UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Catalog of Courses for Religious Studies    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Religion-African Religions
RELA 1559New Course in African Religion (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions
RELA 2559New Course in African Religions (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions.
RELA 2700Festivals of the Americas (3.00)
Readings will include contemporary ethnographies of religious festivals in the Caribbean ans South, Central, and North America, and increase their knowledge of the concepts of sacred time and space, ritual theory, and the relationships between religious celebration and changing accounts of ethnicity.
RELA 2750African Religions (3.00)
Introduces the mythology, ritual, philosophy, and religious art of the traditional religions of sub-Saharan Africa, also African versions of Christianity and African-American religions in the New World.
RELA 2850Afro- Creole Religions in the Americas (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey course which familiarizes students with African-derived religions of the Caribbean and Latin America
RELA 3000Women and Religion in Africa (3.00)
This course examines women's religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women.
RELA 3351African Diaspora Religions (3.00)
This seminar examines changes in ethnographic accounts of African diaspora religions, with particular attention to the conceptions of religion, race, nation, and modernity found in different research paradigms. Prerequisite: previous course in one of the following: religious studies, anthropology, AAS, or Latin American studies
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Fall 2009
RELA 3559New Course in African Religions (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014
RELA 3730Religious Themes in African Literature and Film (3.00)
An exploration of religious concepts, practices and issues as addressed in African literature and film. We will examine how various African authors and filmmakers weave aspects of Muslim, Christian and/or traditional religious cultures into the stories they tell. Course materials will be drawn from novels, memoirs, short stories, creation myths, poetry, feature-length movies, documentaries and short films.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELA 3890Christianity in Africa (3.00)
Historical and topical survey of Christianity in Africa from the second century c.e. to the present. Cross listed with RELC 3890. Prerequisite: A course in African religions or history, Christianity, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
RELA 3900Islam in Africa (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELI 3900. Prerequisite: RELA 2750, RELI 2070, RELI 2080, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
RELA 4085Christian Missions in Contemporary Africa (3.00)
: An examination of Christian missions in Africa in the 21st Century. Through a variety of disciplinary lenses and approaches, we examine faith-based initiatives in Africa--those launched from abroad, as well as from within the continent. What does it mean to be a missionary in Africa today? How are evangelizing efforts being transformed in response to democratization, globalization and a growing awareness of human rights?
Course was offered Spring 2016
RELA 4100Yoruba Religion (3.00)
Studies Yoruba traditional religion, ritual art, independent churches, and religious themes in contemporary literature in Africa and the Americas.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RELA 4510Advanced Topics in African Religions (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in African Religions
RELA 4559New Course in African Religions (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELA 5085Evangelism in Contemporary Africa (3.00)
An examination of Christian missions in Africa in the 21st Century. Through a variety of theoretical lenses and methodological approaches, we examine faith-based initiatives in Africa--those launched from abroad, as well as from within the continent. What does it mean to be a missionary in Africa today? How are evangelizing efforts being transformed in response to democratization, globalization and a growing awareness of human rights?
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELA 5559New Course in African Relgions (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELA 5620Ritual & Remembrance (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
By reading ethnographic accounts of ritual performances in West Africa and its Atlantic diaspora, the seminar considers theories of ritual, discursive and non-discursive forms of remembrance, and the production, malleability and politics of memory amidst the particular challenges that the histories of slavery, colonialism, and collective trauma pose to the development of collective identities in the Afro-Atlantic World.
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELA 7410Yoruba Religion (3.00)
The study Yoruba traditional religion, ritual art, independent churches, and religious themes in contemporary literature in both Africa and the Americas. Prerequisite: RELA 4100 Yoruba Religion
RELA 7559New Course in African Religions (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2012
RELA 8559New Course in African Religions (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of African Religions.
Religion-Buddhism
RELB 1559New Course in Buddhism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
RELB 2054Tibetan Buddhism Introduction (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Provides a systematic introduction to Tibetan Buddhism with a strong emphasis on tantric traditions of Buddhism - philosophy, contemplation, ritual, monastic life, pilgrimage, deities & demons, ethics, society, history, and art. The course aims to understand how these various aspects of Tibetan religious life mutually shape each other to form the unique religious traditions that have pertained on the Tibetan plateau for over a thousand years.
RELB 2100Buddhism (3.00)
Theravada, Mahayana, and Tantrayana Buddhist developments in India.
RELB 2120Buddhist Literature (3.00)
Introduces Buddhist literature in translation, from India, Tibet, and East and South East Asia.
RELB 2130Taoism and Confucianism (3.00)
Surveys the major religions of Chinese Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism.
RELB 2135Chinese Buddhism (3.00)
This course examines the ways in which Chinese Buddhism differs from the Buddhisms of other countries. The first half of the course introduces Buddhism with a focus on the historical development of the tradition.The second half of the course surveys several philosophical schools and forms of practice including Huayan, Chan, Pure Land, and Tantric Buddhism.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RELB 2165Buddhist Meditation & the Modern World (3.00)
This course offers a survey of Buddhist meditation traditions in India and Tibet, an introduction to the ways that meditation is adapted and used today throughout many areas of life, and a chance to practice secular meditation techniques in a contemplative lab. In class meetings are experimentally based.
RELB 2252Buddhism in Film (3.00)
This course is an introduction to Buddhism and an exploration of the place of Buddhism within contemporary Asian, European, and North American cultures through film. The goals are 1) to identify longstanding Buddhist narrative themes in contemporary films, 2) to consider how Buddhism is employed in films to address contemporary issues, and 3) to gain through film a vivid sense of Buddhism as a complex social and cultural phenomenon.
RELB 2450Zen (3.00)
Studies the development and history of the thought, practice, and goals of Zen Buddhism.
RELB 2559New Course in Buddhism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2013
RELB 2715Introduction to Chinese Religions (3.00)
This course serves as an introductory survey of religious life in China, with emphasis on everyday religious practice over doctrine. Through primary texts (in translation), we will explore key figures and texts, core concepts, and ritual traditions with reference to the cultural, historical, political and material contexts in which they were conceived and expressed.
RELB 2770Daoism (3.00)
Studies Daoist philosophy and religion within the context of Chinese society and history.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
RELB 2900Buddhist Meditation Traditions (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The goal of this course will be to examine different conceptions of Buddhist meditation and how these different conceptions affect the nature of practice and the understanding of the ideal life within a variety of Buddhist traditions. Thus, the study of Buddhist meditation traditions reveals not just intricate forms of practice, but reveals the nature of the good life and how one lives it.
RELB 3000Buddhist Mysticism and Modernity (3.00)
Buddhist Mysticism and Modernity
RELB 3030Mindfulness and Compassion: Living Fully Personally and Professionally (3.00)
This course provides an in-depth experience in contemplative practices to prepare students to live more fully, be more engaged & compassionate citizens & professionals, & navigate life's stressors with greater clarity, peace of mind, & healthy behaviors. Besides mindfulness training, this course will also foster the cultivation of compassion and prosocial qualities. For more info: http://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/Mindfulness__Compassion/.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELB 3150Seminar in Buddhism and Gender (3.00)
This seminar takes as its point of departure Carolyn Bynum's statements: "No scholar studying religion, no participant in ritual, is ever neuter. Religious experience is the experience of men and women, and in no known society is this experience the same." The unifying theme is gender and Buddhism, exploring historical, textual and social questions relevant to the status of women and men in the Buddhist world from its origins to the present day.
RELB 3160The Religions of Japan (3.00)
This course is a survey of religions in Japan as well as their roles in Japanese culture and society. The topics that will be discussed are syncretism between Buddhism and Shinto, the development of uniquely Japanese forms of Buddhism, the spontaneous emergence of Pure Land Buddhism, the use of Shinto as a nationalistic ideology, and the role of Christianity. No prerequisites; but a basic knowledge of Buddhism or Japanese history is useful.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2011
RELB 3190Buddhist Nirvana (3.00)
This seminar will examine what Buddhists mean when they talk about Nirvana. We'll begin with how the concept of Nirvana develops in the culture in which Sakyamuni Buddha lived and taught, explore how different forms of Buddhism in Sri Lanka, Tibet, China, Japan, and in the west developed new ideas about what Nirvana is and how it can be experienced. We'll read classic sutras on the topic, as well as books and essays by contemporary Zen Masters.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Spring 2011
RELB 3408Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Tibet possesses one of the great Buddhist philosophical traditions in the world. Tibetan Buddhist thinkers composed comprehensive and philosophically rigorous works on human growth according to classical Buddhism, works that surveyed ethics, meditation practice, the nature of personal identity, and enlightenment itself. In this seminar we will read and discuss famous Tibetan overviews of Buddhist philosophy. Pre-Requisites: One prior course in religion or philosophy recommended
RELB 3559New Course in Buddhism (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
RELB 3655Buddhism in America (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is a seminar that examines the development of Buddhism in America going from its earliest appearance to contemporary developments.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Spring 2012
RELB 4520Advanced Topics in Buddhism (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Buddhism
RELB 4559New Course in Buddhism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism
RELB 5011Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts I, II (3.00)
Instruction in the reading and interpretation of Chinese Buddhist texts and the use of reference tools such as Chinese language dictionaries, bibliographies, encyclopedias, and indices.
Course was offered Fall 2009
RELB 5012Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts I, II (3.00)
Instruction in the reading and interpretation of Chinese Buddhist texts and the use of reference tools such as Chinese language dictionaries, bibliographies, encyclopedias, and indices.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
RELB 5055Buddhist Philosophy (3.00)
Study of the Pali and Sanskritic Buddhist philosophical traditions.
RELB 5170The Dalai Lamas of Tibet (3.00)
A seminar on the history, mythology, and Buddhist doctrinal basis of the Dalai Lamas, the most important religious and political leaders of traditional Tibet. Prerequisite: one course on Buddhism or Tibet
Course was offered Spring 2012
RELB 5250Seminar in Japanese Buddhism (3.00)
Examines selected topics in the major schools of Japanese Buddhism, Tendai, Shingon, Pure Land, Nichiren, and Zen. Prerequisite: RELB 2130 or 3160, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011
RELB 5390Tibetan Buddhist Tantra Dzokchen (3.00)
Examines the Dzokchen tradition of Tibetan Buddhist Tantra focusing on its philosophical and contemplative systems and its historical and social contexts.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2009
RELB 5430Sanskrit Religious Texts (3.00)
Readings in Sanskrit religious and philosophical texts, their syntax, grammar, and translation. Prerequisite: SANS 5010, 5020, or equivalent and instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
RELB 5440Sanskrit Religious Texts (3.00)
Readings in Sanskrit religious and philosophical texts, their syntax, grammar, and translation. Prerequisite: SANS 5010, 5020, or equivalent and instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013
RELB 5460Seminar in Mahayana Buddhism (3.00)
Studies the Middle Way School of Madhyamika, including Nagarjuna's reasoning and its intent and place in the spiritual path.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELB 5470Literary Tibetan V (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, or equivalent.
RELB 5480Literary Tibetan VI (3.00)
Advanced study in the philosophical and spiritual language of Tibet, past and present. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, or equivalent.
