Part 1 concerns the nature and definition of emotions and the role of cognitive appraisals in their elicitation and intensity.  Part 2 concerns the consequences of emotion for cognition, experience, and behavior.  Of interest will be such topics as the effects on judgment and decision-making, processing and performance, and memory and attention, and the role of culture.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 3005   
PSYC 5200Seminar in Psychobiology (3.00)
Examines a major subject in psychobiology. Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050. 4th yr Psyc major/minor, CogSci or Neurosci major. GSAS. Instructor permission. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-level PSYC course.
PSYC 5215Neuroplasticity and Perception/Cognition/Behavior (3.00)
Description of course contents: This course begins by examining the long-held view that functions are localized in particular places in the brain, fixed by adulthood. After reviewing the history of these ideas we will examine the tide of research challenging that view: how imagination and virtual reality might change thinking; how memory can be enhanced; and correction of language disabilities with training. Prerequisite: 3006.
PSYC 5220Critical Period Plasticity (3.00)
A survey of sensory systems and plasticity. Organizational principles common for sensory systems, and mechanisms of plasticity will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 4200.
PSYC 5260Brain Systems Involved in Learning and Memory (3.00)
Studies the major theories, findings, and conceptual issues important to an analysis of the neuronal mechanisms that underlie memory storage. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200, 2220, or 4200.
Course was offered Fall 2013
PSYC 5265Functional Neuroanatomy (3.00)
An overview of the structure of the vertebrate nervous system with an emphasis on the mammalian brain. Prerequisites: PSYC 4200 or BIOL 3050 or graduate standing. 4th years: Psychology majors/minors, Cognitive Science Majors, and Neuroscience majors; enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course. GSAS.
PSYC 5305Moral Development (3.00)
This course will cover the development of moral emotions, cognition, and behavior from infancy through middle childhood.
PSYC 5310Developmental Psycholinguistics (3.00)
Examines current research and theoretical models of children's language acquisition. Topics include typically developing children's acquisition of spoken language skills, and the development of communication skills in deaf, autistic, and other groups of children with language disabilities.
PSYC 5315Pleasure (3.00)
This seminar explores the nature of pleasure. It is divided into three parts. The first deals with pleasures of the body, such as tonic (sustained) pleasures and relief pleasures. The second deals with the pleasurability of episodes and their relation to the pervasive human propensity to create narratives. The third deals with the context within which episodes emerge and analyses the stricture of lives.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PSYC 5320Theories of Cognitive Development (3.00)
Studies current theories of cognitive development from birth through adolescence. Includes the views of Piaget, Werner, Bruner, G. H. Mead, and others; cybernetic approaches covered briefly; with some discussion of the measurement and assessment of cognitive processes. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 5324Research Methods in Human Neuroscience (3.00)
This course will provide students with background and experience with the major methods used in human neuroscience research. The focus will be on functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography and event-related potentials. A special emphasis will be placed on how these techniques are used in cognitive and social neuroscience.
PSYC 5325Cognitive Neuroscience (3.00)
Several approaches have been used to investigate relations between mind (or cognition) and brain. For example, the case study perspective focuses on cognitive deficits of patients with localized brain damage, and the cognitive neuroscience perspective attempts to determine the neurobiological substrates of cognitive processes in normal humans, usually by means of structural or functional neuroimaging. Prerequisites: PSYC 3006, PSYC 2150, PSYC 2200.
PSYC 5326The Neuroscience of Social Relationships (3.00)
This course will provide a broad overview of neuroscientific research into social relationships. The field is relatively new, and changing quickly. After a brief review of the neuroscientific methods we are likely to encounter in this literature, the course will be oriented toward readings and discussion, with brief research proposals presented at the end. 4th year Psych major/minor or 4th year COGS major/minor or GSAS. Psyc 3005; Psyc 2200 or Biol 3050 recommended. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000- or 5000-level PSYC course.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PSYC 5328Cognitive Aging (3.00)
The focus of this seminar will be on the relations between age and cognitive functioning in healthy and individuals with pathologies such as dementia. The topics to be covered will range from methodological issues to neuroanatomical substrates to practical consequences of age-related cognitive changes. Enrollment not allowed in more than one 4000-level or 5000-levl PSYC course.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PSYC 5350Neurochemical Systems in Learning and Memory (3.00)
Examines historical and current theories implicating the involvement of specific neurotransmitter, amino-acid, and peptide systems in regulating learning and the encoding of memory. Provides an extensive review of the literature in order to understand mechanisms by which chemical compounds modify learning and the brain sites where neurochemicals exert their effects. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200 or 2220, or instructor permission.
