UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses for the School of Architecture    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Architecture and Landscape Architecture
ALAR 5010Introduction to Design (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to design concepts from the scale of the city to the body, developing an understanding of design process and compositional strategies in architecture and landscape architecture. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5020Introduction to Design Visualization (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to both digital and manual representational techniques, developing the precision and facility necessary for visual communication. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5030Introduction to Design Theory and Analysis (1.00)
The Summer Design Institute prepares graduate students admitted to the Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape Architecture Programs for rigorous professional study in these design disciplines. Three courses comprise the full time course of study over a two month period during the University of Virginia's Summer Session. Introduction to the analysis of the physical environment at the intersection of historical understanding and contemporary imagination. Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Architecture or Master of Landscape Architecture Program - required for entry into the three year course of professional study unless waived by the Department Chair.
ALAR 5500Special Topic in Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture and landscape architecture.
Course was offered Summer 2012, Summer 2011
ALAR 7010Research Studio 1 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Prerequisite: ARCH 6020 or LAR 6020.
ALAR 7020Foundation Studio III (6.00)
Intermediate-level design problems, emphasizing structure, enclosure, life safety and building systems. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010
ALAR 8010Research Studio 2 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Part one of a two part comprehensive design sequence. Prerequisite: ARCH 7020 or LAR 7020.
ALAR 8020Design Development Studio (6.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Typical projects include brownfields, urban landscape infrastructure, and sustainable designs. Prerequisite: ARCH 8010 or LAR 8010
ALAR 8030Design Studio 3 (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010 and ALAR 8010.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ALAR 8060Urbanism Design Studio (6.00)
This design studio pulls together many issues that graduate students have studied individually in design technology, theory and history courses into a complex and integrated section of a living and working community. This research looks at integrating infrastructure systems as a community connection system, energy producing ecology and as a civic public space symbol.
ALAR 8100Design Research Seminar (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course is for students in architecture/landscape undertaking an independent design/thesis studio in the spring semester, or students interested in strategic design thinking. Methods for initiating a thesis, research systems, documentation strategies, design experimentation, and modes of production and presentation will be covered. Collective critical discussion, analysis, and feedback as well as production of a final book will be required.
ALAR 8102Design Research Seminar (1.00 - 2.00)
This course is for architecture or landscape architecture students expecting to undertake an independent thesis studio during the following fall semester. ALAR 8100 is the prerequisite. This student-driven course will engage with faculty and other students to support their independent work. Students are expected to gather the appropriate resources and focus on contextualizing their work.
ALAR 8993Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ALAR 8995Independent Design Research Studio (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Design Research Studio. Prerequisite: ALAR 8100 and permission of the chair.
ALAR 8999Non-Topical Design Research-Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Design Thesis Studio. Prerequisite: ALAR 8100 and permission of the chair.
History of Art and Architecture
ARAH 5253Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I (3.00)
Italian Fifteenth Century Painting I
ARAH 5254Italian 16th Century Painting (3.00)
Italian 16th Century Painting
ARAH 5559New Course in History of Art (3.00 - 4.00)
This course provides the opportunity to offer new topics in the subject of History of Art.
ARAH 5575Topics in Modern Art History (3.00)
examines focused topics in the history of modern art
Course was offered Fall 2012
ARAH 5585Topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Examines focused topics in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 5681Museum Studies (3.00)
Museum Studies
ARAH 5752Representations of Race in American Art (3.00)
Representations of Race in American Art
ARAH 5753Southern History and Material Culture (3.00)
Southern History & Material Culture is an intensive graduate-level introduction to the decorative arts, history and material culture of the American South. The four-week course includes a number of lectures, collection studies and workshops by members of the staff of the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Old Salem, Inc., the faculty of the University of Virginia, and guest scholars.
Course was offered Summer 2012
ARAH 5951African Art (3.00)
African Art
ARAH 7500Research Problems in Ancient Architecture/Archaeology (3.00)
Reading and research problems in ancient architecture and archaeology.
ARAH 7505Research Problems in Ancient Art/ Archaeology (3.00)
Reading and research on problems in Greek, Etruscan, and Roman art.
ARAH 7510Research Problems in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in medieval architecture
ARAH 7515Research Problems Medieval Art (3.00)
Reading and research on problems in medieval art and its social background.
ARAH 7520Research Problems in Renaissance/Baroque Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in Renaissance/Baroque architecture
ARAH 7525Research Problems in Renaissance/Baroque Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in Renaissance/Baroque art
ARAH 7530Research Problems in 18th/19th Century Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 18th/19th century architecture
ARAH 7535Research Problems in 18th/19th Century Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 18th/19th century art
ARAH 7540Research Problems in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 20th/21st century architecture
ARAH 7545Research Problems in 20th/21st Century Art (3.00)
Reading and research problems in 20th/21st century art.
ARAH 7560Research Problems in Architecture Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Reading and research problems in architecture theory, comparative & other topics.
ARAH 7565Research Problems in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Reading and research problems in art theory, comparative & other topics.
ARAH 7570Research Problems in the Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of the Americas.
ARAH 7575Research Problems in the Art of the Americas (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of the Americas.
ARAH 7580Research Problems in the Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
ARAH 7585Research Problems in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of East, South, and Southeast Asia.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARAH 7590Research Problems in the Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the architecture of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 7595Research Problems in the Art of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Reading and research problems in the art of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 8051Theory and Interpretation in the Visual Arts (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in the theory and interpretation of the visual arts
ARAH 8052Library Methodology in the Visual Arts (1.00)
Required for all entering graduate students. Introduces the bibliography of the visual arts including architecture, archaeology, painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts. Specific research and reference publications are analyzed in terms of their scope, special features, and applications to meeting research and information needs.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARAH 8091MA Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
MA Thesis Research
ARAH 8092MA Thesis Writing (3.00)
The MA thesis, up to 50 pages in length, will be prepared under the supervision of the major advisor, reviewed by a three-person committee and defended orally before the end of term.
ARAH 8095Dissertation Proposal (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Preparation of a 15-20 page dissertation proposal under the supervision of a dissertation advisor.
ARAH 8695Special Reading Problems (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special Reading Problems
ARAH 8940Special Reading Problems in Art (1.00 - 3.00)
Special Reading Problems in Art
ARAH 8950Special Reading Problems (1.00 - 12.00)
Special Reading Problems
ARAH 8998Non-Topical Rsch, Masters Prep (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ARAH 8999Non-Topical Research, Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For master's research, taken under the supervision of a thesis director.
ARAH 9500Seminar in Ancient Architecture/Archaeology (3.00)
Investigates problems in ancient architecture/archaeology.
ARAH 9505Seminar in Ancient Art/Archaeology (3.00)
Investigates problems in ancient art/archaeology
ARAH 9510Seminar in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Investigates problems in medieval architecture
ARAH 9515Seminar in Medieval Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in medieval art
ARAH 9520Seminar in Renaissance/Baroque Architecture (3.00)
Investigates problems in Renaissance and/or Baroque architecture.
ARAH 9525Seminar in Renaissance/Baroque Art (3.00)
Investigates problems in renaissance/baroque art
ARAH 9535Seminar in 18th/19th Art (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in 18th-19th century art
ARAH 9540Seminar in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates problems in 20th/21st century architecture
ARAH 9545Seminar in 20th/21st Century Art (3.00)
Investigates problems in 20th/21st century architecture.
ARAH 9560Seminar in Architecture Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture theory, comparative, and other topics.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
ARAH 9565Seminar in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture theory, comparative, and other topics
ARAH 9570Seminar in the Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of the Americas
ARAH 9575Seminar in the Art of the Americas (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of the Americas
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARAH 9580Seminar in the Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia
ARAH 9585Seminar in the Art of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of East, South, and Southeast Asia
ARAH 9590Seminar in the Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Investigates problems in architecture of Africa or Islam
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARAH 9595Seminar in the Art of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Investigates problems in art of Africa or Islam.
ARAH 9995Supervised Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Supervised Research
ARAH 9998Non-Topical Rsch,Doctoral Prep (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
ARAH 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Architecture
ARCH 1010Lessons of the Lawn (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The study of architecture as a speculation on origins is located at the conjunctive core of any liberal arts curriculum and serves as the physical armature and conceptual foundation of the University. This course is concerned with the contemporary imagination, attempting to make the discipline of architecture meaningful to a wide range of citizens in its public obligation to be constructive and optimistic in the most profoundly ethical, pragmatic, and magical of terms.
ARCH 1020Lessons in Making (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
IIn this course we explore the delights and dilemmas of design. Through writing, drawing, and making collages and models we seek to answer fundamental questions. What are the basic elements of design? What does an artist or architect do when he or she designs? Are there key principles of design? What are the difficulties of the design process? What are its rewards? To see students' work visit: http://www.arch.virginia.edu/designfundamentals/
ARCH 1030Foundation Studio I (4.00)
The studio course introduces first year students from architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.
ARCH 1031Summer Foundation Studio I (4.00)
The studio course introduces architecture, urban and environmental planning, and architectural history to the built environment related to scales from the body to buildings, landscapes, and cities.Students explore comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets, and critical thinking.
ARCH 1040Introduction to Design (4.00)
Introduction to the principles, methods, and processes that designers use to observe and design the constructed environment. Working in both two and three-dimensional analog and digital media, students will analyze inputs and propose places through innovative forms of visual communication. Spatial, conceptual, relational, and critical thinking will all be creatively explored within a lively interdisciplinary community.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARCH 2010Foundation Studio II (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 1010, 1020, 1030.
ARCH 2011Summer Intro to Design Studio (6.00)
Prerequisite: For undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. This introductory architectural design studio explores comprehensive & foundational design principles, skill sets, & critical thinking. The material covered is presented through a series of lectures, projects, exercises,workshops, symposia & reviews involving the beginning design student in the thoughtful application of comprehensive critical design.
ARCH 2020Foundation Studio III (6.00)
The foundations studios involve beginning design students in thoughtful application of fundamental design principles, foundational techniques of representation and fabrication and comprehensive critical design strategies. These courses foster the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions. Prerequisite: ARCH 2010
ARCH 2021Summer Intro to Design Studio 1 (6.00)
Prerequisite: ARCH 2010 or 2011, for undergraduate transfer students accepted by the Dept. of Architecture only. The second architectural studio in the core curriculum fosters the development of the beginning design student's design methodology founded on thoughtful, creative, ethical and rigorous work practices in service of exploring meaningful formal and spatial propositions.
ARCH 2040Introduction to Architectural Design (3.00)
Introduction to Architectural Design
ARCH 2150Global Sustainability (3.00)
Earth's ecosystems are unraveling at an unprecedented rate, threatening human wellbeing and posing substantial challenges to contemporary society. Designing sustainable practices, institutions, and technologies for a resource-constrained world is our greatest challenge. This integrated and interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand, innovate and lead the efforts necessary to engage in this task.
ARCH 2230Systems, Sites and Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
ARCH 2240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures for undergraduates to develop analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation. Topics include statics, mechanics of materials, computer-based structural analysis, and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: Equivalent college-level physics.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 2500Special Topics in Architecture (3.00)
Topical offerings in the subject of Architecture.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 2710CAAD 3D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive hands-on course in three-dimensional computer aided design that ranges from beginning to advanced methods in geometrical modeling, macro programming, and visualization used in design related disciplines. The class explores approaches to design made possible through computer-based methods. Lectures and workshops provide a conceptual and applied framework, examine state-of-the-art techniques today,and speculate on future advances
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
ARCH 3010Research Studio I (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 2020
ARCH 3011Design Thinking Studio I (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 3020Foundation Studio IV (6.00)
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3010
ARCH 3021Design Thinking Studio II (4.00)
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 3070Foundations in Design Thinking (4.00)
This design thinking course will focus on complex design challenges with the goal of generating relevant proposals that benefit the common good. Design thinking approaches will be used to leverage innovative scenarios from novel perspectives to frame new interdisciplinary relationships and design strategies. Design principles and iterative applications will frame project-based exercises and involve students from across the University
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
ARCH 312020th Century History of Ideas (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class examines major themes & methodologies found in or taken up by twentieth century architectural theory. The course considers architecture through a wider set of cultural studies that include critical theory, phenomenology, semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism & psychoanalysis.Questions involve the associations constructed between architecture &autonomy, technology, perception, art,theory&practice. Prereq: ARH 1010 &1020
ARCH 3122Contemporary Spatial Practices (3.00)
This seminar will present a critical account of contemporary spatial practices and develop a theoretical framework of spatial operations enabling students to situate their own work within this new territory.
ARCH 3140Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings of Modernism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates the link between ideas and forms of significant buildings in the canon of modern architecture.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3230Systems, Sites and Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures for undergraduates to develop analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation. Topics include statics, mechanics of materials, computer-based structural analysis, and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: Equivalent college-level physics.
ARCH 3260Building Matters (4.00)
Explores and evaluates the properties of basic building materials and construction assemblies. Introduces building construction from a variety of viewpoints, with emphasis on ecological thinking in architectural decision-making. Students will analyze and critique materials and construction systems, and how they correspond to aesthetic, technical, financial and ethical issues.
ARCH 3270Intro Parametric Structural Design (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This second course in structures for undergraduate students focuses on synthesis of structural issues and design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2240
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 3271Breaking BIM (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM workflow, associative modeling, conceptual massing, building components, site tools, customizing components, materials, detailing, schedules, and visualization. With successful completion students will be able to use Revit proficiently in a design process.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARCH 3410CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization (3.00)
A comprehensive course in three-dimensional computer aided design and visualization methods used in architecture and landscape architecture. The class explores design worlds that are made accessible through computer-based media. Lectures provide a theoretical framework for computer-aided design, describe current methods, and speculate on advanced methods.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 3422Computer Animation: Design in Motion (3.00)
Arch 3422 is a hands-on workshop in moviemaking by techniques in three-dimensional computer animation with composite video, sound editing and capture. We screen independent and feature film animation and ongoing student work concluding in a 1 to 5 min. final project. Short readings are in film and cognitive science. Students may enroll from diverse areas such as design, art, drama, computer science, the physical sciences, and education.
Course was offered Summer 2016
ARCH 3500Special Topics in Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 3640Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 3710Photography and Digital Media (3.00)
This course seeks to give students the ability to conceive and create digital photographic imagery with control and sophistication. Topics include fundamentals of photography, color theory, digital control of visual qualities, and methods of image montage for both still images and short animations. Methods include production and presentation for both printed hard copy and for the World Wide Web.
Course was offered Summer 2016
ARCH 3993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 4010Research Studio II (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This studio course emphasizes conceptualization and synthesis of complex programs in contemporary contexts at multiple scales. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020
ARCH 4011Design Thinking Studio III (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3021
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 4020Independent Design Research Studio (6.00)
Students pursue a semester long independent design project. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 or ARCH 4011.
ARCH 4021Ind Design Thinking Research Studio (6.00)
This is a studio based course on Architectural design thinking with a focus on creative approaches to analyzing and solving diverse problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 3011/3021
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 4100Thesis Positioning (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Architectural research methods are introduced and applied to the development of an undergraduate thesis in Architecture. Students develop and investigate research questions, research methods, and data sources. Open to both Pre-Professional and Design Thinking concentrations.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARCH 4201Forms and Materials of the Buildings of Venice (3.00)
The course aims at introducing the physical essence of Venice through direct contact with selected materials by means of manifold complementary approaches. Different specialists, from week to week, will go into depth on the techniques & their aesthetics through time, taking the students to sites of interest. Among others, the course provides an experience in a glass furnace as part of a practical design atelier, & focuses on marbles & stones.
ARCH 4401Drawing Venice (3.00)
This course will focus on the analysis of urban space and flows, with a focus on the development of representational techniques that investigate the relationship between urban form and urban life. The course will engage a range of media, from hand drawing through digital mapping, photography and film. The students will be expected to develop a capacity to diagram both static and dynamic conditions that structure the urban experience.
ARCH 4500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 4510J-Term Courses (1.00 - 3.00)
January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of "J-term" classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.