RELB 5490Religious History of Tibet (3.00)
Surveys political, social, religious, and intellectual issues in Tibetan history from the fifth to fifteenth centuries, emphasizing the formation of the classical categories, practices, and ideals of Tibetan Buddhism.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELB 5520Seminar in Daoism (3.00)
Topics on the history, scripture, thought, and practice of religious Daoism, with an emphasis on the formative period (2nd-10th c.).
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
RELB 5559New Course in Buddhism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
RELB 5600Elementary Pali (3.00)
Studies Pali religious and philosophical works, including grammar and translation. Prerequisite: SANS 5010, 5020, or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2010
RELB 5610Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit (1.00 - 3.00)
Studies Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit works and their grammar and translation. Prerequisite: SANS 5010, 5020 or equivalent.
RELB 5660Seminar on Indian Buddhism (3.00)
Investigates the techniques and presuppositions involved in the methods used to study Buddhism, including textual, historical, philosophical, and social scientific methods.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2010
RELB 5715Seminar on Chinese Religion and Society (3.00)
Studies Chinese religion and society within the context of a specific period of Chinese history, or in terms of a specific theme. Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and popular religion will be covered (along with other forms of religion, as appropriate).
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
RELB 5800Literary Tibetan VII (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya's Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, 5470, 5480 or equivalent.
RELB 5810Literary Tibetan VIII (3.00)
Examines the Yogachara-Svatantrika system as presented in Jang-kya's Presentation of Tenets, oral debate, and exercises in spoken Tibetan. Prerequisite: RELB 5000, 5010, 5350, 5360, 5470, 5480 or equivalent
RELB 5991Seminar in Chinese Buddhism (3.00)
Examines the major schools of Chinese Buddhism: T'ien-t'ai, Hua-yen, Pure Land, and Ch'an.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELB 7559New Course in Buddhism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RELB 8200Literary Tibetan VII (4.00)
Literary Tibetan VII
RELB 8210Literary Tibetan VIII (4.00)
Literary Tibetan VIII
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELB 8230Advanced Literary and Spoken Tibetan (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Readings in various genres, including philosophy, poetry, ritual, narrative, and so forth.
RELB 8310Advanced Sanskrit/Pali I (1.00 - 3.00)
Advanced readings in poetry, psychology, or philosophy.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2010
RELB 8559New Course in Buddhism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Buddhism.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2009
RELB 8706The Buddhist Canon in Tibet: Structure, Scope, and Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial introduces the structure, scope, and contents of the Tibetan-language Buddhist canonical collections. We will read and discuss selections in both English and Tibetan from the 5000 works in the Scripture (Bka' 'gyur) and Treatise (Bstan 'gyur) collections, as well as reference aids and current research on the canons. The course goal is to develop a firm basis for all research involving Tibetan-language canonical literature.
Religion-Christianity
RELC 1050Introduction to Christian Traditions (3.00)
Explore Christianity in its modern and historical contexts, combining an examination of current historical and theological scholarship, worship, and practice. The emphasis is on modern American Christianity.
RELC 1210Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel in the light of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Emphasizes methods of contemporary biblical criticism. Cross listed as RELJ 1210.
RELC 1220New Testament and Early Christianity (3.00)
Studies the history, literature, and theology of earliest Christianity in light of the New Testament. Emphasizes the cultural milieu and methods of contemporary biblical criticism.
RELC 1559New Course in Christianity (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Christianity
RELC 2000The Bible and Its Interpreters (3.00)
Surveys Jewish and Christian interpretations of the Torah (the first five books of the Bible). Examines how the Bible becomes sacred scripture for Jews and Christians.
RELC 2050The Rise of Christianity (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course traces the rise of Christianity in the first millennium of the Common Era, covering the development of doctrine, the evolution of its institutional structures, and its impact on the cultures in which it flourished. Students will become acquainted with the key figures, issues, and events from this formative period, when Christianity evolved from marginal Jewish sect to the dominant religion in the Roman Empire.
RELC 2057Christian Theologies of Liberation (3.00)
An examination of recent theological statements about Christianity and political activity, with an emphasis on contemporary discussions of race, culture, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, poverty, wealth, and class.
Course was offered January 2013, January 2012
RELC 2060The Reform and Global Expansion of Christianity (3.00)
How did Christianity become a global religion with hundreds of denominations and nearly two billion adherents? In this course, we will explore the reform and expansion of Christianity in the second millennium of the Common Era, from the high Middle Ages to the present day.
RELC 2215Mormonism and American Culture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is designed to add substantive depth to a general understanding of American religious pluralism and insight into the socio-historical context of American religion through the study of Mormonism. In addition to introducing Mormonism's basic beliefs and practices, the course will explore issues raised by Mormonism's move toward the American mainstream while retaining its religious identity and cultural distinctiveness.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
RELC 2245Global Christianity (3.00)
The story of Christianity's emergence in the Middle East and its migration into Europe and then North America is just one aspect of Christian history, which also has a rich and long history in Africa, Asia and other parts of the global South. This course looks at the shape Christianity is taking in non-Western parts of the world and how this growth impacts Christianity in the West.
RELC 2330History of Christian Social and Political Thought I (3.00)
Surveys the history of Christian social and political thought from the New Testament to 1850 including the relation of theological ideas to conceptions of state, family, and economic life.
Course was offered Fall 2009
RELC 2340History of Christian Social and Political Thought II (3.00)
Surveys the history of Christian social and political thought from the rise of Social Gospel to the contemporary scene. Considers 'love' and 'justice' as central categories for analyzing different conceptions of what social existence is and ought to be.
RELC 2360Elements of Christian Thought (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course considers the complex world of Christian thought, examining various perspectives on the nature of faith, the being and action of God, the identity of Jesus of Nazareth, the role of the Bible in theological reflection, and the relationship between Christian thought and social justice. Students will read various important works of Christian theology and become acquainted with a range of theological approaches and ideas.
RELC 2401History of American Catholicism (3.00)
Historical survey of American Catholicism from its colonial beginnings to the present.
RELC 2460The Spirit of Catholicism: Its Creeds and Customs (3.00)
The course will trace the origins and development of Roman Catholic doctrine in light of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). The following topics will be treated: the nature and person of Christ as examined in the first ecumenical councils from Nicaea (325) to Chalcedon (451); the nature of the Church and its authority vested in bishops and the pope; original sin, grace, and justification; the rise of hte Reformation in western Christianity;
RELC 2559New Course in Christianity (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Christianity
RELC 2850The Kingdom of God in America (3.00)
This course examines the influence of theological ideas on social movements in twentieth- and twenty-first-century America and investigates how religious commitments shape everyday living, including racial perception and economic, political, and sexual organization. The course will examine the American Civil Rights Movement, late 1960s counter-cultural movements, and recent faith-based community-development movements and organizing initiatives.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELC 3006Augustine's City of God (3.00)
A text-focused class that will read the entire City of God, supplementing that work with several other of Augustine's smaller texts (particularly letters and sermons) to attempt to understand that work's argument, paying attention to the various audiences to which it was addressed, and to Augustine's larger thought as captured in that one great and difficult book
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELC 3009Protestant Theology (3.00)
This course uses the category of protest to understand western Christian thought in the modern period. We examine the rise and development of Protestant thought, considering how Christians conceptualized challenges to established ideas, norms, and institutional structures during and after the Reformation.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Fall 2009
RELC 3030Jesus and the Gospels (3.00)
This course focuses on Jesus of Nazareth as an historical figure, that is, as he is accessible to the historian by means of historical methods. Our most important sources of information on Jesus are the canonical Gospels, and so much of the course will involve reading and attempting to understand these texts. We will attempt to reconstruct at least the broad outlines of Jesus activity and teachings, keeping in mind the limits of our sources.
RELC 3040Paul: Letters and Theology (3.00)
Intensive study of the theological ideas and arguments of the Apostle Paul in relation to their historical and epistolary contexts.
RELC 3043Themes in Eastern Orthodoxy: An Introduction (3.00)
This course is an introduction to the thematic core of the Orthodox Christian tradition. There is first reviewed the major elements of the Orthodox faith, its theology and doctrine, that developed over the course of the Byzantine era, This study is followed by an examination of writings on scripture and tradition, iconography. liturgy and sacrament, as well as the relationship of Orthodox Christianity to the culture.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
RELC 3045History of the Bible (3.00)
The history of the formation, transmission, translation, forms and uses of the Christian Bible from the 1st to the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
RELC 3055American Feminist Theology (3.00)
Contemporary theological models for American Christian feminists. The primary goal is to understand the various types of Christian feminism that exist in America today and how these theologies contribute to or challenge American feminism. Prerequisite: introductory religious studies and SWAG courses recommended.
RELC 3056In Defense of Sin (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Exploration of transgression in Judaism and Christianity with a focus on the Ten Commandments and the seven deadly sins. Reflection on who determines what is sinful and why. Close reading of texts challenging the wrongfulness of acts and attitudes long considered sinful, with critical attention to the persuasiveness of religious rules.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
RELC 3058The Christian Vision in Literature (3.00)
Studies selected classics of the Christian imaginative traditions; examines ways in which the Christian vision of time, space, self, and society emerges and changes as an ordering principle in literature and art up to the beginning of the modern era.
RELC 3077Theologies of Liberation (3.00)
"Liberation Theology" has emerged in modern contexts of violence and oppression as a faithful form of critique and protest. It radically contextualizes the pervasive scriptural emphasis on freedom from injustice and exploitation. In this course, we will examine the larger biblical narrative of human suffering and divine justice and the way it is reanimated in global theologies of liberation, including Latino/a, Black, and feminist theology.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELC 3090Israelite Prophecy (3.00)
This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel. We will read in translation most of the stories from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament about prophets (Moses, Deborah, Samuel, Elijah, Elisha), as well as the books attributed to prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and The Twelve). Each primary text will be considered in its historical, cultural, and political contexts.
RELC 3150Salem Witch Trials (3.00)
Salem Witch Trials
RELC 3181Medieval Christianity (3.00)
Studies the development of Christianity in the Middle Ages and how it reflected upon itself in terms of theology, piety, and politics. Cross-listed as HIEU 3181.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELC 3200Medieval Church Law (3.00)
Surveys the origins and development of the law of the Christian Church, the canon law, from its origins to its full elaboration in the 'classical period', 1140-1348. Readings and exercises from original sources will focus on general principles of the law, using marriage law as the particular case.
RELC 3211American Christian Autobiography (3.00)
This course examines Americans' self-perceptions and religious analysis in light of dominant American values, notable national and international events, cultural trends, and Christian doctrine. Among the autobiographers are Henri Nouwen and Anne Lamott.
Course was offered Summer 2010
RELC 3215American Religious Innovation (3.00)
This course is about America's newer religious movements: Scientology, Nation of Islam and Mormonism. The class will be using theories of ritual and text to understand how religious communities constitute themselves around an originating vision and retain a sense of continuity notwithstanding dramatic change. We will ask also why these three movements have created such crisis for the American state and anxiety among its citizens.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
RELC 3222From Jefferson to King (3.00)
A seminar focused upon some of the most significant philosophical and religious thinkers that have shaped and continued to shape American religious thought and culture from the founding of the Republic to the Civil Rights Movement, including Thomas Jefferson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Jane Addams, William James, Reinhold Niebuhr and Martin Luther King, Jr. We will explore how their thought influenced the social and cultural currents of their time.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2011
RELC 3231Reformation Europe (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys the development of religious reform movements in continental Europe from c. 1450 to c. 1650 and their impact on politics, social life, science, and conceptions of the self. Cross-listed as HIEU 3231.
