UVa Course Catalog (Unofficial, Lou's List)
Complete Catalog of Courses for the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences    
Class Schedules Index Course Catalogs Index Class Search Page
These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). I hope that you will find them useful. — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics
Applied Mechanics
AM 6010Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3.00)
Reviews basic stress-strain concepts and constitutive relations. Studies unsymmetrical bending, shear center, and shear flow. Analyzes of curved flexural members, torsion, bending, and twisting of thin walled sections. Cross-listed as CE 6710. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanics and mathematics.
AM 6020Continuum Mechanics With Applications (3.00)
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as APMA 6020, MAE 6020; Taught concurrently with CE 6720. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6030Computational Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes of variational and computational mechanics of solids, potential energy, complementary energy, virtual work, Reissner's principle, Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement, force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis, including shape functions, convergence and integration; and applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 6730.
AM 6040Plates and Shells (3.00)
Includes the classical analysis of plates and shells of various shapes; closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution of governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross listed with MAE 6040 and taught concurrently w/ CE 6740. Prerequisite: APMA 6410 and CE 6710 or 6720.
AM 6060Applied Boundary Element Analysis (3.00)
Analyzes the fundamental concepts of Green's functions, integral equations, and potential problems; weighted residual techniques and boundary element methods; poisson type problems, including cross-sectional analysis of beams and flow analyses; elastostatics; and other applications. Prerequisite: AM 6710 or 6030.
AM 6070Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Reviews concepts/stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke's law;displacement & stress formulations of elasticity problems;plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates;Airy's stress function; plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates,axisymmetric problems;torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real functions);thermal stress;energy methods.Pre-requisites:CE 6720, AM/MAE 6020,or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 6130Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics (3.00)
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. The relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; the kinematics of finite deformations and motions leading to the definition of finite strain measures; the process of linearization; and the concept of stress. Conservation laws of mechanics yield the equations of motion and equilibrium and description of constitutive theory leading to the constitute laws for nonlinear elasticity, from which the more familiar generalized Hooke's law for linearly elastic solid is derived. Constitutive laws for a Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid are also discussed. The basic problems of continuum mechanics are formulated as boundary value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as APMA 6130. Prerequisite: Linear algebra, vector calculus, elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
AM 6200Energy Principles in Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes the derivation, interpretation, and application of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work to engineering problems; related theorems, such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigliano's Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduces generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles; variational methods of approximation, Hamilton's principle, and Lagrange's equations of motion. Uses variational theorems to approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 6700. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
AM 6210Analytical Dynamics (3.00)
Topics include the kinematics of rigid body motion; Eulerian angles; Lagrangian equations of motion, inertia tensor; momental ellipsoid; rigid body equations of motion, Euler's equation, force-free motion; polhode and herpolhode; theory of tops and gyroscopes; variational principles; Hamiltonian equations of motion, Poinsote representation. Prerequisite: Differential equations, undergraduate dynamics course.
AM 6220Waves (3.00)
The topics covered are: plane waves; d'Alembert solution; method of characteristics; dispersive systems; wavepackets; group velocity; fully-dispersed waves; Laplace, Stokes, and steepest descents integrals; membranes, plates and plane-stress waves; evanescent waves; Kirchhoff's solution; Fresnel's principle; elementary diffraction; reflection and transmission at interfaces; waveguides and ducted waves; waves in elastic half-spaces; P, S, and Rayleigh waves; layered media and Love waves; slowly-varying media and WKBJ method; Time-dependent response using Fourier-Laplace transforms; some nonlinear water waves. Also cross-listed as MAE 6220. Prerequisite: MAE/AM 6020 Continuum Mechanics and Applications, or equivalent.
AM 6230Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped single-degree-of-freedom systems and undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems; use of Lagrange's equations; Laplace transform, matrix formulation, and other solution methods; normal mode theory; introduction to vibration of continuous systems. Cross-listed as CE 6230. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6280Motion Biomechanics (3.00)
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) which act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopaedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as BME 6280. Prerequisite: BME 6103 or instructor permission.
AM 6310Fluid Mechanics I (3.00)
Analyzes of hydrostatics, including surface tension; kinematics; non-inertial reference frames; rigorous formulation of conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy; Euler and Bernoulli equations; vorticity dynamics; two-dimensional potential flow theory, complex potentials; applications to airfoils; the Navier-Stokes equations: selected exact and approximate solutions. Cross-listed as MAE 6310. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6320Fluid Mechanics II (3.00)
Topics include the laminar boundary layer equations, differential and integral; elementary similar and integral solutions; introduction to and modeling of turbulent flows; surface waves; quasi-one-dimensional compressible, perfect gas dynamic analysis; practical applications. Cross- listed as MAE 6320. Prerequisite: AM 6310.
AM 6650Mechanics of Composite Materials (3.00)
Analyzes the properties and mechanics of fibrous, laminated composites; stress, strain, equilibrium, and tensor notation; micromechanics, lamina, laminates, anisotropic materials, classical lamination theory, stiffness and strength, interlaminar stresses, fabrication, and test methods; thermal stresses, analysis, design and computerized implementation. Taught concurrently with CE 6750. Prerequisite: CE 2310 or equivalent and a computer language
AM 6660Stress Analysis of Composites (3.00)
Focuses on 3-D anisotropic constitutive theory, edge effects and interlaminar stresses, failure criteria, fracture, anisotropic elasticity, micromechanics, laminated plates, hygro-thermal effects, conduction and diffusion. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6660. Prerequisite: CE 6750 or AM 6650.
AM 6710Finite-Element Analysis (3.00)
Introduces finite element methods for solving problems in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, and electrical fields. Emphasizes the basics of one, two, and three-dimensional elements; applications to bars, electrical networks, trusses, conduction and convection heat transfer, ideal and viscous flow, electrical current flow, plane stress, plane strain, and elasticity; development of computer codes to implement finite element techniques. Cross-listed as MAE 6710. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6750Theory of Structural Stability (3.00)
Introduces the elastic stability of structural and mechanical systems. Topics include classical stability theory and buckling of beams, trusses, frames, arches, rings and thin plates and shells; derivation of design formulas; computational formulation and implementation. Cross-listed as CE 6775. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 6910Special Problems in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Detailed study of special topics in mechanics.
AM 6920Special Problems in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Detailed study of special topics in mechanics.
AM 6993Independent Study in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 6995Supervised Project Research in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Pre-requisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 7030Thermal Structures (3.00)
Topics include the fundamentals of thermal structural analysis; mechanical and thermodynamic foundations; formulation of heat transfer and thermal-structural problems; heat transfer in structures; thermal stresses in rods, beams, and plates; thermally induced vibrations; thermoelastic stability; and computational methods. Prerequisite: AM 6020 or instructor permission; corequisite: AM 6070.
AM 7040Theory of Shells (3.00)
Introduces the nonlinear, thermoelastic theory of shells. Governing equations are derived by a mixed approach in which those equations of three-dimensional continuum mechanics that are independent of material properties are used to derive the corresponding shell equations, whereas the constitutive equations of shell theory which, unavoidably, depend on experiments, are postulated. Emphasizes efficient, alternative formulations of initial/boundary value problems, suitable for asymptotic or numerical solution, and discusses variational principles. Some comparisons made with exact, three-dimensional solutions. Prerequisite: AM 6020 and 6040.
AM 7080Inelastic Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as APMA 7080. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
AM 7120Advanced Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Topics include generalized Hooke's law, strain-energy density, uniqueness; classes of boundary value problems (Navier's and Beltrami-Mitchell equations); torsion (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems); flexure; complex variable formulation of torsional (Dirlichlet and Neumann problems) and two-dimensional problems; general solution methodologies based on complex variable techniques and elements of potential theory for torsional and two-dimensional problems; three-dimensional problems; wave propagation; and energy methods. Prerequisite: AM 6020 or instructor permission and AM 6070.
AM 7140Nonlinear Elasticity Theory (3.00)
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. New features not present in the linear theory are emphasized. These include instabilities (both material and geometric), normal stress effects, non-uniqueness, bifurcations and stress singularities. A variety of illustrative boundary value problems will be discussed which exhibit some of the foregoing features. Both physical and mathematical implications considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as APMA 7140. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
AM 7250Random Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include a review of probability theory; stochastic processes, with an emphasis on continuous, continuously parametered processes; mean square calculus, Markov processes, diffusion equations, Gaussian processes, and Poisson processes; response of SDOF, MDOF, and continuous linear and nonlinear models to random excitation; upcrossings, first passage problems, fatigue and stability the considerations; Monte Carlo simulation, analysis of digital time series data, and filtered excitation models. Cross-listed as CE 7750. Prerequisite: Background in probability theory and vibration analysis.
AM 7290Selected Topics in Applied Mechanics (3.00)
Subject matter varies from year to year depending on students' interest and needs. Typical topics may include geophysics, astrodynamics, water waves, or nonlinear methods. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
AM 7320Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials (3.00)
Develops the tools necessary for fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Continuum fracture mechanics principles are presented. Fracture modes are discussed from the interdisciplinary perspectives of continuum mechanics and microscopic plastic deformation/fracture mechanisms. Cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, and environmental cracking are included, with emphasis on micromechanical modeling. Cross-listed as MSE 7320. Prerequisite: MSE 7310 or instructor permission.
AM 7670Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media (3.00)
Analyzes averaging principles, equivalent homogeneity, effective moduli, bounding principles, self-consistent schemes, composite spheres, concentric cylinders, three phase model, repeating cell models, inelastic and nonlinear effects, thermal effects, isotropic and anisotropic media, strength and fracture. Cross-listed as APMA 7670 and CE 7707. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
AM 7993Independent Study in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Pre-requisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 8220Biomechanics (3.00)
Topics include the rheological properties of biological tissues and fluids, with emphasis on methods of measurement and data organization; basic principles of continuum mechanics and their application to mechanical problems of the heart, lung, and peripheral circulation; criteria for selecting either lumped or continuous models to simulate mechanical interaction of biological systems (and mechanical prostheses) and application of such models under static and dynamic loading conditions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
AM 8987Graduate Teaching Instruction in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's students.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
AM 8995Supervised Project Research in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
AM 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction in Applied Mechanics (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral students.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
Applied Mathematics
APMA 1000Preparation for Engineering Mathematics (2.00)
Covers the fundamental concepts necessary for success in engineering courses and Applied Mathemtics courses.
Course was offered Fall 2009
APMA 1090Single Variable Calculus I (4.00)
The concepts of differential and integral calculus are developed and applied to the elementary functions of a single variable. Limits, rates of change, derivatives, and integrals. Applications are made to problems in analytic geometry and elementary physics. For students with no exposure to high school calculus.
APMA 1110Single Variable Calculus II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes the concepts of differential and integral calculus and applications to problems in geometry and elementary physics, including inverse functions, indeterminate forms, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, including Taylor and Maclaurin series. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 1090 or equivalent.
APMA 1501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (1.00)
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
APMA 2102Discrete Mathematics I (3.00)
Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include sets (finite and infinite, such as sets of strings over a finite alphabet), elementary combinatorial problems, and finite state automata. Develops tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems. Cross-listed as CS 2102. Prerequisite: APMA 1110 and CS 1110, or equivalent.
APMA 2120Multivariable Calculus (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Topics include vectors in three-space and vector valued functions. The multivariate calculus, including partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and the vector calculus, including Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes's theorem. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.
APMA 2130Ordinary Differential Equations (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
First order differential equations, second order and higher order linear differential equations, reduction of order, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms, linear systems of first order differential equations and the associated matrix theory, numerical methods. Applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 2131Systems of Ordinary Differential Equations (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The focus will be on solving systems of ordinary differential equations using basic linear algebra. Techniques for both homogeneous and nonhomogenous systems will be introduced. Time permitting, solving differential equations with the unit step and unit impulse functions will also be covered. Prerequisite: Differential Equations from Virginia Community College or equivalent
Course was offered Fall 2017
APMA 2501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Special topics in applied mathematics
Course was offered January 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
APMA 2502Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Special topics in applied mathematics.
Course was offered Spring 2017
APMA 2511Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Advanced Special topics in Applied Mathematics
Course was offered Fall 2017
APMA 2512Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Advanced special topics in Applied Mathematics
APMA 3080Linear Algebra (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes the systems of linear equations; vector spaces; linear dependence; bases; dimension; linear mappings; matrices; determinants; quadratic forms; eigenvalues; eigenvectors; orthogonal reduction to diagonal form; inner product spaces; numerical methods; geometric applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3081Linear Algebra for General Vector Spaces (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyze systems of equations, finding the best approximation to a solution; vector space of matrices and polynomials; coordinate vectors, change of coordinate system; inner product space; linear transformations between general vector spaces; approximating a trigonometric function by a polynomial.
Course was offered Fall 2017
APMA 3100Probability (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A calculus-based introduction to probability theory and its applications in engineering and applied science. Includes counting techniques, conditional probability, independence, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution functions, expected value and variance, joint distributions, covariance, correlation, the Central Limit theorem, the Poisson process, an introduction to statistical inference. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3102Theory of Computation (3.00)
Introduces computation theory including grammars, finite state machines and Turing machines; and graph theory. Prerequisite: APMA 2102 and either CS 2110 or 2220 all with grades of 'C' or better.
APMA 3110Applied Statistics and Probability (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Examines variability and its impact on decision-making. Introduces students to basic concepts of probability, such as random variables, probability distribution functions, and the central limit theorem. Based on this foundation, the course then emphasizes applied statistics covering topics such as descriptive statistics, statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression modeling, statistical quality control. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and APMA 3120. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3120Statistics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes confidence interval and point estimation methods, hypothesis testing for single samples, inference procedures for single-sample and two-sample studies, single and multifactor analysis of variance techniques, linear and non-linear regression and correlation, and using Minitab for large data sets. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and APMA 3110. Prerequisite: APMA 3100.
APMA 3140Applied Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Separation of variables, superposition, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems, eigenfunction expansion techniques. Particular focus on the heat, wave, and Laplace partial differential equations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Prerequisites: APMA 2120 and 2130 or equivalents.
APMA 3150From Data to Knowledge (3.00)
This course uses a Case-Study approach to teach statistics with R. Basic statistical techniques covered include: correlation, confidence interval and point estimation methods, hypothesis testing for single samples, inference procedures for single-sample and two-sample studies, single and multifactor analysis of variance techniques, linear and non-linear regression, Monte-Carlo simulation techniques and bootstrap sampling.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
APMA 3340Complex Variables with Applications (3.00)
Topics include analytic functions, Cauchy Theorems and formulas, power series, Taylor and Laurent series, complex integration, residue theorem, conformal mapping, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: APMA 2120 or equivalent.
APMA 3501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies mathematical techniques to special problems of current interest. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
APMA 4501Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies mathematical techniques to special problems of current interest. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
Course was offered Spring 2017
APMA 4993Independent Reading and Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.
APMA 4995Independent Reading and Research (3.00)
Reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 5070Numerical Methods (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces techniques used in obtaining numerical solutions, emphasizing error estimation. Includes approximation and integration of functions, and solution of algebraic and differential equations. Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra and differential equations, and the ability to write computer programs in any language.
APMA 6000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (3.00)
APMA 6020Continuum Mechanics with Applications (3.00)
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as AM 6020, MAE 6020, CE 6720 Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
APMA 6130Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics (3.00)
Describes the mathematical foundations of continuum mechanics from a unified viewpoint. Review of relevant concepts from linear algebra, vector calculus, and Cartesian tensors; kinematics of finite deformations and motions; finite strain measures; linearization; concept of stress; conservation laws of mechanics and equations of motion and equilibrium; constitutive theory; constitutive laws for nonlinear elasticity; generalized Hooke's law for a linearly elastic solid; constitutive laws for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; basic problems of continuum mechanics as boundary-value problems for partial differential equations. Cross-listed as AM 6130. Prerequisite: Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus, Elementary PDE (may be taken concurrently).
APMA 6150Linear Algebra (3.00)
Analyzes systems of linear equations; least squares procedures for solving over­ determined systems; finite dimensional vector spaces; linear transformations and their representation by matrices; determinants; Jordan canonical form; unitary reduction of symmetric and Hermitian forms; eigenvalues; and invariant subspaces. Prerequisite: Three years of college mathematics or instructor permission.
APMA 6240Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves (3.00)
Introduces phase-space methods, elementary bifurcation theory and perturbation theory, and applies them to the study of stability in the contexts of nonlinear dynamical systems and nonlinear waves, including free and forces nonlinear vibrations and wave motions. Examples are drawn from mechanics and fluid dynamics, and include transitions to periodic oscillations and chaotic oscillations. Also cross-listed as MAE 6240. Prerequisite: Undergraduate ordinary differential equations or instructor permission.
APMA 6340Numerical Analysis (3.00)
Topics include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, calculations of matrix eigenvalues, least squares problems, and boundary value problems in ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear algebra, and the ability to write computer programs.
APMA 6370Singular Perturbation Theory (3.00)
Analyses of regular perturbations; roots of polynomials; singular perturbations in ODE's; periodic solutions of simple nonlinear differential equations; multiple-Scales method; WKBJ approximation; turning-point problems; Langer's method of uniform approximation; asymptotic behavior of integrals; Laplace Integrals; stationary phase; and steepest descents. Examples are drawn from physical systems. Cross-listed as MAE 6370. Prerequisite: Familiarity with complex analysis.
APMA 6410Engineering Mathematics I (3.00)
Review of ordinary differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems, and various physical applications. Linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and various applications. Scalar and vector field theory, including the divergence theorem, Green's theorem, Stokes theorem, and various applications. Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of partial differential equations by separation of variables, superposition, Fourier series, variation of parameters, d' Alembert's solution. Eigenfunction expansion techniques for nonhomogeneous initial-value, boundary-value problems. Particular focus on various physical applications of the heat equation, the potential (Laplace) equation, and the wave equation in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Cross-listed as MAE 6410. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
APMA 6420Engineering Mathematics II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Further and deeper understanding of partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of linear partial differential equations by eigenfunction expansion techniques. Green's functions for time-independent and time-dependent boundary value problems. Fourier transform methods, and Laplace transform methods. Solution of a variety of initial-value, boundary-value problems. Various physical applications. Study of complex variable theory. Functions of a complex variable, and complex integral calculus, Taylor series, Laurent series, and the residue theorem, and various applications. Serious work and efforts in the further development of analytical skills and expertise. Cross-listed as MAE 6420. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and APMA 6410 or equivalent.
APMA 6430Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes the role of statistics in science; hypothesis tests of significance; confidence intervals; design of experiments; regression; correlation analysis; analysis of variance; and introduction to statistical computing with statistical software libraries. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies.
APMA 6440Applied Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posedness of initial and boundary value problems. Cross-listed as MAE 6440. Prerequisite: APMA 6420 or equivalent.
APMA 6548Special Topics in Applied Mathematics (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Topics vary from year to year and are selected to fill special needs of graduate students.
APMA 6720Computational Fluid Dynamics I (3.00)
Topics include the solution of flow and heat transfer problems involving steady and transient convective and diffusive transport; superposition and panel methods for inviscid flow; finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations; elementary grid generation for odd geometries; and primitive variable and vorticity-steam function algorithms for incompressible, multidimensional flows. Extensive use of personal computers/workstations including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 6720. Prerequisite: MAE 6310 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
APMA 6995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 7080Inelastic Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Emphasizes the formulation of a variety of nonlinear models. Specific topics include nonlinear elasticity, creep, visco-elasticity, and elasto-plasticity. Solutions to boundary value problems of practical interest are presented in the context of these various theories in order to illustrate the differences in stress distributions caused by different types of material nonlinearities. Cross-listed as AM 7080. Prerequisite: AM 6020.
APMA 7140Nonlinear Elasticity Theory (3.00)
Describes the theory of finite (nonlinear) elasticity governing large deformations of highly deformable elastic solids. Both physical and mathematical implications considered. The results are applicable to rubber-like and biological materials and the theory serves as a prototype for more elaborate nonlinear theories of mechanics of continuous media. Cross-listed as AM 7140 Nonlinear Elasticity. Prerequisite: AM 6020 Continuum Mech. (or equiv)
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
APMA 7340Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Topics include the numerical solution of elliptic equations by finite element methods; solution of time dependent problems by finite element and finite difference methods; and stability and convergence results for the methods presented. Prerequisite: One or more graduate courses in mathematics or applied mathematics.
APMA 7548Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies annually; topics may include wave propagation theory, shell theory, control theory, or advanced numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
APMA 7670Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media (3.00)
Includes averaging principles; equivalent homogeneity; effective moduli; bounding principles; self-consistent schemes; composite spheres; concentric cylinders; three phase model; repeating cell models; inelastic and nonlinear effects; thermal effects; isotropic and anisotropic media; and strength and fracture. Cross-listed as AM 7670, and CE 7770. Prerequisite: APMA 6020.
APMA 7720Computational Fluid Dynamics II (3.00)
A continuation of APMA 6720. More advanced methods for grid generation, transformation of governing equations for odd geometries, methods for compressible flows, methods for parabolic flows, calculations using vector and parallel computers. Use of personal computers/workstations/supercomputer including graphics. Cross-listed as MAE 7720. Prerequisite: APMA 6720 or equivalent.
APMA 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of advanced graduate-level material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
APMA 8548Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics (3.00)
Course content varies from year to year and depends on students' interests and needs. See APMA 7548 for possible topics. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
APMA 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
APMA 8995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Applied Mathematics degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 8999Non-Topical Research, Master's Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
APMA 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students.
APMA 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010, Fall 2009
Biomedical Engineering
BIOM 1000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (3.00)
Biomedical Engineering
BME 1501Special Topics (1.00)
Student led special topic courses which vary by semester
BME 2000Biomedical Engineering Design and Discovery (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Provides overview of the BME discipline and major sub-disciplines (biomechanics, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, imaging, cellular engineering, computational systems biology), covers conceptual and detail design processes, and introduces quantitative tools utilized throughout the BIOM curriculum. A major focus of the class will be formulation and execution of a design project. Prerequisite: BME 2101, BME 3315, AND second-year status in Biomedical Engineering OR instructor permission.
BME 2101Physiology I for Engineers (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
We learn how excitable tissue, nerves and muscle, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. You will develop an understanding of mechanisms, with an introduction to structure, an emphasis on quantitative analysis, and integration of hormonal and neural regulation and control. Prerequisites: intro courses in biology, chemistry, physics & calculus (BIOL 2010, CHEM 1610, PHYS 1425, APMA 1110 or similar) or instructor permission.
BME 2102Physiology II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the physiology of the kidney, salt and water balance, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, and central nervous system, with reference to diseases and their pathophysiology. (Circulation and respiration are covered in the fall semester course, BME 2101). Prerequisite: BME 2101 or instructor permission.
BME 2104Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the fundamentals of cell structure and function, emphasizing the techniques and technologies available for the study of cell biology. A problem-based approach is used to motivate each topic. Divided into three general sections: cell structure and function includes cell chemistry, organelles, enzymes, membranes, membrane transport, intracellular compartments and adhesion structures; energy flow in cells concentrates on the pathways of glycolysis and aerobic respiration; information flow in cells focuses on modern molecular biology and genetic engineering, and includes DNA replication, the cell cycle, gene expression, gene regulation, and protein synthesis. Also presents specific cell functions, including movement, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction. Prerequisite: CHEM 1610 or instructor permission.
BME 2220Biomechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to principles of continuum mechanics of biological tissues and systems. Topics include development of selected fundamental methods and results from statics and strength of materials, continuum mechanics, free-body diagrams, and constitutive equations of biological materials. Properties of blood vessels, heart, bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, blood, and other tissues. Mechanical basis and effects of pathology and trauma. Prerequisites: APMA 2130, BME 2101, or permission of instructor
BME 2315Computational Biomedical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces computational techniques for solving biomedical engineering problems & constructing models of biologic processes. Numerical techniques include regression, interpolation, differentiation, integration, root finding, systems of equations, optimization and approaches to ordinary differential equations. Applications include bioreactors, biotransport, pharmacokinetics & biomechanics. Prereq: APMA 2120 & CS 1110; recommended co-req APMA 2130.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
BME 3030Design and Innovation in Medicine (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A project-based grounding in biomedical product design, with emphasis on clinical immersion and topics including design fundamentals, problem/needs identification, delineation of realistic constraints and product specifications, intellectual property, market analysis, entrepreneurship, specific advanced design topics, business plan development, venture funding, and medical product testing methods.REQ: instructor permission .
BME 3080Biomedical Engineering Integrated Design and Experimental Analysis (IDEAS) Laboratory I (4.00)
First half of a year-long course to integrate concepts and skills from prior courses in order to formulate and solve problems in biomedical systems, including experimental design, performance, and analysis. Lab modules include testing in tissues/cells and manipulation of molecular constituents of living systems to determine their structural and functional characteristics for design of therapeutic or measurement systems. Methods include biochemical, physiological, cell biology, mechanical, electrical and computer, systems, chemical, imaging, and other approaches. Prerequisite: APMA 2120, APMA 2130, APMA 3110, BME 2101, BME 2104, and BME 2220, or instructor permission; corequisite: BME 3310 or instructor permission.