ARCH 4820Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Selected students lead a seminar (of 8 to 10 younger students each) for 'Lessons of the Lawn' and 'Lessons in Making.' All student assistants attend class lectures (for a second time) and then meet with their seminar groups weekly, leading discussions of topics and questions raised by the instructor.
ARCH 4821Research Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
ARCH 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 4995Ind Design Res Thesis Studio (6.00)
Independent Design Research Studio for 4th year students in their final year. Prerequisite: ARCH 4010 and permission of the chair.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 5011International Summer Studio (6.00)
Students will design proposals for the complex cultural, formal, spatial and constructional context of a particular location outside the US. Pedagogical objectives include strengthening analytical and creative abilities at multiple scales through an iterative design process, studying material and tectonics, developing critical thinking abilities, and improving graphic, verbal and written communication skills.
ARCH 5110Design Approaches to Existing Sites (3.00)
Explores various approaches by designers to the contexts of their work. Examines buildings, urban infrastructure, and landscape interventions, and includes lectures, discussions, and presentations by visitors and students.
Course was offered Fall 2011
ARCH 5130Paper Matters (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Which is the role of publications in the contemporary architectural debate & in a school of architecture? The seminar has the purpose of experimenting the critical edition of contents, reflect on the instruments & educate in the related skills. It will combine the research on themes & other publications, the presence of experts & the editorial staff meetings, & will include short exercises, the definition of an editorial line.
ARCH 5132Paper Matters II (3.00)
Which is the role of publications in the contemporary architectural debate & in a school of architecture? The seminar has the purpose of experimenting the critical edition of contents, reflect on the instruments & educate in the related skills. It will combine the research on themes & other publications, the presence of experts & the editorial staff meetings, & will include short exercises, the definition of an editorial line.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 5140Advanced Design Themes of Great Cities (3.00)
This course discusses the design qualities of the world's great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 5150Global Sustainability (3.00)
Earth's ecosystems are unraveling at an unprecedented rate, threatening human wellbeing and posing substantial challenges to contemporary society. Designing sustainable practices, institutions, and technologies for a resource-constrained world is our greatest challenge. This integrated and interdisciplinary course prepares students to understand, innovate and lead the efforts necessary to engage in this task.
ARCH 5160Models for Higher Density Housing (3.00)
This seminar will focus on density and contemporary housing issues, specifically related to affordable housing. As cities have spread out or decayed at the core, the variety of housing options has decreased leading to a growing divide between where and how people can afford to live. Assignments range from readings and leading discussion to case study presentations of recent global and local housing designs.
ARCH 5170New Urban Housing (3.00)
The class attempts to give students an introduction to the design issues associated with high-density urban housing. This area was a focus of experimentation for the first generation of modern architects. Today, pressures from urban sprawl and concerns for sustainable patterns of living have renewed the need to find ways of making modern urban neighborhoods. Issues of innovation and continuity need to be explored. This seminar will discuss the history of modern housing and explore a range of contemporary architectural projects, built and unbuilt.
ARCH 5180Issues in Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
Participants will investigate a diverse range of issues confronted in the conception, making and interpretation of contemporary architecture, including urban, social, aesthetic, representational, and technological concerns. Questions will be examined through a case study model grounded in history and supplemented by readings. During each class, 2-3 buildings will be formally analyzed to illustrate the thematic investigation.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
ARCH 5190Cultural Criticism in Architecture (3.00)
This seminar explores the relationship between architecture and culture. The seminar will study the effects of advanced capitolism, identity politics and latent biases that form the foundation of the architecture profession.
ARCH 5201Forms and Materials of the Buildings of Venice (3.00)
The course aims at introducing the physical essence of Venice through direct contact with selected materials by means of manifold complementary approaches. Different specialists, from week to week, will go into depth on the techniques & their aesthetics through time, taking the students to sites of interest. Graduate students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARCH 5300ecoMOD/ecoREMOD Seminar (3.00)
This interdisciplinary seminar is focused on ecoMOD and ecoREMOD, two parallel design / build / evaluate projects at the university -- (ecomod.virginia.edu). The project goal is to develop sustainable, prefabricated or renovated housing units for affordable housing organizations.
Course was offered Fall 2009
ARCH 5301Eco-Mod Seminar (3.00)
This seminar is focused on an evaluation of the third ecoMOD project. ecoMOD is a research and design / build / evaluate project at the School of Architecture, in partnership with the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project goal is to develop ecological, prefabricated and affordable house prototypes for low-income families. Over the next several years, interdisciplinary teams of UVA students and faculty are designing and building several 600 to 1,400 square foot housing units. The completed homes are being evaluated carefully. The results of these efforts will directly influence later designs. The objective of the seminar is to analyze the third project, using the building monitoring, life cycle assessments, post occupancy evaluations and an affordability analysis. The course is open to graduate as well as 3rd and 4th year undergraduates from any program at the university. In particular, the instructor is hoping for a mix of architecture, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, economics, business and environmental science students. Engineering students will be enrolled in a separate course, led by engineering professor Paxton Marshall. The engineering students will meet with the class on a regular basis, so that all disciplines can work together on the final report.
ARCH 5310Learning Barge: Intention Fabrication (3.00)
Learning Barge: Intention Fabrication
ARCH 5320Some Assembly Required: Research and Development (3.00)
This course functions as research and development seminar - the research and development initiatives will consist of three distinct and critically interdependent phases: first, case study analysis and interpretation; secondly, development of issue-specific project proposal; and thirdly, innovative advancement of research topic. In consultation with the course instructor, research initiatives focus on a specific topic of building construction
ARCH 5321Some Assembly Required: Design Build (4.00)
The course focuses on the study of modern fabrication practices in the context of design/build projects.
ARCH 5340Construction Practice Management (3.00)
Provides future architects, engineers, lawyers, and developers with an overall understanding of the construction process for commercial, industrial, and institutional projects. Follows the history of a typical project from selection of architect to final completion of construction. Topics include design cost control, cost estimating, bidding procedures, bonds and insurance, contracts and sub-contracts, progress scheduling, fiscal controls, payment requests, submittals, change orders, inspections, overall project administration, and continuing architect-owner-contractor relationships. Lectures and related field trips.
ARCH 5342Introduction to Parametric Energy Design (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers a foundation in understanding climate and energy in buildings and cities, and teaches the tools to parametrically analyze, model, visualize and design for energy impacts. Starting from real energy in real buildings through physical and data exploration, the course then teaches parametric tools to propose interventions and analyze for performance. The course is open to students in both Architecture and Engineering.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 5360Concepts in Architecture Detailing (3.00)
An exploration of the life of details in building. Examines the ways in which technical decisions are made, and focuses on details and constructions within particular regional contexts.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ARCH 5361Advanced Architectural Detailing (3.00)
An exploration of the life of details in building. Examines the ways in which technical decisions are made, and focuses on details and constructions within particular regional contexts.
ARCH 5370Depth of Surface (3.00)
Construction systems and material selection must be a generative process not a reactive application. What are the possibilities for the Depth of Surface to exploit the tension between internal criteria and external forces & context? The fundamental issues of buildability must be driven by a sense of 'what do you want to see?' as well as the pragmatic - with the detail reinforcing, not diluting, the whole. How can overall composition, form, performance and structure of building envelope come together (via detail) within a specific conceptual context?
ARCH 5380Soft Surface Operations (3.00)
We will explore the parameters of shaping the flow of light, wind, and water; then test these discoveries through full-scale mock-ups, exploring practical potentials as well as the experiential aspects of weather phenomena and surface performance. Working with a set of high performance fabrics, it will be possible to produce operable, interactive, beautiful surfaces that create comfortable semi-exterior conditions year-round.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 5400Experimental Technologies (3.00)
Covering theory to practice, the course is an introduction to the use of digital technologies for the analysis, simulation and visualization of space, time and processes on cultural sites. The course focuses on the use of computer technologies for the visualization, exploration and analysis of natural and built environments (broad enough to include issues and methodologies of interest to architects, landscape architects, archaeologists and architectural historians). Topics are explored through class lectures on the theory and application of computational/visualization technology, guest lectures, example projects, field trips to project site and exercises examining emergent issues.
ARCH 5401Drawing Venice (3.00)
This course will focus on the analysis of urban space and flows, with a focus on the development of representational techniques that investigate the relationship between urban form and urban life. The course will engage a range of media, from hand drawing through digital mapping, photography and film. The students will be expected to develop a capacity to diagram both static and dynamic conditions that structure the urban experience.
ARCH 5420Digital Animation & Storytelling (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
An exploration of moviemaking through exercises in computer animation. Approximately five independently developed short animations constitute the work of the semester, culminating in a one- to five-minute long final movie project. It is anticipated that an interdisciplinary group of students admitted to the seminar will bring perspectives from across the visual & design arts. Movie projects may range in creative subject areas. Instructor Consent
ARCH 5422Computer Animation: Design in Motion (3.00)
Arch 5422 is a hands-on workshop in moviemaking by techniques in three-dimensional computer animation with composite video, sound editing and capture. We screen independent and feature film animation and ongoing student work concluding in a 1 to 5 min. final project. Short readings are in film and cognitive science. Students may enroll from diverse areas such as design, art, drama, computer science, the physical sciences, and education.
ARCH 5424Direct Cinema Media Fabrics (3.00)
An interdisciplinary workshop and seminar that combines documentary moviemaking and video input with virtual and physical media output. Video and sound recording or a motion capture body suit may be used to collect initial data. The data may be translated to facilitate the making or movement of physical objects. Or, the data may be translated to figure creatively in virtual representations such as used in motion picture production.
ARCH 5430Land Development Workshop (3.00)
Explores the land development process from the perspective of the private land developer interacting with local governments. Includes development potential, site, and traffic analysis; land planning; development programming; and services to accommodate new development and public regulation of land development.
Course was offered Fall 2012
ARCH 5450Digital Moviemaking & Animation (3.00)
Visual storytelling is the basis for making movies in this hands-on production oriented class. The technology of both computer graphics animation and digital video production are explored. Themes may incorporate short character studies or visual narratives related to the built and natural environment, such as its observable symbols and images, the process of physical and conceptual assembly, transformations of light and form, spatial or formal composition, the movement of people and objects, and similar phenomena that vary over time. Students have the option to use either computer graphics animation or video production. The links between perception, representation, and design are examined within both a historical and a contemporary critical framework. Prerequisite: ARCH 3410/6410 or instructor permission.
ARCH 5470Information Space (3.00)
We live in a world rich with information. This course concentrates on the identity and role of information in our environs: in the buildings and cities that we inhabit and in the evolving networks and World Wide Web that are increasingly a part of our daily lives. The course looks practically and theoretically at how we build information, why, and how we use and populate it in our world. In both the physical and digital realms we study language, graphics, and urban form as `Information Space`, and look for ways to build new architectures that use information well. The course uses web design technology as a vehicle to explore these themes.
ARCH 5490CNC Fabrication (3.00)
This is a seminar about computation and the physical making of architecture. The course centers on student research into computer-controlled modeling and fabrication through hands-on use of CNC machines and advanced CAD technologies. The course focuses on the making of objects, parts, and systems at real-world, real-material scales and on the invention of strategies that link geometric form and computation with fabrication and material processing.
ARCH 5500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 5501Special Topics in Architecture (0.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 5510J-Term Courses (1.00 - 3.00)
J Term Courses
ARCH 5590Faculty Research Seminar (1.00 - 4.00)
Affords students opportunities to participate in specific faculty's advance research projects.
ARCH 5605Urban Materiality. The construction of the Public Space (3.00)
This class will introduce students to understand the city scale and landscape design in terms of materiality. The students will learn how to use the materials to resolve urban and landscape issues.
ARCH 5607International Design Research (3.00)
Interanally-focused independent design research conducted under the guidance and direct supervision of a faculty member.
ARCH 5608China Design Workshop (3.00)
The course will combine field analysis, precedent study, and collaborative design proposals into contemporary Chinese architecture and urban form. Focused readings will supplement the design investigation.
ARCH 5609India Research Seminar (3.00)
Students will study seminal and everyday works of architecture and urbanism through sketches, drawings, paintings, collage, photographs, video and narrative. They will investigate literary, historical and philosophical foundations through the close reading of texts and films. Discussions will focus on the evolving environmental, political, religious, social discourse that informs the contemporary India built environment.
ARCH 5610Urban Land (3.00)
The UrbanLand is a research seminar about the catalysts of the contemporaneous urbanity. This seminar will address the impunity spaces in between the Urban and the Land. How can we design and provoke the new urbanity? How can we work in the UrbanLand spaces in the mechanical to digital era? Which are our new tools? How the city will deals with the landscape? How can we design a new generous UrbanLand?
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Fall 2013
ARCH 5612Introduction to Urban Design (3.00)
This course introduces urban design as an area of expertise that deals with the physical form and performance of the city, integrating various scales from a building, to a group of buildings, to entire districts, with particular focus on the open spaces between them. As an interdisciplinary practice it bridges between architecture, landscape architecture and city planning. Its role will be examined through core issues from a global perspective.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARCH 5620Robotic Ecologies (3.00)
The seminar will explore recent advances in the interdisciplinary fields of architecture, landscape and urbanism, where design research has intersected with the advanced sciences to produce entirely new modes of thinking, designing and building. We will explore the promise of robotics to productively intermesh and interact with the complex ecologies of our physical environment.
ARCH 5630Design of Cities (3.00)
Cities are physical artifacts that are experienced psychologically and socially. This course investigates the theories surrounding these processes to reach an understanding of humanistic urban design intentions. Experiential realities are explored through case studies, readings, and mapping exercises.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 5640Adv. Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARCH 5660Design and Leadership (3.00)
The aim of this course is to give students a fundamental and practical understanding of leadership and the role that design plays in exercising leadership and mobilizing the resources of a group. This is a course designed for students currently being educated in the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture and urban planning. The purpose is to increase significantly one's individual capacity to sustain the demands of leadership and to strengthen considerably one's individual ability to exercise both leadership and authority within in the larger arena of public life.
ARCH 5680Lessons of the City (3.00)
This course explores the relationship between cultural values and urban form, introducing students to a body of literature and projects examining the various historical, social, political, regulatory, economic and physical conditions, which influence the design of cities. Through lecture, selected reading, class discussion, individual and group projects, and field trips this class examines the history, theories, and practices that have influenced the development of cities from antiquity to the present. Much of the discussion is on the evolution of the American city; using a field trips as a means to explore first hand urban environments
ARCH 5700InfoLab: Laboratory for Visualizing Information (3.00)
The design process has become an essential filter of all types of information. Due to contemporary forms of communication and media, this process has now been charged with the task of gathering, filtering, comprehending, processing, interpreting, forming and representing information in a clear and coherent manner. This laboratory seeks to introduce its participants to various modes of forming and representing information, qualifying, quantifying and visualizing it with the ultimate goal of familiarizing themselves with contemporary representational techniques and creating new visualization tools.
ARCH 5710Photography and Digital Methods (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course seeks to give students the ability to conceive and create digital photographic imagery with control and sophistication. Topics include fundamentals of photography, color theory, digital control of visual qualities, and methods of image montage. Methods include production and presentation for both print and monitor screen.
ARCH 5750Drawing and Composition (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course covers the fundamentals of drawing with a focus on the human figure. The assignments address line, tone, volume, space, scale, proportion and artistic expression. The analysis of human form (inside and out) is applied to rendering buildings, interiors, still life and landscapes.
ARCH 5760Drawing For Design (3.00)
This course will cover the fundamentals of drawing with a focus on the human figure. It will address line, tone volume, space, scale, proportion and artistic expression. The analysis of human form will also be applied to rendering still-life, buildings, interiors and landscapes. Various wet and dry media will be introduced to illustrate the drawing objectives. An emphasis on 'process' will direct the momentum of this course.