RELC 3240Medieval Mysticism (3.00)
Introduces the major mystical traditions of the Middle Ages and the sources in which they are rooted.
RELC 3245American Church State Conflict (3.00)
An analysis of America's church-state conflicts and enduring questions that have tested and contributed to its evolving understanding of First Amendment guarantees of church disestablishment and freedom of conscience.
RELC 3270Salvation in the Middle Ages (3.00)
Studies four topics in medieval Christian thought: How can human beings know God? How does Jesus save? How does grace engage free will? How does posing such questions change language? Authors include Athanasius, Irenaeus, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, Anslem, Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, and some modern commentators.
RELC 3280Eastern Christianity (3.00)
Surveys the history of Christianity in the Byzantine world and the Middle East from late antiquity (age of emperor Justinian) until the fall of Constantinople.
RELC 3292The Book of Job & Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELC 3360Judaism and Christianity (3.00)
Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship.
RELC 3447History of Christian Ethics (3.00)
Survey of development of Christian ethical thought and teaching from beginnings through Reformation era. Major ethical themes are traced through the centuries, as the church's scripture, evolving doctrine, and emerging tradition interact with secular society, politics, and philosophy. Readings will be taken mostly from primary texts, such as the Bible and the writings of selected Christian thinkers.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2011
RELC 3470Christianity and Science (3.00)
Christian Europe gave rise to modern science, yet Christianity and science have long appeared mutual enemies. In this course we explore the encounter between two powerful cultural forces and study the intellectual struggle (especially in Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Freud) about the place of God in the modern world.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
RELC 3480Dynamics of Faith (3.00)
Studies a variety of contrasting contemporary accounts of the character and status of 'religious faith.'
RELC 3550Faith and Reason (3.00)
Studies approaches to the relation between reason, faith, doubt, and certainty in selected classical writings (e.g., Aquinas, Pascal, Kant, Kierkegaard, William James).
Course was offered Summer 2010
RELC 3559New Course in Christianity (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Christianity.
RELC 3610Female Saints in the Western Tradition (3.00)
This course is a study of the lives of female saints from the early Christianity through the present. The course focuses on the theological writings of female saints as well as exploring the cultural/historical importance of canonization. Prerequisite: one religious studies course.
RELC 3620Modern Theology (3.00)
Who are the great modern Christian theologians? What do they have to say to us? What do they argue about? Who did they offend and why? In this seminar we shall read major works by four of the truly great modern theologians of the twentieth century. Two are Protestant (Karl Barth and Paul Tillich), and two are Catholic (Karl Rahner and Henri de Lubac).
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
RELC 3625Christ (3.00)
This course is an introduction to Christology, that part of Theology concerned with the claim that Jesus is the Christ. How is this doctrine built up from Scripture, Church Councils, and the Fathers? What roles do heresies and creeds play in the construction? What events in the life and death of Jesus are most relevant to Christological claims? Particular attention is given to Jesus's preaching of the Kingdom of God.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELC 3650Systems of Theological Ethics (3.00)
Examines one or more contemporary systems of Christian ethics, alternating among such figures as Reinhold Niebuhr, C.S. Lewis, Jacques Ellul, and Jacques Maritain.
RELC 3675Women in Ancient and Medieval Christianity (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Why were women excluded from the priestly hierarchy of the church? How did male clerics subsequently circumscribe women's roles in the church? And how did women respond? These are the questions that we will explore in this course on the intersection between gender and power in pre-modern Christianity.
RELC 3681Cultural Catholicism (3.00)
Exploration of Roman Catholic experience outside structure of the Holy See (for example, devotions, pilgrimages, shrines, art, fiction, cinema, television), particularly as committed Catholics argue over how to honor their spiritual tradition in day-to-day life. Study of current challenges wrought by women, Jews, and gays. Special attention paid to contemporary intellectuals and artists who criticize John Paul II while fiercely guarding their own.
Course was offered Fall 2011
RELC 3685Christianity, Gender, and Sexuality (3.00)
This class engages debates about Christianity, gender, and sexuality in past and present. Topics addressed include: biblical treatments of sex, gender, and sexuality; theological views of the human in patristic, medieval, and modern theology; Christianity, feminism, and feminist theology; sexuality and sexual ethics; and queer theology.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELC 3690The Gospel of John and Its Interpretation (3.00)
A close reading of the Gospel of John, this course considers literary, historical, and theological issues. Questions raised include: What is distinctive about the portrayal of Jesus in the Gospel of John in comparison with the synoptic gospels. Why was this gospel so important for the development of Christian theology? Some attention will also be given to the book's reception history, especially its role in the early centuries of the church.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
RELC 3695Sex and Creation in Christianity (3.00)
What is the origin of human sexuality and what are it's purposes? What do sexual identities as male and female have to do with the Christian doctrines of Creation, the imago Dei (image of God), original sin, and salvation? Are male and female complementary or incidental? What value does the Christian faith five to the body? How should we view the body with respect to our sexuality. Premarital sex, dating, cohabitation, and marriage.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELC 3700The Revelation to John and Its Interpretation Throughout the Centuries (3.00)
Course considers both the book's meaning in the original first-century context and its reception through the ages in music, art, literature, film, politics, and theological works.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2011, Spring 2010
RELC 3715Walker Percy and Flannery O'Connor (3.00)
The course covers the major fiction of two important American writers of the twentieth century who challenged and tested the modern temper with a Christian imagination and vision of the human condition
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELC 3770Flannery O'Connor and Walker Percy (3.00)
This course covers the major fiction of two important American writers of the twentieth century who challenged and tested the modern temper with a Christian imagination and vision of the human condition.
RELC 3790Augustine of Hippo (3.00)
Examines the life and thinking of Augustine of Hippo, a major figure in Christian history and a formative influence on Christian thought to this day. Prerequisite: Any RELC course or instructor permission.
RELC 3795Theology, Spirituality and Ethics of Sustainability (3.00)
Primarily through the readings of theologians from the Protestant, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions, this course explores theological, spiritual and ethical perspectives on the environmental issues that are becoming increasingly important across the globe.
RELC 3804American Catholic Social and Political Thought (3.00)
This seminar examines American Catholic social and political thought.
RELC 3835Christian Art (3.00)
Among other topics, this course explores the derogation of Jews as 'the people without art'; the theological implications of Augustine's renumbering of the commandments; the Protestant backlash against Catholic art in the Counter-Reformation; and the controversy surrounding the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, which published twelve cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in 2005.
RELC 3880Religion in Children's Literature (3.00)
This course examines the great fairy tales and works of children's literature for their capacity to communicate moral norms and to instill virtue..The stories that are read raise a host of theological questions that touch on the meanings of faith, grace, good and evil, sin, forgiveness, and redemption. Stories included: Peter Pan, Pinocchio, Wind in the Willows, Narnia Chronicles, and fairy tales of Andersen, the Grimms, and MacDonlad
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
RELC 3890Christianity in Africa (3.00)
Historical and topical survey of Christianity in Africa from the second century c.e. to the present. Cross listed with RELA 389. Prerequisite: a course in African religions or history, Christianity, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2010
RELC 3910Women and the Bible (3.00)
Surveys passages in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELJ 3910. Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.
RELC 4025Family Values (3.00)
Exploration of family structures and norms, specifically of what came to be known in the United States as 'family values' in the early 1970s, with particular attention to the Family Research Council and James Dobson's 'Focus on the Family' today. How are family values enforced and transmitted through religious communities, social pressures, and laws?
RELC 4044Religion and the American Courts (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
What is the nature of religion and its role in American society? This seminar will explore the limits of spiritual convictions in a liberal democracy which guarantees religious freedom. This course will examine: 1) the First Amendment; 2) legal methodology; and 3) the contemporary debate over whether citizens and public officials have a duty to refrain from making political and legal decisions on the basis of their religious beliefs.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
RELC 4085Missions in Contemp Africa (3.00)
An examination of Christian missions in Africa in the 21st Century. Through a variety of disciplinary lenses and approaches, we examine faith-based initiatives in Africa--those launched from abroad, as well as from within the continent. What does it mean to be a missionary in Africa today? How are evangelizing efforts being transformed in response to democratization, globalization and a growing awareness of human rights?
RELC 4160Salem Essays (1.00)
An Opportunity for students to write a short essay based on the court records of the Salem Witch trials to be posted on the Salem Witch trials documentary archive. Prerequisite: RELC 4150 Salem Witch Trials
RELC 4530Advanced Topics in Christianity (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Christianity
RELC 4559New Course in Christianity (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Christianity.
RELC 4610Sex and Morality (3.00)
A theological overview of Jewish and Christian reflection on proper sexual conduct in the United States, with specific emphasis on pre-marital sex, adoption, abortion, gay marriage, and the teaching of sex education in public schools.
RELC 5009Bonhoeffer, Niebuhr and King: Resistance and Reconciliation (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course has four goals: (1) to understand the theologies of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Martin Luther King Jr.; (2) to explore the themes of resistance and reconciliation in their writings and actions; (3) to examine their ambivalent relationships with academic theology; and (4) to consider the promise of lived theology for contemporary religious thought.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
RELC 5043Prospects in Eastern Orthodox Theology (3.00)
A study of important theological writings from the past fifty years by Orthodox theologians on such topics as the dovtrine of God, Christology, liturgy, theological aesthetics, and ethics.This will include major works of Vladmimir Lossky, Seerius Bulgakoc John Zizioulas, and Alexander Schmeman, as well as more recent writers such as Kallistos Ware, Phillip Sherrard, ChrsitosYannaras, David Hart, Elizabeth Behr-Sigel and Olivier Clement.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELC 5048Philo of Alexandria and Hellenistic Judaism (3.00)
An indepth inquiry into the writings and thought of Philo of Alexandria (ca. 20 BCE-50 CE)
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELC 5052Seminar in American Catholic History (3.00)
Examines a selected movement, issue, or figure in the history of Catholicism in America. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
RELC 5077Pius XII, Hitler the US and WW II (3.00)
For the past forty years the role of Pius XII and the Vatican during World War II has been controversial. This seminar will look at that controversy and place it in the context of newly available archival material. The students will read several books on both sides of the question and then present their own research papers, the topics of which will be chosen in consultation with the professor.
RELC 5090African-Americans and the Bible (3.00)
In this course, we will look at the ways African American scholars, clergy, laity, men, women, the free, and the enslaved, have read, interpreted, preached, and taught scripture. In examining these uses, we will also seek to sketch out a broader theology, history, and sociology of black people as they used the tool at hand, the Bible, to argue for their own humanity, create their own cultures, and establish their own societies.
RELC 5130Being and God (3.00)
A constructive treatment of questions related to the possibility of the experience of being and God or of the being of God.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012
RELC 5135America's Bibles: Narrative Construction of Relig (3.00)
This course asks why and to what ends have Americans produced so many versions of the Bible, as well as several new scriptures, such as the Book of Mormon? We will be analyzing the uses of the Bible both as a sacred text for some and an unavoidable cultural object others. Questions of historicity and myth, reason and revelation will run throughout the course. Specific texts will raise issues of race, gender, nationalism, & millennialism.