BME 3090Biomedical Engineering Integrated Design and Experimental Analysis (IDEAS) Laboratory II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Second half of a year-long course to integrate the concepts and skills from prior courses in order to formulate and solve problems in biomedical systems, including experimental design, performance, and analysis. Lab modules include testing in tissues/cells and manipulation of molecular constituents of living systems to determine their structural and functional characteristics and to design measurement or therapeutic systems. Methods include biochemical, physiological, cell biology, mechanical, electrical and computer, systems, chemical, imaging, and other approaches. Prerequisite: BIOM 3080 or instructor permission.
BME 3240Biotransport (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Biotransport in biological living systems is a fundamental phenomenon important in all aspects of the life cycle. Course will introduce principles and application of fluid and mass transport processes in cell, tissue and organ systems. Topics include, introduction to physiological fluid mechanics in the circulation and tissue, fundamentals of mass transport in biological systems, effects of mass transport and biochemical interactions at the cell and tissue scales, and fluid and mass transport in organs.
BME 3310Biomedical Systems Analysis and Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Presents the analytical tools used to model signals and linear systems. Specific biomedical engineering examples include multicompartment modeling of drug delivery, modeling of dynamic biomechanical systems, and electrical circuit models of excitable cells. Major topics include terminology for signals and systems, convolution, continuous time Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, electrical circuits with applications to bioinstrumentation and biosystems modeling, and applications of linear system theory. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and ECE 3750. Prerequisite: APMA 2130, CS 1110 or instructor permission.
BME 3636Neural Network Models of Cognition and Brain Computation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An introductory course to neural networks research, specifically biologically-based networks that reproduce cognitive phenomena. The goal of this course is to teach the basic thinking and methodologies used in constructing and understanding neural-like networks. Cross-listed as NESC 5330. CS 1110; and BIOM 2101; or permission of the instructor.
BME 4063Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design I (3.00)
A year-long design project in biomedical engineering required for BME majors. Students select, formulate, and solve a biomedically relevant design problem whose deliverables include a device, therapeutic, and/or system. Projects may be sponsored by BME faculty, medical doctors, and/or companies. Students may work on their own with outside team members when appropriate or with other SEAS students in integrative teams. Prerequisite: APMA 2120, 2130, 3110, BME 2101, 2104, 3080, 3310, fourth-year standing in BME major, or instructor permission.
BME 4064Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Second half of a year-long design project in biomedical engineering required for BME majors. Students select, formulate, and solve a biomedically relevant design problem whose deliverables include a device, therapeutic, and/or system. Projects may be sponsored by BME faculty, medical doctors, and/or companies. Students may work on their own with outside team members when appropriate or with other SEAS students in integrative teams. Prerequisite: APMA 2120, 2130, 3110, BME 2101, 2104, 3080, 3310, fourth-year standing in BME major, or instructor permission.
BME 4280Motion Biomechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: BME 2101, 2220, or instructor permission.
BME 4414Biomaterials (3.00)
This course will provide an introduction to biomaterials science and biological interactions with materials, focusing on clinical applications using FDA approved materials. Areas of concentration will include the use of polymers and ceramics in biomaterials today, tissue response to materials, and drug delivery & diagnostic applications. Prerequisite: BME 2104 and BME 2220 or equivalent
BME 4417Tissue Engineering (3.00)
Introduces the fundamental principles of tissue engineering. Topics: tissue organization and dynamics, cell and tissue characterization, cell-matrix interactions, transport processes in engineered tissues, biomaterials and biological interfaces, stem cells and interacting cell fate processes, and tissue engineering methods.Prerequisites: CHEM 1620, APMA 2130, and an introductory course in cell and molecular biology or instructor permission.
BME 4550Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in biomedical engineering. Topics vary by semester. Recent topics include Medical Imaging Systems Theory, BME Advanced Design, BME Electronics Lab, and Systems Biology Modeling and Experimentation. Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing and instructor permission.
BME 4641Bioelectricity (3.00)
Studies the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals, measurement of these signals and their analysis in basic and clinical electrophysiology. Introduces the principles of design and operation of therapeutic medical devices used in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Includes membrane potential, action potentials, channels and synaptic transmission, electrodes, electroencephalography, electromyography, electrocardiography, pacemakers, defibrillators, and neural assist devices. Prerequisite: BME 3310 or ECE 2630, BME 2101, or instructor permission.
BME 4783Medical Imaging Modalities (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An overview of modern medical imaging modalities with regard to the physical basis of image acquisition and methods of image reconstruction. Topics cover the basic engineering and physical principles underlying the major medical imaging modalities: x-ray (plain film, mammography, and computed tomography (CT)), nuclear medicine (positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photo-emission computed tomography (SPECT)), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prerequisite: BME 3310 or ECE 3750, or instructor permission.
BME 4784Medical Image Analysis (4.00)
Introduces the fundamental principles of medical image analysis and visualization. Focuses on the processing and analysis of ultrasound, MR, and X-ray images for the purpose of quantitation and visualization to increase the usefulness of modern medical image data. Includes image perception and enhancement, 2-D Fourier transform, spatial filters, segmentation, and pattern recognition. A weekly lab develops skill in computer image analysis with the KHOROS system. Prerequisite: BME 3310, ECE 3750, or instructor permission.
BME 4806Biomedical Applications of Genetic Engineering (3.00)
Provides biomedical engineers with a grounding in molecular biology and a working knowledge of recombinant DNA technology, thus establishing a basis for the evaluation and application of genetic engineering in whole animal systems. Beginning with the basic principles of cell structure and function, this course examines the use of molecular methods to study gene expression and its critical role in health and disease. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation, methods for studying genes and gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels, methods for mutating genes and introducing genes into cells, methods for creating genetically-engineered mice and methods for accomplishing gene therapy by direct in vivo gene transfer. Prerequisite: BME 2101, 2102, and 2104, or CHE 2246, and third- or fourth-year standing, or instructor permission.
BME 4890Nanomedicine (3.00)
Students will design treatment strategies for cancer and cardiovascular disease based on molecular bioengineering principles. Special topics will include design of nanoparticle drug and gene delivery platforms, materials biocompatibility, cancer immunotherapy, and molecular imaging. Prerequisite: BME 2104 or CHE 2246, BME 2220, fourth-year standing, or instructor permission; Recommended: BME 2240
BME 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In-depth study of a biomedical engineering area by an individual student in close collaboration with a departmental faculty member. Requires advanced analysis of a specialized topic in biomedical engineering that is not covered by current offerings. Requires faculty contact time and assignments comparable to regular course offerings. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
BME 4995Biomedical Engineering Advanced Projects (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A year-long research project in biomedical engineering conducted in consultation with a department faculty advisor; usually related to ongoing faculty research. Includes the design, execution, and analysis of experimental laboratory work and computational or theoretical computer analysis of a problem. Requires a comprehensive report of the results. Prerequisite: third- or fourth-year standing, and instructor permission.
BME 6026Quantitative Models of Human Perceptual Information Processing (3.00)
An introduction to the measurement and modeling of human perceptual information processing, with approaches from neurophysiology to psychophysics, for the purposes of system design. Measurement includes classical psychophysics, EEG field potentials, and single-neuron recordings. Modeling includes signal detection theory, neuronal models (leaky integrate-and-fire, Hodgkin-Huxley, and models utilizing regression, probability, and ODEs). Prerequisite: Graduate standing; background courses in ordinary differential equations, statistics and probability; or consent of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2013
BME 6030Design and Innovation in Medicine (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A project-based grounding in biomedical product design, with emphasis on clinical immersion and topics including design fundamentals, problem/needs identification, delineation of realistic constraints and product specifications, intellectual property, market analysis, entrepreneurship, specific advanced design topics, business plan development, venture funding, and medical product testing methods. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
BME 6060Biomedical Innovation (3.00)
Multi-disciplinary problem solving is an essential component of innovation, especially in complex systems such as health care. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate students with supervised real-world experience identifying problems in health care and developing solutions using a collaborative approach. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in any participating school and instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2010
BME 6101Physiology I for Engineers (3.00)
Introduces fundamental concepts of cellular physiology; applies quantitative engineering analysis to intra- and intercellular signaling and mechanical systems relevant to organ physiology and pathology; teaches students to learn to think critically about the physiology and cell biology literature. Prerequisite: BME 2104 or equivalent; proficiency with ODEs.
BME 6102Engineering Physiology II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Second part of physiology sequence for engineering students; focuses on physiology of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and nervous systems; emphasizes quantitative analysis of organ function, particularly the use of mathematical models to identify and understand key underlying mechanisms. Prerequisite: BME 6101
BME 6103Physiology I (3.00)
We learn how excitable tissue, nerves and muscle, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. You will develop an understanding of mechanisms, with an introduction to structure, an emphasis on quantitative analysis, and integration of hormonal and neural regulation and control. Prerequisites: introductory undergraduate courses in biology, chemistry, physics and calculus or instructor permission.
BME 6104Physiology and Pathophysiology (3.00)
This course will emphasize a fundamental understanding of physiology with a focus on mechanisms, and continues the coverage of major systems from BIOM 6103. Studies the renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Integration of function from molecule to cell to organ to body. Includes some functional anatomy. Quantitative understanding of problems like salt and water balance through class work and homework sets. Five lectures on specific diseases and their pathophysiology. Prerequisite: BME 6103 or instructor permission.
BME 6280Motion Biomechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as AM 6280. Prerequisite: BME 6103.
BME 6310Computation and Modeling in Biomedical Engineering (3.00)
The principle objective of this course is to instruct graduate students on fundamental mathematical, modeling, and computational principles of relevance in biomedical engineering. The course is structured to provide lecture material, biomedical examples that use modeling and computation, and homework/exams that strengthen the mathematical and computational foundation of the graduate students. Prerequisites: 1. BME 6101: Physiology I (or equivalent) 2. SEAS grad student status 3. Some previous exposure to probability-statistics, Fourier analysis, and linear systems 4. Or instructor permission
BME 6311BME Measurement Principles (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students will gain a fundamental understanding of the theoretical principles underlying biomedical measurements. Topics are organized sequentially from signal initiation through signal processing to downstream statistical analysis of measurements. Students will be exposed to the practical implementation of general principles through homework assignments that involve the analysis and evaluation of molecular, cellular, and clinical measurements. Prerequisites: 1. BME 6101: Physiology I (or equivalent) 2. SEAS graduate student status 3. Some previous exposure to probability-statistics, Fourier analysis, and linear systems 4. Or Instructor Permission
BME 6550Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in biomedical engineering. Topics vary by semester.
BME 7370Quantitative Biological Reasonsing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Provides students with a quantitative framework for identifying and addressing important biological questions at the molecular, cell, and tissue levels. Focuses on the interplay between methods and logic, with an emphasis on the themes that emerge repeatedly in quantitative experiments. Prerequisites: BME 6101 (or equivalent), SEAS graduate student status, or instructor permission.
BME 7641Bioelectricity (3.00)
Studies the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals, measurement of these signals and their analysis in basic and clinical electrophysiology. Introduces the principles of design and operation of therapeutic medical devices used in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Prerequisite: BME 6310 or instructor permission.
BME 7782Medical Imaging Systems Theory (3.00)
Develops an intuitive understanding of the mathematical systems theory needed to understand and design biomedical imaging systems, including ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. Topics will include multidimensional Fourier transform theory, image reconstruction techniques, diffraction theory, and Fourier optics. Prerequisite: BME 6310 or equivalent exposure to linear systems theory or instructor permission.
BME 7784Medical Image Analysis (3.00)
Comprehensive overview of medical image analysis and visualization. Focuses on the processing and analysis of these images for the purpose of quantitation and visualization to increase the usefulness of modern medical image data. Topics covered involve image formation and perception, enhancement and artifact reduction, tissue and structure segmentation, classification and 3-D visualization techniques as well as pictures archiving, communication and storage systems. Involves 'hands-on' experience with homework programming assignments. Prerequisite: BIOM 6310 and ECE 6782 or instructor permission.
BME 7806Biomedical Applications of Genetic Engineering (3.00)
Provides biomedical engineers with a grounding in molecular biology and a working knowledge of recombinant DNA technology, thus establishing a basis for the evaluation and application of genetic engineering in whole animal systems. Beginning with the basic principles of genetics, this course examines the use of molecular methods to study gene expression and its critical role in health and disease. Topics include DNA replication, transcription, translation, recombinant DNA methodology, methods for analyzing gene expression (including microarray and genechip analysis), methods for creating genetically-engineered mice, and methods for accomplishing gene therapy by direct in vivo gene transfer. Prerequisite: BME 6103, undergraduate-level cell and/or molecular biology course. (e.g., BME 2104) or instructor permission. Suggested preparation: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and physiology..
BME 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
BME 8315Systems Bioengineering and Multi-Scale Models (3.00)
In this course students will gain working knowledge of constructing mathematical and computational models of biological processes at many levels of organizational scale from genome to whole-tissue. Students will rotate through several modules where they will hear lectures, read literature, and participate in discussions focused on the various modeling techniques. Prerequisites: BME 6101/6102: Physiology (or equivalent); 2. One of the following courses in cellular and/or molecular biology: BME 2104: Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers, BME 7806: Genetic Engineer.
BME 8550Advanced Topics in Biomed Engineering (3.00)
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in biomedical engineering. Topics vary by semester.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
BME 8730Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging (3.00)
Underlying principles of array based ultrasound imaging. Physics and modeling techniques used in ultrasound transducers. Brief review of ID circuit transducer models. Use of Finite Element techniques in transducer design. Design considerations for 1.5D and 2D arrays will be reviewed. Diffraction and beamforming will be introduced starting from Huygen's principle. FIELD propagation model will form an important part of the class. In depth discussion of various beamforming and imaging issues such as sidelobes, apodization, grating lobes, resolution, contrast, etc. The course addresses attenuation, time-gain-compensation and refraction. Finally, speckle statistics and K-Space techniques will be introduced. Laboratories will involve measuring ultrasound image metrics, examining the effect of various beamforming parameters and simulating these on a computer using Matlab. Prerequisite: instructor permission, BIOM 6310 and BIOM 6311. Preparation: Undergraduate Physics, Electronic circuit analysis, Differential Equations, Fourier and Laplace Transforms, Sampling Theorems.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2011
BME 8782Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3.00)
The course covers the physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, the biological and medical problems addressed using MRI, the analysis and design of MRI pulse sequences from a signal processing perspective, and MR image reconstruction techniques. It will introduce various advanced topics, including non-Cartesian scanning and compressed sensing. The course will include a laboratory session working with an MRI scanner. Prerequisites: BME 6311 BME Measurement Principles, or knowledge of 2D Fourier transforms and linear systems theory.
BME 8783Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3.00)
Advanced physics and applications of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy will be covered. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the factors that affect the MRI signal, and will know how these factors can be exploited to image or measure various aspects of physiology with MR. Prerequisites: BME 8782 Magnetic Resonance Imaing and MATLAB experience.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2011
BME 8823Cell Mechanics, Adhesion, and Locomotion (3.00)
Biomechanics and structural biology of cell structure and function, focusing on quantitative description and measurements of cell deformability, adhesion, and locomotion. Cell deformability: erythrocyte properties, membrane mechanics, shear, bending, and area elasticity. Leukocyte structure and deformability. Structural basis of plasma membrane, lipid bilayer, surface structures, nucleus, organelles, cell junctions, cytoskeleton, membrane transport, active cytoskeletal functions, specific and non-specific forces between molecules, protein structure, molecular graphics. Cell adhesion molecules: families of adhesion molecules, cell-cell and cell-matrix binding, biochemical characteristics, regulation of expression, regulation of binding avidity, functional role. Cell adhesion assays: detachment assays, aggregation of leukocytes and platelets, controlled shear systems, flow chambers. Mechanics of cell adhesion: equilibrium analysis of cell adhesion, models of cell rolling, adhesion bond mechanics. Liposomes, microbubbles, and applications to targeted adhesion. Cell motility: measurement of active forces and motility in cells, molecular motors. Effects of mechanical stress and strain on cell function. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
BME 8890Biomolecular Engineering (3.00)
In this class, students design treatment strategies for cancer and cardiovascular disease based on molecular bioengineering principles. Special topics will include design of nanoparticle drug and gene delivery platforms, materials biocompatibility, cancer immunotherapy, and molecular imaging. Prerequisites: Undergraduate coursework in cell and molecular biology and biomechanics. Recommended undergraduate course in transport processes.
BME 8900Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
For master's students.
Course was offered Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
BME 8995M.E. Supervised Project Research (M.E. STUDENTS ONLY) (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
FOR M.E. STUDENTS ONLY. A research project in biomedical engineering conducted in consultation with a faculty advisor. Includes the design, execution, and analysis of experimental laboratory work and computational or theoretical computer analysis of a problem. Fulfills the project requirement for the Biomedical Engineering Masters of Engineering degree. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission Required.
BME 8999Master's Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Master's Research
BME 9999Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Civil Engineering
CE 1501Special Topics in Civil & Environmental Engineering (1.00)
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester
CE 2010Civil Engineering Techniques (3.00)
Development of fundamental civil engineering design knowledge and skills, with a focus on surveying, engineering graphics, and engineering economics. Emphasis on hands-on experience with the latest equipment and technology. Prerequisites: ENGR 1620 and Civil major/minor.
CE 2020Engineering Economic Analysis (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This purpose of this course is to introduce and familiarize students with engineering economics. Students will apply the concepts of the time value of money to infrastructure management. Students will be able to compare cash flows using net present value, future value, and cost-benefit analysis. Students will use cost indices to complete cost estimations. Students will be able to make appropriate adjustments for depreciation and inflation.
CE 2100Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on society's interaction with water, air, and soil systems. Management of these major environmental components is examined, considering health and ecological needs and technical limitations. This course may stand alone as introduction to the current environmental challenges that we face, or as the foundation for further study in the field of envir Prerequisites: CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1610 and Civil Engr major/minor or Instructor Permission.
CE 2110Environmental Engineering Laboratory (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Lab study/basic principles in environmental engineering inc.reactor theory, fate & transport in the environment, wastewater treatment unit operations, climate change dynamics, & life cycle assessment. Lab, field, & online simulations will be used to produce data for analysis. Opportunity to develop design/experiments methodologies and to work in teams on written reports.Corequisite CE 2100 and Prerequisite:CE major/minor or Instructor Permission
CE 2300Statics (3.00)
Basic concepts of mechanics: systems of forces and couples: equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures: trusses, frames, machines; internal forces, shear and bending moment diagrams; distributed forces; friction, centroids and moments of inertia; principle of virtual work; and computer applications. Cross-listed as MAE 2300. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425.
CE 2305Statics and Strength of Materials (4.00)
Concepts of mechanics; systems of forces, couples; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; trusses, frames, machines and beams; centroids and moments of inertia; concepts of stress and strain; constitutive relations; axially loaded members; torsion of bars; internal forces in beams; stresses and deformations in beams; analysis of stress and strain; failure theories;buckling/columns.Pre-req:APMA2120,PHYS1425
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013
CE 2310Strength of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Normal stress and strain, thermal strain, shear stress, shear strain; stress and strain transformations; Mohr's circle for plane stress and strain; stresses due to combined loading; axially loaded members; torsion of circular and thin-walled closed sections; deformation, strains and stresses in beams; beam deflections; column stability; energy concepts in mechanics. Cross-listed as MAE 2310. Prerequisite: CE 2300, APMA 2120.
CE 2320Dynamics (3.00)
Kinematics and kinetics of particles and kinematics of rigid bodies; translation and fixed-axis rotation relative to translating axes; general planar motion; fixed point rotation; general motion and the kinetics of rigid bodies, center of mass, mass moment of inertia, product of inertia, principal-axes, parallel axis theorems, planar motion, and the work-energy method. Cross-listed as MAE 2320. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425 and CE 2300.
CE 2500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering. Topcis for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment. Check with the course instructor regarding any prerequisites.
CE 3000Civil Engineering Systems Analysis (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course focuses on the analysis and management of large-scale civil engineering systems. Students will be introduced to problem formulation, linear programming, and decision analysis, with applications in structural optimization, traffic flow, resource allocation and environmental design. Prerequisites: CE 2010
Course was offered Spring 2017
CE 3001The Art and Science of Systems Modeling (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the systemic process of model building. The central role of state space and state variables in system modeling will be the focus. Models developed in class will be introduced with example problems on modeling infrastructure systems of systems, covering: bridges, telecommunications, transportation, electrical grid, water resources and aviation. To be taught concurrently w/SYS 3001, SYS 6581 and CE 6009.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013
CE 3050Introduction to Green Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A hands-on overview in systems thinking as it relates to infrastructure and sustainability analysis. Students will learn quantitative tools to analyze complex socio-technical systems with a focus on water, energy, transportation, buildings, and food. Students will undertake an open-ended, team-based life cycle assessment project on a topic of their choice. Prerequisites: College Chemistry, and CE 2100 or Energy/Mass Balances.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Summer 2016
CE 3100Water for the World (3.00)
This course will examine complex issues associated with providing potable water to the world's population. Topics will include the use of surface and ground water as potable water supplies, fundamentals of water chemistry, the engineering principles used to design modern water treatment and distribution systems, and problems associated with providing potable water in developing global communities. Prerequisites: CHEM1610, APMA 2130, CE3210
CE 3210Fluid Mechanics (3.00)
Studies the statics and dynamics of incompressible fluids, primarily water. The basic principles of fluid flow, energy equation, and momentum equation, are presented and applied to closed conduit flow, open channel flow, and problems of flow measurement pertinent to civil engineering practices. Prerequisite: CE 2300 or equivalent.
CE 3212Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (1.00)
Laboratory study of the flow of fluids. Uses laboratory data to quantify hydrostatic forces, flow rates in pipes and open channels, forces due to impact, and flow regimes in open channels. Students conduct experiments and prepare written reports. Prerequisite: CE 2300. Corequisite: CE 3210 or instructor permission and CE major/minor.
CE 3220Water Resources Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Covers topics related to hydraulics and hydrology, including complicated pipes designs, pumps, open channel, rainfall, evaporation, and surface runoff applied to stormwater and bmp design. Applications include water supply, drainage, flood control, and water control, and computer modeling. Prerequisite: CE 3210
CE 3300Structural Mechanics (3.00)
Fundamentals of structural mechanics: equilibrium compatibility, determinacy, stability; mathematical models of structural elements: stress resultants in bars, beams, and framed structures; calculation of deflections; general analysis of structures: concepts of stiffness and flexibility, force and displacement methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CE 2310.
CE 3310Design of Concrete Structures (3.00)
Introduces physical properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Design and analysis of basic structural elements of reinforced concrete including beams, slabs, columns, and footings. Consideration of construction practices and building codes. Prerequisites: CE 3300.
CE 3330Introduction to Design of Structural Systems (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction of concepts, approaches, procedures, and codes for the design of civil structural systems with emphasis on the characterization of structural loads, structural systems and system behavior on structural systems constructed of steel and reinforced concrete. Topics to include engineering properties of materials, design and behavior of compression members, flexural members, and tension members. Prerequisite: CE3300 or equivalent.
CE 3400Transportation Infrastructure Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Fundamentals of transportation infrastructure design will be covered. Topics include: analysis of the characteristics of the driver, pedestrian, vehicle, and road; highway geometric design; intersection desgin and operations; highway drainage and drainage structures; highway pavement design. Prerequisite: CE 2010 and Third-year standing in Civil Engineering or instructor permission and Corequisite: CE 3402
CE 3402Transportation Infrastructure Design Workshop (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Computer aided design applications of the fundamentals of transportation infrastructure design using real world scenarios. Application topics include: highway geometric design for highway facilities; intersection design including at-grade, roundabouts, and grade separated interchanges, and the transportation improvements associated with a new development. Prerequisite: CE 2010, CE 2305, CE 3700, CE 3400 (concurrently)
CE 3500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering. Topics for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CE 3559Special Topic in Semester at Sea (1.00 - 3.00)
Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced.
CE 3700Properties and Behavior of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Studies the properties and behavior of engineering materials, emphasizing construction materials, including metals, concrete, wood, and composites. Considers service conditions and underlying scientific principles related to applications and performance of materials. Corequisite: CE 3702. Prerequisite CE 2310
CE 3702Materials Laboratory (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Laboratory study of the macroscopic mechanical, thermal, and time-dependent properties and behaviors of typical civil engineering construction materials (metals, concrete, wood, plastics). Students plan and conduct experiments, and prepare written reports. Corequisite: CE 3700.
CE 3710Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering (3.00)
Introduces the fundamental principles of particulate mechanics with an emphasis on soil strength, consolidation behavior, and fluid flow. Concepts of theoretical soil mechanics and soil physics. Prerequisites: CE 2310.
CE 3712Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory (1.00)
Laboratory study of soil properties. Students will gather and evaluate data to determine particle size, permeability, dry density, compressive strength, shear strength, and critical water contents of soil specimen. Students will conduct ASTM standard soil tests and prepare written reports. Pre-requisite CE 2310, Co-requisite CE 3710.
CE 3800Civil Engineering Undergraduate Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students will be introduced to current civil engineering challenges and emerging solutions. Research and practical case studies will be included. Participants will summarize and explore implications of introduced topics.