ARCH 5770Drawings and Collages (3.00)
In this course we make collages, drawings, and mixed media projects. Rather than distinguishing collage and drawing as separate categories, we explore their exciting in-between territory. We make plane (and plain) images: configurations of relatively stable, still marks on two-dimensional surfaces. We use traditional drawing methods (graphite, colored pencil or ink on paper) as well as more unusual tools and materials (sidewalk chalk, earth, trash, recycled materials). Through brief weekly readings and discussions we explore the relationship between aesthetics and ethics between "good forms" and forms that in some way contribute or allude to the "common good."
ARCH 5780Painting and Public Art (3.00)
In this course we make paintings and mixed media projects. We stress the process rather then the artistic product and, like artist Sol LeWitt, define painting 'as an activity on a flat plane.' We make plane (and plain) images: configurations of relatively stable, still marks on two-dimensional surfaces. We use traditional methods (watercolor or ink on paper, acrylics on canvas) as well as more unusual tools and materials (sidewalk chalk, earth, trash, recycled materials). Through weekly readings and discussions we explore the relationship between aesthetics and ethics between 'good forms' and forms that in some way contribute or allude to the 'common good.'
ARCH 5800Vicenza Program (6.00)
Summer study abroad in Vicenza, Italy. Students will be introduced to Italian culture through the study of architecture, landscape architecture, and city planning. Both the formal ideals as well as the constructed reality of these three subjects will be studied through critical observation and documentation of universal conditions and critical junctures.
ARCH 5993Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
ARCH 6010Foundation Studio I (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Introductory design problems in architecture for  First Professional degree students.  Emphasizes developing a systemic approach to design on the land and in the city through experience with a constructional kit of parts and an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. The faculty reviews all work in ARCH 6010-6020 to determine the progress and potential of each student.
ARCH 6020Foundation Studio II (6.00)
Introductory design problems in architecture for First Professional degree students. Emphasizes developing a systemic approach to design on the land and in the city through experience with a constructional kit of parts and an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. The faculty reviews all work in ARCH 6010-6020 to determine the progress and potential of each student. Prerequisite: ARCH 6010.
ARCH 6120Architectural Theory and Analysis (3.00)
Investigates the role that ideas play in the conception, making, and interpretation of buildings and cities, and assists students in clarifying their own values and intentions as designers. Lectures cover a broad range of topics, with special emphasis placed on contemporary issues.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 6140Architectural Analysis: Key Buildings of Modernism (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Investigates the link between ideas and forms of significant buildings in the canon of modern architecture.
ARCH 6231Building Integration Workshop 1 (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For first year students in the first professional MArch program (Path A). This course is part one of a year-long workshop and discussion seminar focused on dynamic site systems, bioclimatic and passive design, construction assembly methods and building materials. Students are required to sit in on the lectures of ARCH 6232.
ARCH 6232Systems, Sites & Building (4.00)
Examines the role of design in mediating between dynamic climatic forces such as wind, energy and light and the human response to the environment. Weaving discussions of fundamental principles with case studies and illustrative exercises, the course focuses on the design of the boundary between the internal and external environments.
ARCH 6240Introduction to Structural Design (4.00)
A first course in structures that develops analytic and critical skills through both mathematical and visual investigation of structures. Topics include static; mechanics of materials; computer-based structural analysis; and the design and behavior of basic structural elements and systems. Prerequisite: College-level physics. Graduate students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARCH 6261Building Integration Workshop 2 (4.00)
For first year students in the first professional MArch program. This course is part two of a year-long workshop and discussion seminar focused on dynamic site systems, bioclimatic and passive design, construction assembly methods and building materials. Students are required to sit in on the lectures of ARCH 3260, Building Matters.
ARCH 6270Parametric Structural Design (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
New integration of structural analysis into standard design software links design with immediate analysis and feedback, allowing architects to extend their structural intuition. This course covers basic structural systems, their historical development, design considerations, and analysis through physical and parametric modeling.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
ARCH 6410Advanced CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization (3.00)
A comprehensive course in three-dimensional computer aided design and visualization methods used in architecture and landscape architecture. The class explores design worlds that are made accessible through computer-based media. Lectures provide a theoretical framework for computer-aided design, describe current methods, and speculate on advanced methods.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
ARCH 6500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 6605Urban Materiality, Gaudi's Legacy (3.00)
Gaudi is one of the best known Catalan architects from Barcelona. He is famous for his buildings and his furniture, but he is not known as an urban designer. This class will introduce the students to understanding the city scale in terms of Materiality. It will be apparent by looking at Gaudi¿s work how important it is to understand the laws of construction and framework for creating a good design.
ARCH 6710CAAD 3D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A comprehensive hands-on course in 3D computer aided design, geometrical modeling and visualization from a beginning to an advanced level. Includes macro programming, parametrical modeling and light energy rendering used by designers in different fields. Lectures and workshops provide both a conceptual and applied framework. Graduate and undergraduate students undertake separate case study projects appropriate to their distinct academic programs.
ARCH 7020Foundation Studio 3 (6.00)
Intermediate-level design problems, emphasizing structure, enclosure, life safety and building systems. Prerequisite: ALAR 7010
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ARCH 712020th Century History of Ideas (3.00)
This course will investigate the role that ideas play in the conception, making and interpretation of buildings. As a basis for this inquiry, the course will explore significant architectural and urban theories, design strategies, and architectural projects developed primarily from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Lectures will cover a broad range of theoretical positions that have influenced or emerged from form making.
ARCH 7122Contemporary Spatial Practices (3.00)
This seminar will present a critical account of contemporary spatial practices and develop a theoretical framework of spatial operations enabling students to situate their own work within this new territory.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ARCH 7210Structural Design for Dynamic Loads (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines wind and earthquake loads in structural design, reviewing the vocabulary of lateral resisting systems, and the basic dynamic theories that underlie building code requirements. Explores recent developments in research and practice. Student projects include reviewing and presenting literature on lateral load research and design.
ARCH 7230Design Development (3.00)
This course focuses on the resolution of an architectural project with particular emphasis on issues of comfort, life safety, structural stability assembly processes.
ARCH 7250Environmental Systems (3.00)
The course involves the study of human comfort, environmental conditioning systems, building systems, daylighting and lighting technology. Students will be exposed to digital simulation tools to assess daylighting and energy use.
ARCH 7270BIM and Revit 1 (1.00)
This visualization module offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM interface, parametric objects, parametric families, file organization, workflow, drawing setup, and output techniques. No experience with BIM is required for this module.
ARCH 7271Adv. Breaking BIM (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course offers an introduction to the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the interface and workflow of Autodesk's Revit. Topics include the BIM workflow, associative modeling, conceptual massing, building components, site tools, customizing components, materials, detailing, schedules, and visualization. With successful completion students will be able to use Revit proficiently in a design process.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARCH 7272BIM and Revit 2 (1.00)
This visualization module is the second component in the Building Information Modeling (BIM) sequence and serves as an advanced study of the principles of BIM. Emphasis will be on the exploitation of parametric tools and data within BIM software for specific design agendas. Topics will include scheduling, energy analysis and adaptive components. BIM and Revit 1 is a prerequisite unless sufficient knowledge of Revit can be demonstrated.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARCH 7500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8230Building Synthesis (3.00)
This course investigates, develops and applies environmental and design strategies at various scales of operation through the concurrent ARCH 8020 Comprehensive Design Research Studio 2.
ARCH 8300Preservation/ Adaptive Use (1.00 - 4.00)
Individual study directed by a faculty member.
ARCH 8480Professional Ethics and Communication (3.00)
Introduces the primary issues involved in the practice of architecture: professional ethics, business practices, project process and management, personnel management, management of the process of producing a building, and the methods available to do so.
ARCH 8481Professionl Ethics & Communctn Seminar (1.00)
This course introduces students to standards for the set of documents used in architectural project construction.
ARCH 8500Special Topics in Architecture (1.00 - 6.00)
Topical offerings in architecture.
ARCH 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Teaching Experience Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8801Research Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
ARCH 8993Advanced Independent Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
ARCH 8999Non-Topical Research, Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: Permission of the chair.
Architectural History
ARH 1000History of Architecture: Survey (3.00)
The history of Western architecture from ancient times to the present.
ARH 1004History of Architecture (3.00)
Surveys architecture from the Ancient to the present.
ARH 1010History of Architecture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
We will explore how architecture affects us, as well as how it informs us about past societies. In what ways does architecture shape our experiences; how does it enhance or detract from human activities? This course will cover material from the pre-historic period through c. 1420 largely in Europe with some examples from Asia, Africa and the Americas. Classes will be a combination of lectures and in-class activities.
ARH 1020History of Architecture II (3.00)
This course will examine architecture and urbanism from around 1400 C.E. to the present, tracing connections and distinctions that have guided the design, uses, and meanings of built environments around the globe. You will be introduced to celebrated buildings and less well-known sites and cities, with particular attention to the aesthetic, social, cultural, and institutional situations in which they developed.
ARH 1700Thomas Jefferson's Architecture (3.00)
Surveys Jefferson's architectural world with special emphasis on the Lawn.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ARH 2252High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (3.00)
Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 2401History of Modern Architecture (3.00)
Tracing the history of architecture and urbanism from 1870 through the 1970s, this course considers how architecture has participated in and responded to shifting aesthetic, technological, social, environmental, and theoretical challenges during this period. While Europe is an important terrain of investigation, the course emphasizes networks of exchange with Latin America, North Africa, Turkey, India, and Japan.
ARH 2500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Spring 2014
ARH 2700Thomas Jefferson and American Architecture (3.00)
To Thomas Jefferson architecture was an art that encompassed more than simply shelter but embodied cultural and political values. This course will focus on his architectural and other designs (gardens, interiors, towns, campuses) and his interest in the arts.
ARH 2753Arts & Cultures of the Slave South (4.00)
This interdisciplinary course covers the American South to the Civil War. While the course centers on the visual arts, architecture, material culture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture; it is not designed as a regional history of art, but an exploration of the interrelations between history, material and visual cultures, foodways, music and literature in the formation of Southern identities.
ARH 3010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
ARH 3030World Vernacular Architecture (3.00)
Vernacular Architecture is often understood to be all the built environment that is not 'High Architecture.' This is a profound misunderstanding; Vernacular is any aspect of the built environment examined through the lens of the local AND it is a method of interrogating the relationship between architecture and the human experience. This lecture class enlists global examples to explore the many complex dimensions of vernacular.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 3040Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 3100History of Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Examines the architecture of Medieval Western Europe, emphasizing the period from 1000-1400. Includes the iconography, function, structure and style of buildings, and the use of contemporary texts.
ARH 3101Early Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 800-1150.
ARH 3102Later Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 1140-1500.
ARH 3103Reconstructing the Medieval Haj (3.00)
Our course will reconstruct the journey of Ibn Jubayr, a twelfth century Spanish Muslim who recorded his haj from Spain to Mecca. Using his lively travel diary, we will analyze the visual culture and built environment of the medieval Mediterranean and together recreate key sites from his journey with easy to use digital tools such as Neatline.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARH 3201Italian Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
This course aims to introduce the principal architects, monuments, and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The lectures will be varied in approach and scope, some considering broad issues, others focusing on particular architects, buildings, or texts. Special topics will include architectural theory, patronage, villas, gardens, architectural drawing, and urban design.
ARH 3202Renaissance Architecture 16th Century (3.00)
Developments in classicism in Italy between 1500 and 1600.
ARH 3203European Classical Architecture Outside Italy, 1400-1750 (3.00)
The development of classicism primarily in France, England, and Germany between 1400 and 1750.
ARH 3204Italy, Spain, & The Ottoman Empire (3.00)
This course will examine Islamic architecture around the Mediterranean in relation to developments in Italy. Particular problems to be considered in a cross-cultural context include those of geometry and ornament, architectural theory, the role of the architect, and garden design and conception. Also important will be issues such as the visual ideology and cultural politics of empire; and the role of the traveler, merchant and ambassador in cultural exchange. Geographical focus will be on Southern Spain, or Andalusia, on Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire, as well as on various cities and regions of Italy including Venice, Genoa, Rome, Naples and Sicily. In the case of Southern Spain, analysis will focus on the points of contact and tension between the Roman heritage, the architectural achievements of the Nasrid Empire, the Gothic tradition, and the imported Italian style. With regard to the Ottoman Empire, an attempt will be made to understand how an obsessive concern among Italian humanists, political leaders, and popes with the Ottoman threat could coincide with cultural fascination and appropriation.
ARH 3205Rome, Istanbul, Venice (3.00)
This course will consider architecture, urbanism and landscape in three cities with multilayered histories: Rome, Venice, and Istanbul. While conditioned by distinct historical and topographic circumstances, each city negotiated complex and varied local traditions: Roman and Medieval in Rome; Byzantine and Gothic in Venice; and Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman in Istanbul.
ARH 3206Mediterranean Architecture (3.00)
This course will consider a range of buildings and landscapes from across the Mediterranean world, encompassing Italy, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, North Africa and Egypt. Its chronological and geographical scope are meant to bring into question some the conventional categories by which art and architectural history are studied: Medieval, Renaissance, Italian, Islamic, Eastern, Western, etc.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 3207Arts and Architecture of the Islamic World (3.00)
In order to understand the production, representation and perception of space in the Islamic world, this survey course examines significant works of arts, architecture, urbanism & landscape from 650 to 1800. While studying common themes & shared values of the Islamic world, the course questions the disparities and novelties in the reception of Islam as a social, cultural & political practice, mapping distant geographies from Al-Andalus to India
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARH 3251Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600.
ARH 3402Postwar Architecture (3.00)
An examination of critical issues in the history and theory of architecture, from World War II to the present, focused particularly on how the shifting geopolitical contours of the postwar world have helped to shape key projects and debates. The course will also provide the opportunity to discuss recent studies in architectural history that have trained renewed attention on this period.
ARH 3403World Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
As the construction of cities redistributes its activities across the world in the twenty-first century, this course considers the ways in which architecture and architects are changed by a complex shifting field of forces. These forces include critical and ethical discourses, digital media, global finance and trade, developments in materials science, environmental awareness, and geo-political strategies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 3500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 3591Architectural History Colloquium (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Architectural History Colloquium combines lecture and discussion. Subject varies with the instructor, who may decide to focus attention either on a particular period, artist, or theme, or on the broader question of the aims and methods of architectural history. Subject is announced prior to each registration period. Enrollment is capped at 20.
Course was offered Fall 2013
ARH 3601East Meets West (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies cultural exchanges in architecture between East and West, emphasizing master architects such as F.L. Wright and L. Kahn.
ARH 3602World Buddhist Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Studies the history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world, including East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.
ARH 3603Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ARH 3604Historical Archaeology (3.00)
An introduction to analytical methods in historical archaeology, their theoretical motivation, and their practical application in the interpretation of the archaeological record of the early Chesapeake. The use of computers in the analysis of real archaeological data is emphasized.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ARH 3605Drawing Historic Architecture (3.00)
This is mainly a drawing workshop, with some lectures. Learn the classical features of historic architecture such as five orders and domes in details through drawing them. Learn the techniques of drawing the historic architecture, with pencil and pen. There is a focus topic each week to learn and draw. Some drawings are to be done with field trips in the nearby area. At the mid-term and the end of the semester there are group reviews.
ARH 3606Landscape Archaeology (3.00)
This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011
ARH 3607Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 3701Early American Architecture (3.00)
American architecture from the first European contact to the death of Jefferson. Lectures and field trips.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
ARH 3702Later American Architecture (3.00)
Surveys American architecture from 1800 to the present.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 3703Nineteenth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
The development of architecture from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Lloyd Wright, along with consideration of issues in housing, landscape design, city planning, and influences from Europe.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 3704Twentieth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Surveys American architecture emphasizing the development of modernism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 3801East Asia Architecture (3.00)
Surveys traditional architecture in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the main features and monuments of East Asian and landscape architecture.