RELC 5155Ecology, Christianity, and Culture (3.00)
This seminar examines ancient through modern sources of an ecological vision within Christianity, including patristic and medieval writers, liturgy, hymnody and poetry, and contemporary writings on ecology and environmental ethics. The aim is to reach deeper than policy discussions; to canvas the theological and cultural resources that the Christian faith has furnished for adherence to and practice of a serious ecological ethos.
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELC 5158History of Christian Ethics (3.00)
This course is designed to provide a solid understanding of the historical roots, from the New Testament period to the Reformation, of Christian ethics, experience in working with historical source materials, and familiarity with some important interpreters of this history. In seminar discussions, we will primarily explore primary materials, but also consider the work of interpreters such as Ernst Troeltsch and Peter Brown.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
RELC 5230Pentecostalism (3.00)
Examines the history, theology, and practices of Pentecostalism, the fastest growing Christian movement in the world, from its origins among poor whites and recently freed African Americans to its phenomenal expansion in places like South America, Asia, and Africa.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
RELC 5310Religions of the Roman Empire (3.00)
An investigation of the diverse religious landscape of the Greco-Roman world from the end of the Roman Republic through the rise of Christianity. We will consider a variety of religious practice and expression, including the Roman public cult, Dionysiac/Orphic cult, Isis cult, Mithras cult, Greco-Roman Magic, Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity.
Course was offered Fall 2009
RELC 5385The Song of Songs (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical Song of Songs (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
RELC 5445The Atonement in Christian Thought (3.00)
This course engages landmark Christian statements about atonement. For about two-thirds of the semester, we read classic texts by Anselm of Canterbury, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, G. W. F. Hegel, and others. In the remaining third of the course we consider contemporary statements, with an especial focus on liberationist perspectives that examine the possible connections between Christian doctrines, violence, and discrimination. Prerequisite: The course is open to graduate students in Religious Studies and undergraduates who have taken at least three academic classes on Christian thought at the university/college level.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELC 5551Seminar in Early Christian Thought (3.00)
Intensive consideration of a selected issue, movement or figure in Christian thought of the second through fifth centuries. Prerequisite: RELC 2050 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2010, Spring 2010
RELC 5559New Course in Christianity (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Christianity
RELC 5665Freedom: Theological & Philosophical Perspectives (3.00)
This seminar examines perspectives on freedom in landmark texts of Christian theology, western philosophy, and recent critical theory. It engages diverse accounts of (a) the relationship of divine and human action; (b) the nature of sin and grace; and (c) gender, sex, race, and class as they bear on human subjection and/or liberation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELC 5676Human Image, Divine Image (3.00)
This is a study of major figures of the Patristic and medieval Christianity as well as several modern or contemporary theologians who have reflected on the Imago Dei and the humanity of God with respect to Christology and Christian anthropology and inclusive of Christian dogmatics, hymnody, poetry, and sacramentology.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELC 5685Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity (3.00)
This seminar traces the making of Christian 'orthodoxy' in Late Antiquity. Our focus will be debates concerning the doctrines of God and Christ, which we will place in their historical, philosophical and exegetical contexts. Our study is informed by the move in modern scholarship towards anti-essentialist notions of orthodoxy and heresy, and so we will be attentive to the myriad ways in which early Christians sought to authorize their own views.
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELC 5700Patristic Greek (3.00)
Readings of Greek fathers such as John Chrysoston and Gregory of Nazianzus, with emphasis on grammar, syntax and rhetoric. An intermediate to advanced level course.
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELC 5795The Icon in Orthodox Christianity (3.00)
Course explores the history and theology of the icon. How is the icon itself a form of theology, and how does it function in liturgy and worship? Iconography understood as interpretation of Scripture and dogmatic teaching. Study of the theological aesthetics of the icon and of the images themselves, both traditional icons of the Byzantine and Russian type and gospel illuminations of the Armenian, Ethiopic and Coptic traditions.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELC 5830Love and Justice in Christian Ethics (3.00)
Examines various conceptions of love and justice in selected Protestant and Catholic literature mainly from the last fifty years.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
RELC 5910Religion, Race and Politics in American Society (3.00)
This course will examine the role of religion and race in politics in the US with an emphasis on elections from the 1960s to the present.
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELC 5976The Theology of Friedrich Schleiermacher (3.00)
An in-depth analysis of the major writings of Friedrich Schleiermacher, one of the most important European theologians of the nineteenth century. Texts studied include *On Religion*, *Hermeneutics*, *Brief Outline*, and *The Christian Faith*
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELC 5980The Theology of Karl Barth (3.00)
A semester-long engagement with the writings of the most important Protestant theologian in the twentieth century. While we will read some of Barth's earlier work, our main focus will be the *Church Dogmatics*.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013
RELC 7245Religious Liberty in Historical and Legal Perspective (3.00)
An analysis of America's church-state conflicts and enduring questions that have tested and contributed to its evolving understanding of First Amendment guarantees of church disestablishment and freedom of conscience.
Course was offered Spring 2016
RELC 7515Themes and Topics in Christian Thought (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An advanced graduate class, run tutorial-style, which will acquaint graduate students with core texts, themes, and thinkers in Christian thought.
Course was offered Fall 2016
RELC 7559New Course Christianity (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Christianity.
Course was offered Fall 2011
RELC 8315Trinity (3.00)
This seminar develops a systematic theology of the doctrine of the Trinity.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELC 8410Seminar on American Religious Thought I: Edwards to Emerson (3.00)
A historical and theological examination of seminal figures in the development of American religious thought from the Enlightenment through the 'American Renaissance.' Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
RELC 8420Seminar on American Religious Thought II: Liberalism Through Neo-Orthodoxy (3.00)
A historical and theological examination of the work of major religious thinkers in American from 1860 to 1960.
RELC 8559New Course in Christianity (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Christianity.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RELC 8590Topics in New Testament Studies (3.00)
Selected issues in the theory and methods of New Testament criticism.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELC 8701Tutorial in Christian Apocrypha (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
In this tutorial, students will work with manuscripts to produce an edition of a Greek text, an English translation of that edition, and a short commentary on the text. Students will also assemble an annotated bibliography.
RELC 8705Tutorial in Translating Biblical Poetry (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An advanced tutorial in translating biblical poetry, with several interrelated goals: developing skills in advanced biblical grammar; furthering capacities for biblical interpretation; exploring the dynamics of biblical poetry; understanding how ancient poetry and biblical books formed, developed, and were redacted; evaluating secondary literature as a prelude to developing sound arguments and coherent elegant translations.
RELC 8920Seminar in Early Christianity (3.00)
Studies selected topics in early Christian history and thought. Topic varies annually.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Religion-General Religion
RELG 1000First-Year Seminar (3.00)
Introduces a specific topic, research and study techniques, and use of the library.
RELG 1005World Religions (3.00)
This course is a comparative study of the world's enduring religious traditions and their cultural expressions in architecture, art, and music. Among others, the course will examine Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity, and their expression in world culture.
RELG 1010Introduction to Western Religious Traditions (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the major religious traditions of the Western world; Judaism, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Islam.
RELG 1040Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces various aspects of the religious traditions of India, China, and Japan.
RELG 1500Introductory Seminar in Religious Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
These seminars introduce first- and second-year students to the academic study of religion through a close study of a particular theme or topic. Students will engage with material from a variety of methodological perspectives, and they will learn how to critically analyze sources and communicate their findings. The seminars allow for intensive reading and discussion of material. Not more than two Intro Seminars may count towards the Major.
RELG 1559New Course in Religious Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2012
RELG 2140Archaic Cult and Myth (3.00)
Surveys scientific and popular interpretations of prehistoric, ancient, and traditional religions.
RELG 2150Religion in American Life and Thought to 1865 (3.00)
Topics include the influence of Puritanism, the character of American religious freedom, and the interaction between religion and social reform.
RELG 2155Whiteness & Religion: Religious Foundations of a Racial Category (3.00)
This class examines the role religion plays in defining a racial category known as whiteness. By reading cultural histories and ethnographies of the religious practices of various communities, we will examine how groups now classified as white (Irish, Italians, Poles, Jews, etc.) and religious images (depictions of Jesus and the Virgin Mary) "became white" and the role that religious practice played in this shift in racial classification.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
RELG 2160Religion in American Life and Thought from 1865 to the Present (3.00)
Includes American religious pluralism, religious responses to social issues, and the character of contemporary American religious life.
RELG 2190Religion and Modern Fiction (3.00)
Studies religious meanings in modern literature, emphasizing faith and doubt, evil and absurdity, and wholeness and transcendence in both secular fiction and fiction written from traditional religious perspectives.
RELG 2210Religion, Ethics, & Global Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course interprets humanity's changing ecological relationships through religious and philosophical traditions. It takes up ethical questions presented by environmental problems, introduces frameworks for making sense of them, and examines the symbols and narratives that shape imaginations of nature.
RELG 2255Religion and Film (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the relationship between religion and film. We will watch several films in class and, after learning the basics of film analysis, we will be able to perceive and interpret how films portray religions, religious peoples, and religious categories, and even to consider what religion and film have in common as experiences. Viewing of the films will be supplemented by short lectures and class discussion.
Course was offered Summer 2012, Summer 2011
RELG 2260Religion, Race, and Relationship in Film (3.00)
This course explores themes of religion, race, gender, and relationship to the religious or racial 'other' in films from the silent era to the present. It will consider film as a medium and engage students in analysis and discussion of cinematic images, with the goal of developing hermeneutic lenses through which these images can be interpreted. The films selected all ask "How should we treat one another?"
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
RELG 2285Religion, Politics, Society (3.00)
Politics and religion are links to the exploration to culture, history, and current events. This course seeks to understand what is meant by religion and the multiple ways in which it is politically important by examining the world views of various religious traditions and their political implications.
RELG 2290Business Ethics (3.00)
Studies contemporary issues in business from a moral perspective, including philosophical and religious, as well as traditional and contemporary, views of business. Topics include international business, whistleblowing, discrimination, the environment, and marketing.
RELG 2300Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3.00)
Examines several contemporary moral problems from the perspective of ethical thought in the Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish traditions.
RELG 2370Religion After Jefferson (3.00)
This course explores the history of the idea of "religion" as a distinct concept, and introduces students to a crucial topic of modern public life and helps them prepare to grapple with this problem from a global perspective. A Jefferson Public Citizens course.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2011, Spring 2011
RELG 2380Faith and Doubt in the Modern Age (3.00)
This course introduces undergraduates to seminal writings in modern Western thought that explore and question the meaning, truthfulness, and uses of religious belief. The goal is to develop a multi-storied narrative of the variety of interpretations given to the idea of God in modernity and to clarify the conditions of responsible religious belief in a pluralistic world. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.
RELG 2390Theism and Humanism (3.00)
Studies contemporary understandings of religious faith in response to the challenge of humanism.
RELG 2440Human Nature and Its Possibilities (3.00)
Examines psychological, literary, philosophical, and theological perspectives on human existence with a view to seeing what possibilities are contained in the linguistic, theoretical, practical, poetic, and ecstatic capacities of human beings.