PSYC 5355Neurobiology of Speech and Language (3.00)
An overview of the neural systems underlying production and perception of vocal signals, with a focus on animal models and their application to human communication. Course activities will emphasize discussion and critical review of the primary literature.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PSYC 5401Chemical Senses: Taste and Smell (3.00)
Explores the neurobiology of the chemical senses by examining the biophysical basis of sensory transduction, the anatomical organization of two systems, and the physiological properties of peripheral and central structures along the gustatory and olfactory pathways. Emphasizes new, important findings in taste and smell. Prerequisite: PSYC 2200, 2220, or 4200.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PSYC 5410Juvenile Justice and Violence (3.00)
Seminar focuses on the current state of juvenile justice and its treatment of violent and aggressive youth. Topics such as developmental maturity in culpability and competence to stand trial, transfer to adult court, and relevant topics in developmental, clinical, social and community psychology are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 3460 (with a B+ or better). Undergraduates who have not taken PSYC 3460 will not be accepted under any circumstances.
PSYC 5500Current Topics in Psychology (3.00)
Current topical offerings in Psychology.
PSYC 5559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 5703Cultural Psychology (3.00)
This course explores various issues in the intersection of personality, social, and cultural psychology. It is designed to expose you to different research perspectives, methodologies, and most recent developments in this area. Topics covered in this course include theories of self and culture, the measurement of personality across cultures, cross-situational consistency, cultural influences on personality and emotion.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PSYC 5704Social Ecological Psychology (3.00)
This course explores the processes in which individuals and society 'make up' each other. Specifically, the course explores the way in which socio-ecological factors such as residential mobility, density, and geography affect individuals' thoughts, feelings, and actions, and the way in which individuals' thoughts, feelings, and actions help create particular socio-ecological conditions. Prerequisite: Completion of Psyc 3005/3006 is recommended.
Course was offered Fall 2015
PSYC 5710Machine Learning and Data Mining (3.00)
While most psychological studies ask " is something different between groups?", in this course we will introduce quantitative methods to answer the question "what is different between groups?", i.e., we ask which part (or combination) of our data maximizes the chances to distinguish between given groups.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PSYC 5720Fundamentals of Item Response Theory (3.00)
This course is designed to introduce you to the concepts of item response theory (IRT) models and their application to substantive psychological problems in measurement, such as test and scale design and analysis. Prerequisite: Undergraduates must have taken Psyc 3005 and 3006 OR 4005 and 4006.