ARH 3802Modern Japanese Architecture (3.00)
The history of architecture in modern Japan from Meiji period to the present. Focuses on post-WW II development; discusses the major influential architects such as Tange, Kikutake, Maki, Isozaki, Kurokawa, and Ando.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARH 4120History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure and agricultural systems, public and private space, theater and performance, court rituals, horticultural display, natural philosophy and aesthetic theory, visual representation, and the professionalization of landscape design.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 4130History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 4201Art and Architecture of Venice (3.00)
This course examines the art and architecture of Venice from the fifth century until the seventeenth century. We consider the major "nuclei" of the city like Piazza San Marco and personalities that shaped the built and artistic environment - Codussi, Sansovino, Palladio, and Titian for example. Our study explores the factors that contributed to Venetian art such as political and social context and contact with Byzantine, Islamic and northern Europe.
ARH 4500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 4510J-Term Courses (3.00)
January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of "J-term" classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse themselves in a particular subject.
ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture (3.00)
Research seminar for majors in the department of architectural history. Topics vary.
ARH 4600Arch History Practicum: Preserv Intern (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Internship at World Heritage Site; Monticello or the University of Virginia. 6-8 hours weekly. Some projects have a digital component.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 4993Independent Studies in Architectural History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students.
ARH 4999Major Special Study: Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research projects by fourth year architectural history students. Prerequisite: Instructor approval and departmental approval of topic.
ARH 5001Library Methodology (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Required for all entering M.A. students. Introduces research tools and methods for architectural history and related disciplines, reflecting the current breadth of scholarship in the field. Specific research resources are analyzed in terms of their scope, special features, and applications to meeting research and information needs.
ARH 5120History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure & agricultural systems, public & private space,theater & performance,court rituals,horticultural display,natural philosophy & aesthetic theory,visual representation, & the professionalization of landscape design. Graduates Only.
Course was offered Fall 2016
ARH 5130History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 5201Art and Architecture of Venice (3.00)
This course examines the art and architecture of Venice from the fifth century until the seventeenth century. We consider the major "nuclei" of the city like Piazza San Marco and personalities that shaped the built and artistic environment -- Codussi, Sansovino, Palladio, and Titian for example. Graduate students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARH 5500Selected Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special topics pursued in a colloquium. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ARH 5600Arch History Practicum: Preserv Intern (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Internship at World Heritage Site; Monticello or the University of Virginia. 6-8 hours weekly. Some projects have a digital component.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
ARH 5601Historic Preservation Theory and Practice (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar surveys preservation from its historical beginnings through contemporary emerging trends, focusing on the changing nature of its ideals and practice in a critical and international perspective. We will explore the role of historic preservation and heritage in cultural politics, historical interpretation, urban development, and planning and design practice
ARH 5602Community History Workshop (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The Community History Workshop is both an in-depth historical analysis of the architecture, urban form, and planning of a selected community, and a forum for speculative futures and plan making for the community, informed by the historical analysis. This preservation-focused course explores the historical significance of the built landscape as an element in, and an expression of, the social and cultural life of the community.
ARH 5603Community Public History Seminar (3.00)
Explores a variety of approaches to conveying the architectural and cultural history of a community to a diverse public constituency. Builds upon ARH 5602 (Community History Workshop). Also analyzes the preservation implications of the work undertaken in collaboration with students in ARCH 8300 (Community Preservation Studio).
ARH 5604Field Methods I Building Archaeology (3.00)
This combined upper level undergraduate and graduate class is a field based seminar on methods of analyzing and recording historic buildings, especially vernacular buildings and landscapes. Students will be introduced to an intensive building analysis geared to understanding change over time. Students will also learn methods of careful field recording for the purposes of both documentation and analysis.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2010
ARH 5605Falmouth Field School (3.00)
The Falmouth Field School in Historic Preservation is a four-week, three-credit program in applied historic preservation held on-site in Falmouth, Jamaica. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, the field school engages many aspects of the practice of preservation in the culturally diverse and economically complex context of the Caribbean.
ARH 5606Chinese Architecture and Culture (3.00)
Students will learn about Chinese architecture and culture, and have the opportunity to meet professionals in the field. Students will spend a total of six weeks in China, with four weeks in Beijing and the first two weeks traveling to historical sites in and around Shanghai.
ARH 5607Historic Preservation at UVA (3.00)
This course surveys the changing ideals, philosophy, and methods that have guided the historic preservation of buildings and landscapes at the University of Virginia.Taught by preservation professionals from the University's Office of the Architect the course will explore in case studies and readings the design and conservation decisions made on the Rotunda and other historic buildings and landscapes at UVA.
ARH 5610Representing Buildings and Landscapes (3.00)
This field-based workshop explores advanced methods of both traditional and digital representation of historic buildings and landscapes. While engaging cutting-edge methods of digital representation, an emphasis will be placed on critical perspectives on story-telling, meaning, and representation.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ARH 5611Architectural Field School: The Cultural Landscape of Birdwood (3.00)
Through lectures, readings, discussions and on-site tutorials, students in this course will learn fieldwork and archival research methodology through a detailed exploration of the historic UVA Birdwood site. Students will analyze and interpret the data collected to prepare field reports and formal architectural drawings explicating the meanings and significance of the site. 9am to 12pm daily, with time spent both on-site and in the studio.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Summer 2016
ARH 5612Introduction to Urban Design (3.00)
This course introduces urban design as an area of expertise that deals with the physical form and performance of the city, integrating various scales from a building, to a group of buildings, to entire districts, with particular focus on the open spaces between them. As an interdisciplinary practice it bridges between architecture, landscape architecture and city planning. Its role will be examined through core issues from a global perspective.
ARH 5613A Design Process. Gaudi's Origin and Legacy (3.00)
Gaudi is one of the best known Catalan architects from Barcelona. He is famous for his buildings and his furniture, but he is not known as an urban designer. This class will introduce the students to understanding the city scale in terms of Materiality. It will be apparent by looking at Gaudi's work how important it is to understand the laws of construction and framework for creating a good design.
ARH 5614Historic Preservation in Venice (3.00)
Not only is Venice an extraordinary repository of early modern architecture, it is also a locus of cutting edge conservation technologies and progressive design strategies for historic sites. The 1964 Venice Charter was a landmark document in historic preservation and has positioned Venice at the front edge of new conservation technologies for decades while the International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, founded in 1980.
ARH 5616History of American Building Technology (3.00)
This course examines the history of American building technology. Over the past three centuries, a wide range of materials and techniques have been used to erect the structures in which we live, work, and play. Local buildings will serve as case studies for investigating this technology - from commonplace building materials such as wood, masonry, steel, and concrete to less familiar materials such as structural tile and iron vaulting.
ARH 5993Independent Studies in Architectural History (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
ARH 6010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
ARH 6603Barcelona Urban History (3.00)
The students will understand the history of Barcelona from its Roman foundation to the extension of its medieval walls. The development of its urban structural grid, example of Cerdà, as well as its current state of remodeling for the Olympic games, and the ongoing urban transformations will all be studied in this class.This course will consist of lectures, field trips and practical exercises.
ARH 7010History of Architecture I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course will introduce students to the tools of visual analysis, reading architectural drawings and the study of architecture as a part of the larger cultural, social and political context of its society. While the course will focus on Western Europe, it will also include topics from the eastern Mediterranean and Asia.
ARH 7020History of Architecture II (3.00)
This course will examine architecture and urbanism from around 1400 C.E. to the present, tracing connections and distinctions that have guided the design, uses, and meanings of built environments around the globe. You will be introduced to celebrated buildings and less well-known sites and cities, with particular attention to the aesthetic, social, cultural, and institutional situations in which they developed.
ARH 7030World Vernacular Architecture (3.00)
Vernacular Architecture is often understood to be all the built environment that is not 'High Architecture.' This is a profound misunderstanding; Vernacular is any aspect of the built environment examined through the lens of the local AND it is a method of interrogating the relationship between architecture and the human experience. This lecture class enlists global examples to explore the many complex dimensions of vernacular.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 7040Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 7100History of Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Examines the architecture of Medieval Western Europe, emphasizing the period from 1000-1400. Includes the iconography, function, structure and style of buildings, and the use of contemporary texts.
ARH 7101Early Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 800-1150.
ARH 7102Later Medieval Architecture (3.00)
The architecture of Western Europe from c. 1140 and 1500.
ARH 7103Adv. Reconstructing the Medieval Haj (3.00)
Our course will reconstruct the journey of Ibn Jubayr, a twelfth century Spanish Muslim who recorded his haj from Spain to Mecca. Using his lively travel diary, we will analyze the visual culture and built environment of the medieval Mediterranean and together recreate key sites from his journey with easy to use digital tools such as Neatline.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
ARH 7201Italian Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
This course aims to introduce the principal architects, monuments, and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The lectures will be varied in approach and scope, some considering broad issues, others focusing on particular architects, buildings, or texts. Special topics will include architectural theory, patronage, villas, gardens, architectural drawing, and urban design.
ARH 7202Italian Architecture, 1550-1750 (3.00)
Developments in classicism in Italy between 1550 and the advent of neoclassicism, including urban form and landscape.
ARH 7203European Classical Architecture Outside Italy, 1400-1750 (3.00)
The development of classicism primarily in France, England, and Germany between 1400 and 1750 including discussion of cities and landscape design.
ARH 7204Italy, Spain & The Ottoman Empire, 1400-1700 (3.00)
This course will examine Islamic architecture around the Mediterranean in relation to developments in Italy. Particular problems to be considered in a cross-cultural context include those of geometry and ornament, architectural theory, the role of the architect, and garden design and conception. Also important will be issues such as the visual ideology and cultural politics of empire; and the role of the traveler, merchant and ambassador in cultural exchange. Geographical focus will be on Southern Spain, or Andalusia, on Istanbul and the Ottoman Empire, as well as on various cities and regions of Italy including Venice, Genoa, Rome, Naples and Sicily. In the case of Southern Spain, analysis will focus on the points of contact and tension between the Roman heritage, the architectural achievements of the Nasrid Empire, the Gothic tradition, and the imported Italian style. With regard to the Ottoman Empire, an attempt will be made to understand how an obsessive concern among Italian humanists, political leaders, and popes with the Ottoman threat could coincide with cultural fascination and appropriation.
ARH 7205Rome, Istanbul, Venice (3.00)
This course will consider architecture, urbanism and landscape in three cities with multilayered histories: Rome, Venice, and Istanbul. While conditioned by distinct historical and topographic circumstances, each city negotiated complex and varied local traditions: Roman and Medieval in Rome; Byzantine and Gothic in Venice; and Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman in Istanbul.
ARH 7206Mediterranean Architecture (3.00)
This course will consider a range of buildings and landscapes from across the Mediterranean world, encompassing Italy, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, North Africa and Egypt. Its chronological and geographical scope are meant to bring into question some the conventional categories by which art and architectural history are studied: 'Medieval,' 'Renaissance,' 'Italian,' 'Islamic,' 'Eastern,' 'Western,' etc.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 7207Arts and Architecture of the Islamic World (3.00)
In order to understand the production, representation and perception of space in the Islamic world, this survey course examines significant works of arts, architecture, urbanism & landscape from 650 to 1800. While studying common themes & shared values of the Islamic world, the course questions the disparities and novelties in the reception of Islam as a social, cultural & political practice, mapping distant geographies from Al-Andalus to India
Course was offered Spring 2011
ARH 7251Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600. Graduate students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARH 7401History of Modern Architecture (3.00)
Tracing the history of architecture and urbanism from 1870 through the 1970s, this course considers how architecture has participated in and responded to shifting aesthetic, technological, social, environmental, and theoretical challenges during this period. While Europe is an important terrain of investigation, the course emphasizes networks of exchange with Latin America, North Africa, Turkey, India, and Japan.
ARH 7402Postwar Architecture (3.00)
An examination of critical issues in the history and theory of architecture, from World War II to the present, focused particularly on how the shifting geopolitical contours of the postwar world have helped to shape key projects and debates. The course will also provide the opportunity to discuss recent studies in architectural history that have trained renewed attention on this period.
ARH 7403World Contemporary Architecture (3.00)
As the construction of cities redistributes its activities across the world in the twenty-first century, this course considers the ways in which architecture and architects are changed by a complex shifting field of forces. These forces include critical and ethical discourses, digital media, global finance and trade, developments in materials science, environmental awareness, and geo-political strategies.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
ARH 7500Special Topics in Architecture History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
ARH 7601East Meets West (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A study of cultural exchanges and interactions in architecture between East and West. Major events and master architects like F.L. Wright and L. Kahn who contributed to the exchanges are discussed. The forms and meaning of East-West architecture are compared.
ARH 7602World Buddhist Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The history of Buddhist architecture and allied arts in the Buddhist world which includes East, South, and Southeast Asia. Lecture starts from the Indian stupas and ends in Japanese Zen gardens.
ARH 7603Archaeological Approaches to Atlantic Slavery (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course explores how archaeological and architectural evidence can be used to enhance our understanding of the slave societies that evolved in the early-modern Atlantic world. The primary focus is the Chesapeake and the British Caribbean, the later exemplified by Jamaica and Nevis. The course is structured around a series of data-analysis projects that draw on the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
ARH 7604Historical Archaeology (3.00)
An introduction to analytical methods in historical archaeology, their theoretical motivation, and their practical application in the interpretation of the archaeological record of the early Chesapeake. The use of computers in the analysis of real archaeological data is emphasized.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2012, Fall 2009
ARH 7605Drawing Historic Architecture (3.00)
This is mainly a drawing workshop, with some lectures. Learn the classical features of historic architecture such as five orders and domes in details through drawing them. Learn the techniques of drawing the historic architecture, with pencil and pen. There is a focus topic each week to learn and draw. Some drawings are to be done with field trips in the nearby area. At the mid-term and the end of the semester there are group reviews.
ARH 7606Landscape Archaeology (3.00)
This course examines current archaeological approaches to the reconstruction and explanation of the ways in which humans at once shaped and adapted to past landscapes. It emphasizes current theory as well as GIS and statistical methods for the analysis of diverse data - from pollen spectra to topography. The course is structured around a series of projects in which students will have an opportunity to make sense of real archaeological data.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2011
ARH 7607Adv Architecture and the Asia Trade (3.00)
This course presents a series of case studies on trading events between Asia & Europe from Renaissance to the nineteenth century,&examines how architecture &urbanism in Asia changed in response to the practical needs of foreign trade. In tracing the impact of trade on architectural traditions in both Europe and Asia,this course offers an opportunity to document,organize,analyze& theorize one of the most important forces in the devel. of the world
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2012
ARH 7612Theory and Practice in Rural Preservation (3.00)
This course investigates rural heritage sites, communities, and areas in Virginia's countryside in a context of historic trends and national practice. Exploring principles of historic preservation and land conservation, students will develop a critical understanding of the interactions of nature and culture in the settlement, development, & evolution of the countryside as part of an urban/rural continuum.
Course was offered Spring 2015
ARH 7700Adv Thomas Jefferson and American Architecture (3.00)
To Thomas Jefferson architecture was an art that encompassed more than simply shelter but embodied cultural and political values. This course will focus on his architectural and other designs (gardens, interiors, towns, campuses) and his interest in the arts. Graduate students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARH 7701Early American Architecture (3.00)
A survey of American architecture from the first European contact to 1800 including Jefferson, urban form and landscape design.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013, Fall 2009
ARH 7702Later American Architecture (3.00)
A survey of American architecture from 1800 to present including landscape and urban design.
Course was offered Spring 2017
ARH 7703Nineteenth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
The development of architecture from Thomas Jefferson to Frank Lloyd Wright, along with consideration of issues in housing, landscape design, city planning, and influences from Europe.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ARH 7704Twentieth-Century American Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A survey of American architecture emphasizing the development of modernism.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 7801Adv. East Asia Architecture (3.00)
A survey and introduction of traditional architecture and allied arts in China, Japan and Korea. Study of the main features and major monuments of East Asian architecture and landscape architecture.
ARH 7802Modern Japanese Architecture (3.00)
The history of architecture in modern Japan from the Meji period to the present. Focus on post-WW II development. Influential architects, like Tange, Kikutake, Maki, Isozaki, Kurokawa, and Ando are discussed along with urban issues.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ARH 7993Independent Study: Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.