RELG 2455Christian America? (3.00)
This course aims to describe the historical development of religious diversity in the United States, and to grapple with its social, political, legal, cultural, and spiritual implications. We will chart the trends that led this nation, once characterized as a triple melting pot of Protestant-Catholic-Jew, to become, by the late twentieth century, one of the most religiously diverse societies in the history of the world.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELG 2475God (3.00)
An introduction to the personality of God as portrayed in the sacred literatures, histories, and practices of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (For the religious studies major, or minor, this counts as either RELC, RELI or RELJ)
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2011
RELG 2559New Course in Religious Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
RELG 2605Religion and Violence (3.00)
Our aim in this course is to analyze the 'religious' logic of certain acts of violence and terror that have come to dominate popular political discussions. We begin the course by surveying the positions that emphasize the 'religious' nature of these actions. We then explore the ambiguous nature of the terms 'terrorism' and 'religion' in general and through example. Finally we ask about the value of characterizing such violence as religious.
Course was offered Summer 2011
RELG 2630Business, Ethics, and Society (3.00)
A study of the philosophical and religious frameworks for interpreting and evaluating human activity in the marketplace. This includes major theoretical perspectives, contemporary issues within the marketplace, and corporate ethics.
RELG 2650Theological Bioethics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes various moral problems in medicine, health care, and global health from Christian (Catholic and Protestant), Jewish, and Islamic theological perspectives with reference to salient philosophical influences.
RELG 2660"Spiritual But Not Religious": Spirituality in America (3.00)
This course asks: what does "spiritual but not religious" mean, and why has it become such a pervasive idea in modern America? We'll study everything from AA to yoga to Zen meditation, with stops in Christian rock, Beat poetry, Abstract Expressionist painting and more. In the end, we'll come to see spirituality in America as a complex intermingling of the great world religions, modern psychology, and a crassly commercialized culture industry.
RELG 2713Sensing the Sacred: Sensory Perception and Religious Imagination (3.00)
Seeing is believing. Or is it? In this course, we will examine the role of sensory perception in religious imagination. We will consider how religious practitioners think about the senses, utilize the senses to experience the world, and assign meaning to the senses. We will also probe the ways in which religious traditions deploy sensory metaphors to describe human experience of the sacred.
Course was offered Summer 2015, Spring 2013
RELG 2820Jerusalem (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course traces the history of Jerusalem with a focus on its significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. How has Jerusalem been experienced and interpreted as sacred within these religious communities? How have they expressed their attachments to this contested space from antiquity to modern times? Discussion will be rooted in primary texts from Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sources, with attention to their historical context.
RELG 3050Religions of Western Antiquity (3.00)
Studies Greco-Roman religions and religious philosophies of the Hellenistic period, including official cults, mystery religions, gnosticism, astrology, stoicism; emphasizes religious syncretism and interactions with Judaism and Christianity.
RELG 3051Religion and Society (3.00)
Critical appraisal of classical and contemporary approaches to the sociological study of religion and society.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013
RELG 3053Religion and Psychology (3.00)
Major religious concepts studied from the perspective of various theories of psychology, including the psychoanalytic tradition and social psychology.
RELG 3057Existentialism: Its Literary, Philosophical and Religious Expressions (3.00)
Studies Existentialist thought, its Hebraic-Christian sources, and 19th and 20th century representatives of the movement (Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, Buber, and Tillich).
Course was offered Fall 2010
RELG 3200Martin, Malcolm, and America (3.00)
An analysis of African-American social criticism centered upon, but not limited to, the life and thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
RELG 3210Major Themes in American Religious History (3.00)
Examines a major religious movement or tradition in American history.
RELG 3255Ethics, Literature, and Religion (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores how ethical issues in religious traditions and cultural narratives are addressed in literature, scripture, essay, and memoir. How do stories inquire into "the good life"? How may moral principles and virtues be "tested" by fiction? How does narrative shape identity, mediate universality and particularity, reflect beliefs and values in conflict, and depict suffering?
RELG 3305Basic Philosophy Plato to Kant (3.00)
This course introduces students to the primary philosophic contributions of Plato/Socrates, Aristotle, the Stoics, Augustine, Locke, Descartes, Hume, and Kant, with briefer studies in Thomas, Maimonides, Ibn Sina, and Leibniz. Discussion will focus on these thinkers' potential significance for contemporary studies in religion and theology.
RELG 3315Jefferson, Religion and the Secular University (3.00)
The undergraduate seminar will explore as inter-related topics the religious formation and outlook of Thomas Jefferson, his conception of the proper relation of religion and the civil power, his idea of the university as a secular institution, ad the role of religion in the founding and subsequent history of the University of Virginia.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELG 3333Literature and Ethics (3.00)
Explores ethical questions raised by religious-traditional and cultural narratives as well as by fiction and memoir. How do stories inquire into the good life? How may moral principles and virtues be tested by fiction? How does narrative shape identity, mediate universality and particularity, reflect values that may conflict, and depict suffering. Format: literature and theory, guided discussion, critical essays, and a final presentation.
RELG 3360Conquests and Religions in the Americas, 1400s-1830s (3.00)
Beginning with Islamic-ruled Spain and the Aztec and Incan empires, the course examines historical changes in the religious practices of indigenous peoples, enslaved Africans and European settlers in Latin America and the Caribbean under European colonization and the transatlantic slave trade. Topics include: religious violence, human sacrifice, the Inquisition; missions; race, gender and sexuality; slavery, revolts, revolutions, nationalism.
RELG 3365Conscious Social Change: Contemplation and Innovation for Social Change (3.00)
This course offers an experiential social venture incubator integrating mindfulness-based leadership and contemplative practices and social entrepreneurship tools. Students will work in teams to develop a business plan for a real or hypothetical social-purpose venture. Daily contemplative practice, interactive personal leadership work and dialogue will allow students to explore both the inner and external dimensions of becoming change leaders.
RELG 3370God Since Cinema (3.00)
A survey of films about God and the effect these films (as opposed to books or paintings) have had on the Western understanding of God.
RELG 3375Spiritual Writing (3.00)
This course in spiritual writing chronicles quests for meaning, purpose and direction. The reading and writing assignments explore encounters with the sacred, and consider such written wrestlings within faith communities, and other sources of wisdom. Over the semester, students will study examples of contemporary spiritual writing in diaries, memoir, and fiction. They will also write about "matters of the spirit" in various genres.
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELG 3380Feasting, Fasting and Faith: Food in Judaism and Christianity (3.00)
Students study and research religion as it has been practiced in everyday life in two different traditions and write up and communicate their findings in articulate and thoughtful ways. As they focus on the themes of feasting and fasting in Jewish and Christian communities, they engage in various forms of interdisciplinary inquiry, including the study of sacred texts, history, ethics, and ethnography.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELG 3400Women and Religion (3.00)
Introduces the images of women in the major religious traditions, the past and present roles of women in these traditions, and women's accounts of their own religious experiences.
RELG 3420First Amendment Limits (3.00)
The promise of religious liberty contained in the First Amendment has always been subject to a variety of restraints by federal and local governments. This course will focus on the cultural experience of these restraints; not only how they were devised by courts and implemented by regulatory agencies, but also how they are understood in the popular imagination and, finally, what influence they have on the shape of religion in America.
RELG 3444Religious Conflict and Resolution Among the Abrahamic Religions (3.00)
What are the religions of Abraham? Are they bound for peace or conflict? This course introduces students to the scriptural sources and medieval to modern practices of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism including key historical narratives from the Qur'an, and the Hebrew and Christian Bibles. An examination of the role these scriptures play in people's lives is followed by focusing on the 'hot spots' of inter-Abrahamic conflict today.
Course was offered Summer 2012, Summer 2011
RELG 3450The Emotions (3.00)
Exploration of how what we feel colors what we believe, what we claim to know. What are human emotions and why do we have them? Philosophers, psychiatrists, neurologists and religious thinkers disagree. We will analyze these disagreements, along with the question of how the emotions can be controlled or educated. We will focus on William James, who influentially argued that for most believers, religious experience is first and foremost emotional.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELG 3470Christianity and Science (3.00)
Christian Europe gave rise to modern science, yet Christianity and science have long appeared mutual enemies. Does science undermine religious belief? Can human life and striving really be explained in terms of physics and chemistry? In this course we explore the encounter between two powerful cultural forces and study the intellectual struggle to anchor God in the modern world.
RELG 3485Moral Leadership (3.00)
This course introduces students to the moral frameworks of Aristotle, Maimonides, Machiavelli, and Jeff McMahon and then examines pressing moral issues in contemporary America.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
RELG 3559New Course in Religious Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
RELG 3560Issues in Theological Ethics (3.00)
Studies a moral problem or set of related problems (e.g., human experimentation, special moral relations, or warfare) in the context of recent work in theological ethics.
RELG 3600Religion and Modern Theatre (3.00)
Examines the works of several playwrights, some of whom dramatize explicitly religious themes or subjects, and others who are predominantly concerned with secular situations and contexts that imply religious questions and issues.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
RELG 3605Religion, Violence and Strategy: How to Stop Killing in the Name of God (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will teach students to evaluate critically the leadership and strategies of social impact campaigns, and the ways in which governments, religious actors and civil society have tried to reduce violent conflict. Students will be organized into small integrated teams to research the root causes and triggers for religion-related violence across the Middle East and North Africa.
RELG 3630Idolatry (3.00)
Beginning with Biblical sources and concluding with contemporary texts, this course will examine the philosophical framework of casting idolatry as an unspeakable sin: What is an idol, and why is idolatry so objectionable? With an emphasis on Judaism, though not exclusively, we will discuss idolatry in the context of representation, election, otherness, emancipation, nationalism, secularism, religious innovation, and messianism.
RELG 3640Religion, God, and Evil (3.00)
Studies the 'problem of evil,' using philosophical, literary, and various religious sources.
RELG 3650Systems of Theological Ethics (3.00)
Examines one or more contemporary systems of Christian ethics, alternating among such figures as Reinhold Niebuhr, C. S. Lewis, Jacques Ellul, and Jacques Maritain.
RELG 3750Taoism and Confucianism (3.00)
Taoism and Confucianism
RELG 3780Faulkner and the Bible (3.00)
This class is study of the influence of the Bible (both Hebrew and Christian canons) on the fiction of William Faulkner. We will also see how this ancient text and its heritage informed Faulkner's views on race, community, and personal identity as well.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
RELG 3795Theology, Spirituality and Ethics of Sustainability (3.00)
Primarily through the readings of theologians from the Protestant, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions, this course explores theological, spiritual and ethical perspectives on the environmental issues that are becoming increasingly important across the globe.