CE 4000Construction Engineering (3.00)
Construction engineers plan and manage the construction of infrastructure needed by society, working with four fundamental resources: labor, machinery, materials, and money. This course introduces students to the activities and challenges of construction engineering, with an emphasis on scheduling and estimating. The course includes numerous guest speakers from industry.Cannot receive credit for both CE 4000 & ARCH 5340. Prerequisites: CE 2010 and Civil Engr major/minor
CE 4010Concrete Technology (3.00)
Fundamentals of concrete: ingredients, hydration, and proportioning; production of concrete: batching, transport, finishing, curing, testing, and inspections; special types of concrete; high-performance, fiber-reinforced, roller compacted, polymer, shrinkage compensating, structural light-weight, and shotcrete; and design and code provisions: working stress and ultimate strength design, and provisions of ACI code. Prerequisites: CE 3700.
CE 4020Pavement Analysis and Design (3.00)
Introduces the concepts of design, performance, and analysis of rigid and flexible pavements. Focuses on: review of engineering materials used for pavement construction, empirical and mechanistic design methodologies for pavement construction and rehabilitation, influence of traffic loading on pavement performance, life-cycle cost analysis techniques, and pavement management. Taught concurrently with CE 6120 Prerequisites: CE 3700
CE 4030Earth Work (3.00)
Applies concepts and principles of earthwork, land manipulation, grading, and drainage in short exercises. Introduces digital applications in a combined lecture and workshop format. Prerequisite CE 2010 or LAR 5330 or instructor permission.
CE 4100Water Chemistry for Environmental Engineering (3.00)
This course covers the basic principles of aquatic chemistry as applied to problems in natural and engineered waters relevant to environmental engineering. Four specific reaction types will be covered including 1) acid-base, 2) precipitation-dissolution, 3) complexation, and 4) oxidation-reduction. Problem solving skills will be developed using graphical, analytical and computer simulation techniques. Taught concurrently with CE 6220 Prerequisites: CHEM 1610 and 1611
Course was offered Spring 2014, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
CE 4110Environmental Systems Modeling & Management (3.00)
The course emphasizes the formulation of environmental management issues as optimization problems. Simulation models will be presented and then combined with optimization algorithms. Environmental systems to be addressed include stream quality, air quality, water supply, waste management, groundwater remediation, and reservoir operations. Optimization techniques presented include linear programming, dynamic programming, and genetic algorithms.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 4120Experimental Analyses in Environmental Engineering (3.00)
Course is structured around weekly hands-on experiments in environmental engineering. Weekly lectures provide pertinent theoreticl background. Areas of emphasis will include: formulation of hypotheses, use of proper lab technique and instruments to measure important environmental prameters, simple statistical data analysis, and clear communication of results. The course culminates in an open-ended lab and poster presentation. Prerequisites: College Chemistry and Calculus; CE 2100; CE 2210.
CE 4160Environmental Microbiology and Biological Waste Treatment (3.00)
We will explore terminology and concepts for characterizing and mathematically modeling human impacts on microbial systems and vice versa. Special consideration will be given to microbe-mediated cycling of organic materials (i.e., pollutants) in natural and engineered systems, including: conventional water and wastewater treatment, municipal landfills, pristine and contaminated groundwater and surface waters, etc. Prerequisites: CE 2100, 3100
CE 4200Ground-Water Hydrology and Contaminant Transport (3.00)
Topics include Darcy's Law, fluid potential, hydraulic conductivity, the unsaturated zone, the 3-D equation of ground-water flow, well hydraulics and pump tests, including the principle of superposition, the advection-dispersion-reaction equation, pollutant fate and transport processes, and numerical simulation of ground-water flow and contaminant transport. Prerequisites: CE 2210, CE 3210 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
CE 4210Stormwater Management (3.00)
Emphasizes the management of stormwater quantity and quality, especially in urban areas. Course includes impacts of stormwater on infrastructure and ecosystems, hydrologic and contaminant transport principles, stormwater regulation, structural and non-structural stormwater management approaches, and modeling tools for stormwater analysis and management. Prerequisite: CE 3220
CE 4220Coastal Engineering:Energy and Environment (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introductory course on coastal processes, and the fundamentals of coastal engineering. The aim of the course is to develop a basic understanding of the characteristics and physical behavior of the coastal environment in order to apply engineering principles and concepts to solve relevant problems. Prerequisite: CE 2210 Fluid Mechanics. Pre-requisite: CE 2210 Fluid Mechanics or equivalent.
CE 4270Hydraulics of Rivers, Streams, and Channels (3.00)
To provide students with a practical foundation in the hydraulics of open channel flow, so that they may apply their skills to design and analysis of man-made structures and natural rivers. To provide a theoretical underpinning on which students can develop research hypotheses related to open channel hydraulics. Prerequisite: CE 3210
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
CE 4280Paleohydrology (3.00)
Paleohydrology is the study of ancient use and handling of water. Course's primary objective: investigate innovative, sophisticated solutions Inca engineers used to design and construct one of the ancient world's most advanced hydrological systems. Students will apply basic hydrological and hydraulic engineering principles to investigate the Inca Misana Water Temple complex at Ollantaytombo.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 4300Design of Metal Structures I (3.00)
Introduction to design of metal structures, rational development of design methods for structural members and systems: behavioral basis for interpreting design codes, using mechanics and experimental bases. behavior and design of tension, compression, and flexural members in metal, and the behavior and design of bolted and welded connections, using the AISC Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) specification. Prerequisites: CE 2310, CE 3300.
CE 4310Design of Metal Structures II (3.00)
Behavior and design of continuous beams, plate girders, composite steel-concrete members, members subjected to combined bending and compressions, and eccentric connections using LRFD design approach; and torsion and torsional stability of structural members. Prerequisites: CE 4310.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 4320Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design (3.00)
Design of building and bridge components, including floor systems, rigid frames, retaining walls, and tanks. Introduction to prestressed concrete. Prerequisite: CE 3310. May be taught concurrently with CE 6320.
CE 4330Prestressed Concrete Design (3.00)
Prestressing materials and concepts, working stress and strength analysis and design for flexure, prestress losses, design for shear, composite prestressed beams, continuous prestressed beams, prestressed concrete systems concepts, load balancing, and slab design. Prerequisite CE 3310.
Course was offered Fall 2010
CE 4340Advanced Topics in Structural Engineering (3.00)
Direct stiffness analysis of frames and grids; second order frame analysis; uniform torsion of non-circular sections; influence functions; introduction to work and energy theorems; polynomial approximation and approximate stiffness matrices for framed structures; topics in beam analysis including shear deformable beams, beams on elastic foundations and elastic foundations. Prerequisite: CE 3300 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2017
CE 4400Traffic Operations (3.00)
Covers the methods for evaluating the impact on the quality of traffic operations due to the interactions of the driver, the vehicles, and the road. Includes the collection and analysis of traffic operations data, fundamentals of traffic flow theory, analysis of capacity and level of service and accident analysis. Taught concurrently w/ CE 6400Prerequisites: CE 3400
CE 4410Introduction to Transportation Planning (3.00)
Introduces the legal requirements, framework, and principles of urban and statewide planning. Focuses on describing and applying the methodology of the forecasting system of the transportatoin planning process, including inventory, forecasts of population and economic activity, network analysis, and travel demand analysis. Taught concurrently with CE 6410. Prerequisites: CE 3400
CE 4500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.
CE 4700Foundation Engineering (3.00)
Properties of soils; subsurface exploration; bearing capacity, settlement and soil improvement; structural design of shallow foundations and mats; earth pressure theories and applications to design of retaining structures, anchors, sheet piles and bracing; stability of slopes; introduction to deep foundations. Prerequisites: CE 3310, CE 3710.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2012
CE 4710Asphalt Materials (3.00)
This course will cover the major types of bituminous materials: asphalt cements, cutback asphalts, asphalt emulsions, and tars. The influence of chemical composition upon physical properties, desirable aggregate characteristics for bituminous mixtures, and asphalt mixtures and construction techniques are also covered. Prerequisites: CE 3700
CE 4800Computational Methods in Civil Engineering (3.00)
Studies civil engineering problems and their solutions in a numerical, computer-based context; the formulation of these problems using various computational procedures; the development of typical algorithms; utilization of microcomputers, including structured programming with graphics. Emphasizes construction of numerical models for applications and the solution of representative multi-dimensional problems from all areas of civil engineering. Prerequisites: 4th-year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 4810Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3.00)
Introduces engineering problem solving using geographic information systems (GIS). GIS has proven to be an effective tool in civil engineering applications that include a significant spatial component. The course addresses basic GIS concepts, and includes hands-on exercises using GIS software.
Course was offered Fall 2013
CE 4820Introduction to Finite Element Methods (3.00)
Basic concepts of finite element analysis. Weighted residual (Galerkin) approach and variational (Rayleigh-Ritz) approach. One-dimensional and two-dimensional formulations; local vs. global coordinate systems; shape functions. Computational implementation and applications in the areas of structural analysis, steady-state fluid flow, and heat transfer. Prerequisite: CE 3300 or MAE 3310.
CE 4990Civil Engineering Research and Design (3.00)
Team-based project course focusing on design or research effort with focus in a CEsub-discipline. Involves the study of an open-ended project, including problem formulation, development of methodology, data collection from physical experiments and/or models, analysis and interpretation, and formulation of conclusions/solutions. Requisites: 4th Year Standing Civil Majors and Assignment by CEE dept.
CE 4991Civil Engineering Design and Practice (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course will broaden a student's exposure to professional practice issues, including project planning and management, financial and contractual relationships. The major focus of the course will be providing practical civil engineering design experience. Students will participate in one or more multi-disciplinary team design projects requiring integration of technical skills from sub-areas of Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: 4th yr standing as CE major
CE 4995Civil Engineering Research (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Study of a civil engineering problem in depth by each student using library, computer, or laboratory facilities. The project is conducted in close consultation with departmental faculty and involves survey, analysis, or project development. Progress reports and a comprehensive written report are required. May be repeated if necessary. Prerequisite: Contact individual professor for Instructor Permission.
CE 5000Management Large-Scale Construction Projects (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Large-scale construction projects demand engineers with strong technical abilities, as well as sound project management knowledge. This course provides a foundation for students with hands-on projects in project delivery methods, contract vehicles, finance, scheduling, estimating, project control, and project commissioning. The course will also include project case studies from construction professionals. Prerequisite: CE 2020 or equivalent
CE 5010Concrete Technology (3.00)
Basic properties of hydraulic cements & mineral aggregates & their interactions in concrete; properties of plastic & hardened concrete. Modifications through admixtures; concrete test methods; behavior under various loads; durability & performance of concrete. Production, handling, placement problems; lightweight, heavyweight, &other special concretes topics. Prerequisite:Graduate standing ; instructor permission as 4th yr civil major/minor.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 5020Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3.00)
Introduces engineering problem solving using geographic information systems (GIS). GIS has proven to be an effective tool in civil engineering applications that incluce a significant spatial component. The course addresses basic GIS concepts, and includes hands-on exercises using GIS software.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 5240Ground-Water Hydrology and Contaminant Transport (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An introduction to ground-water hydrology and contaminant transport. Topics include Darcy's Law, fluid potential, hydraulic conductivity, the unsaturated zone, the 3-D equation of ground-water flow, well hydraulics and pump tests, including the principle of superposition, the advection-dispersion-reaction equation, pollutant fate and transport processes, and numerical simulation of ground-water. Prerequisites: CE 2210, CE 3200 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
CE 5320Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Advanced topics in reinforced concrete design, including design of slender columns, deflections, torsion in reinforced concrete, design of continuous frames, and two-way floor systems. Introduction to design of tall structures in reinforced concrete, and design of shear walls. Prerequisite: CE 3310. Prerequisite:Graduate standing ; instructor permission as 4th yr civil major/minor.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 5400Traffic Operations (3.00)
This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of traffic operations including traffic data collection and analysis, safety and crash studies, traffic flow theory, highway capacity analysis, signalized intersection design and analysis, simulation modeling, and sustainable transportation system.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
CE 5410Introduction to Transportation Planning (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the legal requirements, framework, and principles of urban and statewide planning. Focuses on describing and applying the methodology of the forecasting system of the transportation planning process, including inventory, forecasts of population and economic activity, network analysis, and travel demand analysis.
CE 5500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies basic engineering principles, analytical procedures and design methodology to special problems of current interest in civil engineering. Topic for each semester are announced at the time of course enrollment.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017
CE 6000Forefronts of Civil Engineering (3.00)
This course is an introduction to major challenges facing civil engineering infrastructures and emerging solutions to these challenges. Innovative technologies and techniques will be presented. Topics will vary but may include sustainability, sensor technology, infrastructure security, and resiliency and design for natural disasters. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Instructor Permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
CE 6009The Art and Science of Systems Modeling (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the systemic process of model building. The central role of state space and state variables in system modeling will be the focus. Models developed in class will be introduced with example problems on modeling infrastructure systems of systems, covering: bridges, telecommunications, transportation, electrical grid, water resources and aviation. To be taught concurrently w/SYS 3001, SYS 6581 and CE 3001.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2013
CE 6010Computational Methods in Civil Engineering (3.00)
Studies CE problems and solutions in a numerical, computer-based context; formulation of these problems using various computational procedures; development of typical algorithms; utilization of microcomputers, including structured programming with graphics. Emphasizes construction of numerical models for applications and the solution of representative multi-dimensional problems from all areas of CE. Prerequisite: Graduate standing
CE 6030Green Engineering and Sustainability (3.00)
An introductory to sustainability metrics and the engineering tools of industrial ecology, most notably life cycle assessment (LCA). Case studies from various engineering disciplines will be explored. Students will undertake an open-ended LCA project related to their thesis research or improving the sustainability of UVA operations. Asynchronous online format: roughly 6-7 h/wk. Prerequisite: SEAS 4th-year or Grad standing.
CE 6040Infrastructure Management (3.00)
Studies the tools required to formulate a prioritization procedure that identifies candidate projects for programming at both the network and project level infrastructure management systems. Topics include methods for obtaining condition rating measurements and optimization procedures. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
CE 6050Nondestructive Evaluation (3.00)
Basic physics of optical, electromagnetic, mechanical, ultrasonic and radiographic NDE measurements. Principles and uses of these and other quantitative techniques in nondestructive evaluation. Signal processing and evaluation methods. Laboratory experiments in optical, ultrasonic, eddy current, and magnetic methods of NDE. Pre-requisites: MAE 2310, APMA 2130 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 6110Asphalt Materials (3.00)
This course will cover the major types of bituminous materials: asphalt cements, cutback asphalts, asphalt emulsions, and tars. The influence of chemical composition upon physical properties, desirable aggregate characteristics for bituminous mixtures, and asphalt mixtures and construction techniques are also covered. May be taught concurrently with CE 4710. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission.
CE 6120Pavement Analysis and Design (3.00)
Introduces the concepts of design, performance, and analysis of rigid and flexible pavements. Focuses on: review of engineering materials used for pavement construction, empirical and mechanistic design methodologies for pavement construction and rehabilitation, influence of traffic loading on pavement performance, life-cycle cost analysis techniques, and pavement management. Taught concurrently with CE 4020.
CE 6130Advanced Geotechnical Engineering (3.00)
This course addresses advanced geotechnical engineering concepts related to slope stability and earth pressures. Topics covered include: stress-strain, shear strength, slope stability analysis, lateral earth pressure, and the design of retaining walls (gravity, sheet-pile, anchored, and braced). Students should have taken CE 3710 (or an equivalent) or obtain instructor permission to enroll.
Course was offered Spring 2016
CE 6140Advanced Foundations (3.00)
Subsurface investigation, control of groundwater, analysis of sheeting and bracing systems, shallow foundations, pile foundations, retaining walls, bridge abutments, caissons and cofferdams. Prerequisite: CE 3310 and CE 3710.
Course was offered Fall 2012
CE 6200Fate and Transport Modeling of Ecosystems (3.00)
This is a first course in modeling surface water ecosystems, including watersheds. Ecosystems ranging from watersheds, rivers, reservoirs, estuaries, coastal waters and wetlands will be covered. Using actual field data, students are assigned modeling projects with currently used models for TMDLs. Prerequisite: Graduate Engineering or Instructor permission
CE 6210Wastewater Treatment (3.00)
Presents a concise summary of wastewater treatment processes, with emphasis on applications to municipal and industrial wastewaters. Physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes are discussed. Also covers practices of removing conventional and toxic pollutants in wastewaters. Prerequisites: CE 2210, CE 3200, and CE 4100 (concurrent) or Instructor Permission.
CE 6220Water Chemistry for Environmental Engineering (3.00)
This course addresses the chemical fate relating to acidification, eutrophication, and contamination for water quality management. Chemical equilibrium and reaction kinetics including acid-base, speciation, and precipitation-dissolution, hydrolysis, oxidation-reduction, and photolysis will be covered for nutrients, heavy metals, PCBs, and endocrine disrupting chemicals using equilibrium models: MINTEQA2 and TOXIWASP with real world data.
CE 6230Hydrology (3.00)
Stresses the quantitative description and the physical basis of hydrology. Both deterministic and stochastic methodology are applied to the analysis of the hydrologic cycle, namely, precipitation, evaporation, overland flow and stream flow, infiltration, and groundwater flow. The use of compute simulation models, especially microcomputer based models, is emphasized. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CE 6240Ground-Water Hydrology and Contaminant Transport (3.00)
An introduction to ground-water hydrology and contaminant transport. Topics include Darcy's Law, fluid potential, hydraulic conductivity, the unsaturated zone, the 3-D equation of ground-water flow, well hydraulics and pump tests, including the principle of superposition, the advection-dispersion-reaction equation, pollutant fate and transport processes, and numerical simulation of ground-water. Prerequisites: CE 2210, CE 3200 or equivalent.
CE 6250Environmental Systems Modeling & Management (3.00)
The course emphasizes the formulation of environmental management issues as optimization problems. Simulation models will be presented and then combined with optimization algorithms. Environmental systems to be addressed may include stream quality, air quality, water supply, groundwater remediation, and reservoir operations. Optimization techniques presented include linear programming, dynamic programming, and genetic algorithms.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 6260Environmental Microbiology and Biological Waste Treatment (3.00)
We will explore terminology and concepts for characterizing and mathematically modeling human impacts on microbial systems and vice versa. Special consideration will be given to microbe-mediated cycling of organic materials (i.e., pollutants) in natural and engineered systems, including: conventional water and wastewater treatment, municipal landfills, pristine and contaminated groundwater and surface waters, etc.
CE 6270Hydraulics of Rivers, Streams, and Channels (3.00)
To provide students with a practical foundation in the hydraulics of open channel flow, so that they may apply their skills to design and analysis of man-made structures and natural rivers. To provide a theoretical underpinning on which students can develop research hypotheses related to open channel hydraulics. Prerequisites: CE 3210 or Instructor Permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
CE 6280Paleo-Engineering (3.00)
Ancient civilizations created extremely sophisticated and sustainable water supply and distribution systems. Many of these systems are as efficient as current water systems. Each student will use modern hydraulic and hydrologic engineering tools to analyze the water system technology developed by an ancient civilization.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 6300Advanced Design of Metal Structures (3.00)
Behavior and design of structural elements and systems, including continuous beams, plate girders, composite steel-concrete members, members in combined bending and compression. Structural frames, framing systems, eccentric connections, and torsion and torsional stability are also studied. (Y) Prerequisites: CE 4300 or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 6310Prestressed Concrete Design (3.00)
Prestressing materials and concepts, working stress analysis and design for flexure, strength analysis and design for flexure, prestress losses, design for shear, composite prestressed beams, continuous prestressed beams, prestressed concrete systems concepts, load balancing, slab design. Prerequisite: CE 3310 or equivalent.
CE 6330Introduction to Finite Element Methods (3.00)
Fundamental concepts of the finite element method; modeling and discretization; one dimensional problems; element characteristics; interpolation functions; plane stress and plane strain problems; isoparametric mappings and numerical quadrature; axisymmetry; three dimensional elasticity. Prerequisites: CE 4340, CE 4820 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2010
CE 6340Risk and Reliability in Structural Engineering (3.00)
Fundamental concepts of structural reliability; definitions of performance and safety, uncertainty in loadings, materials and modeling. Analysis of loadings and resistance. Evaluation of existing design codes. Development of member design criteria, including stability, fatigue and fracture criteria; and the reliability of structural systems. Prerequisite: APMA 3100 or APMA 3110 or equivalent.
CE 6350Experimental Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes the theories and techniques for the determination of static and dynamic stresses, strains, and deformations. Studies include photoelastic, electrical, mechanical, and optical methods and instruments. Both models and full-scale specimens will be used in experimental testing. Prerequisite: CE 3700 or equivalent.
CE 6360Smart Structures (3.00)
The course covers basic aspects of smart structural systems. Fundamental concepts of structural dynamics and vibrations will first be reviewed. Students will then be introduced to a variety of subjects including smart materials, sensing and data acquisition systems, signal processing methods, structural health monitoring, and structural control concepts. Practical applications of smart materials and technologies will be presented and discussed.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CE 6400Traffic Operations (3.00)
Covers the methods for evaluating the impact on the quality of traffic operations due to the interactions of the driver, the vehicles, and the road. Includes the collection and analysis of traffic operations data, fundamentals of traffic flow theory, analysis of capacity and level of service and accident analysis. Taught concurrently with CE 4400.
CE 6410Introduction to Transportation Planning (3.00)
Introduces the legal requirements, framework, and principles of urban and statewide planning. Focuses on describing and applying the methodology of the forecasting system of the transportation planning process, including inventory, forecasts of population and economic activity, network analysis, and travel demand analysis.Taught concurrently with CE 4410.
CE 6420Public Transportation (3.00)
Study of the applicatoin of transportation systems and technologies in an urban context. Focuses on the management and operation of public transit systems, and comparative costs and capabilities of transit modes.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
CE 6430Intermodal Transportation (3.00)
Studies the structure of domestic freight and passenger transportation in the United States. Focuses on the integration of modes, economic impacts, national transportation policy and advanced technology. Case studies of contemporary examples of intermodal integration are explored.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
CE 6440Intelligent Transportation Systems (3.00)
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) can best be defined as the application of infomration technology to the surface transportation sytem. This technology, which includes communications, sensors, and computer hardware and software, supports both travelers and transportation providers in making more effective decisions. This course provides an introduction to the concepts of ITS, explores the supporting technology and includes case studies.
Course was offered Summer 2017, Spring 2012
CE 6450Transportation Safety Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A study of different transportation systems management strategies with specific emphasis on their impact on safety, including methods of obtaining and analyzing crash data. Emphasis is also placed on the interaction of human and vehiclecharacteristics and the road environment on safety.
CE 6460Introduction to Integrated Transportation Systems Models (3.00)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to core models that support transportation engineering. In addition, the course provides a background on fundamental mathematical and heuristic search methods, optimization theory, stochastic optimization, and graph theory that underpin the transportation models.
Course was offered Spring 2011
CE 6470Transport Economics & Finance (3.00)
Economic theory and applications enhance transport demand analysis, transport pricing, welfare considerations and policy evaluation. This course illustrates the fundamentals of transport economics (costs, benefits and pricing), describes key factors that affect these (movement and location choice), and introduces different methods of economic analysis for quantifying the trends in and interactions across these topics. Pre/Co-requisite: CE 6410
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2016
CE 6480Advanced Geometric Design (3.00)
This course covers advanced topics in geometric design of highways. Topics include highway functions and classification, characteristics, design control and criteria, and cross section elements. Other material covered includes local collectors, rural and urban arterials, freeways, at-grade intersections, grade separations, and interchanges. The topics covered parallel the AASHTO geometric design book, 'The Green Book.' Prerequisite: CE 3400.
CE 6490Transportation Data Analysis and Modeling (3.00)
This course explores the unique modeling and analysis challenges faced by transportation engineers. Students will be introduced to these challenges in a wide range of transportation areas - ranging from traffic flow theory, to safety, to aviation. Data characteristics from these areas will be investigated, along with well-suited modeling and analysis techniques.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
CE 6500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: to be listed for each section as needed
CE 6555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Special Topics in Distance Learning
CE 6700Energy Principles in Mechanics (3.00)
Introduction to calculus of variations. Derivation and application of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work. The principles of stationary total potential energy and complementary energy, Castigiliano's Theorems. Introduction to mixed and hybrid principles. Variational approximation methods. Hamilton's principle, Lagrange's equations of motion. Corequisite: CE 6720 or equivalent. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6200 and MAE 6200
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2011, Fall 2009
CE 6710Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3.00)
Reviews basic stress-strain concepts; constitutive relations. Studies unsymmetrical bending, shear center, and shear flow. Analyzes curved flexural members, beams on elastic foundation, torsion, bending, and twisting of thin walled sections. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6010. Prerequisite: Undergraduate mechanics and mathematics.
CE 6720Continuum Mechanics (3.00)
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Taught concurrently with APMA 6020, AM 6020, MAE 6020. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CE 6730Computational Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes the variational and computational mechanics of solids, potential energy, complementary energy, virtual work, Reissner's principle, Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement, force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis, including shape functions, convergence and integration; and applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as AM 6030, MAE 6030. Corequisite: CE 6702.