ARH 8001Methods in Architectural History (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Required for candidates for the degree of Master of Architectural History. An investigation of the nature of architectural history, materials, methods, and writings.
ARH 8002Digital Technologies in Architectural History (3.00)
The study of analytic and digital technologies for Architectural History Master Students.
Course was offered Fall 2010
ARH 8601Historic Preservation Theory and Practice (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This seminar surveys preservation from its historical beginnings through contemporary emerging trends, focusing on the changing nature of its ideals and practice in a critical and international perspective.We will explore the role of historic preservation and heritage in cultural politics, historical interpretation, urban development, & planning & design practice. Graduate Students will undertake additional course requirements.
ARH 8604Field Methods I: Reading and Recording Historic Buildings (3.00)
This combined upper level undergraduate and graduate class is a field based seminar on methods of analyzing and recording historic buildings, especially vernacular buildings and landscapes. Students will be introduced to an intensive building analysis geared to understanding change over time. Students will also learn methods of careful field recording for the purposes of both documentation and analysis.
ARH 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Supervised teaching research under the guidance of a faculty supervisor, Permission of the Chair.
ARH 8994Thesis (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Preparation and completion of a thesis..
ARH 8995MA Thesis Research (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Research on topic for Master Thesis.
ARH 8999Thesis Project (6.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For Thesis Preparation, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
ARH 9100Seminar in Medieval Architecture (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.  Past topics have discussed Gothic/Non-Gothic, Norman, and Monastic architecture. 
ARH 9202Borromini & Baroque Rome (3.00)
This seminar will consider the architecture of Francesco Borromini as a lens into Baroque Rome. Broadly, it will examine the struggle to define the classical in the seventeenth century. The famous rivalry between Borromini and Bernini was not merely personal, but involved competing claims to interpret the heritage of ancient Rome. Bernini's vision ultimately triumphed, but it is Borromini who tests the limits of classical language.
ARH 9500Special Topics in Architectural History (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in architectural history.
ARH 9510Seminar in Medieval Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9520Seminar in Renaissance Architecture (3.00)
Seminar discussion of special research topics. Past topics have discussed anthropomorphism in Renaissance and Baroque architecture; Alberti's De re Aedificatoria; Renaissance and Baroque buildings in their larger settings; the Rome of Julius II; Renaissance and Baroque classification of Buildings; Renaissance Space; Brunelleschi and Alberti; Renaissance urbanism; Rome and the Renaissance; and the Renaissance palace.
ARH 9530Seminar in 18th/19th Century Architecture (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ARH 9540Seminar in 20th/21st Century Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9550Seminar in Ancient/Archaeology Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
ARH 9560Seminar in Theory, Comparative, & Other Topics (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
ARH 9570Seminar in Architecture of the Americas (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
ARH 9580Seminar in Architecture of East, South, and Southeast Asia (1.00 - 3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Fall 2015
ARH 9590Seminar in Architecture of Africa or Islam (3.00)
Special research topics pursued in a seminar.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Fall 2010
ARH 9993Independent Studies in Architectural History (3.00)
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
ARH 9999Non-Topical Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Landscape Architecture
LAR 4120History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure and agricultural systems, public and private space, theater and performance, court rituals, horticultural display, natural philosophy and aesthetic theory, visual representation, and the professionalization of landscape design.
LAR 4130History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
LAR 4140Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture (3.00)
Lectures and discussions sections examining the interrelationships between modern designed landscapes, and the theoretical texts that influenced, or were influenced by them.  Readings include primary sources, such as, design treatises, manifestos, park reports and essays, as well as related texts in ecology, art, architecture, geography, and cultural theory.
LAR 4160Topics in the History of Landscape Design (3.00)
Advanced seminar on topics in the history of landscape design. Advanced historical research and analysis of designed and other landscapes. Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.
Course was offered Fall 2009
LAR 4180Topics in Landscape History (3.00)
Advanced seminar on topics in landscape history. Advanced historical research and analysis of the history landscape formation and change. Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.
LAR 4200Healing Spaces (3.00)
Lectures and workshops investigating theme of designed landscapes as means to physically and mentally heal human beings. Topics include a historical overview of various healing landscapes, and an examination of various healing practices in different cultures; Field trips to hospitals, hospices and out-patient clinics in the Charlottesville area.
LAR 4210Topics in Contemporary Theory (3.00)
Seminar exploring topics in landscape architecture theory through direct readings, discussions and research papers. Subjects vary from topics such as design drawing and representation to changing conceptions of nature and ecology (from sustainability to emergence), to gender and design, to the works of a specific designer or region.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
LAR 4230Cultural Landscapes (3.00)
Graduate seminar on contemporary theory and practice for preserving and interpreting a broad range of cultural landscapes and historic sites. Evaluation of these theories and practices through critical review of case studies, and close reading and discussion of current texts. Field trip/exercises to be subject of student seminar research.
Course was offered Fall 2010
LAR 5120Adv History of Landscape Design I (3.00)
This course surveys the pre-modern history of gardens and designed landscapes. The sessions follow a roughly chronological sequence, with a thematic focus appropriate to each landscape culture, e.g. water infrastructure and agricultural systems, public and private space, theater and performance, court rituals, horticultural display, natural philosophy and aesthetic theory, visual representation, and the professionalization of landscape design. Prerequisite: Graduates only.
LAR 5130Adv History of Landscape Design II (3.00)
This course examines gardens and landscapes of the modern period, tracing the complex relations between innovations in landscape design and social, technological, and ideological developments of the past 200 years. Case studies focus on the United States and Europe, with thematic emphasis on the rise of the bourgeoisie, the public park movement, modernism, environmentalism, the post-war consumer society, and the influence of earthworks/land art.
LAR 5140Advanced Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture (3.00)
Lectures and discussions sections examining the interrelationships between modern designed landscapes, and the theoretical texts that influenced, or were influenced by them. Readings include primary sources, such as, design treatises, manifestos, park reports and essays, as well as related texts in ecology, art, architecture, geography, and cultural theory. Prerequisite: LAR 5120 or instructor permission.
LAR 5200Adv. Healing Spaces (3.00)
Lectures and workshops investigating theme of designed landscapes as means to physically and mentally heal human beings.  Topics include a historical overview of various healing landscapes, and an examination of various healing practices in different cultures.  Field trips to hospitals, hospices and out-patient clinics in the Charlottesville area.
LAR 5210Adv Topics in Contemporary Theory (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Seminar exploring topics in landscape architecture theory through direct readings, discussions and research papers. Subjects vary from topics such as design drawing and representation to changing conceptions of nature and ecology (from sustainability to emergence), to gender and design, to the works of a specific designer or region.
LAR 5230Cultural Landscapes (3.00)
Seminar introduces contemporary theory and practice for describing, interpreting, planning, preserving, and designing vernacular and designed cultural landscapes (urban/peri-urban/rural; sylvan & postindustrial) and historic sites. Exploration through case study review, close reading and discussion of texts, short position papers & field trips. Guest lecturers include designers, historians and planners in government agencies and private practice.
LAR 5250Landscape and Narrative (3.00)
This workshop explores the role of narrative in creating, experiencing, and representing landscapes. In addition to examining built landscapes where inscriptions and sequential movement play a crucial role, we will analyze the use of landscape in the narrative arts, including the novel, drama, and film. Case studies include Goethe's Elective Affinities, Stoppard's Arcadia, Tati's Mon Oncle, and Greenaway's The Draughtsman's Contract.
Course was offered Spring 2013
LAR 5260D.I.R.T. Seminar: Doing Industrial Research Together (3.00)
Readings, lectures, and class discussions focus on the evolving definition and reclamation technologies of the post-industrial landscape. Includes field work/visits to a variety of brownfield and industrial sites.
LAR 5280Green Cities/Green Sites (3.00)
This course teaches students how to redesign city properties to reduce runoff pollution and follow environmentally sensitive design principles. By assessing the city's existing `greenfrastructure' and retrofitting city lands and buildings, students learn how the city can demonstrate environmentally sensitive design, protect public health and provide more opportunities for environmental education and healthful recreation.
LAR 5290Green Lands (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Students in this course inventory existing environmental functions of undeveloped land in order to designate appropriate protection and restoration techniques to enhance environmental capital. Using the lens of green infrastructure planning, the course assesses the interconnected network of waterways, wetlands, woodlands, and wildlife habitats to maximize environmentally responsible development.
LAR 5330Sites and Systems (3.00)
Recent trends in landscape architecture can be framed as moving from how things look to how they perform. The interest in ecosystem services or green infrastructure indicates how concerns are moving from issues of form to issues of flow. In studying the co-dependent relationship of urban metabolism and morphology, this seminar asks how far engineered solutions provided by technical infrastructure can be reevaluated as assets of the public realm.
LAR 5340Earthwork (3.00)
Applies concepts and principles of earthwork, land manipulation, grading, and drainage in short exercises. Introduces digital applications in a combined lecture and workshop format. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in LAR 6020 or 7010 Studio or instructor permission.
LAR 5370Natural Systems and Plant Ecology (4.00)
Lectures and fieldwork introducing ecological concepts and natural systems, and focusing on plant associations in natural habitats. Concentration on both ecological structure and function as well as physical form/shape of plants. Emphasis on field identification and analysis. Lecture and frequent fieldtrips to varied ecosystems in different regions within Virginia, including Tidewater, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, and Ridge Valley.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
LAR 5375Planted Systems and Urban Ecology (3.00)
Building on the palette of native plants learned in LAR 5370, this course focuses on the characteristics and requirements of ornamental, non-native woody and herbaceous plant species and their design and cultivation in constructed sites and urban conditions. The course includes lectures and field trips to varying designed landscapes and towns in the region.
Course was offered Spring 2014
LAR 5380Planted Form and Function (4.00)
This course builds on LAR 5370 & 5375 shifting emphasis from plant description &identification to making design propositions using plants. Lectures alternate with short planting design exercises & research into creating plant palettes for different site conditions.Students learn how planting designs move through various stages of the design from conceptual, to schematic, to design development, &construction documentation.Prerequisite:5370&5375
LAR 5430Landscape Visualization & 3-D Modeling (3.00)
Investigates advanced computer-based techniques for landscape visualization, including 3-D geometric modeling, texture mapping and animation. A series of lectures, computer-based workshop exercises and readings of increasing sophistication focus on internal and external representations of terrain elements: landform, vegetation, water, meteorological and atmospheric effects. Photo-realistic and abstract strategies are explored to augment design investigation and presentation.
Course was offered Spring 2010
LAR 5460Representing Landscape III (2.00)
A continuation of LAR 6410 Landscape Representation II and aligning with LAR 7010 studio, this course will explore ways to analyze, index, and represent larger scale landscape systems and their relationship and use, and to utilize them as a critical design tool in studio. Students will investigate urban and environmental data software such as GIS and methods to spatialize such information in physical/3D forms using Rhino and laser cutting.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
LAR 5500Special Topics in Landscape Architecture (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in landscape architecture.
LAR 5590Faculty Research Seminar (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Affords students opportunities to participate in specific faculty's advance research projects. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
LAR 5670Place Making (3.00)
Seminar that explores the interconnections between infrastructure--ecological systems, transportation, and water supply--and the form and vitality domestic urban landscape. Readings, discussions and research papers examine contemporary case studies, from the Charlottesville Urban Habitats Design Competition to ideas for rebuilding New Orleans.
Course was offered Fall 2009
LAR 5993Advanced Independent Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
LAR 6010Foundation Studio I (6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Series of short analytical and conceptual design projects with special emphasis on the landscape medium, on site readings, and site-specific design approaches. Prerequisite: ALAR 5010 & 5020
LAR 6020Foundation Studio II (6.00)
LAR 6020 focuses on process and from, exploring how dynamic living systems shape the landscape with design interventions resulting in complex places within specific contexts. Design methodologies are introduced as a means to translate landscape processes and to respond through iterative design propositions. Prerequisite: LAR 6010.
LAR 6160Advanced Topics in the History of Landscape Design (3.00)
Advanced seminar on topics in the history of landscape design. Advance historical research and analysis of designed and other landscapes. Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.
Course was offered Fall 2009
LAR 6180Advanced Topics in Landscape History (3.00)
Advanced seminar on topics in landscape history. Advanced historical research and analysis of the history of landscape formation and change. Permission of instructor required for undergraduates.
LAR 6210Movement and Built Environment (3.00)
This seminar will consider the bodily experience of movement in the environment and how designers, attuned to the kinesthetic potentials of the body, might use movement as a generative device. A guest choreographer will lead the class in a series of environmental movement
Course was offered Fall 2011
LAR 6211EcoTech I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Applies concepts and principles of earthwork, land manipulation, water, and drainage& basic construction in short exercises. Introduces digital applications in a combined lecture and workshop format. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in LAR 6010 or ALAR 7010 Studio or instructor permission. Requisite: This course will focus on the participatory design process, looking especially into models that incorporate theories of cultural landscape preservation and address social practices and community
LAR 6212EcoTech II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A continuation of LAR 6311 , this course will develop a more advanced understanding of grading, land manipulation, water + drainage landscape construction materials and methods. Uses case study analysis to explore the expressive design potential of materials, technical concerns for performance and durability, and ethical concerns for sustainability.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
LAR 6221Planted Form and Function I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Concentration on both ecological structure and function as well as physical form/shape of plants. Lectures and fieldwork introducing ecological concepts and natural systems, and focusing on plant associations in natural habitats. Emphasis on field identification and analysis. Lecture and frequent fieldtrips to varied ecosystems in different regions within Virginia, including Tidewater, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, and Ridge Valley.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
LAR 6222Planted Form and Function II (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course builds on LAR 6221, shifting emphasis from plant description & identification to making design propositions using plants. Lectures alternate with short planting design exercises & research into creating plant palettes for different site conditions.Students learn how planting designs move through various stages of the design from conceptual, to schematic, to design development, &construction documentation. Prerequisite:LAR 6221
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
LAR 6410Representing Landscape I (2.00)
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media including drawing, collage, model making & digital modeling. Students will explore manual and digital techniques to represent the physical and phenomenal structures of landscape, site, and ground and encouraged to incorporate the two means fluidly & expressively. The media and assignments will align with LAR 6010 first-year LAR studio
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
LAR 6411Visual Studies I (1.00)
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media including drawing, collage, model making & digital modeling. Students will explore manual and digital techniques to represent the physical and phenomenal structures of landscape, site, and ground and encouraged to incorporate the two means fluidly & expressively.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
LAR 6412Visual Studies II (1.00)
This course is a continuation of LAR 6413 Visual Studies III and aligns with LAR 6020 first-year spring studio. Students will further explore ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media including drawing, collage, model making & digital modeling. The course also introduces the basics of CAAD drawing.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
LAR 6414Digital Practices II (3.00)
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media. Through a series of lectures, exercises, fieldwork, case studies, reading discussions and workshops, students will be introduced to a diverse body of representational models and methods to address form, scale, materiality, context and time unique to the praxis of landscape architecture
Course was offered Spring 2017
LAR 6417Digital Practices I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media. Through a series of lectures, exercises, fieldwork, case studies, reading discussions and workshops, students will be introduced to a diverse body of representational models and methods to address form, scale, materiality, context and time unique to the praxis of landscape architecture.
Course was offered Fall 2016
LAR 6420Representing Landscape II (1.00)
This course is a continuation of LAR 6410 Representing Landscape I and aligns with LAR 6020 first-year spring studio. Students will further explore ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media including drawing, collage, model making & digital modeling. The course also introduces the basics of CAD drawing.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
LAR 7010Foundation Studio III (6.00)
Semester long design project, usually of a complex urban or suburban site that explores the contemporary public realm at multiple scales, from the urban watershed to the detail.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
LAR 7020Foundation Studio III (6.00)
LAR 7020 is grounded in issues of urban design. Fundamental aspects of urban form are explored in contemporary contexts of cities impacted by urgent environmental, economic and social circumstances. Design propositions are generated at the scale of landscape infrastructure to that of individual citizens. Prerequisite: of ALAR 7010
Course was offered Spring 2017
LAR 7180Landscape and Technology (3.00)
This seminar examines the impact of technological revolutions on landscape design. Case studies include innovations in hydraulics and irrigation, horticulture and the plant trade, transportation and civil engineering, construction techniques, and landscape representation. Readings address modern conceptions of the nature/technology divide, the social dimensions of technological development, and the relation of these domains to landscape design.