RELG 3800African American Religious History (3.00)
This course will explore African American religious traditions in their modern and historical contexts, combining an examination of current scholarship, worship and praxis. It will examine the religious life and religious institutions of African Americans from their African antecedents to contemporary figures and movements in the US.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2012
RELG 3820Global Ethics & Climate Change (3.00)
This seminar takes up questions of responsibility and fairness posed by climate change as ways into a search for shared ground across moral traditions. It investigates the ethical dimensions of climate change as a way to consider broad frameworks for developing responsibilities across national, cultural, and religious borders.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014
RELG 3860Human Bodies and Parts as Properties (3.00)
An analysis and assessment of theological, philosophical, and legal interpretations of rights holders and rights held in living and dead human bodies and their parts, in the context of organ and tissue transplantation, assisted reproduction, and research. Prerequisite: RELG 2650
RELG 3950Evil in Modernity: Banal or Demonic (3.00)
Investigates how modern thinkers have understood the character of evil and the challenge it poses to human existence. Evaluates the proposals made in response to that challenge. Prerequisite: Any course in religious studies.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELG 4023Bioethics Internship Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course enables students to spend time in medical settings as 'participant-observers,' in order to gain first-hand experience of the subject matter that is the focus of the theory, teaching, and practice of bioethics. Prerequisites: Bioethics Major/Minor
RELG 4220American Religious Autobiography (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Multidisciplinary examination of religious self-perception in relation to the dominant values of American life. Readings represent a variety of spiritual traditions and autobiographical forms.
RELG 4450Visions of the Apocalypse (3.00)
The course will introduce apocalypticism in Western religious traditions, but will soon focus on the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Explorations will take us from slave revolts to UFO cults to Dr. Strangelove, from Edward Bellamy to genetic engineering, from the space program to Left Behind, and from the Great Disappointment of the 1840s and the Ghost Dance of 1890 to the New Age of the present.
Course was offered Fall 2010
RELG 4500Majors Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the study of religion as an interdisciplinary subject, utilizing methods in history of religions, theology, sociology, depth psychology, and literary criticism. The seminars are thematic and topics will vary according to the design of the instructor. Limited to twenty religious studies majors.
RELG 4540Advanced Topics in General Religious Studies (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in General Religious Studies
RELG 4559New Course in Religious Studies (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
RELG 4800Crafting a Research Project in Religious Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers third- and fourth-year Religious Studies majors resources for conceiving and executing a major research project. As a follow-up, students usually take RELG 4900 ("Distinguished Major Thesis"), which affords them an opportunity to write the research project they have conceived in this course. Whether you plan to write a thesis or not, RELG 4800 offers an accessible introduction to the craft of research in Religious Studies.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
RELG 4810Poetry and Theology (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar seeks to develop a close reading of major religious poetry by two major religious poets
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014
RELG 4900Distinguished Major Thesis (3.00)
Students write a thesis, directed by a member of the department, focusing on a specific problem in the theoretical, historical or philosophical study of religion or a specific religious tradition. The thesis grows out of the project proposal and annotated bibliography developed in the Research Methods seminar. Prerequisite: Selection by faculty for Distinguished Major Program and completion of RELG 4800.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
RELG 4910Secularism and Religion (3.00)
Does religion belong in the public square? Does it have a legitimate role in secular life, despite a lack of unanimity in the religious beliefs of the public? Can religion be separated from public and political life? This course explores theoretical works that examine these and related questions and queries the ways in which religion shapes, challenges, and clashes with the modern nation-state.
RELG 5030Readings in Chinese Religion (3.00)
Examines selected readings from a specific text, figure, or theme. Readings emphasize possible structures of religious language and their translation.
RELG 5070Interpretation Theory (3.00)
Analyzes existentialist, phenomenological, structuralist, literary, historical, and psychological approaches to the interpretation of texts, especially narrative religious texts; and the interactions of language, history, and understanding.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
RELG 5088Dostoevsky and Eliot: Notes from the Wasteland (3.00)
The title of this course is not just a play on words. It suggests the common mind of both authors concerning the character of the modern world. Each has given us an acute and haunting diagnosis of modernity. Each has explored the failures of faith and love among the inhabitants of modernity. Yet each also has rendered a compelling vision of a reintegrated world of community, communion, and salvation..
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELG 5170Seminar in History of Religions (3.00)
Introduces the basic thinkers in the field of history of religions and to fundamental problems in the study of religious sociology, mythology, and ritual.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELG 5240Problems in Philosophy of Religion (3.00)
Examines classic and contemporary discussions of problems in the philosophy of religion.
RELG 5320Research Seminar in Religion, Conflict, and Peace (3.00)
Advanced research on religion, politics and conflict for students of "religion-on-religion" conflict/conflict resolution. Research methods drawn from religious studies, politics, anthropology and linguistics, history, sociology, nursing, philosophy, systems analysis and data science. Topics recommended by current work in the Global Covenant of Religions, the UVA Initiative on Religion in Conflict, and other professional work in the field.
Course was offered Fall 2016
RELG 5375Aesthetics and Ethics (3.00)
What is the relationship between ethics and aesthetics? Specifically, how might theological and philosophical aesthetics inform approaches to religious engagement in plural socio-political contexts? This graduate seminar explores contemporary aesthetic theory, especially in relation to conceptions of justice and emotion.
RELG 5455Recent Feminist Thought (3.00)
In this course we shall explore in depth works published in the last decade or two that demonstrate, to varying degrees, feminist thought as increasingly integral to on-going conversations and controversies in ethics, both social/political and theological, and at the same time instrumental in taking those discussions in new and important directions. The emphasis in the course is on careful reading and explication, and on recognition and critique
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELG 5485History of American Religion and Social Reform (3.00)
American Religion and Social Reform examines the history of the interplay between theology, morality, and politics in American history. Topics covered include temperance and prohibition, labor, civil rights, the peace movement, and environmentalism. Weekly reading, class presentation, and original research will be important components of the class. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELG 5541Seminar in Social and Political Thought (3.00)
An examination of the social and political thought of selected religious thinkers.
RELG 5559New Course in Religion (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of general religion.
RELG 5630Seminar: Issues in the Study of Religion and Literature (3.00)
Analyzes, in terms of fundamental theory, the purposes, problems, and possibilities of interdisciplinary work in religion and literary criticism.
RELG 5775Religion on Fire: Religion, Politics, Conflict (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The course examines "religion" as an element of socio-political activity in major conflicts in the past two decades: examining the global phenomenon of irremediable, religion-related violent conflict, recent efforts to diagnose religion-specific sources of both violence and peacebuilding, and prospects for cooperative peacebuilding efforts among governmental, civil society, and religious agencies.
RELG 5780Wallace Stevens and the Absolute (3.00)
A close reading of Wallace Steven's major poems and an evaluation of their theological significance. Prerequisite: Graduate seminar plus advanced undergraduates in approved.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2010
RELG 5801Crafting a Research Project in Religious Studies (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers MA students in Religious Studies resources for conceiving and executing a major research project or thesis. By the end of the semester, each participant will have completed a well-organized, detailed prospectus. The prospectus will reflect the guidance of one¿s thesis advisor as well as the scrutiny of the instructor and input from peers. Each student will thus be poised to begin writing his/her thesis the following semester.
RELG 5820Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures (3.00)
An interdisciplinary course that includes the following elements: studies in the textual traditions of particular religions; studies in literary theory; studies in literary traditions; the application of literary theory to studies in religious text traditions; and the application of the history of religions to the study of literary canons.
RELG 5821Proseminar in World Religions, World Literatures (1.00)
This monthly seminar explores methods and issues vital to the combined study of literatures and religions. It brings all MA students together, under faculty guidance, to attend to the broad range of individual projects and to foster a rich conversation that traverses the emergent field of study.
RELG 5835Ethnography and the Study of Religion (3.00)
This course familiarizes students with a range of ways of studying practice in religions as it is evidenced in sacred texts, religious artifacts, images and locations; as it is chronicled in historical documents; as it is reflected in literary and artistic creations; and as it revealed in contemporary practice.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
RELG 5850Narrative in Ethics and Theology (3.00)
Examines the nature of narrative modes of representation and argument, and how narrative theory has been employed in contemporary ethics and religious thought.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013
RELG 5900Ethics, Politics, and Rhetoric (3.00)
Studies the perennial problems of politics and morals considered primarily by the reading of plays, novels, speeches, and historical documents.
RELG 5960What Is Scripture? (3.00)
'What is Scripture?' That is the defining question for this introductory seminar in Scripture, Interpretation, and Practice - one of three entry courses for the SIP program. While SIP prides itself in not asking 'what is?' questions, this course risks the question but only as a source of context-specific, tradition-based reasonings. The goal is sampling: examining selected passages from each canon to answer the question, what is scripture?
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELG 7130American Spirituality (3.00)
What is "spirituality" and why has it become such a pervasive term in contemporary American culture? This course explores this question through historical interrogation of the category and its development since the early nineteenth century. The encounter of historic religious traditions, especially Protestant Christianity, with the intellectual, cultural, economic, and social currents of modernity will form the larger background for our analysis.
Course was offered Fall 2016
RELG 7360Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Given the multidisciplinary character of religious studies, it is imperative for new scholars to gain a basic sense of theoretical and methodological options in the field. By way of an examination of landmark texts, this course surveys the formation of religious studies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and considers some important contemporary approaches.
RELG 7450Phenomenology and Theology (3.00)
This seminar investigates the relations between phenomenology and theology.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2010
RELG 7460Religion, Theory, Theology, and Modernity (3.00)
This interdisciplinary class acquaints graduate students with landmark texts that consider the place, significance, and purpose of religion in late modernity. Focusing on works written over the last few decades, it draws on multiple genres of study: philosophy, anthropology, social science, religious studies, and theological inquiry.
RELG 7528Topics in Modern Religious Thought (3.00)
Examination of a major topic in modern religious thought--e.g., religious imagination, ethical and religious subjectivity, metaphor and religious language, religious and ethical conceptions of love.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2010
RELG 7559New Course in Religious Studies (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Religious Studies.
RELG 8000Negativity and the Religious Imagination (3.00)
Examines ways in which tragedy (and other forms of imaginative literature), scripture and theology, and hermeneutics and criticism portray and reflect on aspects of suffering and evil.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012
RELG 8130Figures and Traditions in Philosophical and Religious (1.00 - 3.00)
A two-semester course that introduces the basic ethical works and theories of central figures in the Western tradition: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Bentham, Mill, Buber, Dewey, and Rawls.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2010
RELG 8205Edmund Husserl's Philosophy (3.00)
This seminar seeks to read a range of texts by Edmund Husserl, beginning with his "breakthrough" text The Logical Investigations and ending with his final re-statement of phenomenology The Crisis of the European Sciences. Some attention will be paid to the Nachlass as well as to the writings that Husserl published in his own lifetime. The importance of intentionality, of intuition, and of the epoche and reduction will be stressed.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015
RELG 8330Comparative Religious Ethics (3.00)
Examines the theoretical and methodological questions underlying comparative studies of religious ethics. Tests several methods in relation to materials from different religious traditions.
Course was offered Spring 2012
RELG 8350Proseminar in Scripture Interpretation and Practice (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This one credit seminar introduces students the Scriptural Interpretation and Practice (SIP) program to recent approaches to the comparative study of scriptural sources and scriptural traditions.
RELG 8400Historiography Seminar in American Religion (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines current historiographical issues in the interpretation of religion in American history. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013, Spring 2012
RELG 8559New Course in Religious Studies (1.00 - 6.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of general religion.
RELG 8704Themes and Topics in Religious Ethics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Tutorial on important themes, topics, and figures in religious ethics, both historically and in the present moment.