CE 6731Vibrations (3.00)
Free and forced vibration of undamped and damped single-degree-of-freedom systems and undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems; use of Lagrange's equations, Laplace transform, matrix formulation, and other solution methods; normal mode theory; introduction to vibration of continuous systems. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6230 and MAE 6230. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CE 6740Plates and Shells (3.00)
Includes the classical analysis of plates and shells of various shapes; closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution of governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Taught concurrently w/ AM 6040 and MAE 6040. Prerequisite: APMA 6410 and CE 6710 or 6720.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Fall 2011
CE 6750Mechanics of Composite Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes the properties and mechanics of fibrous, laminated composites; stress, strain, equilibrium, and tensor notation; micromechanics, lamina, laminates, anisotropic materials, classical lamination theory, stiffness and strength, interlaminar stresses, fabrication, and test methods; thermal stresses, analysis, design and computerized implementation. Taught concurrently with AM 6650. Prerequisite: CE 2310 or equivalent and a computer language
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Fall 2011
CE 6760Stress Analysis of Composites (3.00)
Focuses on 3-D anisotropic constitutive theory, edge effects and interlaminar stresses, failure criteria, fracture, anisotropic elasticity, micromechanics, laminated plates, hygro-thermal effects, conduction and diffusion. Taught concurrently w/ AM 6660. Prerequisite: CE 6750 or AM 6650.
CE 6770Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Reviews concepts/stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility;Hooke's law;displacement & stress formulations of elasticity problems;plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates;Airy's stress function; plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates,axisymmetric problems;torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real functions);thermal stress;energy methods.Pre-requisites:CE 6720,AM/MAE 6020,or instructor permission
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
CE 6775Theory of Structural Stability (3.00)
Introduces the elastic stability of structural and mechanical systems. Studies classical stability theory and buckling of beams, trusses, frames, arches, rings and thin plates and shells. Also covers the derivation of design formulas, computational formulation and implementation. Taught concurrently with AM 6750. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CE 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 6995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Master's-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 7001Graduate Seminar (0.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Weekly meeting of graduate students and faculty for presentation and discussion of contemporary research and practice in civil engineering. This seminar is offered every spring semester. Prerequisite: For students who have established resident credit.
CE 7120Advanced Pavement Analysis and Design (3.00)
This course covers advanced topics in the design and analysis of pavement structures for all types of pavements. Mechanistic-empirical design procedures are covered, and drainage layer design is discussed in detail. Actual pavement design programs are used and advanced design checks and analysis topics covered in detail. Stress, strain, deflection calculation, and back calculation procedures are also discussed. Prerequisite: CE 6120.
CE 7200Environmental Hydraulics Modeling (3.00)
This course focuses on an advanced modeling topic - environmental hydraulics of contaminants in ecosystems. Major components covered in the course include mixing zone modeling analysis of near field and far field, hydrodynamic modeling of ecosystems such as reservoirs/lakes, estuaries/coastal waters, and wetlands. One of the key elements in the course is conducting a dye dispersion study in the receiving water to support a mixing zone modeling analysis. Finally, linking the watershed, hydrodynamic and receiving water fate and transport models is addressed. Prerequisite: CE 6200 or instructor permission.
CE 7240Theory of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport (3.00)
Provides a theoretical framework for understanding fluid flow and contaminant transport in porous media. Topics include the properties of a porous medium, including types of phases, soil and clay mineralogy, surface tension and capillarity, soil surface area, and soil organic-matter composition; the derivation of the general equations for multi-phase fluid flow and multi-species solute transport; and the fundamentals of the fate and transport processes of organic pollutants in ground-water systems, including advection, dispersion, diffusion, sorption, hydrolysis, and volatilization. Prerequisite: CE 6240 or equivalent.
CE 7300Optimum Structural Design (3.00)
Introduces the basic concepts, numerical methods, and applications of optimum design to civil engineering structures; formulation of the optimum design problems; development of analysis techniques including linear and nonlinear programming and optimality criteria; examples illustrating application to steel and concrete structures. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CE 7310Non-Linear Structural Systems (3.00)
Discussion of deflection theory. Analysis of arches, suspension bridges, cable supported roof systems, guyed towers, lattice domes and space trusses. Focuses on wind-induced vibration, creep effects, and the visco-elastic behavior of structures. Prerequisite: CE 6330 or CE 6730, or instructor permission.
CE 7320Design of Slab and Shell Structures (3.00)
Using both exact and simplified methods of thin shell theory, such structures as domes, cylindrical roofs, tanks, hyperbolic paraboloids, folder plate roofs, and suspension forms are analyzed and designed. Effects of stiffening beams and edge stress are studied. Considers erection, economy and aesthetics. Prerequisite: CE 6310 or CE 6320.
CE 7330Advanced Finite Element Applications in Structural Engineering (3.00)
Development and application of two- and three-dimensional finite elements; plate bending; isoparametric formulation; solid elements; nonlinear element formulation with application to material and geometric nonlinearities; stability problems; formulation and solution of problems in structural dynamics; use of commercial computer codes. Prerequisite: CE 6330 or equivalent.
CE 7340Dynamics of Structures (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Study of the dynamic behavior of such structures as beams, rigid frames, floors, bridges, and multi-story buildings under the action of various disturbing forces such as wind, blasts, earthquakes, vehicles, machinery, etc.; dynamic modeling of single, multidegree of freedom, and continuous systems; damping; numerical integration; Prerequisite: Concrete and metal structure design.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
CE 7400Traffic Flow Theory (3.00)
Analyzes theoretical and mathematical models of traffic flow; deterministic and stochastic traffic flow models, queueing theory and its application including cases where arrival rates exceed service rates; acceleration noise and traffic simulation. Prerequisite: CE 6400.
CE 7410Transportation Impact Analysis (3.00)
Introduces the non-travel impacts of transportation systems and the methodologies used to capture them for project evaluation; to develop and illustrate methodologies used for evaluating the effectiveness of transportation system/projects including benefit-cost analysis and multi-objective decision models, and to illustrate the analysis of different alternatives. Prerequisites: CE 6400 and 6410.
Course was offered Fall 2010
CE 7430Transportation Logistics (3.00)
This course covers logistics systems, with emphasis on the design and analysis of transportation and supply chain systems. Topics include transportation nnetwork design, scheduling, routing, contracting and pricing; interactions and trade-offs of these activities; and models and techniques for the analysis of logistics systems. Prerequisites: CE 6400, 6410.
CE 7460Advanced Integrated Transportation Systems Models (3.00)
Introduces the current & advanced optimization and simulation computer models used in traffic operations.Covers the advantages and disadvantages of models considered and is project-oriented, with students spending a significant amount of time in selecting & using these models to solve "real world" problems. Prerequisite CE 6400.
Course was offered Fall 2009
CE 7500Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of special topics in civil engineering. Doctoral-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 7555Advanced Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Distance Learning
CE 7750Random Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include a review of probability theory; stochastic processes, with an emphasis on continuous, continuously parametered processes; mean square calculus, Markov processes, diffusion equations, Gaussian processes, and Poisson processes; response of SDOF, MDOF, and continuous linear and nonlinear models to random excitation; upcrossings, first passage problems, fatigue and stability considerations; Monte Carlo simulation, analysis of digital time series data, and filtered excitation models. Cross-listed as AM 7250. Prerequisite: A background in probability theory and vibration analysis.
CE 7770Micromechanics of Heterogeneous Media (3.00)
Analyzes averaging principles, equivalent homogeneity, effective moduli, bounding principles, self-consistent schemes, composite spheres, concentric cylinders, three phase model, repeating cell models, inelastic and nonlinear effects, thermal effects, isotropic and anisotropic media, strength and fracture. Crosslisted with APMA 7670 and AM 7670, Prerequisites: CE 6720.
CE 7993Independent Research in CE (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed independent study of graduate course material under the guidance of a faculty member. Doctoral-level graduate students. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 7995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Doctoral-level graduate student. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
CE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
CE 8001Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For graduate students who will be GTA for a course taught by CE faculty who have granted Instructor Permission for that section. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 8240Groundwater Modeling (3.00)
Introduces the fundamentals of modeling groundwater systems. Emphasizes the evaluation, development, and application of computer models. Modeling techniques include analytical solutions, finite difference and finite element methods, particle tracking, and inverse modeling. Models are applied to flow and transport in saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems. Prerequisite: CE 6240 or instructor permission.
CE 8999Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
CE 9999Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Chemical Engineering
CHE 2202Thermodynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes the formulation and analysis of the first and second laws of thermodynamics; energy conservation; concepts of equilibrium, temperature, energy, and entropy; partial molar properties; pure component and mixture equations of state; processes involving energy transfer as work and heat; reversibility and irreversibility; and closed and open systems and cyclic processes. Prerequisite: APMA 2120
CHE 2215Material and Energy Balances (3.00)
Introduces the field of chemical engineering, including material and energy balances applied to chemical processes, physical and thermodynamic properties of multi-component systems. Three lecture and one discussion hour. Prerequisite: CHEM 1610, APMA 1110.
CHE 2216Modeling and Simulation in Chemical Engineering (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Mathematical and computational tools for the analysis and simulation of chemical processes and physicochemical phenomena. Mathematical and numerical methods. Three lecture and one laboratory hour. Prerequisite: CS 1110, APMA 2130, CHE 2215.
CHE 2246Introduction to Biotechnology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to the fundamentals of biochemistry and molecular and cell biology emphasizing their relevance to industrial applications of biotechnology. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 1610.
Course was offered Fall 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
CHE 3316Chemical Thermodynamics and Staged Unit Operations (4.00)
Principles of chemical thermodynamics developed and applied to chemical and phase equilibria. Principles and methods for staged separation processes including distillation, absorption and stripping, extraction, and adsorption systems. Four Lecture Hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2202, 2215, or equivalent.
CHE 3318Chemical Reaction Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Determination of rate equations for chemical reactions from experimental data. Use of kinetics and transport relations in the design of both batch and continuous reactors; homogeneous, heterogeneous, uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2216, 3316; corequisite: CHE 3322.
CHE 3321Transport Processes I: Momentum Transfer (3.00)
Fundamental principles of momentum transport will be discussed and mathematical methods will be used to describe transport in steady state and unsteady state situations. This course will emplasize the application of these principles and quantitative relations to fluid flow problems. Three lecture hours . Prerequisite: APMA 2130, CHE 2215, 2216
CHE 3322Transport Processes II: Heat and Mass Transfer (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Fundamental concepts of heat and mass transfer; applications of these concepts and material and energy conservation calculations for design of heat exchanger and packed absorption/stripping columns. Four lecture hours. Prerequisites: CHE 2216, 3316, 3321
CHE 3347Biochemical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Quantitative engineering aspects of industrial applications of biology including the microbial synthesis of commercial products, environmental biotechnology, and the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals through recombinant microorganisms, transgenic animals, and plants. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2246, CHE 3321, or instructor permission; corequisite: CHE 3318, 3322 or instructor permission.
CHE 3398Chemical Engineering Laboratory I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Experimental study of selected operations and phenomena in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Students plan experiments, analyze data, calculate results and prepare written and/or oral planning and final technical reports. One hour discussion, four laboratory hours. Prerequisite: CHE 2215 and 3321.
CHE 4417Tissue Engineering (3.00)
Introduces the fundamental principles of tissue engineering. Topics: tissue organization and dynamics, cell and tissue characterization, cell-matrix interactions, transport processes in engineered tissues, biomaterials and biological interfaces, stem cells and interacting cell fate processes, and tissue engineering methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 1620, APMA 2130, and an introductory course in cell and molecular biology or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CHE 4438Process Synthesis, Modeling, and Control (3.00)
Combining chemical engineering unit operations to create complete manufacturing processes, including safety, environmental, and economic considerations. Modeling processes using commercial simulation software. Analysis and design of control systems for chemical plant s. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3318 and 3322.
CHE 4442Applied Surface Chemistry (3.00)
Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, emphasizing thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena. Application to areas such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, and electrophoresis. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 4448Bioseparations Engineering (3.00)
Principles of bioseparations engineering, including specialized unit operations not normally covered in regular chemical engineering courses. Processing operations downstream of the initial manufacture of biotechnology products, including product recovery, separations, purification, and ancillary operations such as sterile processing, clean-in place and regulatory aspects. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3322 or instructor permission.
CHE 4449Polymer Chemistry and Engineering (3.00)
Analyzes the mechanisms and kinetics of various polymerization reactions; relations between the molecular structure and polymer properties, and how these properties can be influenced by the polymerization process; fundamental concepts of polymer solution and melt rheology. Applications to polymer processing operations, such as extrusion, molding, and fiber spinning. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3321 or instructor permission.
CHE 4450Energy Science and Technologies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Overview of energy technologies with an emphasis on materials research and development concepts and current production. The scope of these technologies within the broader contexts of innovation and energy policy. Topics will include fossil fuels, electrochemical energy storage, fuel cells, and photovoltaics. Prerequisite: Fourth-Year or Higher Standing in Chemical Engineering
Course was offered Spring 2017
CHE 4456Bioproduct and Bioprocess Engineering (3.00)
The course focuses on engineering¿s role in commercialization of vaccines and biologics. Biologics are more complex than small molecule drug products and present unique challenges in commercialization. This course includes an overview of vaccines and biologics from historical context, product, process and analytical technologies, immunology, clinical, regulatory and ethical considerations, economics, risk mitigation, and impact on human health. Prerequisites: 4th year or higher CHE or BME standing or Instructor Permission
CHE 4476Chemical Engineering Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Application of academically acquired skills to the practice of chemical engineering in an industrial environment: industrial economics; process synthesis and selection; flow sheet development; equipment sizing; plant layout and cost estimation. Report preparation and oral presentations. Use of commercial process simulation software. Two lecture hours, two discussion hours, and design laboratory. Prerequisite: CHE 2216, 3318, and 3322.
CHE 4491Chemical Engineering Laboratory II (3.00)
Continuation of CHE 3398; emphasizes separations, chemical reaction, and process dynamics and control. One discussion and four laboratory hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3318, 3322, and 3398.
CHE 4561Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in chemical engineering. Topics are announced at registration. Prerequisite:Third or Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2012
CHE 4562Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in chemical engineering. Topics are announced at registration. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing and instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
CHE 4995Chemical Engineering Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Library and laboratory study of an engineering or manufacturing problem conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty member, often including the design, construction, and operation of laboratory scale equipment. Requires progress reports and a comprehensive written report. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 5456Bioproduct & Bioprocess Eng (3.00)
The course focuses on engineering¿s role in commercialization of vaccines and biologics. Biologics are more complex than small molecule drug products and present unique challenges in commercialization. This course includes an overview of vaccines and biologics from historical context, product, process and analytical technologies, immunology, clinical, regulatory and ethical considerations, economics, risk mitigation, and impact on human health. Prerequisites: 4th year or higher CHE or BME standing or Instructor Permission
CHE 5561Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in chemical engineering. Topics are announced at registration.
CHE 5562Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies engineering science, design methods, and system analysis to developing areas and current problems in chemical engineering. Topics are announced at registration.
CHE 6438Process Control and Dynamics (3.00)
Introduction to dynamics and control of process systems, controllers, sensors, and final control elements. Development and application of time- and frequency-domain characterizations of subsystems for stability analyses of closed control loops. State-space models, principles of sampled-data analysis and digital control techniques. Elementary systems identification with emphasis on dead time, distributed parameters, and nonlinearities. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6442Applied Surface Chemistry (3.00)
Factors underlying interfacial phenomena, with emphasis on thermodynamics of surfaces, structural aspects, and electrical phenomena; applications such as emulsification, foaming, detergency, sedimentation, flow through porous media, fluidization, nucleation, wetting, adhesion, flotation, electrocapillarity. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6447Biochemical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to properties, production, and use of biological molecules of importance to medicine and industry, such as proteins, enzymes, and antibiotics. Topics may include fermentation and cell culture processes, biological mass transfer, enzyme engineering, and implications of recent advances in molecular biology, genomics, and proteomics. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6448Bioseparations Engineering (3.00)
Principles of bioseparations engineering including specialized unit operations not normally covered in regular chemical engineering courses. Processing operations downstream of the initial manufacture of biotechnology products, including product recovery, separations, purification, and ancillary operations such as sterile processing, clean-in place and regulatory aspects. Bioprocess integration and design aspects. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6449Polymer Chemistry and Engineering (3.00)
Analyzes the mechanisms and kinetics of various polymerization reactions; relations between the molecular structure and polymer properties, and how these properties can be influenced by the polymerization process; fundamental concepts of polymer solution and melt rheology. Applications to polymer processing operations, such as extrusion, molding, and fiber spinning. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHE 3321 or instructor permission.
CHE 6450Energy Science and Technologies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Overview of energy technologies with an emphasis on materials research and development concepts and current production. The scope of these technologies within the broader contexts of innovation and energy policy. Topics will include fossil fuels, electrochemical energy storage, fuel cells, and photovoltaics.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CHE 6476Process Design and Economics (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Factors that determine the genesis and evolution of a process. Principles of marketing and technical economics and modern process design principles and techniques, including computer simulation with optimization. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 6615Advanced Thermodynamics (3.00)
Development of the thermodynamic laws and derived relations. Application of relations to properties of pure and multicomponent systems at equilibrium in the gaseous, liquid, and solidphases. Prediction and calculation of phase and reaction equilibria in practical systems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate-level thermodynamics or instructor permission.
CHE 6618Chemical Reaction Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Fundamentals of chemical reaction kinetics and mechanisms; experimental methods of determining reaction rates; introduction to heterogeneous catalysis; application of chemical kinetics, along with mass-transfer theory, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics, to the design and operation of chemical reactors. Prerequisite: CHE 6625 and 6665.
CHE 6625Transport Processes (3.00)
Integrated introduction to fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Development of the basic equations of change for transport of momentum, energy, and mass in continuous media. Applications with exact solutions, consistent approaches to limiting cases and approximate solutions to formulate the relations to be solved in more complicated problems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate transport processes
CHE 6630Mass Transfer (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Fundamental principles common to mass transfer phenomena, with emphasis on mass transfer in diverse chemical engineering situations. Detailed consideration of fluxes, diffusion with and without convection, interphase mass transfer with chemical reaction, and applications. Prerequisite: CHE 6625 and 6665.
CHE 6665Techniques for Chemical Engineering Analysis and Design (3.00)
Methods for analysis of steady state and transient chemical engineering problems arising in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mass transfer, kinetics, and reactor design. Prerequisite: Undergraduate differential equations, transport processes, and chemical reaction engineering.
CHE 7716Applied Statistical Mechanics (3.00)
Introduction to statistical mechanics and its methodologies such as integral equations, computer simulation and perturbation theory. Applications such as phase equilibria, adsorption, transport properties, electrolyte solutions. Prerequisite: CHE 6615, or other graduate-level thermodynamics course, and instructor permission.
CHE 7744Electrochemical Engineering (3.00)
Electrochemical phenomena and processes from a chemical engineering viewpoint. Application of thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, interfacial phenomena, and transport processes to electrochemical systems such as batteries, rotating disk electrodes, corrosion of metals, and semiconductors. Influence of coupled kinetics, interfacial, and transport phenomena on current distribution and mass transfer in a variety of electrochemical systems. Prerequisite: Graduate-level transport phenomena (e.g., CHE 6625) and graduate-level mathematical techniques (e.g., CHE 6665), or instructor permission.
CHE 7796Graduate Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Weekly meetings of graduate students and faculty for presentations and discussion of research in academic and industrial organizations. May be repeated.
CHE 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CHE 7995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Engineering degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CHE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
CHE 8581Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Special subjects at an advanced level under the direction of staff members. Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.
Course was offered Fall 2012
CHE 8582Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Special subjects at an advanced level under the direction of staff members. Prerequisite: Permission of the staff.
CHE 8819Advanced Chemical Engineering Kinetics and Reaction Engineering (3.00)
Advanced study of reacting systems, such as experimental methods, heterogeneous catalysis, polymerization kinetics, kinetics of complex reactions, reactor stability, and optimization. Prerequisite: CHE 6618 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2012
CHE 8820Modeling of Biological Processes in Environmental Systems (3.00)
Use of mathematical models to describe processes such as biological treatment of chemical waste, including contaminant degradation and bacterial growth, contaminant and bacterial transport, and adsorption. Engineering analyses of treatment processes such as biofilm reactors, sequenced batch reactors, biofilters and in situ bioremediation. May include introduction to hydrogeology, microbiology, transport phenomena and reaction kinetics relevant to environmental systems; application of material and energy balances in the analysis of environmental systems; and dimensional analysis and scaling. Guest lectures by experts from industry, consulting firms and government agencies to discuss applications of these bioremediation technologies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 8833Specialized Separation Processes (3.00)
Less conventional separation processes, such as chromatography, ion-exchange, membranes, and crystallization using in-depth and modern chemical engineering methods. Student creativity and participation through development and presentation of individual course projects. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CHE 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
CHE 8993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CHE 8998Master's Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
CHE 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students.
CHE 9999Dissertation Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
Computer Engineering
CPE 6190Computer Engineering Perspectives (1.00)
This course is designed for first year Graduate students in the Computer Engineering Program to help orient new graduate students to the current research topics, available research tools, software and systems, publishing systems, and other topics to help new students become successful. Prerequisite: CpE grduate student or instructor permission
Course was offered Fall 2017
CPE 6890Industrial Applications (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students register for this course to complement an industry work experience. Topics focus on the application of engineering principles, analysis, methods and best practices in an industrial setting. A final report is required.
CPE 7993Independent Study (0.50 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member
CPE 7995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research for a Masters degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CPE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
CPE 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For Computer Engineering Master's Students who are teaching assistants.
CPE 8999Non-Topical Research, Master's Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty adviser. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
CPE 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
CPE 9999Non-Topical Research, Doctoral Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty adviser. May be repeated as necessary.
Computer Science
CS 1010Introduction to Information Technology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
How computers create, preserve, manipulate and communicate information and the concepts and tools used to that end. Units include how computers work, web technologies, creating web pages, algorithms and logic, basic programming, and solving problems with spreadsheets. Students will learn to recognize computational problems and develop basic skill sets to solve future problems in their discipline of study. No prior programming experience required. Not intended for students expecting to do further work in CS. Cannot be taken for credit by students in SEAS or Commerce.
CS 1110Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. No previous programming experience required. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1111Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students should have some experience with programming. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1112Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Prerequisite: Students must have no previous programming experience. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1113Introduction to Programming (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in programming, software development, and computer science. Introduces computing fundamentals and an appreciation for computational thinking. Special domain topics and materials will differ by section and semester. Note: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, 1113, and 1120 provide different approaches to teaching the same core material; students may only receive credit for one of these courses.
CS 1120Introduction to Computing: Explorations in Language, Logic, and Machines (3.00)
This course is an introduction to the most important ideas in computing. It focuses on the big ideas in computer science including the major themes of recursive definitions, universality, and abstraction. It covers how to describe information processes by defining procedures using the Scheme and Python programming languages, how to analyze the costs required to carry out a procedure, and the fundamental limits of what can be computed.
CS 1501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00)
Student led special topic courses which vary by semester.
CS 1511Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
Course was offered Fall 2017
CS 2102Discrete Mathematics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces discrete mathematics and proof techniques involving first order predicate logic and induction. Application areas include finite and infinite sets, elementary combinatorial problems, and graph theory. Development of tools and mechanisms for reasoning about discrete problems. Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112 or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2110Software Development Methods (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A second course in computing with an emphasis on modern software development and principles central to computer science. Topics include software requirements, testing, object-oriented design, abstraction, encapsulation, recursion, and time-complexity. Prerequisite: CS 1110, 1111, 1112, or 1120 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2150Program and Data Representation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces programs and data representation at the machine level. Data structuring techniques and the representation of data structures during program execution. Operations and control structures and their representation during program execution. Representations of numbers, arithmetic operations, arrays, records, recursion, hashing, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and related concepts. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and CS 2110, both with grades of C- or higher.
CS 2190Computer Science Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Provides cultural capstone to the undergraduate experience. Students make presentations based on topics not covered in the traditional curriculum. Emphasizes learning the mechanisms by which researchers and practicing computer scientists can access information relevant to their discipline, and on the professional computer scientist's responsibility in society. The course requires second-year standing in the CS BS major for enrollment. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2110, both with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 2330Digital Logic Design (3.00)
Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Cross-listed as ECE 2330.
CS 2501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the Department. Taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 2910CS Education Practicum (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An overview of computer science education for undergraduate students. Topics include ethics, diversity, tutoring and teaching techniques, and classroom management. Students enrolled in this course serve as a teaching assistant for a computer science course as part of their coursework.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
CS 2993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. This version of Independent Study is appropriate for students who have not completed CS 2150.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017
CS 3102Theory of Computation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces computation theory including grammars, finite state machines, pushdown automata, and Turing machines. Prerequisites: CS 2102 and CS 2110 both with grades of C- or higher
CS 3205HCI in Software Development (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Human-computer interaction and user-centered design in the context of software engineering. Examines the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction. Includes evaluating a system's usability based on well-defined criteria; user and task analysis, as well as conceptual models and metaphors; the use of prototyping for evaluating design alternatives; and physical design of software user-interfaces, including windows, menus, and commands. Prerequisite: CS 2110 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 3240Advanced Software Development Techniques (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes modern software engineering practice for multi-person projects; methods for requirements specification, design, implementation, verification, and maintenance of large software systems; advanced software development techniques and large project management approaches; project planning, scheduling, resource management, accounting, configuration control, and documentation. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 3330Computer Architecture (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes the organization and architecture of computer systems hardware; instruction set architectures; addressing modes; register transfer notation; processor design and computer arithmetic; memory systems; hardware implementations of virtual memory, and input/output control and devices. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher. CS 2330 recommended. Students may not receive credit for both CS 3330 and ECE 3430. CPE majors cannot use this course to fulfill their program of study.