LAR 7213EcoTech III (3.00)
Advanced level of ground manipulation + water integrated with ecological principles and engineering applications in the area of urban watershed management. Topics include urban hydrology & soils, storm water management & low impact development techniques, as well as constructed wetlands & stream restoration. Prerequisite:Must be enrolled in ALAR 7010 Studio or taken LAR 6211, or with permission of instructor.
LAR 7214EcoTech IV (3.00)
Illuminating course looking at earthwork, and construction that integrates the principles of water and land into the studio, with an emphasis in self remediation, bioengineering, living systems and management.Typological library of solutions.
LAR 7224Planted Form and Function III (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Urban forests are a consequence of a non-planned decision. They are an addition of independent interventions through the history of the city. The objective of the course will be to rethink urban forests taking as a base the existing reality, reviewing its history, but also learning from the original forest to propose new typologies of design where city and trees will share the same objective: working together with complexity and efficacy.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
LAR 7310Planted Form (3.00)
Develops a design vocabulary specific to individual plant architecture and collective planted form studying the structure and dynamics of native plant communities, vernacular planting systems and design precedents. Vocabulary and principles applied in the formulation of plant palettes for specific design intentions and situations. Prerequisite: LAR 5370 and 5380, or instructor permission.
LAR 7320Regenerative Technologies (3.00)
Negative environmental consequences of production and use are an opportunity to design new landscapes typologies. Review of negative externalities in primary, secondary and tertiary sector of the economy through history. Global and specific remediation strategies. Development of conceptual approaches for every sector. Typological library of solutions. Introduction of the concepts management, self remediation, resilience, process.
LAR 7340Site Assembly (3.00)
Introduces landscape construction materials and methods for their assembly, focusing on small structures. Uses case study analysis to explore the expressive design potential of materials, technical concerns for performance and durability, and ethical concerns for sustainability.
LAR 7350Waterworks (3.00)
Integrates ecological principles with engineering applications in the area of urban watershed management. Topics include urban hydrology and soils, storm water management and low impact development techniques, as well as constructed wetlands and stream restoration. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in LAR 7010 Studio or LAR 5340, or with permission of instructor.
LAR 7414Visual Studies III (1.00)
A continuation of LAR 6411 Visual Studies I and aligning with ALAR 7010 studio, this course will explore ways to analyze, index, and represent larger scale landscape systems and their relationship and use, and to utilize them as a critical design tool in studio. Students will investigate urban and environmental data software such as GIS and methods to specialize such information in physical/3D forms using Rhino and laser cutting.
LAR 7416Digital Practices IV (1.00)
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media. Through a series of lectures, exercises, fieldwork, case studies, reading discussions and workshops, students will be introduced to a diverse body of representational models and methods to address form, scale, materiality, context and time unique to the praxis of landscape architecture
LAR 7417Digital Practices III (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Course explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of 2D and 3D media. Through a series of lectures, exercises, fieldwork, case studies, reading discussions and workshops, students will be introduced to a diverse body of representational models and methods to address form, scale, materiality, context and time unique to the praxis of landscape architecture
LAR 7700Advanced Landscape Drawing and Representation (3.00)
Explores ways of representing, analyzing and designing the landscape through a variety of media to include drawing, collage, image processing, model making and digital modeling. Prerequisite: LAR 6010, 6020, 7010.
LAR 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor .
LAR 8001Design Research Seminar (1.00)
This course is for landscape architecture students expecting to undertake an independent design research studio during the following fall semester. This student-driven course will engage with faculty and other students to support their independent work.
Course was offered Spring 2016
LAR 8010Comprehensive Studio (6.00)
Semester -long design project that integrates eco-technology course content - earthwork, planted systems, and site assemblies - with a conceptual design idea, leading to the comprehensive and rigorous design development of a landscape. Prerequisite: ALAR 7020.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
LAR 8020Foundation Studio IV (6.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research. Typical projects include brownfields, urban landscape infrastructure, and sustainable designs. Prerequisite: ALAR 8010
LAR 8102Design Research Methods (1.00)
This course is for landscape architecture students expecting to undertake an independent thesis studio during the following fall semester. ALAR 8100 is the prerequisite. This student-driven course will engage with faculty and other students to support their independent work. Students are expected to gather the appropriate resources and focus on contextualizing their work.
Course was offered Spring 2017
LAR 8140Adv Theories of Modern Landscape Architecture (3.00)
Lectures and discussions sections examining the interrelationships between modern designed landscapes, and the theoretical texts that influenced, or were influenced by them. Readings include primary sources, such as, design treatises, manifestos, park reports and essays, as well as related texts in ecology, art, architecture, geography, and cultural theory.
Course was offered Spring 2017
LAR 8320Professional Practice (3.00)
Introduction to methods and models of design practice administration: proposal, contracts, project management, collaboration and licensure.
LAR 8321Landscape Architecture Construction Documentation (1.00)
This course introduces students to standards for the set of documents used in landscape architectural project construction.
LAR 8500Special Studies in Landscape Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
LAR 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Involves serving as a teaching assistant for a course, with teaching assignments coordinated by the chair. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
LAR 8801Research Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Student will engage with faculty on selected topics in Landscape Architecture Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
LAR 8993Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture faculty approval of topic.
LAR 8999Non-Topical Research (3.00 - 12.00)
Non-Topical Research.
Planning Application
PLAC 2500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Planning
PLAC 3500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Planning
PLAC 4010Neighborhood Planning Studio (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores neighborhood, planning issues from the professionals' and citizens' perspectives. Cross-listed with PLAC 5610.
PLAC 4041Real Estate Development and Finance (3.00)
The course will examine the dialogue between economic forces and design decisions in the real estate development process. The course will emphasize the ability of intelligent design to create lasting economic value and the utilization of marketing and finance strategy to augment project viability and profitability.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
PLAC 4500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Planning
PLAC 4993Applied Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, or independent study. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAC 5130Applied GIS Workshop (3.00)
Students apply GIS technology to examine significant issues of land, natural resources, and the characteristics of urban development.
PLAC 5240Collaborative Planning for Sustainability (3.00)
Examines the processes by which consensus can be developed, focusing general negotiation theory and skill development, including the concept of principled negotiation; the conflict landscape, including government and non-government organizations; and negotiation resources and opportunities, including organizations, processes, and enabling legislation.
PLAC 5430Land Development Workshop (3.00)
Explores the land development process from the perspective of the private land developer interacting with local governments. Includes development potential, site, and traffic analysis; land planning; development programming; and services to accommodate new development and public regulation of land development.
PLAC 5440Affordable Housing (3.00)
The issue of affordable housing is one that touches every community and which is a major challenge. There are a variety of housing needs that the market does not address effectively with the result that many families pay a disproportionate share of their income for housing while others have long commutes in order to find housing that is affordable.
Course was offered Spring 2011
PLAC 5500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical Offerings in Planning
PLAC 5610Neighborhood Planning Studio (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores neighborhood, planning issues from the professionals' and citizens' perspectives. Cross-listed with PLAC 5610.
PLAC 5720Transportation and Land Use (3.00)
Reviews basic relationships between land use and transportation. Considers the decision process, planning principles, impact measures, and the methodological framework for identifying and evaluating practices in action on a regional, local, and neighborhood scale.
PLAC 5740Transportation Planning and Policy (3.00)
This course introduces graduate and advanced undergraduate students to current issues in the field of transportation planning and policy. It addresses all modes of transportation (auto, walk, bike) and considers multiple scales (national, state, regional and local). Through the analysis of key topics such as congestion, air quality, social equity, and security, we will gain an understanding of how decisions about the transportation system are made and the role of transportation planners and advocates in these decisions.
Course was offered Fall 2009
PLAC 5800Green Lands (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course assesses the existing 'green infrastructure' of counties in Virginia and develops strategies for protecting environmental assets and channeling future development to the most appropriate locations. Students will use the existing county comprehensive plan to create effective strategies for implementation of goals related to conserving open space and creating livable communities.
PLAC 5812Ecological Democracy (3.00)
Students will participate in community engaged design and/or research activities that help better connect people with their environments. Subject matter might include civic environmentalism, greening alleys and other semi-public spaces, climate change education, sustainable design, etcetera.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PLAC 5820Sustainable Planning and Design Workshop (3.00)
Students act as a consultant team to develop sustainable planning and design strategies for sites which rotate each year.
Course was offered Fall 2009
PLAC 5850Community Food Systems (3.00)
Students will gain experience in policies that support a sustainable food system. They will undertake community projects that span production, distribution, processing, and consumption of food, and also gain practical knowledge in effective community engagement.
Course was offered Spring 2010
PLAC 5851Global-Local Connections in Community Food Systems (3.00)
Using case studies of cities and regions in the U.S. and throughout the world, this course explores global health issues through the lens of food systems. The purpose is to reveal how food production and distribution are key indicators of environmental and economic health.
PLAC 5852Community Food System Assessment (3.00)
Students will learn the fundamentals of food system assessment for community sustainability - its importance, methods, and applications. They will design and conduct a food system assessment for a local community, while using best practices for community engagement.
PLAC 5853Community Food Systems: Food Heritage (2.00 - 3.00)
This class is part of a larger Virginia Food Heritage Project (a PLAC) (vafoodheritage.wordpress.com/), led by the IEN in partnership with numerous community partners. Students will learn about how food heritage could be an important tool in community planning for sustainability and resilience. Students will build the larger Charlottesville community's knowledge about its unique food heritage through primary and secondary research.
Course was offered Summer 2013
PLAC 5860Green Cities/Green Sites (3.00)
This course teaches students how to redesign city properties to reduce runoff pollution and follow environmentally sensitive design principles. By assessing the city's existing 'greenfrastructure' and retrofitting city lands and buildings, students learn how the city can demonstrate environmentally sensitive design, protect public health and provide more opportunities for environmental education and healthful recreation. The course works with a different local partner each semester.
PLAC 5870Environmental Impact Statements (3.00)
This course is intended to provide students with a broad background of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the subsequent laws and administrative processes from which developed the environmental impact assessment, particularly the environmental impact statement. The course introduces a framework for conducting environmental impact assessments, technological methods for predicting changes in environmental characteristics, considerations involved in interpreting significance of predicted impacts, techniques for accomplishing public participation, and practical considerations for writing environmental impact statements as applied to a local project. Students will also discuss the future of Environmental Impact Assessments, Community Impact Assessments, Health Impact Assessments and other similar tools.
Course was offered Fall 2011
PLAC 5880Coastal Adapt Sea Level (3.00)
Explores challenges faced by coastal cities in planning for long term sea level rise. Students will examine successful adaptation tools and ideas from around the world, and apply and test them,in Virginia coastal communities.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
PLAC 5993Applied Independent Study (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Applied independent study.
PLAC 6090Planning Practicum (3.00)
This course serves as the fourth semester integrative class for the MUEP. Students work on a group project for a community client. Course entails understanding and drafting MOUs, creating concrete work plans, engaging with the public, gathering data and investigating strategies and alternatives. Final product should be a meaningful, implementable planning document for community use.
PLAC 6862Planning for Climate Change (3.00)
This course is three-credit course that will examine the impacts of climate change on cities & explore the various ways local governments & other stakeholders are working to manage climate change & enhance community resilience. Because the course is a PLAC,students will be working on developing an actual strategic framework for addressing climate change with a client city.Students will get exposures to the central analyses used in climate change
Course was offered Spring 2015
PLAC 7500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Planning
PLAC 8060Urbanism Design Studio (6.00)
This design studio pulls together many issues that graduate students have studied individually in design technology, theory and history courses into a complex and integrated section of a living and working community. This research looks at integrating infrastructure systems as a community connection system, energy producing ecology and as a civic public space symbol. Pre-Requisites: ARCH/LAR 7010
PLAC 8240Advanced Collaborative Planning for Sustainability (3.00)
Examines the processes by which consensus can be developed, focusing general negotiation theory and skill development, including the concept of principled negotiation; the conflict landscape, including government and non-government organizations; and negotiation resources and opportunities, including organizations, processes, and enabling legislation.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAC 8500Topical Offerings in Planning (3.00)
Topical Offerings in Planning
Urban and Environmental Planning
PLAN 1010Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Analyzes community and environmental planning in the United States; the planning process; and sustainable communities.
PLAN 2020Planning Design (4.00)
Studies the principles of design; the architecture of cities and urban design; perception of space and visual analysis; graphic presentation, including mapping techniques; and inventories, information storage, retrieval and use.
PLAN 2110Digital Visualization for Planners (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Digital technology for representing and analyzing planning data will include photo-editing, web page design, geographic information system mapping, spreadsheet modeling, and document layout and production. The major emphasis will be on two- and three- dimensional representation of spaces common to planning: streetscape, neighborhoods, communities and regions. Representation of the past, the present and prospective futures to both professional and citizen audiences will receive critical attention.
PLAN 2500Special Topics in Planning (1.00 - 3.00)
Topical offerings in planning.
PLAN 3010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
PLAN 3030Neighborhoods, Community and Regions (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores theories and concepts of economic, social, and cultural forces that influence urban and regional spatial structure.
PLAN 3040Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
PLAN 3050Planning Methods (3.00)
Analyzes methods used in quantitative and qualitative investigations of urban and regional settings for planning purposes.
PLAN 3060Law, Land and the Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course introduces major legal issues surrounding land-use and environmental issues, focusing on the most notable U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to land use and environmental law, as well as the legal framework for land use law and environmental law.
PLAN 3140Design Themes of Great Cities (3.00)
This course discusses the design qualities of the world's great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
PLAN 3250Mediation Theory and Skills (1.00)
This highly engaging one-credit, pass-fail course will introduce students to the principles and practices of mediation, with an emphasis on inter-personal conflict.
PLAN 3310History of Cities and Planning (3.00)
An overview of the planning profession with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century American urban history.
PLAN 3500Special Topics in Planning (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Topical offerings in planning.
PLAN 3640Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 3811Gender & Built Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class explores the wide range of approaches that have been taken to the complex relationships between body, sex, gender, and the built environment. Some see buildings as a direct expression of sexed bodies (phallic towers and breast-like domes), while others see buildings and settlements as expressions and reiterations of the gender structures of a culture.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 3860Cities and Nature (3.00)
This class begins with the premise that contact with nature is essential to modern life.The class will examine the evidence for why nature in important,and the many creative ways in which cities can plan for,and design-in nature, and foster meaningful and everyday connections with the natural world.
PLAN 4040Planning in Government (3.00)
Examines the role of planning in government decision-making. Focuses on local government, but intergovernmental aspects of planning that influence local decisions are also stressed. Studies planning processes, such as transportation, community development, and social planning.
PLAN 4500Special Topics in Planning (3.00)
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.
PLAN 4510J-Term Courses (3.00)
January Term courses provide students with unique opportunities: new courses that address topics of current interest, study abroad programs, undergraduate research seminars, and interdisciplinary courses. The intensive format of "J-term" classes encourages extensive student-faculty contact and allows students and faculty to immerse he topics of "J-term" courses change each semester and offer focused study, often related travel or current events.
PLAN 4600Urban Research (3.00)
This is a component of the Design studio, focused on local, on site research. The Urban Research component may be taken independently by History and Planning students.
PLAN 4800Professional Practice (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Structured internship experience and reporting as a reflective practitioner for ten weeks or 200 hours of experience.
PLAN 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Elective courses offered at the request of faculty or students to provide an opportunity for internships, fieldwork, and independent study.
PLAN 4999Planning Senior Project (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Note: Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students may, with instructor permission, enroll in selected 5000-level courses.
PLAN 5010Urban Design Research Studio (6.00)
Explores methods of urban design analysis, stressing observational and representational methods. Emphasizes relationships among public and private buildings, spaces, and transportation corridors in commercial centers.