RELG 8708Tutorial in Ethics and Literature (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
We will explore the narrative dimensions of ethical thought and expression and the ethical questions raised by particular literary texts, including how we make ethical decisions, what it means to be a good person and live a good life, how we should live with and respond to those around us, what visions of the world we should cultivate and seek to realize, and what responses we might develop to life¿s sufferings and the fact of our mortality.
Religion-Hinduism
RELH 1559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism
RELH 2090Hinduism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys the Hindu religious heritage from pre-history to the 17th century; includes the Jain and Sikh protestant movements.
RELH 2110Popular Hinduism (3.00)
Introduces Hinduism through the examination of the religious lives, practices, and experiences of ordinary Hindus in the modern world.
RELH 2195Theory and Practice of Yoga (3.00)
An investigation of yoga practice throughout history from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Topics include yoga's origins in ancient India, systematic yoga theories in Buddhism and Hinduism, Tantric Yoga, and the medicalization and globalization of Yoga in the modern period. Students' readings and writing assignments are supplemented throughout with practical instruction in yoga.
RELH 2559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
his course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
RELH 3140The Jain Tradition (3.00)
Examines Jain history, belief, and practice. Prerequisite: RELG 1040, RELH 2090, 2110, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELH 3440Religion and Violence in Modern India (3.00)
The purpose of this course is to study the phenomenon of religious violence in one geographic and cultural context. We will examine the roles of religion and violence in Indian political life from the British period until contemporary times, and through the Indian example, we will explore current questions and problems regarding the relationship between religion and politics.
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELH 3559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism.
RELH 3710Hindu Traditions of Devotion (3.00)
Examines the history of Hindu devotionalism in three distinct geographical and cultural regions of India, focusing on the rise of vernacular literature and local traditions of worship. Prerequisite: Any course in Asian religions or instructor permission.
RELH 3725Travel Writing and India (3.00)
This course examines western encounters with India by reading the fiction and travel writing of Europeans, expatriate Indians, and Americans in India. In reading such works, the course will explore the place of India in the European and American literary and cultural imagination.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
RELH 3740Hinduism Through its Narrative Literatures (3.00)
Examines a major genre of Hindu religious narrative. Genre varies but may include the epics; the mythology of the Puranas; the 'didactic' Kathasaritsagara and Pancatantra; the hagiographies of the great Hindu saints; and the modern novel. Prerequisite: RELG 1040, RELH 2090, RELH 2110, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2011
RELH 4540Advanced Topics in Hinduism (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Hinduism
RELH 4550Advanced Topics in Hinduism (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Hinduism
RELH 4559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism
RELH 5053Hindu Philosophical Systems (3.00)
This course offers an advanced survey of the "six schools" of Indian philosophy. The purpose of the course is to develop a strong familiarity with the major schools of Hindu thought and the major philosophical concerns they addressed, and students will be asked to develop an historical understanding of the relevant authors and traditions. We will read primary texts in translation, along with selected secondary sources.
RELH 5340Ritual and Renunciation (3.00)
This course examines the place for ritual practice and world-renunciation in Hinduism by examining two pivotal Hindu philosophical traditions: the M'm''s', a hermeneutical tradition that interprets the Vedas and the ritual actions they prescribe; and the Ved'nta, which offers a world-renouncing path to spiritual liberation (mok'a). We ask how Hinduism conceives of ritual, of renunciation, and, most importantly, of how the one informs the other.
RELH 5450Hindu-Buddhist Debates (3.00)
This course examines philosophical debates of Hindu and Buddhist authors from the time of the founding of Buddhism to the medieval period. Primary sources in translation and secondary, scholarly sources are examined in this course. Prerequisite: Significant prior exposure to Hinduism and/or Buddhism.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELH 5465Shaiva Tantra (3.00)
The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to Indian tantric Saivism, beginning with the proto-tantric traditions of the "Outer Way" (atiarga) and including the increasingly goddess orientated and increasingly non-dualistic developments evidenced by the myriad traditions of the "Way of Mantras" (mantramarga). Students who wish to take this course are expected to have a deep familiarity with Hindu traditions.
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELH 5475Social Vision in Hinduism (3.00)
This course will examine the public and social dimensions of Hinduism. Topics will include the role of religion in shaping social institutions (e.g.: caste, the law), cultural attitudes toward sexual and other personal relationships, and the relationship between religion and government. Put in emic terms, we will explore the nature of the first three of the four Hindu goals of life (purusarthas): dharma, artha, and kama. Prerequisite: Basic Knowledge of Hindu Traditions
Course was offered Spring 2016
RELH 5559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism.
RELH 7045Panini and the Sanskrit Grammarians (3.00)
This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the system of the great Sanskrit grammarian, Panini. The purpose of the course is to cultivate familiarity and facility with Panini's generative grammar. Students will learn the principles of the grammar and how to apply them in addressing a range of technical and grammatical issues. Key commentators on the grammar will also be read, as will relevant secondary sources.
RELH 7559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism.
RELH 8559New Course in Hinduism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Hinduism.
Course was offered Spring 2011
RELH 8702Tutorial in Sanskrit: Aesthetics (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This tutorial constitutes a reading course in Sanskrit, the classical language of India. Students will read the original texts and translate them into English, analyzing and interpreting the materials in light of the Indian tradition of commentary and exegesis and in light of contemporary scholarly and other analyses of the relevant subject matter: aesthetics, or the alamkarasastra.
Religion-Islam
RELI 1559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
RELI 2024Jewish-Muslim Relations (3.00)
Jewish and Muslim communities share a complex history of interaction, spanning from seventh-century Arabia to the present day, and including instances of collaboration as well as moments of violence. Our course examines this dynamic relationship through documentary and literary sources. We focus on points of contact between Muslims and Jews in contexts ranging from battlefields to universities, from religious discourse to international politics.
RELI 2070Classical Islam (3.00)
Studies the Irano-Semitic background, Arabia, Muhammad and the Qur'an, the Hadith, law and theology, duties and devotional practices, sectarian developments, and Sufism.
RELI 2080Global Islam (3.00)
Global Islam traces the development of political Islamic thought from Napoleons invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the Arab Spring in 2010 and its aftermath in the Middle East.
RELI 2085Modern Islam: From the Age of Empires to the Present (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys Islamic history from the "age of the great empires" (Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal) to the colonial period and up to the present day, including Islam in America. Islamic life and thought will be examined from multiple angles -- including popular piety and spirituality, philosophy and theology, law, gender, art, architecture, and literature -- with particular attention paid to the rise of modern Islamic "fundamentalist" movements.
RELI 2559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2011
RELI 3110Muhammad and the Qur'an (3.00)
Systematic reading of the Qur'an in English, with an examination of the prophet's life and work. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
RELI 3120Sufism: Islamic Mysticism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will be a historical and topical survey of the development of Sufism from the classical Islamic period through the modern age, paying special attention to the interaction of ideas and the social and political contexts surrounding them.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
RELI 3415Medieval Books and Scholars (3.00)
Colloquium on medieval books and scholars
RELI 3559New Course in Islam (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 3670Religion and Politics in Islam (3.00)
Historical and topical survey of the roots and genesis of the religion, and political conceptions operating in the Islamic world today.
RELI 3900Islam in Africa (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELA 3900. Prerequisite: RELA 2750, RELI 2070, RELI 2080, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
RELI 4559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam
RELI 4560Advanced Topics in Islam (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Islam
RELI 5345People of the Book Under Islam (3.00)
Interfaith relations under Islam.
RELI 5380Islamic Biomedical Ethics (3.00)
Seminar will explore the foundations of religious ethics, ethical principles and rules developed by Muslim scholars to provide guidelines in medical practice and research in various cultural and political contexts.
RELI 5400Muslim Comparative Theologies: Sunni-Shi'i Creeds (3.00)
The seminar will undertake to study the comparative Sunni and Shi'ite theologies to underscore a historical development of Muslim creeds in the context of social and political conditions. The course will cover the development of Muslim theology in general and the Sunni and Shi'ite creeds in particular. Prerequisites: RELI 2070 or 2080
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELI 5420War and Peace in Islam: A Comparative Ethics Approach (3.00)
Studies Islamic notions of holy war and peace as they relate to statecraft and political authority in Muslim history.
RELI 5425Islamic Philosophy & Theology (3.00)
This course surveys the major developments within Islamic philosophy and theology from the classical to the early modern periods. Topics covered include the early theological schools (Ash'aris, Maturidis, Mu'tazilis), the transmission of Greek philosophy into Arabic, Peripatetic philosophy, Illuminationism, Shi'ite philosophy, and philosophical Sufism, concluding with the challenges faced by Islamic philosophy through the colonial and modern eras. This course has no prerequisites, but some previous experience in either Islamic studies or philosophy will be helpful.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELI 5540Seminar in Islamic Studies (3.00)
Topics in Islamic Studies
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
RELI 5559New Course in Islam (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 7100Islamic Religious Law (3.00)
Studies the sources and implications of the Islamic Religious Law (the Sharia). Prerequisite: RELI 2070 or RELC 5300.
RELI 7559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 8559New Course in Islam (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Islam.
RELI 8703Advanced Readings in Arabic (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced readings in Arabic philosophical, theological, mystical, and literary texts. Course readings will be in Arabic.
RELI 8707Advanced Readings in Persian (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced readings in Persian philosophical, theological, mystical, and literary texts. Course readings will be in Persian.
RELI 8709Islamic Studies Tutorial (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Tutorial in Islamic Studies on philosophy, theology, jurisprudence, ethics, and political Islam.
Religion-Judaism
RELJ 1210Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel in the light of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Emphasizes methods of contemporary biblical criticism. Cross listed as RELC 1210.
RELJ 1410Elementary Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible.
RELJ 1420Elementary Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1410 or the equivalent.
RELJ 1559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism
RELJ 1590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
RELJ 2024Jewish-Muslim Relations (3.00)
Jewish and Muslim communities share a complex history of interaction, spanning from seventh-century Arabia to the present day, and including instances of collaboration as well as moments of violence. Our course examines this dynamic relationship through documentary and literary sources. We focus on points of contact between Muslims and Jews in contexts ranging from battlefields to universities, from religious discourse to international politics.
RELJ 2030Introduction to Judaism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introduces the world view and way of life of classical Rabbinic Judaism.
RELJ 2040American Judaism (3.00)
Description and explanation of the diverse forms of Jewish religious life in America.
RELJ 2056Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition (3.00)
Classical Sources in the Jewish Tradition/Judaism in Antiquity
RELJ 2061Judaism, Modernity, and Secularization (3.00)
This course attempts to develop the history and intellectual underpinnings of the Jewish experience of modernity and secularization. It will explore the variety of Jewish responses and adjustments to the modern world and their implications for present day Judaism in its many forms.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2009
RELJ 2230Jewish Spiritual Journeys (3.00)
Jewish Spiritual Journeys
RELJ 2240Jewish Ritual (3.00)
Jewish Ritual
RELJ 2300Introduction to Israeli Literature in Translation (3.00)
This course explores Israeli culture and society through the lens of its literature. Beginning with the revival of modern Hebrew and following the formative events of the Israeli experience, we will study a range of fictional works (and poetry) that represent the diverse voices of Israeli self-expression. Readings include S.Y. Agnon, Aharon Appelfeld, Yoel Hoffmann, Etgar Keret, A.B. Yehoshua, Yehudit Hendel, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2010
RELJ 2410Intermediate Classical Hebrew I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Readings in the prose narratives of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 1420 or the equivalent.