CS 4102Algorithms (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the analysis of algorithms and the effects of data structures on them. Algorithms selected from areas such as sorting, searching, shortest paths, greedy algorithms, backtracking, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming. Data structures include heaps and search, splay, and spanning trees. Analysis techniques include asymtotic worst case, expected time, amortized analysis, and reductions between problems. Prerequisite: CS 2102 and 2150 with grades of C- or higher, and APMA 1090 or MATH 1210 or MATH 1310.
CS 4240Principles of Software Design (3.00)
Focuses on techniques for software design in the development of large and complex software systems. Topics will include software architecture, modeling (including UML), object-oriented design patterns, and processes for carrying out analysis and design. More advanced or recent developments may be included at the instructor's discretion. The course will balance an emphasis on design principles with an understanding of how to apply techniques and methods to create successful software systems. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4330Advanced Computer Architecture (3.00)
Provides an overview of modern microprocessor design. The topics covered in the course will include the design of super-scalar processors and their memory systems, and the fundamentals of multi-core processor design. Prerequisite: CS 2150 and CS 3330 with grades of C- or higher
CS 4414Operating Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes process communication and synchronization; resource management; virtual memory management algorithms; file systems; and networking and distributed systems. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher, and CS 3330 or ECE 3430 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include basic dependability concepts and attributes, fault models and effects, combinatorial and state-space modeling, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software fault tolerance, checkpointing and recovery, reliable networked systems, error detection techniques, and experimental dependability evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: APMA 3100 or APMA 3110; CS 3330 or ECE 4435 (co-requisite); ECE 3430 (preferred). A working knowledge of programming is required for homework and mini projects.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
CS 4444Introduction to Parallel Computing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the student to the basics of high-performance parallel computing and the national cyber-infrastructure. The course is targeted for both computer science students and students from other disciplines who want to learn how to significantly increase the performance of applications. Prerequisites: CS 2110 with grade of C- or higher, CS3330 or ECE 3430 with a grade of C- or higher, APMA 3100 and APMA 3110.
CS 4457Computer Networks (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in communication networks for upper-level undergraduate students. Topics include the design of modern communication networks; point-to-point and broadcast network solutions; advanced issues such as Gigabit networks; ATM networks; and real-time communications. Cross-listed as ECE 4457. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or ECE 3430
CS 4458Internet Engineering (3.00)
An advanced course on computer networks on the technologies and protocols of the Internet. Topics include the design principles of the Internet protocols, including TCP/IP, the Domain Name System, routing protocols, and network management protocols. A set of laboratory exercises covers aspects of traffic engineering in a wide-area network. Prerequisite: CS 4457 with a grade of C- or better.
CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Content varies annually, depending on instructor interests and the needs of the department. Similar to CS 5501 and CS 7501, but taught strictly at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite: Instructor permission; additional specific requirements vary with topics.
CS 4610Programming Languages (3.00)
Presents the fundamental concepts of programming language design and implementation. Emphasizes language paradigms and implementation issues. Develops working programs in languages representing different language paradigms. Many programs oriented toward language implementation issues. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4620Compilers (3.00)
Provides an introduction to the field of compilers, which translate programs written in high-level languages to a form that can be executed. The course covers the theories and mechanisms of compilation tools. Students will learn the core ideas behind compilation and how to use software tools such as lex/flex, yacc/bison to build a compiler for a non-trivial programming language. Prerequisite: CS2150 with grade of C- or higher. CS3330 recommended.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
CS 4630Defense Against the Dark Arts (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Viruses, worms, and other malicious software are an ever-increasing threat to computer systems. There is an escalating battle between computer security specialists and the designers of malicious software. This course provides an essential understanding of the techniques used by both sides of the computer security battle. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or above.
CS 4640Programming Languages for Web Applications (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Presents programming languages and implementations used in developing web applications. Both client and server side languages are presented as well as database languages. In addition, frameworks that enable interactive web pages are discussed as well as formatting languages. Language features and efficiencies including scoping, parameter passing, object orientation, just in time compilation and dynamic binary translation are included. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4710Artificial Intelligence (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces artificial intelligence. Covers fundamental concepts and techniques and surveys selected application areas. Core material includes state space search, logic, and resolution theorem proving. Application areas may include expert systems, natural language understanding, planning, machine learning, or machine perception. Provides exposure to AI implementation methods, emphasizing programming in Common LISP. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4720Mobile Application Development (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Mobile computing devices have become ubiquitous in our communities. In this course, we focus on the creation of mobile solutions for various modern platforms, including major mobile operating systems. Topics include mobile device architecture, programming languages, software engineering, user interface design, and app distribution. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4730Computer Game Design (3.00)
This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools used in the development of modern 2-D and 3-D real-time interactive computer video games. Topics covered in this include graphics, parallel processing, human-computer interaction, networking, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher.
CS 4740Cloud Computing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Investigates the architectural foundations of the various cloud platforms, as well as examining both current cloud computing platforms and modern cloud research. Student assignments utilize the major cloud platforms. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4750Database Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the fundamental concepts for design and development of database systems. Emphasizes relational data model and conceptual schema design using ER model, practical issues in commercial database systems, database design using functional dependencies, and other data models. Develops a working relational database for a realistic application. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grades of C- or higher.
CS 4753Electronic Commerce Technologies (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
History of Internet and electronic commerce on the web; case studies of success and failure; cryptographic techniques for privacy, security, and authentication; digital money; transaction processing; wired and wireless access technologies; Java; streaming multimedia; XML; Bluetooth. Defining, protecting, growing, and raising capital for an e-business. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with grade of C- or higher.
CS 4760Network Security (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course covers the principles of secure network communications and the application of network security. Topics include: attack types, attack surfaces, attack phases, network security devices.(a)symmetric key encryption, cryptographic hash function, authentication/identification techniques, key distribution, and data integrity assurance. Also, currently used security mechanisms and protocols will be discussed.
CS 4810Introduction to Computer Graphics (3.00)
Introduces the fundamentals of three-dimensional computer graphics: rendering, modeling, and animation. Students learn how to represent three-dimensional objects (modeling) and the movement of those objects over time (animation). Students learn and implement the standard rendering pipeline, defined as the stages of turning a three-dimensional model into a shaded, lit, texture-mapped two-dimensional image. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a C- or better.
CS 4820Real Time Rendering (3.00)
Examines real-time rendering of high-quality interactive graphics. Studies the advances in graphics hardware and algorithms that are allowing applications such as video games, simulators, and virtual reality to become capable of near cinematic-quality visuals at real-time rates. Topics include non-photorealistic rendering, occlusion culling, level of detail, terrain rendering, shadow generation, image-based rendering, and physical simulation. Over several projects throughout the semester students work in small teams to develop a small 3-D game engine incorporating some state-of-the-art techniques. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CS 4810
CS 4840Computer Animation (3.00)
Introduces both fundamental and advanced computer animation techniques. Discusses such traditional animation topics as keyframing, procedural algorithms, camera control, and scene composition. Also introduces modern research techniques covering dynamic simulation, motion capture, and feedback control algorithms. These topics help prepare students for careers as technical directors in the computer animation industry and assist in the pursuit of research careers. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in CS 4810
CS 4970Capstone Practicum I (3.00)
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Under the practicum track, students will take two 3-credit courses, CS 4970 and CS 4971. These courses would form a year-long group-based and project-based practicum class. There would be an actual customer, which could be either internal (the course instructor, other CS professors, etc.) or external (local companies, local non-profits, etc.). Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4971Capstone Practicum II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track and is the continuation from CS 4970. Under the practicum track, students will take two 3-credit courses, CS 4970 and CS 4971. These courses would form a year-long group-based and project-based practicum class. There would be an actual customer, which could be either internal (the course instructor, other CS professors, etc.) or external (local companies, local non-profits, etc.). Prerequisite: CS 4970
CS 4980Capstone Research (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is one option in the CS fourth-year thesis track. Students will seek out a faculty member as an advisor, and do an independent project with said advisor. Instructors can give the 3 credits across multiple semesters, if desired. This course is designed for students who are doing research, and want to use that research for their senior thesis. Note that this track could also be an implementation project, including a group-based project. Prerequisite: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher
CS 4993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In-depth study of a computer science or computer engineering problem by an individual student in close consultation with departmental faculty. The study is often either a thorough analysis of an abstract computer science problem or the design, implementation, and analysis of a computer system (software or hardware). Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 4998Distinguished BA Majors Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Required for Distinguished Majors completing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. An introduction to computer science research and the writing of a Distinguished Majors thesis. Prerequisites: CS 2150 with a grade of C- or higher and CS BA major status.
CS 5010Programming and Systems for Data Science (3.00)
The objective of this course is to introduce basic data analysis techniques including data analysis at scale, in the context of real-world domains such as bioinformatics, public health, marketing, security, etc. For the purpose of facilitating data manipulation and analysis, students will be introduced to essential programming techniques in Python, an increasingly prominent language for data science and "big data" manipulation. Prerequisite: CS 1110, Math 1310 or APMA 1110, Math 3351 or APMA 3080, Math 3100, APMA 3010 or APMA 3110
CS 5012Foundations of Computer Science (3.00)
Provide a foundation in discrete mathematics, data structures, algorithmic design and implementation, computational complexity, parallel computing, and data integrity and consistency for non-CS, non-CpE students. Case studies and exercises will be drawn from real-world examples (e.g., bioinformatics, public health, marketing, and security). Prerequisite: CS 5010, CS 1110 or equivalent, Math 1210 or equiv, Math 3351 or equiv, Math 3100 or equiv.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
CS 5014Computation as a Research Tool (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is an introduction to programming for students who will be using computational methods for their research but are not computer science or computer engineering students. No previous programming experience is required. We use a multi-language/multi-domain approach. The first part of the course covers basic programming concepts for a given language. The last third of the course splits into domain specific tracks of interest to students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
CS 5487Real-Time Systems (3.00)
This course presents the underlying theory, concepts, and practice for real-time systems, such as avionics, process control, space travel, mobile computing and ubiquitous computing. The goals of the course include: introducing the unique problems that arise when time constraints are imposed on systems, identifying basic theory and the boundary between what is known today and what is still research, stressing a systems integration viewpoint in the sense of showing how everything fits together rather than presenting a collection of isolated solutions, and addressing multiprocessing and distributed systems. This course also presents some of the basic results from what might be called the classical technology of real-time computing and presents these results in the context of new applications of this technology in ubiquitous/pervasive computer systems. Prerequisite: CS 3330 and CS 4414, knowledge of C or C++, or instructor permission.
CS 5501Selected Topics in Computer Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Content varies annually, depending on students' needs and interests. Recent topics included the foundations of computation, artificial intelligence, database design, real-time systems, Internet engineering, and electronic design automation. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015
CS 5787Security in Information Systems (3.00)
This course focuses on security as an aspect of a variety of software systems. We will consider software implementations of security related policies in the context of operating systems, networks, and data bases. Topics include: operating system protection mechanisms, intrusion detection systems, formal models of security, cryptography and associated security protocols, data base security, worms, viruses, network and distributed system security, and policies of privacy and confidentiality. Prerequisite: CS 3240 and either CS 4457 or CS 4414 or instructor permission.
CS 6160Theory of Computation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes formal languages, the Chomsky hierarchy, formal computation and machine models, finite automata, pushdown automata, Turing machines, Church's thesis, reductions, decidability and undecidability, and NP-completeness. Prerequisite: CS 3102 or equivalent.
CS 6161Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3.00)
Analyzes concepts in algorithm design, problem solving strategies, proof techniques, complexity analysis, upper and lower bounds, sorting and searching, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, probabilistic algorithms, intractability and NP-completeness, transformations, and approximation algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 4102 or equivalent.
CS 6190Computer Science Perspectives (1.00 - 3.00)
This 'acclimation' seminar helps new graduate students become productive researchers. Faculty and visitors speak on a wide variety of research topics, as well as on tools available to researchers, including library resources, various operating systems, UNIX power tools, programming languages, software development and version control systems, debugging tools, user interface toolkits, word processors, publishing systems, HTML, JAVA, browsers, Web tools, and personal time management. Prerequisite: CS graduate student or instructor permission.
CS 6240Software Engineering (3.00)
Analyzes project management, software tools, requirements and specification methods; top-down, bottom-up, and data-flow design; structured programming, information hiding, programming language issues, and coding standards; software development environments, fault tolerance principles, and testing. Prerequisite: CS 3240 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
CS 6316Machine Learning (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is a graduate-level machine learning course. Machine Learning is concerned with computer programs that automatically improve their performance through experience. This course covers introductory topics about the theory and practical algorithms for machine learning from a variety of perspectives. Topics include supervised learning, unsupervised learning and learning theory. Prerequisite: Calculus, Basic linear algebra, Basic Probability and Basic Algorithm. Statistics is recommended. Students should already have good programming skills.
CS 6354Computer Architecture (3.00)
Study of representative digital computer organization with emphasis on control unit logic, input/output processors and devices, asynchronous processing, concurrency, and parallelism. Memory hierarchies. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or proficiency in assembly language programming.
CS 6415Performance Analysis of Communication Networks (3.00)
Analyzes the topologies arising in communication networks; queuing theory; Markov Chains and ergodicity conditions; theory of regenerative processes; routing algorithms; multi-access and random-access transmission algorithms; mathematical methodologies for throughput and delay analyses and evaluations; performance evaluation; performance monitoring; local area networks (LANs); interactive LANs. Cross-listed as ECE 6415. Prerequisite: CE/ECE 4457, APMA 3100, or instructor permission.
CS 6434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include basic dependability concepts and attributes, fault models and effects, combinatorial and state-space modeling, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software fault tolerance, checkpointing and recovery, reliable networked systems, error detection techniques, and experimental dependability evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of probability and computer architecture is required. A working knowledge of programming is required for homework and mini projects.
Course was offered Spring 2017
CS 6444Introduction to Parallel Computing (3.00)
Introduces the basics of parallel computing. Covers parallel computation models, systems, languages, compilers, architectures, and algorithms. Provides a solid foundation on which advanced seminars on different aspects of parallel computation can be based. Emphasizes the practical application of parallel systems. There are several programming assignments. Prerequisite: CS 3330, 4414, and 4610, or instructor permission.
CS 6456Operating Systems (3.00)
Covers advanced principles of operating systems. Technical topics include support for distributed OSs; microkernels and OS architectures; processes and threads; IPC; files servers; distributed shared memory; object-oriented OSs; reflection in OSs; real-time kernels; multiprocessing; multimedia and quality of service; mobile computing; and parallelism in I/O. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in OS; CS 6354 or instructor permission.
CS 6501Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Course content varies by section and is selected to fill timely and special interests and needs of students. See CS 7501 for example topics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 6610Programming Languages (3.00)
Examines modern and non-imperative languages, the theoretical techniques used to design and understand them, and the implementation techniques used to make them run. Topics include functional languages, object-oriented languages, language safety and classification of errors, type systems, formal semantics, abstraction mechanisms, memory management, and unusual control-flow mechanisms. Example languages include Standard ML, Modula-3, CLU, Scheme, Prolog, and Icon. Prerequisite: CS 4610 or equivalent.
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2011
CS 6620Compilers (3.00)
Study of the theory, design, and specification of translation systems. Translation systems are the tools used to translate a source language program to a form that can be executed. Using rigorous specification techniques to describe the inputs and outputs of the translators and applying classical translation theory, working implementations of various translators are designed, specified, and implemented. Prerequisite: CS 3330 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
CS 6750Database Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Studies new database systems, emphasizing database design and related system issues. Explores advanced topics such as object-oriented and real-time database systems, data warehousing, data mining, and workflow. Makes use of either commercial or research database systems for in-class projects. Prerequisite: CS 4750 or equivalent.
CS 6840Computer Graphics (3.00)
Analyzes display devices, line and circle generators; clippings and windowing; data structures; 2-D picture transformations; hidden line and surface algorithms; shading algorithms; free form surfaces; color graphics; 3-D picture transformation. Cross-listed as ECE 6435. Prerequisite: Knowledge of C/C++.
CS 6890Industrial Applications (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A graduate student returning from Curricular Practical Training can use this course to claim one credit hour of academic credit after successfully reporting, orally and in writing, a summary of the CPT experience to his/her academic advisor.
Course was offered Fall 2017
CS 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7457Computer Networks (3.00)
Analyzes network topologies; backbone design; performance and queuing theory; data-grams and virtual circuits; technology issues; layered architectures; standards; survey of commercial networks, local area networks, and contention-based communication protocols; encryption; and security. Course equivalent to ECE 7457. Prerequisite: CS 6456 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
CS 7501Selected Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Content varies based on the interest and needs of students. Topics may include safety critical systems, parallel processing, information retrieval, data communications, computer networks, real-time computing, distributed multimedia systems, electronic commerce, and advanced combinatorics and graph theory.. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
CS 7620Advanced Compilers (3.00)
Study of advanced compilation techniques with a focus on code generation and optimization techniques, advanced execution environments, and compilation of emerging programming languages. Prerequisite: CS 6160 and 6610, or equivalent.
CS 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
CS 7995Supervised Project Research (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research for the Master of Computer Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
CS 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
CS 8501Special Topics in Computer Science (3.00)
Special Topics in Computer Science
CS 8524Topics in Software Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A special topics course in software engineering. Topics are determined by the individual instructor, but might include software reliability; engineering real-time systems; managing large software projects; resource estimation; validation and verification; or advanced programming environments. Prerequisite: CS 6240 or instructor permission.
CS 8535Topics in Computer Architecture (3.00)
Studies selected advances in the architecture of computer systems. May include distribution processor systems, memory hierarchies, and secondary storage management schemes. Prerequisite: CS 6354 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2011
CS 8561Topics in Programming Languages (3.00)
Studies selected advanced topics in design, definition, and implementation of programming languages. Typical recent topics: parallel language design; formal semantics of programs. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: CS 6610 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2010
CS 8575Topics in Database Systems (3.00)
Analyzes the implementation of database systems, concurrent and distributed access, backup, and security; query languages and optimization of query access; multi-attribute dependencies and retrieval. Data warehousing and web-based data systems are explored. Prerequisite: CS 6750 or instructor permission
CS 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students who are teaching assistants.
CS 8999Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to thesis research for the Master of Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
CS 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students who are teaching assistants.
CS 9999Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
ECE 1000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit (1.00 - 10.00)
ECE 1501Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering (1.00)
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2014
ECE 2066Science of Information: How the iPhone Works (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An introduction to the fundamental scientific principles governing information science and engineering. Topics include: definition of information; entropy; information representation in analog and digital forms; information transmission; spectrum and bandwidth; information transformation including data compression, filtering, encryption, and error correction; information storage and display; and large-scale information systems. Technologies for implementing information functions.
ECE 2330Digital Logic Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes number systems and conversion; Boolean algebra and logic gates; minimization of switching functions; combinational network design; flip-flops; sequential network design; arithmetic networks. Introduces computer organization and assembly language. Six laboratory assignments. Cross-listed as CS 2330.
ECE 2501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (0.50 - 4.50)
A second-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 2502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (0.50 - 4.50)
A second-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
ECE 2630ECE Fundamentals I (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Electrical circuits with linear applications of passive and active elements; Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws to derive circuit equations; solutions for first- and second-order transient and DC steady-state responses; AC steady-state analysis; frequency and time domain signal representations; Fourier series; phasor methods; complex impedance; transfer functions; Thevenin/Norton equivalent models; controlled sources. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.
ECE 2660ECE Fundamentals II (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Studies the modeling, analysis, design, computer simulation, and measurement of electrical circuits which contain non-linear devices such as junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors. Includes the gain and frequency response of linear amplifiers, power supplies, and other practical electronic circuits. This course is taught in the studio mode with mixed lecture and lab. Prerequisite: ECE 2630, APMA 2130 co-requisite
ECE 3103Solid State Devices (3.00)
Analyzes the basics of band theory and atomic structure; charge-transport in solids; current voltage characteristics of semiconductor devices, including p-n junction diodes, bipolar transistors, Schottky diodes, and insulated-gate field-effect transistors; electron emission; and superconductive devices. Prerequisite: ECE 2630.
ECE 3209Electromagnetic Fields (4.00)
Analyzes the basic laws of electromagnetic theory, beginning with static electric and magnetic fields, and concluding with dynamic E&M fields; plane wave propagation in various media; Maxwell's Laws in differential and integral form; electrical properties of matter; transmission lines, waveguides, and elementary antennas. Prerequisite: APMA 2130, ECE 2630
ECE 3250Electromagnetic Energy Conversion (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes the principles of electromechanical energy conversion; three-phase circuit analysis; magnetic circuits and nonlinearity; transformers; electromagnetic sensing devices; DC, synchronous, stepper, and induction machines; equivalent circuit models; power electronic control of machines, switching regulators, Class D amplification. Laboratory, computer, and design exercises complement coverage of fundamental principles. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, ECE 3209 or PHYS 2415
ECE 3251Electromagnetic Energy Conversion Lab (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
This lab provides practical exposure and continuation of the topics covered in the lecture sections of ECE 3250. Topics include principles of measurement and analysis using computerized instrumentation. Co-requisite ECE 3250
ECE 3255Electromechanical Energy Conversion Laboratory (1.50)
Laboratory investigations of electromechanical energy conversion. Includes three-phase circuit analysis; magnetic coupling, magnetic forces, and nonlinearity; transformers; DC, synchronous and induction machines; equivalent circuit models; and power electronic control of machines. Prerequisite: ECE 2630 and PHYS 2415.
ECE 3330Computer Architecture (3.00)
Includes the organization and architecture of computer systems hardware; instruction set architectures; addressing modes; register transfer notation; processor design and computer arithmetic; memory systems; hardware implementations of virtual memory, and input/output control and devices. Cross-listed as CS 3330. Prerequisite: CS 2110 and ECE/CS 2330 with grades of C- or higher.
ECE 3430Introduction to Embedded Computer Systems (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An embedded computer is designed to efficiently and (semi-) autonomously perform a small number of tasks, interacting directly with its physical environment. This lab-based course explores architecture and interface issues relating to the design, evaluation and implementation of embedded systems . Topics include hardware and software organization, power management, digital and analog I/O devices, memory systems, timing and interrupts. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, CS 2110
ECE 3501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (0.50 - 4.50)
A third-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 3502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (0.50 - 4.50)
A third-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 3660Microelectronic Circuits (4.00)
Construction of electronic circuit design to specifications. Focuses on computer simulation, construction, and testing of designed circuits in the laboratory to verify predicted performance. Includes differential amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, multivibrators, and digital circuits. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisite: ECE 2660
ECE 3663Digital Integrated Circuits (3.00)
Digital CMOS circuits. MOSFET transistor. Combinational circuits. Sequential circuits. Design simple digital gates and circuits at the transistor level. Simulate designed circuits to verify performance. Prerequisite: CS 2330, ECE 2630 and ECE 3630.
ECE 3750ECE Fundamentals III (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Develops tools for analyzing signals and systems operating in continuous-time, with applications to control, communications, and signal processing. Primary concepts are representation of signals, linear time-invariant systems, Fourier analysis of signals, frequency response, and frequency-domain input/output analysis, the Laplace transform, and linear feedback principles. Practical examples are employed throughout, and regular usage of computer tools (Matlab, CC) is incorporated. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIOM 3310. Prerequisite: ECE 2660, APMA 2130
ECE 3760Signals and Systems II (3.00)
Sequel to ECE 3750 provides analogous tools for analyzing discrete-time signals and systems, with applications to discrete-time signal processing and control. Sampling and reconstruction of continuous-time signals provides the transition between CT and DT settings. State space methods are also introduced. Prerequisite: ECE 3750.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ECE 4140Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Today's electronic devices are reaching nanometer dimensions where fundamental quantum and atomistic processes dominate. Instead of the traditional 'top-down' classical viewpoint in "Solid State Device" courses, quantum transport principles are needed to understand `bottom-up' how current flows through individual atoms, molecules, nanotubes or spintronic devices. This course provides a convenient starting point. Prerequisite: APMA 2130
ECE 4155Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Fabrication and testing of MOS capacitors. Determination of material properties, including carrier concentration, mobility, lifetime, orientation, and layer thickness. Device fabrication using oxidation, diffusion, evaporation, and device testing of MOS and power bipolar transistors. Corequisite: ECE 5150.
ECE 4209RF Circuit Design and Wireless Systems (3.00)
Design and analysis of wireless communication circuits. Topics covered include transmission lines, antennas, filters, amplifiers, mixers, noise, and modulation techniques. The course is built around a semester long design project. Prerequisite: ECE 3209,ECE 2660, ECE 3750
ECE 4265Microwave Engineering Laboratory (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analyzes the measurement and behavior of high-frequency circuits and components; equivalent circuit models for lumped elements; measurement of standing waves, power, and frequency; use of vector network analyzers and spectrum analyzers; and computer-aided design, fabrication, and characterization of microstrip circuits. Corequisite: ECE 5260 or instructor permission.