PLAN 5020Planning Design (4.00)
Explores methods of urban design analysis, stressing observational and representational methods. Emphasizes relationships among public and private buildings, spaces, and transportation corridors in commercial centers. Cross-listed with PLAN 2020.
PLAN 5040Planning in Government (3.00)
Examines the role of planning in government decision-making. Focuses on local government, but intergovernmental aspects of planning that influence local decisions are also stressed. Studies planning processes, such as transportation, community development, and social planning.
PLAN 5110Digital Visualization for Planners (4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Digital technology for representing and analyzing planning data will include photo-editing, web page design, geographic information system mapping, spreadsheet modeling, and document layout and production. The major emphasis will be on two- and three- dimensional representation of spaces common to planning: streetscape, neighborhoods, communities and regions. Graduate Students will undertake additional course requirements.
PLAN 5120Geographic Information Systems (3.00)
Reviews the use of computers in planning, emphasizing geographic information systems for collection, analysis, and display of spatial information in urban and environmental contexts.
PLAN 5130Advanced GIS (3.00)
This course focuses on case studies of real world GIS applications. Three cases covering urban and environmental planning at different scales will be introduced. To address these cases, students will learn advanced GIS skills in geodatabase design, data editing, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization. Class time is divided by multimedia lectures, hands-on demonstrations, project status updates from students, and diagnostic discussions
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
PLAN 5131GIS Visualization for Designers (3.00)
This course covers the basic concepts of GIS, spatial data management, GIS mapping, spatial reasoning, site representation, data-driven 3D modeling, and interoperability. It is tailored for students in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, or related programs who want to catch up with the geo-spatial revolution in the design field.
PLAN 5140Advanced Design Themes of Great Cities (3.00)
This course discusses the design qualities of the world's great cities. Each session focuses on the defining characteristics of different cities such as their natural settings, public spaces, transportation systems, types of buildings, and everyday details.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
PLAN 5250Mediation Theory and Skills (1.00)
This highly engaging one-credit, pass-fail course will introduce students to the principles and practices of mediation, with an emphasis on inter-personal conflict.
PLAN 5300Preservation Planning (3.00)
Studies current literature on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of historic places. Develops techniques for surveying, documenting, evaluating, and planning for preservation. Analyzes current political, economic, and legal issues in preservation planning.
PLAN 5310Adv. History Cities & Planning (3.00)
An overview of the planning profession with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century American urban history.
PLAN 5400Housing and Community Development (3.00)
Provides an introduction to the housing and community development area of planning practice. Topics include the housing and development industries, neighborhood change processes, social aspects of housing and development, and housing and development programs and policy issues.
PLAN 5401Models for Higher Density Housing (3.00)
This seminar will focus on density and contemporary housing issues, specifically related to affordable housing. As cities have spread out or decayed at the core, the variety of housing options has decreased leading to a growing divide between where and how people can afford to live. Assignments range from readings and leading discussion to case study presentations of recent global and local housing designs.
Course was offered Spring 2015
PLAN 5410Economic Built Environment (3.00)
Economics studies the efficient allocation of scarce resources. Efficiency is achieved when an economy cannot make anyone economically better off without making someone else worse off. In most mixed economies, like the U.S., there is a dominant market system of organizing economic activity that coordinates the basic questions of allocation: what, how and for whom to produce.
PLAN 5420Economic Development (3.00)
Explores the economy of a community, neighborhood, or region as an essential element, in livability and sustainability. Planners engage economic development by working with the community to assess needs and opportunities, through public-private business partnerships, and in development review.
PLAN 5440Neighborhood Planning (3.00)
As the "building blocks" of cities, neighborhood plans involve citizens in addressing issues of housing, jobs, public services, education, recreation, and transportation.
PLAN 5450Healthy Communities (3.00)
Explores connections between the built environment and community health, with an emphasis on re-integrating planning with its original roots in public health.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 5452Healthy Cities (3.00)
This class explores what makes a healthy city, what are the constituent parts of that system and what are different peoples needs across the life span, from perinatal to older age. The class begins by exploring concepts of health including health resilience - and focuses on how our cities can be better designed to optimize human flourishing.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PLAN 5470Site Selection and Project Feasibility (3.00)
This class addresses the very beginning of the land and building development process: the search for potential sites. Students weekly select sites and conduct feasibility evaluations which are then discussed extensively in class. Students learn about the wide range of factors (regulatory requirements, community acceptance, ability to finance, infrastructure, market potential and others).
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011
PLAN 5500Special Topics in Planning (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.
PLAN 5580Short Courses in Planning (1.00)
A series of one-credit short courses, whose topics vary from semester to semester.
PLAN 5581Short Courses in Planning I (1.00)
A series of one-credit short courses, whose topics vary from semester to semester.
Course was offered Fall 2014
PLAN 5600Land Use and Growth Management (3.00)
Introduces the theory and practice of land use planning and growth management as they have evolved historically and as expressed in contemporary practice. Addresses the need and rationale for land use planning as well as its tools.
PLAN 5601Regional Planning (3.00)
An examination of opportunities & obstacles of regional planning in the U.S. Key topics include the historical foundations of regionalism, political & economic relationships between suburban & urban jurisdictions, & local vs. metropolitan perspectives with regard to growth management, transportation, environmental planning & economic development, among others.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PLAN 5603Biophilic Urbanism (3.00)
This course begins with the premise that nature is essential to healthy, happy and meaningful lives and explores how cities can be designed and planned with nature at the center. The emerging science, key research underpinnings, and principles of biophilic planning will be examined. The class will review best practices of leading biophilic cities around the world and their efforts to restore, integrate and celebrate nature.
PLAN 5605Degrowth (3.00)
What exactly does growth-dependence mean? Is the planning profession dependent on growth as well? If so, how, when and why did this contingent state of affairs come into being and what, if anything, should be done about it? In this follow-up to PLAN 5601 Regional Planning we cast a critical eye toward the topics of growth and sustainability, by way of an in-depth case study examination of an expanding European social movement known as Degrowth.
PLAN 5611Barcelona Urban History (3.00)
The students will understand the history of Barcelona from its Roman foundation to the extension of its medieval walls. The development of its urban structural grid, example of Cerdà, as well as its current state of remodeling for the Olympic games, and the ongoing urban transformations will all be studied in this class. This course will consist of lectures, field trips & practical exercises; specifically we will develop a graphic interpretation.
PLAN 5620Sustainability and Adaptive Infrastructure (3.00)
Infrastructure mediates between the needs of our urban communities and the systems, natural and constructed, which support them. This course is focused on the infrastructure of cities and urbanizing regions and includes topics such as transportation, drinking water, waste water, energy, schools, parks, recycling, and public safety. The course will examine current challenges and a range of means for responding to and funding needed changes.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
PLAN 5630Design of Cities (3.00)
Cities are physical artifacts that are experienced psychologically and socially. This course investigates the theories surrounding these processes to reach an understanding of humanistic urban design intentions. Experiential realities are explored through case studies, readings, and mapping exercises.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 5640Adv. Town Design (3.00)
This course will investigate the generic principles and strategies that shape the form and character of towns and discuss influential towns that over the past several generations have, at least to their advocates, represented 'good' planning and design. While recognizing the importance of social and economic factors, the course will emphasize the physical, visual, and experiential qualities of towns.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 5650Brownfields Redevelopment (3.00)
This course analyzes the challenges and opportunities posed by the development of environmentally impaired properties. It explores the legal, political, and philosophical underpinnings of environmental regulation. The course includes fundamentals of real estate finance, including risk dynamics and debt capital, and assesses community involvement in redevelopment solutions.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 5670Place Making (3.00)
Seminar that explores the interconnections between infrastructure 'ecological systems, transportation, and water supply' and the form and vitality domestic urban landscape. Readings, discussions and research papers examine contemporary case studies, from the Charlottesville Urban Habitats Design Competition to ideas for rebuilding New Orleans.
Course was offered Fall 2009
PLAN 5710Transportation and Environment (3.00)
Course examines the impacts of transportation systems on the environment from roadside air quality to global climate change, exploring sustainable transportation policy, multimodal transportation, environmental justice, resilience,and community-based solutions.Building on course readings and discussion, PhD students will propose and develop a research paper on a topic of their choosing within the overall theme of transportation and the environment.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2014
PLAN 5740Transportation Planning and Policy (3.00)
This course introduces graduate and advanced undergraduate students to current issues in the field of transportation planning and policy. It addresses all modes of transportation (auto, walk, bike) and considers multiple scales (national, state, regional and local). Through the analysis of key topics such as congestion, air quality, social equity, and security, we will gain an understanding of how decisions about the transportation system
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
PLAN 5770Plan Implementation (3.00)
Emphasizes the use of zoning, subdivision, and other regulations to implement comprehensive plans. Attention is given to capital facilities programming and building codes.
PLAN 5810Sustainable Communities (3.00)
Examines sustainable communities and the environmental, social, economic, political, and design standards that underlie them. Focuses on reviewing case studies of cities, towns, and development projects that reflect principles of sustainability.
PLAN 5814Methods Comm Engagement (3.00)
Explores methods beyond the conventional town-hall meeting to gather insights from communities on planning issues. Topics will include more traditional methods of qualitative research such as focus groups, interviews, charrettes, participatory action research, and scenario planning, as well as strategies like asset mapping, visual preference surveys, games, art-based visioning, participatory budgeting.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PLAN 5830Environmental Policy and Planning (3.00)
Examines contemporary environmental policy and practice, including exploration of the normative-philosophical debate surrounding environmental issues. Emphasizes understanding the political and institutional framework for establishing policy and programs; exploring the action approaches to environmental planning including moral suasion, regulation, public investment, and public incentives; and case studies of environmental planning at the federal, state, and local levels.
PLAN 5840Ethics of Environmental & Cities (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010
PLAN 5870Environment and Economy (3.00)
Rather than being opposite, environment and economy are both dimensions that must be addressed to achieve sustainable outcomes. This course explores these issues and students develop proposed solutions.
PLAN 5890Sustainable International Development (3.00)
This course will explore development related root causes of environmental degradation in an international context. The course examines theoretical frameworks explaining the linkage between underdevelopment and environmental issues in a developing country context. Specifically, the course will explore the importance of overconsumption, technology, poverty, and inequality as complex set of factors contributing to the environmental crisis.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
PLAN 5891International Cities (3.00)
This course takes a case study approach to examine the sustainable development issues of 10 cities around the world with attention mainly to urban landscape and urban ecology. One outstanding topic will be studied in depth for each city, such as ecology of large urban park for New York city and urban development in mountainous regions for Chongqing, China. The goal of this course is to give students a global view on these issues.
Course was offered Spring 2012
PLAN 5892Psychology of Environment and Space (3.00)
This course provides a strong foundation in environmental psychology theory and methods. It will help you understand the human response to the designed environment, and how people feel, perceive and respond to the environment, as well as equip you with research skills to measure human-environment interactions.
PLAN 5993Applied Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Individual study directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Planning faculty approval of topic.
PLAN 6010Fundamentals of Planning (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Survey course that introduces the field of urban and environmental planning as practiced in the United States. Topics include: history and theory of urbanization and city growth, emergence of the profession in 20th Century; main movements/eras of planning practice (e.g., City Beautiful, urban renewal) and major sub-fields within the profession (e.g., transportation, community development, urban design).
PLAN 6020Methods of Community Research and Engagement (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores methods beyond the conventional town-hall meeting to gather insights from communities on planning issues. Topics will include more traditional methods of qualitative research such as focus groups, interviews, charrettes, participatory action research, and scenario planning, as well as strategies like asset mapping, visual preference surveys, games, art-based visioning, participatory budgeting.
PLAN 6030Introduction to GIS (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Geographic Information System (GIS) is a data management tool, a mapping tool, a visualization tool & a spatial analysis engine. While this is an introductory GIS course, it will focus on how planners can use GIS to develop critical spatial thinking & address current problems in our natural & built environment. Practical technical training will be undertaken through the use of the ArcGIS software package, GPS, remote sensing, spatial analysis, & 3D.
PLAN 6040Quantitative Methods of Planning Analysis (4.00)
Applies quantitative skills to the planning process: analyzes decision situations and develops precise languages communicating the quantitative dimensions of planning problems. Includes lectures, case studies, and applied assignments addressing statistical methods, survey methods, census data analysis, program and plan evaluation, and emerging methods used by planners.
PLAN 6050Law, Land and the Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course examines major legal issues surrounding land use planning and environmental protection. Intended to introduce students to critical legal concepts (e.g., due process, precedent, standing) as well as the parameters set for planning by the US Constitution, key Constitutional amendments, and various statutes including main federal environmental laws. Where appropriate state level laws and cases are reviewed.
PLAN 6060Collaborative Planning Process for Sustainability (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Examines deliberative processes, including dialogue and consensus building, by which communities can address public issues and build support for sustainable futures. Students will develop confidence in their ability to assess the strengths and weaknesses of collaborative change processes, and to design and conduct authentic public meetings, transformative community dialogues, and powerful collaborative change processes.
PLAN 6070Planning Theory and Practice (3.00)
In this course students grapple with the dynamic tensions between planning and democracy, the various responses that have been proposed, and planning failures and successes. They explore the development of theories about how we ought to plan, why, and for whom.
PLAN 6090Planning Theory and Practice (3.00)
Provides a history of the intellectual and professional roots of contemporary planning theory and practice. Analyzes these roots with an eye to stimulating new perspectives and concepts for a sustainable community orientation. A core course.
PLAN 6500Special Topics in Planning (1.00 - 6.00)
Topical offerings in planning.
Course was offered Spring 2015
PLAN 6600Urban Research (3.00)
This is a component of the Design studio, focused on local, on site research. The Urban Research component may be taken independently by History and Planning students.
PLAN 6601Energy, City and Form (3.00)
This class will introduce students to new urban design techniques by confronting the current challenges of climate change, energy resources, & mobility & transportation. Digital systems will be used to explore new possibilities. We can't imagine the future of urban design without attending to energy issues through data obtained and managed by the use of digital tools.
PLAN 6811Gender & Built Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class explores the wide range of approaches that have been taken to the complex relationships between body, sex, gender, and the built environment. Some see buildings as a direct expression of sexed bodies (phallic towers and breast-like domes), while others see buildings and settlements as expressions and reiterations of the gender structures of a culture.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 6860Cities + Nature (3.00)
This class begins with the premise that contact with nature is essential to modern life.The class will examine the evidence for why nature in important,and the many creative ways in which cities can plan for,and design-in nature, and foster meaningful and everyday connections with the natural world.
PLAN 7010Research Studio 1 (3.00)
Advanced vertical studio, exploring complex issues and sites, often through interdisciplinary design research.
PLAN 7040Advanced Metropolis (3.00)
This lecture course focuses on cities as centers of cultural, social, and artistic activity. It considers how we define cities, the forces that create and sustain them, and what makes them culturally distinctive. It looks at several cities at their moments of cultural, political, and architectural glory: Istanbul in the 16thcentury, London in the late 17th and 18th centuries, Paris in the 19th century, New York in the 20th century, and Shanghai in the 21st century.
Course was offered Spring 2017
PLAN 7400Housing & Community Development (3.00)
Provides an introduction to the housing and community development area of planning practice. Topics include the housing and development industries, neighborhood change processes, social aspects of housing and development, and housing and development programs and policy issues.
Course was offered Fall 2014
PLAN 7401Models for Higher Density Housing (3.00)
This seminar will focus on density and contemporary housing issues, specifically related to affordable housing. As cities have spread out or decayed at the core, the variety of housing options has decreased leading to a growing divide between where and how people can afford to live. Assignments range from readings and leading discussion to case study presentations of recent global and local housing designs.
Course was offered Spring 2015
PLAN 7710Transportation and Environment (3.00)
This course examines the impacts of transportation systems on the environment, including local and regional emissions and global climate change. Both technological solutions and comprehensive transportation and land use approaches to mitigating impacts are explored. The course addresses additional topics including multimodal transportation, environmental justice, resiliency, incentives and pricing sustainable transportation
Course was offered Fall 2014
PLAN 7810Sustainable Communities (3.00)
Examines sustainable communities and the environmental, social, economic, political, and design standards that underlie them. Focuses on reviewing case studies of cities, towns, and development projects that reflect principles of sustainability.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PLAN 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor.