PSYC 6559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 6745Stigma and Social Disparities (3.00)
Introduces classic and contemporary theory and research on the social psychology of stigma, primarily from the perspective of the stigmatized. Topics include stigma's origin and nature, stigma and self-concept, stereotype threat, attributional ambiguity, stigma and social interaction, and implications of stigma for education, health, and life attainment more generally. Provides an overview of this area of psychology and its policy implications.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 7005The Science of Self-Regulation and Decision Making (3.00)
Self-regulation is the management of social, cognitive, and motivational resources in goal pursuit. It is critical to understanding psychological processes (e.g., self control, decision-making) and influencing economic & health behavior (40% of US deaths involve self-reg. failures). Via in-depth reading and discussion of the science of self-regulation, researchers will aim to generate new ideas, and MPPs to inform policy analysis and solutions. Permission is not required, but students are strongly urged to discuss their interest with instructor before enrolling.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PSYC 7055Strategies and Processes of Negotiation (3.00)
This course examines the art and science of negotiation. The science of negotiation involves learning to recognize the structure of a conflict situation and knowing what techniques tend to be most effective given that structure. Because there is no substitute for negotiating experience, this class will rely heavily on role-playing exercises and analyses designed to help students develop their own styles and learning the art of negotiation. Prerequisities: Graduate Student
Course was offered Spring 2012
PSYC 7155Subjective Well-Being (3.00)
This course explores various issues in the merging field of well-being research. It is designed to expose you to different research perspectives, methodologies, and most recent developments in the area. Topics covered in this course include conceputal issues in well-being research, measurement judgmental proceses, goals and values, adaptation, close relationships, culture, psychophysiolgical temperaments, and personality.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PSYC 7160Emotion and Cognition Seminar (3.00)
Seminar examines the nature and consequences of emotion. Review of recent research and new ideas about how cognition shapes emotion and how emotion in turn shapes cognition.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 7200Advanced Neural Mechanisms of Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry needed for an understanding of brain and behavior. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
PSYC 7230Genetic and Epigenetic Research in Behavior (3.00)
We will explore the genetic and epigenetic data that has been linked to behavior in both humans and animal systems. Special attention will be paid to techniques and analyses that are important for understanding these data.
PSYC 7250Brain Systm Involved in Memory (3.00)
The historical and current experimental findings that describe the contribution of neuroanatomical structures in regulating memory formation. Prerequisite: GSAS.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2010
PSYC 7255Special Topics in Cognitive Development (3.00)
We will explore how developmental science can interface with the needs and interests of parents, caregivers, teachers, and policy-makers. Our focus will be three-fold: 1.What do we (as a field) know that might be useful to these groups? 2. What developmental issues and concerns do non-developmental scientists actually want to know about (and why)? 3. How can we (in our own research programs) frame our work to be more obviously useful?
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2013
PSYC 7300Advanced Cognition (3.00)
The course begins with basic questions on the nature of cognitive psychology's goals and methods, then moves on to core findings and theoretical development in representation, and in the fields of attention, memory, and higher thought. The semester closes with some consideration of topics more recently added to the cognitive agenda, e.g., consciousness.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2012
PSYC 7302Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (3.00)
This seminar will examine the neural basis of learning and memory. Study of brain systems that mediate different types of learning and memory as well as the cellular and molecular mechansims that allow these systems to acquire and store information. Topics will include memory consolidation, neural plasticity, cellular competition for memory storage, the role of neurogenesis in learning and memory and mechaisms of retention and forgetting.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Fall 2009
PSYC 7305Biological Models of Cognition (3.00)
This seminar examines animal models that have been developed to study neurobiological mechanisms of cognition. Topics to be covered include goal-directed learning, decision-making, navigation, action selection, motivation, working memory and addiction. Each section will cover a specific cognitive process, the development and validation of animal models to study this process and a discussion of identified neurobiological mechanisms. Prerequisites: Psyc 2200 or 4200.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010
PSYC 7310Human Neuroscience (3.00)
This class will broadly survey human neuroscience methodology and applications to various fields of psychology. We will cover topics in clinical, cognitive, social and developmental neuroscience.
Course was offered Spring 2015
PSYC 7400Practicum to Intervention and Ethics (2.00)
This course has a two-fold purpose. First, it is designed to provide a working introduction to the ethical issues, principles, and techniques of psychotherapy and supervision. Second, will explore psychology's history and development and then investigate the role of History and Systems on our current psychotherapy.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
PSYC 7410Practicum to Intervention and History and Systems (2.00)
This course has a two-fold purpose. First, it is designed to provide a working introduction to the ethical issues, principles, and techniques of psychotherapy and supervision. Second, will explore psychology's history and development and then investigate the role of History and Systems on our current psychotherapy.