ECE 4332Introduction to VLSI Design (4.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Digital CMOS circuit design and analysis: combinational circuits, sequential circuits, and memory. Second order circuit issues. Global design issues: clocking and interconnect. Use of Cadence CAD tools. Team design of a significant VLSI chip including layout and implementation. This course satisfies the requirements for the Major Design Experience for undergraduates. Prerequisites: ECE 2330,ECE 2660
ECE 4434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on the techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include fault models and effects, fault avoidance techniques, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software redundancy, combinatorial reliability modeling, Markov reliability modeling, availability modeling, maintainability, safety modeling, trade-off analysis, design for testability, and the testing of redundant digital systems. Cross-listed as CS 4434. Prerequisite: ECE 3430 or CS 3330 and APMA 3100 or APMA 3110.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ECE 4435Computer Architecture & Design (4.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces computer architecture and provides a foundation for the design of complex synchronous digital devices, focusing on: 1) Established approaches of computer architecture, 2) Techniques for managing complexity at the register transfer level, and 3) Tools for digital hardware description, simulation, and synthesis. Includes laboratory exercises and significant design activities using a hardware description language and simulation. Prerequisite: ECE 3430
ECE 4440Embedded System Design (3.00)
Modeling, analysis and design of embedded computer systems. Tradeoff analysis and constraint satisfaction facilitated by the use of appropriate analysis models. Includes a semester-long design of an embedded system to meet a specific need. Counts as MDE (major design experience) for both electrical and computer engineering students.
ECE 4457Computer Networks (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in communication networks for upper-level undergraduate students. Topics include the design of modern communication networks; point-to-point and broadcast network solutions; advanced issues such as Gigabit networks; ATM networks; and real-time communications. Cross-listed as CS 4457. Prerequisite:  CS 3330 or ECE 3430
ECE 4501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1.00 - 4.00)
A fourth-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 4502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A fourth-level undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests.
ECE 4550Applied Research and Design Lab (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
A lab-based course that provides a hands-on way to learn about new developments in electrical and computer engineering fields. Topics include technologies or application areas that relate to ongoing design and research activities of faculty and students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
ECE 4641Bioelectricity (3.00)
Studies the biophysical mechanisms governing production and transmission of bioelectric signals, measurement of these signals and their analysis in basic and clinical electrophysiology. Introduces the principles of design and operation of therapeutic medical devises used in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Includes membrane potential, action potentials, channels and synaptic transmission, electrodes, electrocardiography, pacemakers, defibrillators, and neural assist devices. Cross-listed as BIOM 4641. Prerequisite: ECE 2630, BIOM 2101, or instructor permission.
ECE 4660Analog Integrated Circuits (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Topics include the design and analysis of analog integrated circuits; feedback amplifier analysis and design, including stability, compensation, and offset-correction; layout and floor-planning issues associated with mixed-signal IC design; selected applications of analog circuits such as A/D and D/A converters, references, and comparators; extensive use of CAD tools for design entry, simulation, and layout; and the creation of an analog integrated circuit design project. Prerequisite: ECE 3660, ECE 3750
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015
ECE 4710Communications (3.00)
Explores the statistical methods of analyzing communications systems: random signals and noise, statistical communication theory, and digital communications. Analysis of baseband and carrier transmission techniques; and design examples in satellite communications. Prerequisite: APMA 3100, ECE 3750
ECE 4715Communication Systems Laboratory (1.50)
Provides first-hand exposure to communications practice, including response of systems, signal theory, modulation and detection, sampling and quantization, digital signal processing, and receiver design. Prerequisite: ECE 3760; corequisite: ECE 4710.
ECE 4750Digital Signal Processing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An introduction to digital signal processing. Topics include discrete-time signals and systems, application of z-transforms, the discrete-time Fourier transform, sampling, digital filter design, the discrete Fourier transform, the fast Fourier transform, quantization effects and nonlinear filters. Prerequisite: ECE 3750
ECE 4784Wireless Communications (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is a survey course in the theory and technology of modern wireless communication systems, exemplified in cellular telephony, paging, microwave distribution systems, wireless networks, and even garage door openers. Wireless technology is inherently interdisciplinary, and the course seeks to serve the interests of a variety of students. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 and 4710.
ECE 4785Optical Communications (3.00)
This course covers the basics of optical communications. The first half of the course is spent describing optical devices including the LED, laser, optical fiber, PIN photodiode, APD detectors, optical amplifiers, modulators, etc. Characteristics of devices and their effect on the overall system are discussed. The second half of the course is devoted to system design and analysis. The emphasis is on modulation/demodulation and channel control methods, defining performance measures, and describing network architectures. Common applications of optical communications are then discussed. This course is intended to complement training in communications and in optics. Prerequisite: ECE 3750, APMA 3100, and ECE 4710.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ECE 4850Linear Control Systems (3.00)
Explores the modeling of linear dynamic systems via differential equations and transfer functions utilizing state space representations and classical input-output representations; the analysis of systems in the time and frequency domains; study of closed-loop systems; state-space methods and the classical stability tests, such as the Routh-Hurwitz criterion, Nyquist criterion, root-locus plots and Bode plots. Studies compensation design through lead and lag networks, rate feedback, and linear state-variable feedback. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 or instructor permission.
ECE 4855Control Laboratory (1.50)
A laboratory consisting of design, analysis, construction, and testing of electrical and electromechanical circuits and devices. Corequisite: ECE 4850.
ECE 4860Digital Control Systems (3.00)
Analyzes the design of dynamic systems that contain digital computers; the Z transform; block diagrams and transfer functions in the z-domain; block diagrams, frequency response and stability in the z-domain; state space methods; and design using the z-transform and state methods. Prerequisite: ECE 4850 or instructor permission.
ECE 4907Electrical Engineering Projects (1.00 - 3.00)
Under faculty supervision, students plan a project of at least one semester's duration, conduct the analysis or design and test, and report on the results. If this work is to be the basis for an undergraduate thesis, the course should be taken no later than the seventh semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 4908Electrical Engineering Projects (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Under faculty supervision, students plan a project of at least one semester's duration, conduct the analysis or design and test, and report on the results. If this work is to be the basis for an undergraduate thesis, the course should be taken no later than the seventh semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 4991MDE-Capstone Design (3.00)
MDE - Capstone Design - this is a one semester course to satisfy the MDE requirement. Students perform a self directed design in teams of 3-5 individuals. The project includes design, fabrication, and test components, along with a final presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-Year Standing
ECE 5150Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Explores fabrication technologies for the manufacture of integrated circuits and microsystems. Emphasizes processes used for monolithic silicon-based systems and basic technologies for compound material devices. Topics include crystal properties and growth, Miller indices, Czochralski growth, impurity diffusion, concentration profiles, silicon oxidation, oxide growth kinetics, local oxidation, ion implantation, crystal annealing, photolithography and pattern transfer, wet and dry etching processes, anisotropic etches, plasma etching, reactive ion etching, plasma ashing, chemical vapor deposition and epitaxy; evaporation, sputtering, thin film evaluation, chemical-mechanical polishing, multilevel metal, device contacts, rapid thermal annealing, trench isolation, process integration, and wafer yield. Prerequisite: ECE 3103 or equivalent.
ECE 5241Optics and Lasers (3.00)
Reviews the electromagnetic principles of optics; Maxwell's equations; reflection and transmission of electromagnetic fields at dielectric interfaces; Gaussian beams; interference and diffraction; laser theory with illustrations chosen from atomic, gas and semiconductor laser systems; detectors including photomultipliers and semiconductor-based detectors; and noise theory and noise sources in optical detection. Prerequisite: ECE 3103, 3209, 3750.
ECE 5260Microwave Engineering I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Design and analysis of passive microwave circuits. Topics include transmission lines, electromagnetic field theory, waveguides, microwave network analysis and signal flow graphs, impedance matching and tuning, resonators, power dividers and directional couplers, and microwave filters. Prerequisite: ECE 3209 or instructor permission.
ECE 5501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (0.50 - 3.00)
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 5502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 5555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Special Topics in Distance Learning
ECE 5630Introduction to VLSI (3.00)
Digital CMOS circuit design and analysis: combinational and sequential circuits, arithmetic structures, memories. Modern design issues: leakage, optimization, clocking, and interconnect. VLSI circuit design, simulation, and layout. Prerequisite: ECE 2630, 2330. Desirable: ECE 3103, ECE 3330 or equivalent.
ECE 5750Digital Signal Processing (3.00)
Fundamentals of discrete-time signal processing are presented. Topics include discrete-time linear systems, z-transforms, the DFT and FFT algorithms, digital filter design, and problem-solving using the computer. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 and 3760, or equivalent.
ECE 5755Digital Signal Processing Laboratory (1.50)
This course provides hands-on exposure to real-time digital signal sampling (DSP) using general-purpose DSP processors. The laboratory sequence explores sampling/reconstruction, aliasing, quantization errors, fast Fourier transform, spectral analysis, and FIR/IIR digital filter design and implementation. Programming is primarily in C++, with exposure to assembly coding. Prerequisite: ECE 3750, ECE 4760 or ECE 6750 co-requisite
ECE 6140Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Today's electronic devices are reaching nanometer dimensions where fundamental quantum and atomistic processes dominate. Instead of the traditional 'top-down' classical viewpoint in "Solid State Device" courses, quantum transport principles are needed to understand `bottom-up' how current flows through individual atoms, molecules, nanotubes or spintronic devices. This course provides a convenient starting point.
ECE 6155Microelectronic Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Topics include the determination of semiconductor material parameters: crystal orientation, type, resistivity, layer thickness, and majority carrier concentration; silicon device fabrication and analysis techniques: thermal oxidation, oxide masking, solid state diffusion of intentional impurities, metal electrode evaporation, layer thickness determination by surface profiling and optical interferometer; MOS transistor design and fabrication using the above techniques, characterization, and verification of design models used. Corequisite: ECE 5150.
ECE 6163Solid State Devices (3.00)
Introduces semiconductor device operation based on energy bands and carrier statistics. Describes operation of p-n junctions and metal-semiconductor junctions. Extends this knowledge to descriptions of bipolar and field effect transistors, and other microelectronic devices. Related courses: ECE 5150, 6155, and 6167. Prerequisite: ECE 3103 or equivalent, or solid state materials/physics course.
ECE 6167Semiconductor Materials and Devices (3.00)
Examines the fundamentals, materials, and engineering properties of semiconductors; and the integration of semiconductors with other materials to make optoelectronic and microelectronic devices. Includes basic properties of electrons in solids; electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of semiconductors; survey of available semiconductors and materials choice for device design; fundamental principles of important semiconductor devices; sub-micron engineering of semiconductors, metals, insulators and polymers for integrated circuit manufacturing; materials characterization techniques; and other electronic materials. Cross-listed as MSE 6167. Prerequisite: Some background in solid state materials and elementary quantum principles.
ECE 6261Microwave Engineering II (3.00)
Explores theory and design of active microwave circuits. Review of transmission line theory, impedance matching networks and scattering matrices. Transistor s-parameters, amplifier stability and gain, and low-noise amplifier design. Other topics include noise in two-port microwave networks, negative resistance oscillators, injection-locked oscillators, video detectors, and microwave mixers. Prerequisite: ECE 5260 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
ECE 6265Microwave Engineering Laboratory (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Explores measurement and behavior of high-frequency circuits and components. Equivalent circuit models for lumped elements. Measurement of standing waves, power, and frequency. Use of vector network analyzers and spectrum analyzers. Computer-aided design, fabrication, and characterization of microstrip circuits. Corequisite: ECE 5260 or instructor permission.
ECE 6331Advanced Switching Theory (3.00)
Review of Boolean Algebra; synchronous and asynchronous machine synthesis; functional decomposition; fault location and detection; design for testability techniques. Prerequisite: ECE 2330 or equivalent.
ECE 6332VLSI Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Digital CMOS circuit design and analysis: combinational circuits, sequential circuits, and memory. Second order circuit issues. Global design issues: clocking and interconnect. Use of Cadence CAD tools. Semester long team research project investigating new areas in circuit design. Prerequisites: ECE 2630, ECE 2330.
ECE 6415Performance Analysis of Communication Networks (3.00)
Analyzes topologies arising in communication networks; queuing theory; Markov Chains and ergodicity conditions; theory of regenerative processes; routing algorithms; multiple-access and random-access transmission algorithms; mathematical methodologies for throughput and delay analyses and evaluations; performance evaluation; performance monitoring; local area networks (LANs); interactive LANs; multimedia and ATM networks. Cross-listed as CS 6415. Prerequisite: ECE /CS 4457, APMA 3100, or instructor permission.
ECE 6434Dependable Computing Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on techniques for designing and analyzing dependable computer-based systems. Topics include basic dependability concepts and attributes, fault models and effects, combinatorial and state-space modeling, hardware redundancy, error detecting and correcting codes, time redundancy, software fault tolerance, checkpointing and recovery, reliable networked systems, error detection techniques, and experimental dependability evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of probability and computer architecture is required. A working knowledge of programming is required for homework and mini projects.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2012, Spring 2010
ECE 6435Computer Architecture and Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Integration of computer organization concepts such as data flow, instruction interpretation, memory systems, interfacing, and microprogramming with practical and systematic digital design methods such as behavioral versus structural descriptions, divide-and-conquer, hierarchical conceptual levels, trade-offs, iteration, and postponement of detail.  Design exercises are accomplished using a hardware description language and simulation.  Prerequisite by topic:  Digital Logic Design (ECE 2330 or equivalent), Introductory Computer Architecture (ECE 3330 or equivalent), Assembly Language Programming.
ECE 6501Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.00)
A first-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 6502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite:  Instructor permission.
ECE 6505Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar (1.00)
This one-hour weekly seminar course features presentations given by ECE faculty members, to introduce various research areas, topics, and advances in Electrical and Computer Engineering.  It is a one-credit course required for all first-year ECE graduate students. 
ECE 6550Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
A non-graded lab-based course that provides a hands-on way to learn about new developments in electrical and computer engineering fields. Topics include technologies or application areas that relate to ongoing design and research activities of faculty and students.
Course was offered Fall 2017
ECE 6555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Special Topics in Distance Learning
ECE 6642Optoelectronic Devices (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Optoelectronics merges optics and microelectronics. Optoelectronic devices and circuits have become core technologies for several key technical areas such as telecommunications, information processing, optical storage, and sensors. This course will cover devices that generate (semiconductor light emitting diodes and lasers), modulate, amplify, switch, and detect optical signals. Also included are solar cells, photonic crystals, and plasmonics.
ECE 6660Analog Integrated Circuits (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Design and analysis of analog integrated circuits. Topics include feedback amplifier analysis and design including stability, compensation, and offset-correction; layout and floor-planning issues associated with mixed-signal IC design; selected applications of analog circuits such as A/D and D/A converters, references, and comparators; and extensive use of CAD tools for design entry, simulation, and layout. Includes an analog integrated circuit design project. Prerequisite: ECE 3103 and 3632, or equivalent.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2015
ECE 6710Pattern Recognition (3.00)
Studies feature extraction and classification concepts: analysis of decision surfaces, discriminant functions, potential functions, deterministic methods, automatic training of classifiers, analysis of training algorithms and classifier performance, statistical classification including optimality and design of optimal decision rules, clustering and non-supervised learning, feature selection and dimensionality reduction. Assignments include programming and analytical problem sets and a final computer project. Prerequisite: ECE 6711 or equivalent.
ECE 6711Probability and Stochastic Processes (3.00)
Topics include probability spaces (samples spaces, event spaces, probability measures); random variables and vectors (distribution functions, expectation, generating functions); and random sequences and processes; especially specification and classification. Includes detailed discussion of second-order stationary processes and Markov processes; inequalities, convergence, laws of large numbers, central limit theorem, ergodic, theorems; and MS estimation, Linear MS estimation, and the Orthogonality Principle. Prerequisite: APMA 3100, MATH 3100, or equivalent.
ECE 6713Communication Systems Engineering (3.00)
A first graduate course in principles of communications engineering. Topics include a brief review of random process theory, principles of optimum receiver design for discrete and continuous messages, matched filters and correlation receivers, signal design, error performance for various signal geometries, Mary signaling, linear and nonlinear analog modulation, and quantization. The course also treats aspects of system design such as propagation, link power calculations, noise models, RF components, and antennas. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in probability.
ECE 6714Estimation Theory (3.00)
Presents estimation theory from a discrete-time viewpoint. One-half of the course is devoted to parameter estimation, and the other half to state estimation using Kalman filtering. The presentation blends theory with applications and provides the fundamental properties of, and interrelationships among, basic estimation theory algorithms. Although the algorithms are presented as a neutral adjunct to signal processing, the material is also appropriate for students with interests in pattern recognition, communications, controls, and related engineering fields. Prerequisite: ECE 6711 or instructor permission.
ECE 6717Information Theory and Coding (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A comprehensive treatment of information theory and its application to channel coding and source coding. Topics include the nature of information and its mathematical description for discrete and continuous sources; noiseless coding for a discrete source; channel capacity and channel coding theorems of Shannon; error correcting codes; introduction to rate distortion theory and practice of data compression; information and statistical measures. Prerequisite: two years of college-level mathematics including discrete probability, or consent of instructor.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014
ECE 6750Digital Signal Processing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first graduate course in digital signal processing. Topics include discrete-time signals and systems, application of z-transforms, the discrete-time Fourier transform, sampling, digital filter design, the discrete Fourier transform, the fast Fourier transform, quantization effects and nonlinear filters. Additional topics can include signal compression and multi-resolution processing.
ECE 6782Digital Image Processing (3.00)
Analyzes the basic concepts of image formation and image analysis: imaging geometries, sampling, filtering, edge detection, Hough transforms, region extraction and representation, extracting and modeling three-dimension objects. Students will be assigned analytical and programming assignments to explore these concepts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
ECE 6784Wireless Communications (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is a survey course in the theory and technology of modern wireless communication systems, exemplified in cellular telephony, paging, microwave distribution systems, wireless networks, and even garage door openers. Wireless technology is inherently interdisciplinary, and the course seeks to serve the interests of a variety of students. Prerequisites: ECE 3750/3760, and ECE 4710.
ECE 6785Optical Communications (3.00)
This course covers the basics of optical communications. The first part of the course is spent describing optical devices including the LED, laser, optical fiber, PIN photodiode, APD detectors, optical amplifiers, modulators, etc. Characteristics of devices and their effect on the overall system are discussed. The second part of the course is devoted to system design and analysis. The emphasis is on modulation/demodulation and channel control methods, defining performance measures, and describing network architectures. Common applications of optical communications are then discussed. This course is intended to complement training in communications and in optics. Prerequisites: ECE 3750 and APMA 3100.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2011
ECE 6851Linear Automatic Control Systems (3.00)
Provides a working knowledge of the analysis and design of linear automatic control systems using classical methods. Introduces state space techniques; dynamic models of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic and other systems; transfer functions; block diagrams; stability of linear systems, and Nyquist criterion; frequency response methods of feedback systems design and Bode diagram; Root locus method; System design to satisfy specifications; PID controllers; compensation using Bode plots and the root locus. Powerful software is used for system design. Cross-listed as MAE 6610. Prerequisite: ECE 3750 or instructor permission.
ECE 6852Linear State Space Control Systems (3.00)
Studies linear dynamical systems emphasizing canonical representation and decomposition, state representation, controllability, observability, stability normal systems, state feedbacks and the decoupling problem. Representative physical examples. Cross-listed as MAE 6620. Prerequisite: APMA 6150, ECE 6851, or instructor permission.
ECE 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
ECE 6995Supervised Project Research (3.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. A project report is required at the completion of each semester. May be repeated as necessary.
ECE 6996Supervised Graduate Teaching Experience (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A guided teaching experience for Ph.D. students, with selected teaching assignments and directed performance evaluation, under the supervision of a faculty member, as a part of Ph.D. training designed for students' development of independent teaching skills.
ECE 7163Physics of Semiconductors (3.00)
Analyzes semiconductor band theory; constant energy surfaces and effective mass concepts; statistics treating normal and degenerate materials; spin degeneracy in impurities; excited impurity states and impurity recombination; carrier transport; scattering mechanisms; and prediction techniques. Prerequisite: ECE 6163 or instructor permission.
ECE 7168Semiconductor Materials and Characterization Techniques (3.00)
Analyzes semiconductor growth and characterization methods applicable to III-V heteroepitaxial growth along with etching and contact formation mechanisms; and the physical, structural, and electrical characterization tools including X-ray diffraction, Auger, Hall and C(V). Prerequisite: ECE 6163 or instructor permission.
ECE 7209Techniques of Advanced Electromagnetics (3.00)
Topics include techniques for solving and analyzing engineering electromagnetic systems; relation of fundamental concepts of electromagnetic field theory and circuit theory, including duality, equivalence principles, reciprocity, and Green's functions; applications of electromagnetic principles to antennas, waveguide discontinuities, and equivalent impedance calculations. Prerequisite: ECE 4209 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Fall 2010
ECE 7332Advanced VLSI Systems Design (3.00)
This course surveys advanced, challenging topics related to digital circuit design, using SRAM as a design driver. Topics include CMOS scaling and technology changes, variation tolerant design, leakage reduction, design for reliability, alternative devices, and advanced memory design. The class draws heavily from current literature on these topics. Students will conduct a semester long project related to the class topics. Prerequisites: ECE 4332 or ECE 6332 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2011
ECE 7438Computer System Reliability Engineering (3.00)
A mathematical introduction to system reliability theory, emphasizing the analysis of digital computer systems. Includes time-to-failure models and distributions, fault tree analysis, Markov models and counting processes, failure and repair dependencies, sensitivity and importance analysis, hardware and software redundancy management, and dependability measurement.
ECE 7457Computer Networks (3.00)
Analyzes network topologies; backbone design; performance and queuing theory; data-grams and virtual circuits; technology issues; layered architectures; standards; survey of commercial networks, local area networks, and contention-based communication protocols; encryption; and security. Course equivalent to CS 7457.. Prerequisite: CS 6456 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
ECE 7501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
A second level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. Topics usually reflect new developments in electrical and computer engineering and are based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
ECE 7502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.00)
A second level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. Topics usually reflect new developments in electrical and computer engineering and are based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite:  Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2010
ECE 7555Advanced Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Distance Learning
Course was offered Fall 2015, Fall 2010
ECE 7712Digital Communications (3.00)
An in-depth treatment of digital communications techniques and performance. Topics include performance of uncoded systems such as Mary, PSK, FSK, and multi-level signaling; orthogonal and bi-orthogonal codes; block and convolutional coding with algebraic and maximum likelihood decoding; burst correcting codes; efficiency and bandwidth; synchronization for carrier reference and bit timing; baseband signaling techniques; intersymbol interference; and equalization. Prerequisite: ECE 6711.
ECE 7714Advanced Detection and Estimation (3.00)
Analyzes classical detection theory and hypothesis testing (Bayes, Neymon-Pearson, minimax); robust hypothesis testing; decision criteria; sequential and nonparametric detection; classical estimation theory (Bayes, minimax, maximum likelihood); performance bounds; robust-outlier resistant estimation of location parameters; stochastic distance measures; parametric and robust operations in time series (Prediction, interpolation, filtering). Applications to problems in communications, control, pattern recognition, signal processing. Prerequisite: ECE 6711 or instructor permission.
ECE 7774Adaptive and Statistical Signal Processing (3.00)
Topics include a review of probability and stochastic processes, parametric and non-parametric spectral estimation, optimal filtering, linear prediction, methods of steepest descent, LMS filters, methods of least squares, RLS filters, Kalman filters, and array signal processing techniques. Prerequisite: ECE 6711, 5750, or equivalent; corequisite: ECE 6714.
ECE 7776Advanced Digital Signal Processing (3.00)
Provides the background of multi-dimensional digital signal processing, emphasizing the differences and similarities between the one-dimensional and multi-dimensional cases. Includes M-D Fourier transforms, M-D sampling and reconstruction, M-D DFT, M-D filtering, M-D spectral estimation, and inverse problems such as tomography, iterative signal reconstruction, and coherent imaging. Broad applications in radar, sonar, seismic, medical, and astronomical data processing are introduced. Prerequisite: ECE 5750 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2015
ECE 7853Optimal Control Systems (3.00)
Analyzes the development and utilization of Pontryagin's maximum principle, the calculus of variations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and dynamic programming in solving optimal control problems; performance criteria including time, fuel, and energy; optimal regulators and trackers for quadratic cost index designed via the Ricatti equation; introduction to numerical optimization techniques. Cross-listed as MAE 7630. Prerequisite: ECE 6852 or instructor permission.
ECE 7855Multivariable Robust Control Systems (3.00)
Studies advanced topics in modern multivariable control theory; matrix fraction descriptions, state-space realizations, multivariable poles and zeroes; operator norms, singular value analysis; representation of unstructured and structured uncertainty, linear fractional transformation, stability robustness and performance robustness, parametrization of stabilizing controllers; approaches to controller synthesis; H2-optimal control and loop transfer recovery; H2-optimal control and state-space solution methods. Cross-listed as MAE 7650. Prerequisite: ECE 6852 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
ECE 7856Nonlinear Control Systems (3.00)
Studies the dynamic response of nonlinear systems; analyzes nonlinear systems using approximate analytical methods; stability analysis using the second method of Liapunov, describing functions, and other methods. May include adaptive, neural, and switched systems. Cross-listed as MAE 7660. Prerequisite: ECE 6851 and 6852.