PLAN 8020Methods of Community Research and Engagement (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Explores methods beyond the conventional town-hall meeting to gather insights from communities on planning issues.Topics will include more traditional methods of qualitative research such as focus groups, interviews, charrettes, participatory action research, & scenario planning, as well as strategies like asset mapping, visual preference surveys, games, art-based visioning, participatory budgeting. Ph.D students will undertake additional course requirements.
PLAN 8030Neighborhoods, Community and Regions (3.00)
Explores theories and concepts of economic, social, and cultural forces that influence urban and regional spatial structure.
Course was offered Spring 2015
PLAN 8040Adv Quantitative Methods of Planning Analysis (3.00)
Addresses the law as it relates to planning practice. Includes substantial work in traditional areas of land-use law, but also deals with the law as an instrument for change. Emphasizes developing legal research skills and performing legal analysis. A core course.
Course was offered Spring 2016
PLAN 8050Advanced Law, Land and the Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This course examines major legal issues surrounding land use planning & environmental protection. Intended to introduce students to critical legal concepts (e.g.,due process,precedent,standing) as well as the parameters set for planning by the US Constitution,key Constitutional amendments, & various statutes including main federal environmental laws.Where appropriate state level laws and cases are reviewed. Ph.D. students will have additional requirements.
PLAN 8090Advanced Planning Theory and Practice (3.00)
Provides a history of the intellectual and professional roots of contemporary planning theory and practice. Analyzes these roots with an eye to stimulating new perspectives and concepts for a sustainable community orientation. A core course.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 8500Advanced Special Topics in Planning (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Varies annually to meet the needs of graduate students.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 8580Advanced Short Courses in Planning (1.00)
A series of one-credit short courses, whose topics vary from semester to semester.
PLAN 8600Land Use and Growth Management (3.00)
Addresses the need and rationale for land use planning as well as its tools. Introduces the theory and practice of land use planning and growth management as they have evolved historically and as expressed in contemporary practice.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PLAN 8710Advanced Transportation and Environment (3.00)
Course examines the impacts of transportation systems on the environment from roadside air quality to global climate change, exploring sustainable transportation policy, multimodal transportation, environmental justice, resilience,and community-based solutions. Building on course readings and discussion, PhD students will propose and develop a research paper on a topic of their choosing within the overall theme of transportation and environment.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 8800Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Involves serving as a teaching assistant for a course, with teaching assignments coordinated by the chair. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
PLAN 8811Advanced Gender & Built Environment (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
This class explores the wide range of approaches that have been taken to the complex relationships between body, sex, gender, and the built environment. Some see buildings as a direct expression of sexed bodies (phallic towers and breast-like domes), while others see buildings and settlements as expressions and reiterations of the gender structures of a culture.
Course was offered Fall 2016
PLAN 8840Adv Ethics of Environmental & Cities (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Detailed exploration of the normative debate surrounding environmental issues. Focus on the foundations of environmental economics, questions about the value of endangered species, concerns of future generations, appropriateness of a sustainable society, notions of stewardship, and obligations toward equity. Graduate Students will undertake additional course requirements.
PLAN 8993Independent Studies in Urban and Environmental Planning (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced work on independent research topics by individual students. Departmental approval of the topic is required.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
PLAN 8994Thesis (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Preparation and completion of a thesis.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
PLAN 8998Non-Topical Research, Masters (1.00 - 12.00)
For Thesis Preparation, taken before a thesis director has been selected.
PLAN 8999Master's Thesis (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
A thesis is optional for the Master of Urban and Environmental Planning degree. Students should begin early to explore topics and to identify potential committee members. A guideline document is available.
Architecture School
SARC 1500SARC Advising Seminars (1.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
SARC 1500 courses are 1-credit seminars capped at 20 first-year students, all of whom are assigned to the instructor as advisees. They are topically focused on an area identified by the faculty member; they also include a significant advising component centered on undergraduate issues (e.g., choosing a major, study abroad opportunities, undergraduate research, etc.).
Course was offered Fall 2016
SARC 3100Principles and Practices of Arts Administration (3.00)
Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.
SARC 3102The Arts & Public Policy (3.00)
Arts & Culture policy is sequestered in the East Wing of the White House, far from the West Wing, where culture is considered a 'soft' backwater of interest (and of career building); but would 9/11 even have happened were it not for exports from 'America's cultural juggernaut' (Ivey) inundating traditional societies around the globe? Arts Policy once played important roles in Foreign Policy
Course was offered Spring 2014
SARC 3103Art Business (1.00 - 2.00)
A survey of contemporary phenomena in the art market, including an in-depth look at current dealings in major auction houses, museums and galleries. An extensive exploration of possible career routes through a series of guest lectures. Speakers possess backgrounds in fine art, arts administration, curation, art history, and economics. Course includes in-class debates and case studies based upon current events in the visual art market.
Course was offered Fall 2014
SARC 3104Design Thinking (3.00)
This course is a pilot seminar designed to launch for the School of Architecture a curriculum in Design Thinking, to be broadened and deepened in subsequent semesters. The course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
SARC 3301The Arts & the Environment (3.00)
The Arts and the Environment explores our complicated human relationship to our environment using water as a key focal point. The goal is to explore and challenge scientists and artists, architects, commerce students and engineers to re-think how we and thus our artists relate to the Environment.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
SARC 3500Special Topics in the School of Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Topical offerings in the School of Architecture
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
SARC 3559New Course in Architecture (3.00)
New course in the subject of the School of Architecture
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
SARC 3993Independent Study: School of Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
SARC 4801Italian Language and Culture (2.00)
Continuation of Italian language study begun in semester prior to arrival in Venice. In addition, introduction to a range of cultural aspects of living in Italy.
SARC 5010Design Practicum Project Internship I (6.00)
Work in real design commissions, collaborations or competitions with a faculty member, in relevant topics for the school, university, city or communities, with a final delivery. The designs solve real needs from a design research approach.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
SARC 5020Design Practicum Project Internship (1.00 - 6.00)
Work in real design commissions, collaborations or competitions with a faculty member, in relevant topics for the school, university, city or community, with a final delivery. The designs solve real needs from a design research approach.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
SARC 5021Design Practium Project: MoMa PSI YAP 2013 (3.00)
This course gives students an opportunity to work on a design competition with TempAgency, a collaboration between Kutonotuk (L. Cho/M. Jull) and mcdowellespinosa (R. Espinosa/S. McDowell), who have been shortlisted as one of five finalists for the 2013 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program in New York. Students will participate in research, concept, design development, and production - leading to a final presentation at MoMA PS1 NYC on Feb 7, 2013
Course was offered Spring 2013
SARC 5022Design Practicum Project: ecoMOD/ecoREMOD (1.00 - 6.00)
This seminar is focused on current projects within ecoMOD / ecoREMOD, a research and design / build / evaluate project at the School of Architecture, in partnership with the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project goal is to develop sustainable and highly energy efficient housing units for affordable housing organizations. Both prefabricated homes, and renovations of existing homes are the focus of the effort.
Course was offered Summer 2014, Spring 2013
SARC 5050Arts Marketing Theory & Practice (3.00)
Audience development theory and marketing strategies and techniques as they apply specifically to the arts and arts institutions.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
SARC 5100Arts Marketing Theory & Practice (3.00)
Arts Marketing Theory & Practice lays a foundation of traditional arts marketing techniques and addresses the 21st-century need to balance innovative web-based communications with new strategies to attract diverse audiences through relevancy, accessibility, and interactivity. Students will learn core concepts and produce a final marketing plan rooted in market research, strategic analysis, and creative thinking. .
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2013
SARC 5102The Arts & Public Policy (3.00)
Arts & Culture policy is sequestered in the East Wing of the White House, far from the West Wing, where culture is considered a 'soft' backwater of interest (and of career building); but would 9/11 even have happened were it not for exports from 'America's cultural juggernaut' (Ivey) inundating traditional societies around the globe? Arts Policy once played important roles in Foreign Policy
Course was offered Spring 2014
SARC 5103Art Business (1.00 - 2.00)
A survey of contemporary phenomena in the art market, including an in-depth look at current dealings in major auction houses, museums and galleries. An extensive exploration of possible career routes through a series of guest lectures. Speakers possess backgrounds in fine art, arts administration, curation, art history, and economics. Course includes in-class debates and case studies based upon current events in the visual art market.
Course was offered Fall 2014
SARC 5104Design Thinking (3.00)
This course is a pilot seminar designed to launch for the School of Architecture a curriculum in Design Thinking, to be broadened and deepened in subsequent semesters. The course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2013
SARC 5106Development & Board Management for the Arts (3.00)
Explores techniques and rationales behind the raising and giving of funds, and the related skills of leading & managing boards, trustees and volunteers; essential tools for community building. Students are exposed to basic grant & proposal writing; other funding and fundraising techniques in class discussions and from guest speakers.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2014
SARC 5300The Arts in Community / Community in the Arts (3.00)
The Arts in Community / Community in the Arts' examines selected topics from among the multiplicity of relations between the two. Included will be spatial and community aspects of public art, art found locally, art to which the local community aspires, and the idea of community within artist populations. Using guest speakers, readings and other resources focuses class discussion on two sites:Charlottesville's Downtown Mall, & UVA's Art Grounds.
Course was offered Spring 2011
SARC 5400Data Visualization (3.00)
This is a course about information and data visualization. We live in a world rich with information. This course teaches visual and spatial thinking coupled with data analysis tools and custom web-enabled programming to construct and envision information. To find and even invent approaches toward seeing into complex problems, we will study, and make, useful, compelling and beautiful tools to see.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
SARC 5500Special Topics in the School of Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Topical offerings in the School of Architecture.
SARC 5555Visualization Elective (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Students select from a number of visualization one to three credit modules focusing on all forms of visualization. During this semester, students must select from among the digital visualization choices.
SARC 5559New Course in Architecture (3.00)
New course in the subject of the School of Architecture
SARC 5701Oxford Field School (6.00)
The Oxford Field School in Historic Preservation is an introduction to the field-based methods of building recordation and materials conservation. The majority of the time will be spent on a site where students will be led through the process of recordation of historic buildings and then develop a conservation proposal for the site. Students will learn the fundamentals of reading, recording, and conserving historic vernacular buildings.
SARC 5702Introduction to Italian (1.00)
This course will introduce the principles of Italian grammar and conversation. It is a required prerequisite for students planning to enroll in the Venice Semester Program but it is open to all students in the School of Architecture.
SARC 5707Design Practicum Project Summer Studio: ecoMOD/ecoREMOD (6.00)
This intensive studio is part of ecoMOD / ecoREMOD, a research and design / build / evaluate project at the School of Architecture, in partnership with the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project goal is to develop sustainable and highly energy-efficient housing units for affordable housing organizations. During the summer of 2013, students will work on the design and construction of several home renovations in the 10th and Page
Course was offered Spring 2016, Summer 2013
SARC 5709Public Service Internship (1.00 - 4.00)
The University of Virginia School of Architecture is launching a new initiative called the SARC Sustainability Service-Learning Seminar (S4). The intent is to place students in academic internships with nonprofit organizations and local government authorities involved in community design, energy and water policy, environmental issues, public health, affordable housing and other issues related to sustainability.
SARC 5710Hoos on the Road (3.00)
This course will engage students in the challenges & opportunities facing American communities. It will include on-Grounds class time, site visits to communities that are implementing new strategies to meet the challenges of the 21st century, & meetings with decision makers.Students will review original legislation & policies that have impacted communities.
SARC 5760Drawing For Design (3.00)
This course will cover the fundamentals of drawing with a focus on the human figure. It will address line, tone volume, space, scale, proportion and artistic expression. The analysis of human form will also be applied to rendering still-life, buildings, interiors and landscapes. Various wet and dry media will be introduced to illustrate the drawing objectives. An emphasis on 'process' will direct the momentum of this course.
SARC 5800Community as Classroom:Urban Studies & Service Learning in Cape Coast,Ghana (6.00)
This course targets advanced undergraduate and graduate students whose research interests focus on values-based planning, design and urban revitalization. Through a unique combination of traditional classroom and field learning experience, students will gain practical knowledge of developing and implementing tangible urban solutions. In this respect, the course is designed to immerse the student in the culture of Cape Coast and Ghana.
SARC 5801Italian Language and Culture (2.00)
Continuation of Italian language study begun in semester prior to arrival in Venice. In addition, introduction to a range of cultural aspects of living in Italy.
SARC 5993Independent Study: School of Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor
SARC 6000The Common Course (1.00)
The Common course analyzes the existing and potential contributions of the four disciplinesin the School of Architecture to the process of contemporary urbanization. The goal is to introduce all incoming graduate students to both the range of distinct perspectives and common threads represented in the School with respect to the land, history, environmental ethics and the role of design.
SARC 6801Introduction to Spanish language (2.00)
This course will be taught during the fall in Barcelona. Students in path 2/2.5 could take an equivalent class during the summer before the program. In order to fully absorb another culture it's necessary to know the language of that culture.
SARC 8101Theories of Knowledge in the Constructed Environment (3.00)
This course provides a framework for the comparison of different theories of knowledge relevant to the School of Architecture's four disciplines through a comparative study of research methods in the humanities, social sciences and sciences. The course's goal is to develop critical thinking as the basis for considering the value of specific research questions and to provide a link between research questions and the methods used to explore them.
Course was offered Fall 2015
SARC 8120Ethics, Politics, & Aesthetics (3.00)
The shaping, production and analysis of the constructed environment has ethical, political and aesthetic implications that are often inextricably related. Ethics, Politics, and Aesthetics is an interdisciplinary theory course that examines major issues and methodologies in twentieth century theories of history, production, time, space and representation: including critical theory, phenomenology, semiotics, post-structuralism and psychoanalysis.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
SARC 8500Adv Special Topics in the School of Architecture (1.00 - 4.00)
Topical offerings in the School of Architecture.
Course was offered Spring 2017
SARC 8812Ecological Democracy (3.00)
Students will participate in community engaged design and/or research activities that help better connect people with their environments. Subject matter might include civic environmentalism, greening alleys and other semi-public spaces, climate change education, sustainable design, etcetera.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
SARC 9911Research Colloquium I (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The research colloquium focuses on individual research, methods and project development. The course provides a forum for the interaction and learning among graduate students from various disciplines, and at different stages in the progress of research. The objective is for students to learn how to articulate their inquiry, and to critically question and compare their own research and methods of inquiry to those found in other disciplines.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
SARC 9912Research Colloquium II (3.00)
The research colloquium focuses on individual research, methods and project development. The course provides a forum for the interaction and learning among graduate students from various disciplines, and at different stages in the progress of research. The objective is for students to learn how to articulate their inquiry, and to critically question and compare their own research and methods of inquiry to those found in other disciplines.
SARC 9913Research Colloquium III (3.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
The research colloquium focuses on individual research, methods and project development. The course provides a forum for the interaction and learning among graduate students from various disciplines, and at different stages in the progress of research. The objective is for students to learn how to articulate their inquiry, and to critically question and compare their own research and methods of inquiry to those found in other disciplines.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
SARC 9914Research Colloquium IV (3.00)
The research colloquium focuses on individual research, methods and project development. The course provides a forum for the interaction and learning among graduate students from various disciplines, and at different stages in the progress of research. The objective is for students to learn how to articulate their inquiry, and to critically question and compare their own research and methods of inquiry to those found in other disciplines.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
SARC 9993Advanced Independent Research (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
Advanced independent research on topics selected by individual students in consultation with a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
SARC 9998Non-Topical Doctoral Prep (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Fall 2017
For doctoral research, taken before a dissertation director has been selected.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
SARC 9999Non-Topical Research (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral dissertation, taken under the supervision of a dissertation director.
Course was offered Spring 2017