PSYC 7420Psychological Intervention I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An overview of psychotherapy process and outcome research, ethnicity issues in psychotherapy and ethical considerations. Begins the survey of adult psychotherapy. Emphasizes a problem-focused, rather than a treatment-focused perspective. Three lecture hours, practicum in supervised intervention. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7430Psychological Assessment (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topics include strategies of assessment, issues of reliability and validity, test construction; theory and practice of individual, couple, family, and community assessment techniques, including testing, interviewing, observation; and assessment research. Three lecture hours, two lab hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7440Psychological Assessment (4.00)
Topics include strategies of assessment, issues of reliability and validity, test construction; theory and practice of individual, couple, family, and community assessment techniques, including testing, interviewing, observation; and assessment research. Three lecture hours, two lab hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7450Psychological Intervention II (4.00)
Concludes the problem-focused survey of adult psychotherapy. Provides a survey of therapy focused on relationship issues in the family, including couples therapy, divorce issues, and especially, child and family therapy. Three lecture hours, practicum in supervised intervention. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7470Experimental Psychopathology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Reviews symptomatological, classificatory, and epidemiological issues, and surveys the psychological, behavior-genetic, and psychophysiological literature in abnormal psychology. Emphasizes adult psychopathology. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7475The Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues in Research and Practices (3.00)
Will examine psychological theory, methodology, and interventions from the vantage of ethnic minority issues.
PSYC 7480Community Psychology and Prevention Science I: Research and Consultation (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the broad area of community psychology and prevention science. Topics include social ecology and primary prevention; conceptions, strategies, and tactics of social intervention; the creation of settings; and interventions in the education, mental health, mental retardation and criminal justice systems. Weekly seminar meetings and participation in community laboratory required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 7481Practica in Community Psychology and Prevention Science (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Practica in Community Psychology and Prevention Science aims to prepare students for a career in one of three settings: academia, industry, or government. To achieve this aim, students are required to design two 1-year fieldwork practica with a local, state, or federal agency, supervised by a laboratory instructor. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
PSYC 7501Contemporary Issues: Cognitive Psychology (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7502Contemporary Issues: Neuroscience and Behavior (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7503Contemporary Issues: Community Psychology (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7504Contemporary Issues: Ethics and Clinical Psychology (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7505Contemporary Issues: Developmental Psychology (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7506Contemporary Issues: Social Psychology (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7507Contemporary Issues: Quantitative Psychology (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Discusses contemporary developments in psychological theory, methods, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 7559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 7600Social Psychology (3.00)
Surveys the major empirical and theoretical concepts in social psychology.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
PSYC 7605Self-Knowledge and the Adaptive Unsconscious (3.00)
In this course we will examine self-knowledge from a scientific perspective, based on research in social, personality, cognitive, and developmental psychology.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PSYC 7610Advanced Research Methods in Social Psychology (3.00)
Surveys various research approaches to social psychological problems; discusses selected methodological issues; and practices designing and criticizing research techniques on assorted psychological topics. Prerequisite: One semester of graduate statistics and PSYC 7600 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015
PSYC 7615Graduate Research Methods (4.00)
Completion of this course will provide a foundation for the practice of science. We will wrestle with the fundamental issues for designing and executing a program of research, and in the interpretation and reporting of the research results.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PSYC 7630Nonverbal Communication and Deception (3.00)
Research and theory in the psychology of nonverbal communication and deception. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
PSYC 7635Psychology and Law (3.00)
Will investigate 10 topics for which psychology has (or might have, or might think it has) things to say to the legal system. Our goal is to learn about the current state of affairs in both domains and propose ways to facilitate the exchange of knowledge between the two disciplines. Topics include eyewitness testimony; confessions; jury decision making, implicit biases; punishment; affective forecasting and decision making about the future. Prerequisites: Background in either (cognitive or social) psychology or in law.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2010
PSYC 7670Longitudinal Data Analysis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will provide an introduction to the principles and methods (e.g., multilevel models, mixed-effects models, latent growth curve models) for the analysis of longitudinal data. Emphasis will be on data analysis and interpretation. Participants should be familiar with the general linear model (regression, analysis of variance) prior to taking this course.
PSYC 7700Approaches to Quantitative Methods in Psychology (3.00)
Many psychological theories nowadays are formulated mathematically. In this course we will survey a variety of approaches to modeling in perception (such as signal detection theory), cognitive psychology (categorization learning) and social psychology. The course has two prerequisites: a course in calculus, and a knowledge of a programming language.