ECE 7858Digital Control Systems (3.00)
Includes sampling processes and theorems, z-transforms, modified transforms, transfer functions, and stability criteria; analysis in frequency and time domains; discrete state models of systems containing digital computers; and advanced discrete-time control techniques. Some in-class experiments using small computers to control dynamic processes. Cross-listed as MAE 7680. Prerequisite: ECE 4860 and 6851, APMA 6150, or equivalent.
ECE 7993Independent Study (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
ECE 7995Supervised Project Research (3.00 - 6.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Registration may be repeated as necessary.
ECE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
ECE 8501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.00)
A third-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
ECE 8502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (3.00)
A third-level graduate course covering a topic not normally covered in the graduate course offerings. The topic will usually reflect new developments in the electrical and computer engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisite:  Instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ECE 8782Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3.00)
The course covers the physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, the biological and medical problems addressed using MRI, the analysis and design of MRI pulse sequences from a signal processing perspective, and MR image reconstruction techniques. It will introduce various advanced topics, including non-Cartesian scanning and compressed sensing. The course will include a laboratory session working with an MRI scanner. Prerequisites: BME 6311 BME Measurement Principles, or knowledge of 2D Fourier transforms and linear systems theory.
Course was offered Fall 2013
ECE 8825Adaptive Control (3.00)
Analyzes parametrized control system models, signal norms, Lyapunov stability, passivity, error models, gradient and least squares algorithms for parameter estimation, adaptive observers, direct adaptive control, indirect adaptive control, certainty equivalence principle, multivariable adaptive control, stability theory of adaptive control, and applications to robot control systems. Prerequisite: ECE 6851 and 6852, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
ECE 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
ECE 8999Thesis (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
ECE 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
For doctoral students.
ECE 9999Dissertation (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Engineering
ENGR 1410Synthesis Design I (3.00)
Prerequisite: first-year Rodman scholar status.
ENGR 1420Synthesis Design II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Prerequisite: first-year Rodman scholar status.
ENGR 1501Special Topics (1.00)
Student led special topic courses which vary by semester.
ENGR 1520Explorations in Engineering (3.00)
This course introduces students to engineering, including the role of engineers in modern society, engineering subdisciplines, & methods used by engineers to solve problems. A key component is a hands-on design-build project in which students work in small teams to develop a solution to a problem. This activity culminates in demonstration of a design solution prototype. Students should be able to make clearer choices when deciding a career path. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
ENGR 1559Special Topics in Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Considers engineering practices and principles in their local and global context. Topics vary based upon student and faculty interest.
ENGR 1595Explorations--First-Year Engineering Seminar (1.00)
This is a seminar course for first-year students in the School of Engineering and Applied Science to acquire information about engineering careers, what different majors do, etc.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2011
ENGR 1620Introduction to Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
ENGR 1620 is a cornerstone course for first year engineering students. They are introduced to the philosophy and practice of engineering through hands-on experience in developing solutions for various open-ended, realistic challenges while considering the various contexts in which these challenges occur. Students will also learn about the majors SEAS offers and receive advisement about careers, plans of study, and major declaration. Prerequisite: First year enrollment in SEAS; exceptions are by instructor permission.
ENGR 1621Introduction to Engineering Lab (1.00)
Ensure that students master essential computer skills necessary for engineering studies and eventual careers, including use of the Internet (search engines), spreadsheets (MS Excel), and an equation solving/symbol manipulation software package (MathCAD). Ensure that students master fundamental problem solving techniques and mathematical skills common to engineering practice, including data plotting, basic statistics, curve fitting and matrices.
ENGR 2500Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology (3.00)
A hands-on introduction to nanoscience for students of all majors: Microfabrication, nanoscale chemical and biological self-assembly, applications, technological and ethical challenges; Labs ranging from use of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopes to DNA fingerprinting. No prerequisites. Lecture/discussion meeting + one lab. For first two weeks of registration, enrollment will be limited to 1st and 2nd years (then opened to all).
ENGR 2555Special Projects in Engineering Education (1.00 - 6.00)
A project in the engineering education field that requires individual investigation. Each student works on an individual project in the engineering education research area of a supervisor. The student is required to conduct investigations that are summarized in a written report at the end of the experience.
ENGR 2595Special Topics in Engineering (1.00 - 4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Special Topics in Engineering.
ENGR 2993Independent Study (1.00 - 3.00)
Special tutorial with a topic declared in advance. The topic, work plan, and conditions are arranged by contract between instructor and student and approved by the department Chair, with a copy to be filed in the department office.
Course was offered Spring 2016
ENGR 3020Introduction to Engineering in Context (1.00)
This course provides students with realistic and contemporary perspectives on the practice of engineering. A key objective is to improve understanding and appreciation for the role of contextual factors in engineering practice, with emphasis on the interactions between technological, organizational and cultural aspects. Invited speakers from industry, community organizations and academic research present and discuss their perspectives on these contextual interactions and professional challenges. The course helps students prepare for their senior thesis by structuring the search for topics, which are of strong interest to the student and likely to provide real benefits to the client and other stakeholders. Finally, students may generate proposals leading to funded, multidisciplinary team capstone projects in their 4th year. Prerequisite: 3rd year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2010
ENGR 3501Special Topics in Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in engineering will vary based upon student and faculty interests.
ENGR 3502Special Topics in Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in engineering will vary based upon student and faculty interests.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2015
ENGR 3580Rodman Scholars Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Special Topics Restricted to Rodman Scholars. Prerequisites: Rodman Scholar Status.
ENGR 3610Nanoscale Devices & Systems (3.00)
The ability to spatially localize, pattern and interconnect structures with nanoscale resolution is critical for emerging technologies. This course utilizes a hierarchical approach to survey nanotechnologies, beginning with the emerging phenomena at the nanoscale; their device application for electronics, photonics, biosensing and tissue regeneration; the fabrication of integrated nanosystems; and finally their impacts on environmental systems. Prerequisite: APMA 2130, and SEAS-required physics and chemistry courses.
Course was offered Fall 2017
ENGR 4010Multidisciplinary Design and Development I (1.00 - 3.00)
A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: 4th year standing.
ENGR 4020Multidisciplinary Design and Development II (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A two-semester, multidisciplinary, capstone engineering design sequence; the primary objective of ENGR 4010/4020 is to provide students with a realistic and rigorous, culminating engineering design experience, which is reflective of contemporary professional practice. Key course attributes include the multidisciplinary composition of the engineering design teams (students and faculty from any department within SEAS, Commerce, Darden, Nursing, etc.), emphasis on aspects of modern practice (e.g. concurrent engineering, total quality management, and balanced consideration of the technological, organizational and cultural context) and realistic problems and client-stakeholders. A disciplined design/development process is followed that incorporates the important activities of contextual analysis, problem definition, customer needs definition, concept generation and selection, product specification, modeling and engineering analysis, proof of concept prototyping, design verification, cost analysis and project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: ENGR 4010; 4th year standing.
ENGR 4595Special Topics in Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Advance projects course to be taken in parallel with STS 4010, 4020, or can be used for an advanced undergraduate course on a topic not covered in the course offerings. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ENGR 4599Special Topics in Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Prerequisite: instructor permission.
ENGR 4880Business and Technical Leadership in Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course on Business and Technological Leadership is normally taught by a senior level corporate executive with broad experience who serves as the Brenton S. Halsey Distinguished Visiting Professor of Chemical Engineering and Related Disciplines. The instructor provides experienced insight on business and professional issues likely to be faced by engineers early in their careers. The course normally covers major business skills and competencies in career management, leadership, working in teams, problem solving, and change management as well as international issues facing global companies. Guest speakers will provide additional insights on theses topics.
ENGR 4920Engineering License Review (0.00)
Overview of registration laws and procedures. Review of engineering fundamentals preparatory to public examination for the 'Engineer in Training' part of the professional engineers examination. Three hours of lecture up to the licensing examination. Corequisite: formal application for state registration.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
ENGR 5555Special Topics in Engineering Education (1.00 - 3.00)
Special Topics in Engineering Education
ENGR 6000Effective Communication in English (0.00 - 3.00)
This course is designed to teach reading/writing/ speaking/ listening skills required for success in technical communication for graduate students whose first language is not English, and scored less than 50 on the SPEAK Test. Specialized instruction in academic/content area writing as well as personal expression in a variety of settings will enable students to complete academic programs in a more efficient and timely manner.
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
ENGR 6555Advanced Topics in Engineering Education (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Engineering Education
ENGR 6890Industrial Applications (1.00 - 3.00)
Students register for this course to complement an industry work experience. Topics focus on the application of engineering principles, analysis, methods and best practices in an industrial setting. A final report is required. Registration is only offered on a Credit/No Credit basis. Courses taken for Credit/No Credit may not be used for any major or degree requirements.
ENGR 900International Scholars Independent Study (0.00)
A zero-credit course with enrollment restricted to international scholars.
ENGR 9997Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Graduate Teaching Instruction for doctoral students.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Fall 2016
Engineering Physics
EP 6950Supervised Project (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated.
EP 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
EP 7000Graduate Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Weekly seminars for graduate students in Engineering Physics offered every semester. All resident EP graduate students enroll each semester.
EP 7592Special Topics in Engineering Physics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Advanced-level study of selected problems in engineering physics. Prerequisite: instructor permission.
EP 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
EP 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
EP 8970Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
EP 8999Master's Degree Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
EP 9970Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students.
EP 9999Ph.D. Dissertation Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
MAE 1501Special Topics in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (1.00)
Student-led special topic courses which vary by semester.
Course was offered Fall 2016
MAE 2000Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Overview of the mechanical engineer's role as analyst and designer. Introduction to manufacturing tools, equipment, and processes; properties of materials relative to manufacture and design; communication through engineering graphics; engineering drawing interpretation, sectioning, auxiliary views; and analysis and design of mechanical devices. Workshop includes CAD and solid modeling. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425, Corequisite: APMA 2120
MAE 2010Introduction to Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Historical introduction, standard atmosphere, basic aerodynamics, airfoils and wings, flight mechanics, stability and control, propulsion (airbreathing, rocket and space), orbital mechanics.
MAE 2090Applied Probability and Statistics (3.00)
Application of probability and statistical analysis to engineering decision analysis,data description, inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis tests), model building, sstatistical quality control, and designing engineering experiments Corequisite: APMA 2120 .
MAE 2100Thermodynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes the formulation of the first and second laws of thermodynamics; energy conservation; concepts of equilibrium, temperature, energy, and entropy; equations of state; processes involving energy transfer as work and heat; reversibility and irreversibility; closed and open systems; and cyclic processes. Prerequisite: APMA 1110.
MAE 2300Statics (3.00)
Basic concepts of mechanics, systems of forces and couples: equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures: trusses, frames, machines; internal forces, shear and bending moment diagrams; distributed forces; friction, centroids and moments of inertia; introduction to stress and strain; computer applications. Cross-listed as CE 2300. Prerequisite: PHYS 1425. Corequisite: APMA 2120.
MAE 2310Strength of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Normal stress and strain, thermal strain, shear stress, shear strain; stress and strain transformations; Mohr's circle for plane stress and strain; stresses due to combined loading; axially loaded members; torsion of circular and thin-walled closed sections; statically indeterminate systems; deformation, strains and stresses in beams; beam deflections; column stability . Prerequisites: MAE 2300, APMA 2120.
MAE 2320Dynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Kinematic and kinetic aspects of motion modeling applied to rigid bodies and mechanisms. Focus on free-body-analysis. Use of work-energy and impulse-momentum motion prediction methods. Use of Cartesian and simple non-Cartesian coordinate systems. Rotational motion, angular momentum, and rotational kinetic-energy modeling; body mass rotational moment of inertia. Relative-velocity and acceleration. Prerequisite: MAE 2300
MAE 2501Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in mechanical engineering
MAE 2502Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in mechanical engineering
MAE 2503Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in aerospace engineering
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
MAE 2504Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in aerospace engineering
MAE 3010Astronautics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Discussion of the Keplerian two-body problem; elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic orbits; solution of Kepler's equation and analogs; the classical orbital elements; orbit determination; prediction of future position and velocity; orbital perturbations; Lambert's problem. Prerequisites: MAE 2320.
MAE 3120Thermal Systems Analysis (3.00)
Analyzes the thermodynamics of reactive and nonreactive, multi-component systems; energy cycles; and thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems. Prerequisite: MAE 2100.
Course was offered Spring 2011
MAE 3130Nanoscale Heat Transfer (3.00)
Development of fundamentals of heat transfer from a nanoscale or atomic perspective, as applied to nanotechnology and energy applications; topics include selected relevant concepts from Kinetic Theory, Quantum Mechanics, Solid State Physics, Statistical Thermodynamics, wave vs. particle transport theory, Landauer and Boltzmann Transport Formalisms, and thermoelectricity. Prerequisite: APMA 2130
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
MAE 3140Elements of Heat and Mass Transfer (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Analysis of steady state and transient heat conduction in solids with elementary analytical and numerical solution techniques; fundamentals of radiation heat transfer, including exchange among black and diffuse gray surfaces; free and forced convective heat transfer with applications of boundary layer theory and an introduction to mass transfer by diffusion using the heat-mass transfer analogy. Prerequisite: MAE 3210.
MAE 3210Fluid Mechanics (3.00)
Introduction to fluid flow concepts and equations; integral and differential forms of mass, momentum, and energy conservation with emphasis on one-dimensional flow; fluid statics; Bernoulli's equation; viscous effects; Courette flow, Poiseuille flow, and pipe flow; boundary layers; one-dimensional compressible flow; normal shock waves; flow with friction or heat addition; isothermal flow; and applications. Prerequisite: APMA 2130 and MAE 2100
MAE 3220Aerodynamics (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Boundary layers: similarity, Blasius and momentum integral methods. Ideal Flows: Kelvin's circulation theorem; complex potential; superposition; Kutta-Joukowski; thin airfoils; finite wings; lifting lines. Gas dynamics: sound waves; normal and oblique shocks; Prandtl-Meyer expansion; quasi 1D flows; converging-diverging nozzles; choked flows; diffusers; Rayleigh line and Fanno line flows. Prerequiste: MAE 3210.
MAE 3310Aerospace Structures (3.00)
Analyzes the design of elements under combined stresses; bending and torsional stresses in thin-walled beams; energy and other methods applied to statically determinate and indeterminate aerospace structural elements; buckling of simple structural members; and matrix and finite element analysis. Prerequisite: MAE 2310.
MAE 3420Computational Methods in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces numerical modeling concepts used in engineering simulation tools like computational fluid dynamics and structural mechanics analysis software. Topics covered include discretization methods of partial differential equations, numerical solutions of linear matrix equations, and relaxation techniques for solving stiff equation sets. As part of the course, students will use Matlab, CFD, and mechanical analysis tools.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017
MAE 3501Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in mechanical engineering
MAE 3502Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in mechanical engineering
MAE 3503Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in aerospace engineering
MAE 3504Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Special topics in aerospace engineering
MAE 3610Aerospace Materials (3.00)
Introduces physical-chemical/microstructural and working mechanical properties, along with practical applications, for materials of wide interest on aerospace materials. Includes common metal, polymer, ceramic, and composite materials. Topics include standard materials names/designations; standard forming methods; usual strengthening means; temperature and temperature-history effects.Prerequisite: CHEM 1610; corequisite: MAE 2310.
MAE 3620Machine Elements and Fatigue in Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies mechanical analysis to the basic design of machine elements; basic concepts in statistics and reliability analysis, advanced strength of materials, and fatigue analysis; and the practical design and applications of materials to fastening systems, weldments, power screws, springs, journal and anti-friction bearings, gears, brake clutches and flexible power transmission elements. Prerequisites: MAE 2000 and MAE 3310.
MAE 3710Mechanical Systems (3.00)
Presents general concepts of dynamical systems modeling and provides mathematical tools to develop and analyze models that describe input/output behaviors of physical systems. Topics include basic elements of mechanical systems, transfer functions, frequency response, stability and poles, resonance and natural frequency, transient and time constant, steady state and DC gain, block diagrams. Prerequisites: MAE 2320 and APMA 2130
MAE 3730Flight Vehicle Dynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces definitions and concepts and includes a review of longitudinal static stability; rigid body dynamics: general equations of motion, rotating coordinate systems; small disturbance theory; atmospheric flight mechanics, stability derivatives; motion analysis of aircraft; static and dynamic stability; aircraft handling qualities; and an introduction to flight control systems and automatic stabilization. Prerequisite: MAE 2010 and MAE 2320.
MAE 3810Experimental Methods Laboratory (3.00)
The study of basic concepts and methods in engineering measurements and data analysis. Basic topics include mechanical and electrical sensors and measurement instruments, measurement uncertainty, statistic and data analysis. Additional topics include digital signal processing and data acquisition systems using Labview. Applications are to mechanical and aero/thermofluids devices. Two lectures and two laboratory hours Prerequisite: PHYS 2415, MAE 2320; corequisite: APMA 3110
MAE 3820Aerodynamics Laboratory (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Application of experimental methods to the design of experiments. Hypothesis testing and uncertainty assessment. Two required experiments investigate wing aerodynamic behaviors in a low speed wind tunnel and supersonic flow over a model or through a nozzle. Two additional laboratories of optional content, selected by the student from an array of available experiments. One lecture and two laboratory hours.
MAE 3840Mechanical Engineering Laboratory (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Application of experimental methods to the design of experiments. Hypothesis testing and uncertainty assessment. Examination of test equipment and procedures through the operation of test facilities for heat transfer, mechanical and fluid systems including data acquisition and processing systems. One lecture and two lab hours.
MAE 4120Air Breathing Propulsion (3.00)
Reviews thermodynamics of compressible fluids and includes analysis of the mechanisms for thrust generation in aerospace propulsion systems; performance and cycle analysis of air-breathing engines, emphasizing turbojets, turbofans, turboprops and ramjets; aerothermodynamics of inlets, diffusers, combustors, and nozzles; performance of axial-flow and centrifugal compressors; turbines; and the matching of engine components. Prerequisite: MAE 3210.
MAE 4130Rocket Propulsion (3.00)
Introduces rocket-engine design and optimization problems; materials, temperature-exposure, and stress-strain issues; rocket flight mechanics and trajectories; rocket staging issues; liquid propellants; liquid-propellant engine designs; rocket thrust-chamber flow behaviors and modeling;rocket exhaust behaviors; modeling methods; maneuver, orbit-adjustment, and attitude-adjustment engines Prerequisite: MAE 2320, 3010, 3210; corequisite: MAE 3220
MAE 4280Motion Biomechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on the study of forces (and their effects) that act on the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Based on the foundations of functional anatomy and engineering mechanics (rigid body and deformable approaches); students are exposed to clinical problems in orthopedics and rehabilitation. Cross-listed as BIOM 4280. Prerequisite: MAE 2310 and 2320.
MAE 4501Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in mechanical engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: 3rd or 4th year standing.
MAE 4502Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in mechanical engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing.
MAE 4503Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in aerospace engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Third or Fourth-year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Fall 2009
MAE 4504Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (3.00)
Applies basic engineering science, design methods, and systems analysis to developing areas and current problems in aerospace engineering. Topics vary based on student and faculty interest. Prerequisite: Third or Fourth-year standing.
Course was offered Spring 2015, Spring 2013, Spring 2012
MAE 4511Mechanical Engineering Special Project (1.50)
Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.
MAE 4512Mechanical Engineering Special Project (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Individual survey, analysis, or apparatus project in the mechanical engineering field, concluded with the submission of a formal report. Subject originates with students wishing to develop a technical idea of personal interest. One hour conference per week. Prerequisite: Professional standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor. Prerequisite: fourth year standing.
MAE 4513Aerospace Engineering Special Projects (1.50)
Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing.
MAE 4514Aerospace Engineering Special Projects (1.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Applied research in areas pertinent to aerospace engineering; conducted in close consultation with a departmental faculty advisor. Includes the design and construction of experiments, analysis, or the investigation of physical phenomena. The research may be related to ongoing faculty research and may be the topic of the senior thesis, but its scope must be significantly beyond that required for the thesis. Prerequisite Fourth yr. standing
MAE 4605Manufacturing and Process Technology (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes familiarization with concepts of mass production tooling and automation; metallurgical and mechanical aspects of machining and metal forming; and experiments with machine tools. Prerequisite: MAE 2000, MAE 3620.
MAE 4610Machine Design I (3.00)
Coverage of the design process including project management, specifications, budgeting and case histories, Conceptual, preliminary, and detailed design phases. Technical proposal and report preparation and technical presentations. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester long mechanical design projects selected to illustrate the design process. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.
MAE 4620Machine Design II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A continuation of MAE 4610 that applies the design process to projects. Organization of design teams to work on specific semester-long design projects, including oral presentations and written reports. Prerequisite: MAE 3620.
MAE 4630Energy Systems Design I (3.00)
Design of systems for the useful conversion of energy. Applications include various combustion systems that generate electricity and the control of air pollutant emissions from combustion systems. Considers the control and performance features present in such operating systems, as well as the economic optimization of capital and operating expense. Y) Prerequisite: MAE 3140
Course was offered Fall 2010, Fall 2009
MAE 4640Energy Systems Design II (3.00)
Design of systems for the useful conversion of energy. Applications include various combustion systems that generate electricity and the control of air pollutant emissions from combustion systems. Considers the control and performance features present in such operating systems, as well as the economic optimization of capital and operating expense. Prerequisite: MAE 3140
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
MAE 4650Aircraft Design I (3.00)
Analyze design requirements for and produce conceptual design of an aircraft. Includes synthesis of materials, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics, stability and control, interior and external configuration, cockpit design and all systems. Work in teams. Trade studies and optimization. State-of-the-art report, presentations and interimreport. Prerequisite: MAE 2010, MAE 3220, MAE 3310, MAE 3610, MAE 3730; Corequisite: MAE 4120.
MAE 4660Aircraft Design II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A continuation of MAE 4650. Completion of preliminary aircraft design, with cost analysis and manufacturability considerations. Submission of final report. Prerequisite: MAE 4650.
MAE 4670Creativity and New Product Development I (3.00)
Engineering design process by engaging teams of students in design activities that results in useful and novel products. Stages of the typical product design process, concepts of intellectual property and its protection through patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets, and the technical tools of modern engineering practice, including solids modeling and rapid prototyping. Prerequisite: 4th year standing - ENU
MAE 4680Creativity and New Product Development II (3.00)
Creating working prototypes, development of business plans for commercialization, and writing of proposals for external funding.Prerequisite: MAE 4670.
MAE 4690Spacecraft Design I (3.00)
This course will examine the multidisciplinary aspects of spacecraft design for a NASA mission. Students will work in teams on an open ended multidisciplinary design problem using industrial methodologies. Students will be introduced to space mission engineering and spacecraft design. Students will conduct mission concept definition and exploration, requirements definition and conceptual design of the spacecraft. Requisite: 4th-Year Standing
MAE 4700Spacecraft Design II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The course will result in the detailed design of the spacecraft, the fabrication of a full scale prototype and a proposal to NASA for funding of the real spacecraft and mission. The spacecraft will be designed to conform to the small satellite class, with a weight under 100 kg and a size less than 1 m. It will be designed for low-Earth orbit, geosynchronous orbit or a space exploration mission. Requisite: MAE 4690
MAE 4710Mechatronics (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Presents the synergistic integration of mechanical engineering with electronics and computer control in the design of industrial products and processes. Surveys basic electronics, electromechanical actuators, analog and digital signals, sensors, basic control algorithms, and microcontrol programming. Weekly laboratory exercises and a final design project. Prerequisites: MAE 2320 and MAE 3810 or instructor permission.
MAE 4730Introduction to Automatic Controls (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Discusses the mathematics of feedback control systems; transfer functions; basic servo theory; stability analysis; root locus techniques; and graphical methods. Applications to analysis and design of mechanical systems, emphasizing hydraulic, pneumatic, and electromechanical devices. Prerequisite: MAE 2320 and 3710.
MAE 4740Mechanical Vibrations (3.00)
Studies free and forced vibration of damped and undamped single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Includes modeling of discrete and continuous mass systems; application to vibration measurement instruments; analysis of concepts of modal analysis; concepts of linear stability; application to rotating machinery, Prerequisite MAE 2320, corequisite MAE 3710
MAE 4760Automobile Dynamics (3.00)
Fundamentals of automobile power train performance. Dynamics of straight-line motion including acceleration and braking. Fundamentals of suspension design, operation, and application to automobile dynamics including geometry, kinematic motion. Static analysis of automobile weight, balance, and load transfer and application to cornering. Prerequisite MAE 2320
Course was offered Spring 2011, Spring 2010
MAE 4990Professional Development in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1.00)
Review of the fundamental topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering covered on the Fundamentals of Engineering licensure examination. Prerequisites: MAE 3140, 4710, 3620.