RELJ 2420Intermediate Classical Hebrew II (3.00)
Readings in the prose narratives and poetry of the Hebrew Bible. Emphasizes grammar, vocabulary, and syntax. Attention to issues of translation and interpretation. Prerequisite: HEBR/RELJ 2410 or the equivalent.
RELJ 2521Special Topics in Judaism (3.00)
Special Topics In Judaism.
RELJ 2559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Judaisim.
RELJ 2590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3030Jesus and the Gospels (3.00)
This course focuses on Jesus of Nazareth as an historical figure, that is, as he is accessible to the historian by means of historical methods. Our most important sources of information on Jesus are the canonical Gospels, and so much of the course will involve reading and attempting to understand these texts. We will attempt to reconstruct at least the broad outlines of Jesus activity and teachings, keeping in mind the limits of our sources.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
RELJ 3052Responses to the Holocaust (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Responses to the Holocaust
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
RELJ 3070Beliefs and Ethics after the Holocaust (3.00)
Examines how theologians and ethicists have responded to the human catastrophe of the Nazi Holocaust, 1933-45. Readings include twentieth-century reflections on the Holocaust, and previous Jewish and Christian responses to catastrophe from Biblical times through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century pogroms in eastern Europe. Prerequisite: Any religious studies, history, or philosophy course, or instructor permission.
RELJ 3080Israeli Fiction in Translation (3.00)
Israeli Fiction in Translation
RELJ 3085The Passover Haggadah: A Service Learning Course (3.00)
The Passover Haggadah cultivates sensitivity for the plight of the stranger, and we will study how it came about and how it has been used as a template for rituals of social activism on behalf of oppressed peoples, and in particular, of refugees. In volunteer placements in the community, UVA students will work with individuals who have have found refuge in Cville. Together, they will collaborate on designing haggadahs and community seders.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
RELJ 3090Israelite Prophecy (3.00)
This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel. We will read in translation most of the stories from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament about prophets (Moses, Deborah, Samuel, Elijah, Elisha), as well as the books attributed to prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and The Twelve). Each primary text will be considered in its historical, cultural, and political contexts.
RELJ 3100Medieval Jewish Thought (3.00)
This course introduces the medieval Jewish intellectual tradition (9th-13th centuries) in its cultural and historical context. We will explore key themes such as the nature of God, prophecy, exile, the status of Scripture, the history of religions, and the quest for spiritual perfection. Readings will be drawn from philosophical, theological, exegetical, pietistic and mystical texts, including works from Saadia Gaon, Judah Halevi, and Maimonides.
Course was offered Spring 2016
RELJ 3170Modern Jewish Thought (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction into the major themes of Modern Jewish Thought.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
RELJ 3220Judaism and Zionism (3.00)
Studies the complex relationship between Judaism the sacred tradition of the Jews and Zionism the modern ideology of Jewish national revival.
RELJ 3292The Book of Job & Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELJ 3300The Jewish Mystical Tradition (3.00)
Historical study of the Jewish mystical tradition, emphasizing the persistent themes of the tradition as represented in selected mystical texts.
Course was offered Spring 2014
RELJ 3310Jewish Law (3.00)
Studies the structure and content of Jewish law in terms of its normative function, its historical background, its theological and philosophical principles, and its role in contemporary society both Jewish and general.
RELJ 3320Judaism: Medicine and Healing (3.00)
Judaism: Medicine and Healing
RELJ 3330Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change (3.00)
Women and Judaism: Tradition and Change
RELJ 3340Jewish Medical Ethics (3.00)
Jewish Medical Ethics
RELJ 3350Judaism and Ethics (3.00)
An exploration of ethical thinking using the resources of the Jewish tradition.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3360Judaism and Christianity (3.00)
Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship.
RELJ 3370Modern Movements in Judaism (3.00)
Studies the modern religious movements in Judaism including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, as well as Zionism, both secular and religious, with an emphasis on their theological and philosophical assertions and historical backgrounds.
RELJ 3372German Jewish Culture and History (3.00)
This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history & thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.
RELJ 3390Jewish Feminism (3.00)
Jewish Feminism
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
RELJ 3430Women in Judaism (3.00)
Women in Judaism
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 3475Judaism and Science (3.00)
A study of the place of science in Judaism, focusing of the example of creation. Topics include: The Genesis story in plain sense, historical scholarship, rabbinic commentary and Jewish philosophy; The Big Bang through the history of Jewish reasoning; Newton and Modern Jewish Humanism; Quantum Physics and the Logic of Scripture; Science in modern and contemporary Jewish thought and belief; Judaism and the environment.
RELJ 3490Jewish Weddings (3.00)
As we study the ritual of the Jewish wedding ceremony from antiquity to the present day, we will see how notions about marriage, gender relations, and the normative family are displayed and challenged. In particular, we will be investigating the establishment of innovations in the contemporary Jewish weddings (traditional, liberal, same-sex and interfaith) in America and Israel.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
RELJ 3559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Judaism.
RELJ 3590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 3615Joseph, Esther, Daniel: Biblical Novels (3.00)
The finest narratives in ancient Judaism - stories about Joseph, Esther, Daniel - describe an exiled hero, who delivers his or her people against all odds; related literature includes Ruth, Tobit, Judith, Joseph & Asenath. This course examines the literary, historical, theological significance of these works and common themes: exile, restoration, extraordinary women, coincidence, human agency, the remote deity, the vindication of the underdog.
Course was offered Spring 2013
RELJ 3830Talmud (3.00)
Talmud
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2012
RELJ 3910Women and the Bible (3.00)
Surveys passages in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELC 3910. Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.
RELJ 4559New Course in Judaism (1.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of Judaism.
RELJ 4570Advanced Topics in Judaism (3.00)
This topical course provides upper level undergraduate students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in Judaism
RELJ 4590Topics in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a new topic in Jewish Studies
RELJ 4591Topics Modern Jewish History (3.00)
This topical course will explore topics in modern Jewish history, from 1948 to the present day.
Course was offered Fall 2009
RELJ 4950Senior Seminar in Jewish Studies (3.00)
This course introduces and examines the origins and development of Jewish Studies with emphasis on its interdisciplinary character. Requirements include active class participation and a significant research paper based on a topic of the student's choice. This course is required of all fourth-year Jewish Studies majors. It is also open to all interested students with permission of the instructor.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
RELJ 5048Philo of Alexandria and Hellenistic Judaism (3.00)
An indepth inquiry into the writings and thought of Philo of Alexandria (ca. 20 BCE-50 CE)
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 5050Judaism in Antiquity (3.00)
Description and analysis of representative systems of Judaic religion which flourished in Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia from 505 BCE to 600 CE.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RELJ 5065Jewish History, Meta-History, Counter History (3.00)
The course discusses models of history, meta-history, counter history, and anti-history in modern Jewish thought. Readings from Heinrich Graetz, Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, A.J. Heschel, Leo Strauss, and others.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 5100Theology and Ethics of the Rabbis (3.00)
This course explores theological and ethical themes in classical rabbinic literature (c. 200-600 CE). Focus is on gaining fluency in textual and conceptual analysis. Questions examined include: How is the relationship between God, humans generally and the people Israel specifically, imagined? What is evil and how is it best managed? What is the nature of one's obligation to fellow human beings? How does one cultivate an ideal self?
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELJ 5105Religion and Culture of the Rabbis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An examination of religion and culture of the rabbinic movement (c. 70-600 CE) in the social and cultural contexts of Greco-Roman antiquity. Among the issues to be examined: rituals and institutions of the rabbis, social organizations within the rabbinic movement, engagement with other sectors of Jewish and gentile society.
Course was offered Fall 2013
RELJ 5165Scripture and Philosophy in Judaism and Beyond (3.00)
What happened when classical Jewish traditions of study and learning encountered the Hellenic traditions of philosophy? This course examines instances of encounter between philosophy and Jewish text learning throughout Jewish history, from the days of Philo to today, focusing on contexts of history, text-reading and hermeneutics. The second half of the course will explore implications for studies in Christianity and Islam.
Course was offered Fall 2015
RELJ 5210Mishnah Seminar (3.00)
This course trains students to read Mishnah in the original language. Primary emphasis will be on giving students tools to decode the text and set the text in its appropriate historical and cultural contexts. Special attention will be paid to literary and legal aspects of the text. The Mishnah will also compared with parallels from contemporary compositions (the Tosephta and midrash halakhah). Secondary readings will expose students to the range
Course was offered Fall 2014
RELJ 5291The Book of Genesis and Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the book of Genesis (with attention to its literary artistry, compositional history, and theological issues) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2012
RELJ 5292The Book of Job & Its Interpretation (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical book of Job (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation. Prerequisite: One course on biblical scholarship is required; knowledge of Hebrew and/or Greek is preferred, but, if not, then admission by instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015
RELJ 5385The Song of Songs (3.00)
A seminar on the biblical Song of Songs (with attention to its literary artistry and compositional history) and its subsequent interpretation.
Course was offered Spring 2017
RELJ 5559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism
RELJ 5950Midrashic Imagination (3.00)
Midrashic Imagination
Course was offered Spring 2013, Fall 2009
RELJ 7559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism.
Course was offered Spring 2010
RELJ 8559New Course in Judaism (3.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subject of Judaism.
Course was offered Fall 2012
RELJ 8705Tutorial in Translating Biblical Poetry (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An advanced tutorial in translating biblical poetry, with several interrelated goals: developing skills in advanced biblical grammar; furthering capacities for biblical interpretation; exploring the dynamics of biblical poetry; understanding how ancient poetry and biblical books formed, developed, and were redacted; evaluating secondary literature as a prelude to developing sound arguments and coherent elegant translations.
RELJ 8710Tutorial in Mishnah Translation (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Assorted passages from the Mishnah are read out loud, subjected to grammatical and content-based analysis, rendered into elegant English, and considered as exemplars of rabbinic literature.
RELJ 8880Biblical and Jewish Palestinian Aramaic (3.00)
Introduces the Aramaic language, intended especially for New Testament graduate students. Emphasizes mastery of the grammar and syntax of Official or Imperial Aramaic and especially Middle Aramaic (second century b.c.e. to second century c.e.).
Religion-Special Topic
RELS 4980Senior Essay (3.00)
Studies selected topic in religious studies under detailed supervision. The writing of an essay constitutes a major portion of the work. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental advisor and instructor.
RELS 4995Independent Research (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Systematic readings in a selected topic under detailed supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of departmental advisor and instructor.
RELS 8500Topics for Supervised Study and Research (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This topical course provides Master's and Doctoral students in Religious Studies an opportunity for advanced coursework in selected, established areas of the department's curriculum.
RELS 8960Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research on problems leading to a master's thesis.
RELS 8995Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Systematic readings in a selected topic under detailed supervision.
RELS 8998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
RELS 8999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's thesis, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
RELS 9998Non-Topical Research, Preparation for Doctoral Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
RELS 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.