Course was offered Fall 2014
PSYC 7705Multi-Level Modeling (3.00)
In this course, we will introduce some simple Multi-Level models, introduce some properties of those and some methods to fit data to these models. In the second part, we will advance to more complex multi-level model with possible overlaps between lower levels and non-normal multi-level models.
Course was offered Spring 2013
PSYC 7710Quantitative Methods I: Probability and Statistical Inference (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course covers mathematical foundations of psychology and statistical techniques used in behavioral science, in particular foundations of linear algebra, probability theory, information theory, statistical testing, normal models, and special, frequently used cases of normal models (t-test). The course has three lecture hours and two laboratory hours that teaches computational aspects of the course in R.
PSYC 7720Quantitative Methods II: Experimental Design (4.00)
Includes Chi-square tests for contingency tables, correlation, multiple regression, analysis of variance of one-way and factorial designs including repeated measures experiments, and analysis of covariance. Extension work with SPSS and MANOVA computer routines. Prerequisite: PSYC 7710 or equivalent.
PSYC 7725Affective Aspects of Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will provide students exposure to current knowledge in the area of affect, mood, and emotion, including research on models of emotion and emotion regulation, historical and developmental perspectives on emotion, and prominent measures and methods used to advance understanding of affective sciences. This will include basic research on affect and healthy emotional functioning, along with research on psychopathology and mood disorders.
Course was offered Spring 2017
PSYC 7730Developmental Aspects of Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will provide students exposure to current knowledge in the area of developmental aspects of behavior, including transitions, growth, and development across an individual¿s life, along with prominent methods used to advance understanding of developmental processes. This will include basic research on both typical and atypical development across the lifespan.
PSYC 7740Practicum to Intervention and Multicultural Issues (2.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course has a two-fold purpose. First, it is designed to provide a working introduction to the ethical issues, principles, and techniques of psychotherapy and supervision. Second, will explore psychology's history and development and then investigate the role of History and Systems on our current psychotherapy.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
PSYC 7750Practicum to Intervention and Supervision (2.00)
Designed to provide a working introduction to the ethical issues, principles, and techniques of psychotherapy and supervision. Additionally, case conceptualization, designing intervention plans, and active listening skills are introduced and practiced. Individual psychotherapy with adolescents and adults will be the primary focus of this aspect of the course.
PSYC 7755Advanced Practicum in Supervision and Consultation (1.00)
This course is designed to provide students with a context for supervision and consultation through sharing with each other their experiences with various clients, providing peer supervision to each other (with the instructor in the room), receiving immediate feedback from the instructor regarding their supervision of each other, and receiving feedback from each other, at the end of the course.
PSYC 7760Introduction to Applied Multivariate Methods (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces major statistical methods used for the data analysis of multiple measures. Includes elementary matrix algebra, multivariate regression (canonical correlation; multivariate analysis of variance and covariance; and discriminant analysis and classification), correlational methods (principal components and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis), and the analysis of multivariate contingency tables using log-linear models. Emphasizes concepts, issues, and examples over mathematical derivations. Prerequisite: PSYC 7710-7720 or equivalent.
PSYC 7765Fundamentals of Statistical Computing for Behavioral and Social Scientists (1.00)
This course will provide students with a basic understanding of statistical computing and programming using the R language. Students will learn methods of integrating the computational skills they acquire into a workflow making the process from analysis to publication more efficient.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PSYC 8040Forum on Scientific and Professional Ethics (1.00)
Studies scholarly writings, empirical research, and current developments relating to ethics in psychology, and relevant ethical codes and regulations influencing the conduct of scientists and educators. Focuses on recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas in academic and research settings. Prerequisite: second-year standing in a graduate program in the Department of Psychology or instructor permission.
PSYC 8200Internship in Teaching Neuroscience (3.00)
Students will collaborate with instructor in co-teaching an advanced level undergraduate course, Psyc 4200 Neural Mechanisms of Behavior, which is concurrently taught. Student responsible for preparing, presenting and assessing three topics from Psyc 4200 syllabus. Objective is to provide a formal environment to obtain teaching experience, while allowing the student to explore different teaching techniques in an advanced survey course setting.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PSYC 8559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
PSYC 8610Psychological Study of Children, Families and the Law (3.00)
To acquaint the student with various issues in the law that have an impact on children and with psychological research and practice regarding children and families that is germane to legal policy. The course is based in developmental, clinical and community psychology theory and research. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
PSYC 8650Social Development (3.00)
Analyzes current theory and research in social and personality developments from infancy through adolescence. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014, Fall 2010
PSYC 8670Cognitive Development (3.00)
This course reviews current and classic literature concerning theory and experimental findings in cognitive development across infancy and childhood.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2014, Spring 2011
PSYC 8725Life-Span Development: Methodological Issues (3.00)
The course is focused on key methodological issues associated with the study of development from a life-span perspective. Includes the conceptualization of research problems, research design, measurement, and data analysis and modeling and promotes the acquisition of skills in formulating and executing life-span research.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 8730Dynamical Systems Analysis (3.00)
This course intends to give the student a practical working understanding of some of the techniques for data analysis of dynamical systems in psychology. The course will concentrate on the development and testing of dynamical systems models for behavior and learning practical methods for fitting models of continuous time differential equations for real world data. Prerequisites: R and Structural Equation Modeling.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
PSYC 8735Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling (3.00)
Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling provides an introduction to statistical modeling with latent variables and multivariate outcomes. Path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multivariate regression, growth curves, and longitudinal mediation and moderation will be covered using the free open source OpenMx software running in R.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014
PSYC 8997Nontop Res: Pract to Inter & History and Systems (1.00)
Research designed to provide an in-depth exploration into psychology's history, the development of important Systems of thought, and the historical and current relationships with philosophy, as well as an investigation of the role of History and Systems on our current theories and techniques of psychotherapy and ethics.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PSYC 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's research, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
PSYC 9501Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9502Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent laboratory research undertaken with advisor. Graded and can be repeated. Instructor permission required.
PSYC 9559New Course in Psychology (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of psychology.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PSYC 9560Teaching Psychology-Review Sessions (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Will introduce you to be being a teaching assistant at UVA. This course is designed for grad students in their first teaching experience who will serve as Review TAs--that is, student contact through office hours and review sessions, but you are not responsible for a course section. You will learn some issues of class organization at UVa (such as the use of Collab) as well as more nuanced skills you'll need in teaching students effectively.Prerequisite: GSAS
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PSYC 9561Teaching Psychology-Sections (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class is to continue your education in teaching of psychology. Course is designed to acquaint you with issues particular to the teaching of a section of a larger lecture course. Will cover classroom management, grading, and pedagogical techniques. It's very difficult to evaluate ones own teaching, so everyone will videotape their teaching at one occasion, and we will spend time learning to evaluate classroom practice through observation. Prerequisite: PSYC 9559-1 or PSYC 9560
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PSYC 9562Teaching Psychology-Courses (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is designed to help students learn how to design a course from scratch. It is presumed that before you take this course, you have led sections for at least two semesters, and have taken Psyc 9561. We will consider course planning from start to finish: factors that influence the topic of a course, purposes and implementation issues for various pedagogical methods, and functions of different methods of assessment. Prerequisite: You have led sections for at least two semesters, and have taken PSYC 9559-1 or Psyc 9561. GSAS.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PSYC 9940Readings in Psychology (1.00 - 12.00)
Readings in Psychology
PSYC 9942Readings in Psychology: Causation in Law (1.00 - 12.00)
Independent study.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PSYC 9980Practicum in Case Consultation (1.00 - 7.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Supervision in case assessment, evaluation, and intervention. Emphasizes issues involved in case management; types of issues and decisions that may affect the outcome of intervention; pragmatic issues in dealing with people referred as clients; consultation procedures with referral agencies; and liaisons with community agencies. Student performance is evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
PSYC 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
PSYC 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.