MAE 6020Continuum Mechanics with Applications (3.00)
Introduces continuum mechanics and mechanics of deformable solids. Vectors and cartesian tensors, stress, strain, deformation, equations of motion, constitutive laws, introduction to elasticity, thermal elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fluids. Cross-listed as APMA 6020, AM 6020. Taught concurrently w/ CE 6720. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6030Computational Solid Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes variational and computational mechanics of solids; potential energy; complementary energy; virtual work; Reissner's principle; Ritz and Galerkin methods; displacement; force and mixed methods of analysis; finite element analysis including shape functions, convergence, and integration. Applications in solid mechanics. Cross-listed as CE 6730. Prerequisite: MAE 6020.
MAE 6040Plates and Shells (3.00)
Includes the classical analysis of plates and shells of various shapes; closed-form numerical and approximate methods of solution of governing partial differential equations; and advanced topics (large deflection theory, thermal stresses, orthotropic plates). Cross listed as AM 6040 and taught concurrently w/ CE 6740. Prerequisite: APMA 6410 and CE 6710 or 6720 or MAE 6020.
MAE 6070Theory of Elasticity (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Review of the concepts of stress, strain, equilibrium, compatibility; Hooke's law (isotropic materials); displacement and stress formulations of elasticity problems; plane stress and strain problems in rectangular coordinates (Airy's stress function approach); plane stress and strain problems in polar coordinates, axisymmetric problems; torsion of prismatic bars (semi-inverse method using real function approach); thermal stress; and energy methods. Cross-listed as CE 6770. Prerequisite: AM 6020 or instructor permission.
MAE 6080Constitutive Modeling of Biosystems (3.00)
The course covers state-of-the-art mechanical models to describe the constitutive behavior of hard and soft tissues with emphasis on biological form following physiological function. The course will cover linear and nonlinear elasticity, viscoelasticity, poroelasticity, and biphasic constitutive relations in the context of biological systems and will include the dependence of macroscopic behavior and properties on material microstructure. Prerequisite: MAE 6020
MAE 6100Thermomechanics (3.00)
Review of classical thermodynamics; introduction to kinetic theory; quantum mechanical analysis of atomic and molecular structure; statistical mechanical evaluation of thermodynamic properties; chemical thermodynamics and equilibria. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
MAE 6110Heat and Mass Transport Phenomena (3.00)
Fundamentals of conduction and convection heat and mass transfer. Derivation and application of conservation equations for heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flows. Steady, unsteady and multidimensional transport. Applications to free and confined flows in forced, natural and mixed convection regimes. Phase change problems with moving boundaries, condensation and evaporation. High speed flows. Prerequisite: Undergraduate fluid mechanics or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2011, Fall 2010
MAE 6120Microscale Heat Transfer (3.00)
This course will begin with a study of the fundamental microscopic energy carriers (definitions, properties, energy levels and disruptions of photons, phonons, and electrons.) Transport of energy will then be investigated with an emphasis on microscale effects in space and in time. The approaches used to describe microscale heat transportation differ significantly from the macroscopic phenomenological approaches and include new physical mechanisms. They often involve solution of the Boltzman transport equation and the equation of phonon radiative transfer. These approaches will be introduced with an emphasis on ultra-short time scale heating and ultra-low temperatures. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
MAE 6130Kinetic Theory and Transport Properties (3.00)
Derivation of Boltzmann equation; Molecular derivation of Navier-Stokes equations; dynamics of molecular collisions; Chapman-Enskog solution of Boltzmann equation; transport properties of gases; analyses of shock structure, flows with chemical reactions, radiative nonequilibrium, rarefied gases, etc. Prerequisite: MAE 6100 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2012
MAE 6160Advanced Thermodynamics (3.00)
Analyzes basic concepts, postulates, and relationships of classical thermodynamics; thermodynamics potentials and derivatives; energy minimum and entropy maximum principle; generalized Maxwell relations; stability considerations; phase transitions; application to perfect and imperfect systems; and extension to chemically reacting and solid systems. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6200Energy Principles in Mechanics (3.00)
Analyzes the derivation, interpretation, and application to engineering problems of the principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work; related theorems, such as the principles of the stationary value of the total potential and complementary energy, Castigliano's Theorems, theorem of least work, and unit force and displacement theorems. Introduces generalized, extended, mixed, and hybrid principles; variational methods of approximation, Hamilton's principle, and Lagrange's equations of motion; and approximate solutions to problems in structural mechanics by use of variational theorems. Cross-listed as CE 6700. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2009
MAE 6210Analytical Dynamics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Classical analytical dynamics from a modern mathematical viewpoint: Newton's laws, dynamical variables, many particle systems; the Lagrangian formulation, constraints and configuration manifolds, tangent bundles, differential manifolds; variational principles, least action; non-potential forces; constrained problems; linear oscillations; Hamiltonian formulation: canonical equations, Rigid body motion. Prerequisite: Undergraduate physics, ordinary differential equations.
MAE 6220Waves (3.00)
The topics covered are: plane waves; d'Alembert solution; method of characteristics; dispersive systems; wavepackets; group velocity; fully-dispersed waves; Laplace, Stokes, and steepest descents integrals; membranes, plates and plane-stress waves; evanescent waves; Kirchhoff's solution; Fresnel's principle; elementary diffraction; reflection and transmission at interfaces; waveguides and ducted waves; waves in elastic half-spaces; P, S, and Rayleigh waves; layered media and Love waves; slowly-varying media and WKBJ method; Time-dependent response using Fourier-Laplace transforms; some nonlinear water waves. Prerequisite: MAE 6020 or equivalent.
MAE 6230Vibrations (3.00)
Topics include free and forced vibrations of undamped and damped single- and multi-degree-of-freedom systems; modal analyses; continuous systems; matrix formulations; finite element equations; direct integration methods; and eigenvalue solution methods. Cross-listed as CE 6731. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6240Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves (3.00)
Introduces phase-space methods, elementary bifurcation theory and perturbation theory, and applies them to the study of stability in the contexts of nonlinear dynamical systems and nonlinear waves, including free and forces nonlinear vibrations and wave motions. Examples are drawn from mechanics and fluid dynamics, and include transitions to periodic oscillations and chaotic oscillations. Prerequisite: Undergraduate ordinary differential equations or instructor permission.
MAE 6250Multibody Mechanical Systems (3.00)
Analytical and computational treatment for modeling and simulation of 3-Dimensional multibody mechanical systems. Provide a systematic and consistent basis for analyzing the interactions between motion constraints, kinematics, static, dynamic, and control behavior of multibody mechanical systems. Applications to machinery, robotic devices and mobile robots, biomechanical models for gait analysis and human motions, and motion control. Matrix modeling procedures with symbolic and numerical computational tools will be utilized for demonstrating the methods developed in this course. Focus on the current research and computational tools and examine a broad spectrum of physical systems where multibody behavior is fundamental to their design and control. Prerequisite: Engineering degree and familiarity with a programming language.
MAE 6310Fluid Mechanics I (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The topics covered are: dimensional analysis; physical properties of fluids; kinematic descriptions of flow; streamlines, path lines and streak lines; stream functions and vorticity; hydrostatics and thermodynamics; Euler and Bernoulli equations; irrotational potential flow; exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation; effects of viscosity - high and low Reynolds numbers; waves in incompressible flow; hydrodynamic stability. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
MAE 6320Fluid Mechanics II (3.00)
The topics covered are: thin wing theory; slender-body theory; three-dimensional wings in steady subsonic and supersonic flows; drag at supersonic speeds; drag minimization; transonic small-disturbance flow; unsteady flow; properties and modeling of turbulent flows. Prerequisite: MAE 6310.
MAE 6330Lubrication Theory and Design (3.00)
Topics include the hydrodynamic theory of lubrication for an incompressible fluid; design principles of bearings: oil flow, load-carrying capacity, temperature rise, stiffness, damping properties; influence of bearing design upon rotating machinery; computer modeling methods; and applications to specific types. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6340Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems (3.00)
Fundamentals of momentum, energy and mass transport as applied to complex biological systems ranging from the organelles in cells to whole plants and animals and their environments. Derivation of conservation laws (momentum, heat and mass), constitutive equations, and auxiliary relations. Applications of theoretical equations and empirical relations to model and predict the characteristics of diffusion and convection in complex biological systems and their environments. Emphasis placed on the bio-mechanical understanding of these systems through the construction of simplified mathematical models amenable to analytical, numerical or statistical formulations and solutions, including the identification and quantification of model uncertainties. Prerequisite: Introductory fluid mechanics and/or heat or mass transfer, or instructor permission.
MAE 6360Gas Dynamics (3.00)
Analyzes the theory and solution methods applicable to multi-dimensional compressible inviscid gas flows at subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic speeds; similarity and scaling rules from small-petrurbation theory, introduction to transonic and hypersonic flows; method-of-characteristics applications to nozzle flows, jet expansions, and flows over bodies one dimensional non-steady flows; properties of gases in thermodynamic equilibrium, including kinetic-theory, chemical-thermodynamics, and statistical-mechanics considerations; dissociation and ionization process; quasi-equilibrium flows; and introduction to non-equilibrium flows. Prerequisite: MAE 6100.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MAE 6370Singular Perturbation Theory (3.00)
Analyzes regular perturbations, roots of polynomials; singular perturbations in ODE's, periodic solutions of simple nonlinear differential equations; multiple-Scales method; WKBJ approximation; turning-point problems; Langer's method of uniform approximation; asymptotic behavior of integrals, Laplace Integrals, stationary phase, steepest descents. Examples are drawn from physical systems. Prerequisite: Familiarity with complex analysis.
MAE 6410Engineering Mathematics I (3.00)
Review of ordinary differential equations. Initial value problems, boundary value problems, and various physical applications. Linear algebra, including systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and various applications. Scalar and vector field theory, including the divergence theorem, Green's theorem, and Stokes theorem, and various applications. Partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of partial differential equations by separation by variables, superposition, Fourier series, variation of parameter, d'Alembert's solution. Eigenfunction expansion techniques for non-homogeneous initial-value, boundary-value problems. Particular focus on various physical applications of the heat equation, the potential (Laplace) equation, and the wave equations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Cross-listed as APMA 6410. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
MAE 6420Engineering Mathematics II (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Further and deeper understanding of partial differential equations that govern physical phenomena in science and engineering. Solution of linear partial differential equations by eigenfunction expansion techniques. Green's functions for time-independent and time-dependant boundary value problems. Fourier transform methods, and Laplace transform methods. Solution of variety of initial-value, boundary-value problems. Various physical applications. Study of complex variable theory. Functions of complex variable, the complex integral calculus, Taylor series, Laurent series, and the residue theorem, and various applications. Serious work and efforts in the further development of analytical skills and response. Cross-listed as APMA 6420. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and APMA/MAE 6410 or equivalent.
MAE 6430Statistics for Engineers and Scientists (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Role of statistics in science, hypothesis tests of significance, confidence intervals, design of experiments, regression, correlation analysis, analysis of variance, and introduction to statistical computing with statistical software libraries. Cross-listed as APMA 6430. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate studies or instructor permission.
MAE 6440Applied Partial Differential Equations (3.00)
Includes first order partial differential equations (linear, quasilinear, nonlinear); classification of equations and characteristics; and well-posed-ness of initial and boundary value problems. Cross-listed as APMA 6440. Prerequisite: APMA/MAE 6410 or equivalent.
MAE 6555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Special Topics in Distance Learning
MAE 6592Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Study of a specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the first-graduate-course level. May be offered on a seminar or a team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. New graduate courses are usually introduced in this form. Specific topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.
MAE 6594Special Graduate Project in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering: First-Year Level (1.00 - 12.00)
A design or research project for a first-year graduate student under the supervision of a faculty member. A written report must be submitted and an oral report presented. Up to three credits from either this course or MAE 7540 may be applied toward the master's degree. Prerequisite: Students must petition the department Graduate Studies Committee before enrolling.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2011
MAE 6610Linear Automatic Control Systems (3.00)
Studies the dynamics of linear, closed-loop systems. Analysis of transfer functions; stability theory; time response, frequency response; robustness; and performance limitations. Design of feedback controllers. Cross-listed as ECE 6851. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAE 6620Linear State Space Systems (3.00)
A comprehensive treatment of the theory of linear state space systems, focusing on general results which provide a conceptual framework as well as analysis tools for investigation in a wide variety of engineering contexts. Topics include vector spaces, linear operators, functions of matrices, state space description, solutions to state equations (time invariant and time varying), state transition matrices, system modes and decomposition, stability, controllability and observability, Kalman decomposition, system realizations, grammians and model reduction, state feedback, and observers. Cross-listed as SYS 6012 and ECE 6852. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
MAE 6680Advanced Machine Technologies (3.00)
Studies new technologies for machine automation, including intelligent machines, robotics, machine vision, image processing, and artificial intelligence. Emphasis on computer control of machines; intelligent automatic control systems; and distributed networks. Focuses on research problems in each of these areas.
MAE 6710Finite Element Analysis (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The topics covered are: review of vectors, matrices, and numerical solution techniques; discrete systems; variational formulation and approximation for continuous systems; linear finite element method in solid mechanics; formulation of isoparametric finite elements; finite element method for field problems, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. Prerequisite: MAE 6020 or equivalent
MAE 6720Computational Fluid Dynamics I (3.00)
Includes the solution of flow and heat transfer problems involving steady and transient convective and diffusive transport; superposition and panel methods for inviscid flow, finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations, elementary grid generation for odd geometries, primitive variable and vorticity-steam function algorithms for incompressible, multidimensional flows. Extensive use of personal computers/workstations, including interactive graphics. Prerequisite: MAE 6310 or instructor permission.
MAE 6850Measurement Theory and Advanced Instrumentation (3.00)
Studies the theory and practice of modern measurement and measurement instrumentation; statistical analysis of data; estimation of errors and uncertainties; operating principles and characteristics of fundamental transducers and sensors; common electrical circuits and instruments; and signal processing methods. Prerequisite: Undergraduate electrical science.
Course was offered Spring 2010
MAE 6870Applied Engineering Optics (3.00)
Analyzes modern engineering optics and methods; fundamentals of coherence, diffraction interference, polarization, and lasing processes; fluid mechanics, heat transfer, stress/strain, vibrations, and manufacturing applications; laboratory practice: interferometry, schlieren/shadowgraph, and laser velocimetry. Prerequisite: PHYS 2415.
MAE 6993Independent Study in Mechanical or Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Independent study of first-year graduate level material under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Students must petition the department Graduate Studies Committee before enrolling.
MAE 7030Injury Biomechanics (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This is an advanced applications course on the biomechanical basis of human injury and injury modeling. The course covers the etiology of human injury and state-of-the-art analytic and synthetic mechanical models of human injury. The course will have a strong focus on modeling the risk of impact injuries to the head, neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities. The course will explore the biomechanical basis of widely used and proposed human injury criteria and will investigate the use of these criteria with simplified dummy surrogates to assess human injury risk. Brief introductions to advanced topics such as human biomechanical variation with age and sex, and the biomechanics of injury prevention will be presented based on current research and the interests of the students. Prerequisite: MAE 6080.
MAE 7150Combustion (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Reviews chemical thermodynamics, including conservation laws, perfect gas mixtures, combustion chemistry and chemical equilibrium; finite-rate chemical kinetics; conservation equations for multicomponent reacting systems; detonation and deflagration waves in premixed gases; premixed laminar flames; gaseous diffusion flames and droplet evaporation; introduction to turbulent flames; chemically-reacting boundary-layer flows; ignition; applications to practical problems in energy systems, aircraft propulsion systems, and internal combustion engines. Projects selected from topics of interest to the class. Prerequisite: Undergraduate thermodynamics and MAE 6310, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2013, Spring 2011
MAE 7510Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Master's Students (0.00 - 1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Required one-hour weekly seminar for master's students in mechanical and aerospace and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 8999 or 6594/7540 make formal presentations of their work.
MAE 7520Special Topics in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Science: Advanced Level (3.00)
A specialized, advanced, or exploratory topic relating to mechanical or aerospace engineering science, at the second-year or higher graduate level. May be offered on a seminar or team-taught basis. Subjects selected according to faculty interest. Topics and prerequisites are listed in the Course Offering Directory.
Course was offered Fall 2009
MAE 7530Independent Study in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Science: Advanced Level (3.00)
Independent study of advanced graduate material under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Students must petition the department Graduate Studies Committee before enrolling.
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2010, Fall 2009
MAE 7540Special Graduate Project in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering: Advanced Level (1.00 - 12.00)
A design or research project for an advanced graduate student under the supervision of a faculty member. A written report must be submitted and an oral report must be presented. Up to three credits of either this course or MAE 6594 may be applied toward the master's degree. Prerequisite: Students must petition the department Graduate Studies Committee before enrolling.
MAE 7555Advanced Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Distance Learning
MAE 7630Optimal Dynamical Systems (3.00)
Introduces the concept of performance metrices for dynamical systems and examines the optimization of performances over both parameter and function spaces. Discusses both the existence of optimal solutions to dynamic problems and how these may be found. Such results provide via limits to performance of dynamic systems, which delineate what can and cannot be achieved via engineering. Constitutes a basis for more advanced study in design synthesis and optimal control. Cross-listed as ECE 7853. Prerequisite: Two years of college mathematics, including some linear and vector calculus. Classical and state-spaced controls and undergraduate design courses are recommended.
MAE 7650Multivariable Control (3.00)
State space theories for linear control system design have been developed over the last 40 years. Among those, H2 and Hinf control theories are the most established, powerful, and popular in applications. This course focuses on these theories and shows why and how they work. Upon completion of this course, student will be confident in applying the theories and will be equipped with technical machinery that allows them to thoroughly understand these theories and to explore new control design methods if desired in their own research. More importantly, students will learn a fundamental framework for optimal system design from a state perspective. Cross-listed as ECE 7855. Prerequisite: MAE 6620.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
MAE 7660Nonlinear Control Systems (3.00)
Studies the dynamic response of nonlinear systems; approximate analytical and graphical analysis methods; stability analysis using the second method of Liapunov, describing functions, and other methods; adaptive, learning, and switched systems; examples from current literature. Cross-listed as ECE 7856. Prerequisite: ECE 6851 or instructor permission.
MAE 7680Digital Control Systems (3.00)
Topics include sampling processes and theorems, z-transforms, modified transforms, transfer functions, stability criteria; analysis in both frequency and time domains; discrete-state models for systems containing digital computers; and applications using small computers to control dynamic processes. Cross-listed as ECE 7858. Prerequisite: MAE 5265 or instructor permission.
MAE 7720Computational Fluid Dynamics II (3.00)
A continuation of MAE 6720. More advanced methods for grid generation, transformation of governing equations for odd geometries, methods for compressible flows, methods for parabolic flows, calculations using vector and parallel computers. Use of personal computers/workstations/supercomputer, including graphics. Prerequisite: MAE 6720 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2013
MAE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
MAE 8591Research Seminar, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: Doctoral Students (0.00 - 1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Required one-hour weekly seminar for doctoral students in mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering. Students enrolled in MAE 9999 may make formal presentations of their work.
MAE 8897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
MAE 8999Master's Thesis Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of thesis research. Each full-time, resident Master of Science student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 7510 seminar) and 12.
MAE 9897Graduate Teaching Instruction (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students.
MAE 9999Dissertation Research, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal documentation of faculty supervision of dissertation research. Each full-time resident doctoral student in mechanical and aerospace engineering is required to register for this course for the number of credits equal to the difference between his or her regular course load (not counting the one-credit MAE 8591 seminar) and 12.
Materials Science and Engineering
MSE 2010Materials That Shape Our Civilization (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A general review of structure, properties, methods of production, uses and world supply of the materials on which present and past civilizations have been based, including materials used in heavy industry, construction, communications, energy production, and medicine as well as textiles and naturally-occurring organic materials. Cross-listed as EVSC 2010.
MSE 2090Introduction to the Science and Engineering of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The collective properties of the materials in an engineering structure often dictate the feasibility of the design. Provides the scientific foundation for understanding the relations between the properties, microstructure, and behavior during use of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Develops a vocabulary for the description of the empirical facts and theoretical ideas about the various levels of structure from atoms, through defects in crystals, to larger scale morphology of practical engineering materials.
MSE 2500Special Topics in Materials Science and Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
Special topic courses in Materials Science and Engineering
Course was offered Spring 2013, Spring 2012
MSE 3050Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Demonstrates how the interplay of thermodynamic driving forces and kinetics of mass transfer defines the formation of complex microstructures in real materials. The course begins with an overview of classical thermodynamics and applies the thermodynamic concepts to the analysis of phase equilibrium and phase transformations in one-component systems and binary solutions. Students learn how to read, analyze and even construct phase diagrams from thermodynamic data. The second part of the course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of kinetic phenomena in materials, with the focus on diffusion and phase transformations. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 or instructor permission.
MSE 3060Structures and Defects of Materials (3.00)
Basic materials structure concepts are developed, include bonding and crystallography. The structure-property paradigm is illustrated through discussion of the frequently anisotropic properties of crystalline solids, such as elastic moduli, thermal expansion, magnetic properties, and the piezoelectric effect. Descriptions of important defects in crystalline solids, from point defects, to dislocations, to interfaces are introduced along with the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern their interactions and roles during materials processing, such as annealing, aging, and sintering. Applications are made to a broad range of materials, from structural alloys to so-called "smart materials" used in sensors and actuators. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 and APMA 2120 or instructor permission.
MSE 3080Corrosion, Batteries and Fuel Cells (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Includes basic electrochemical principles, terminology, definitions and examples of corrosion, batteries and fuel cells, as well as the thermodynamics and kinetic principles of electrochemistry applied to corrosion, batteries and fuel cells. Discusses the eight forms of corrosion and various battery and fuel cell systems. Provides instruction on the various corrosion mitigation methods such as cathodic protection, inhibitors, and coatings as well as design issues in corrosion, batteries and fuel cells at the materials science and engineering level. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 or instructor permission.
MSE 3081Corrosion, Batteries, and Fuel Cells Laboratory (1.00)
Provides instruction in standard corrosion, battery and fuel cell experimental methods that demonstrate the instrumentation of corrosion, battery and fuel cell testing and some of the ways to evaluate these electrochemical systems. Standard experiments involving cathodic protection, anodic protection, inhibitors, and simple examples of batteries and fuel cells. MSE 3080 may be taken without the lab, but MSE 3081 may not be taken without the lecture.
MSE 3101Materials Science Investigations (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
The course amplifies topics covered in introductory materials science through laboratory demonstration and experimentation. An understanding of modern instruments and experimental techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy is gained through lecture and laboratory experience. Experimental determination of the processing, structure, property relationship is emphasized. Laboratory report writing skills are developed. Prerequisite: MSE 2090
MSE 3610Aerospace Materials (3.00)
Introduces physical-chemical-microstructural-mechanical property relations for aerospace materials. Metal, polymer, ceramic, and composite material systems are covered. Topics include strength, fracture, corrosion, oxidation/corrosion, materials selection, phase diagrams, kinetics of phase change, and materials processing. Case studies include materials for aero turbine engines and ultralight structures.
MSE 3670Materials for Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Applications (3.00)
The course introduces the basics of materials interactions with electrons and electromagnetic radiation and describes the classes of materials that exhibit useful electronic, optical, magnetic, and superconductive properties. Particular attention will be devoted to the intrinsic (structure, chemistry) and extrinsic (processing, microstructure) material features that determine these properties. Examples of application of such materials in commercial electronic systems in common use are discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 2090 recommended.
MSE 4055Nanoscale Science & Technology (3.00)
Covers the basic phenomena exhibited by material structures at the scale of one hundred nanometers of less, and the applications to technology. The goal of the course is to provide students with fundamental physical principles which can be used to analyze nanoscale phenomena, the assembly of nanostructures, and their characterization. Different properties: electrical, mechanical, optical, etc. will be discussed in detail on the basis of quantum mechanics and the atomistic description of solids. The description will include the behavior of clusters, nanoparticles, graphene, carbon nanotubes, nanoporous material, and examples from the natural world (DNA, membranes, cells, mineral nanostructures). Different methods of fabrication of nanostructures will be covered, from self-assembly to direct writing with electron beams. The characterization of the microstructures by different methods will be described and compared. The course will give a broad view of current and potential applications, with consideration of economic an societal aspects of the technology. Prerequisite: Exposure to Quantum Mechanics (MSE 3670, PHYS 2320, PHYS 2620, or CHEM 3610) or instructor permission.
MSE 4210Materials Processing (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course examines the fundamental principles of physics, chemistry, materials science, and manufacturing which underlie the making, shaping, and fabrication of engineering components from casting and deformation processing (e.g. rolling, extrusion, forging) of metals, to powder processing of metals and ceramics, to polymer injection molding, to thin-film processing and lithography relevant to microelectronic circuit fabrication. Prerequisite: MSE 3060 and co-requisite MSE 3050
MSE 4270Introduction to Atomistic Simulations (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to several classical atomic-level simulation techniques (molecular dynamics, Metropolis and kinetic Monte Carlo). The basic concepts, capabilities and limitations of the methods are discussed, an overview of the current state-of-the-art is provided, and examples of recent success stories are considered. The emphasis of the course is on getting practical experience in designing and performing computer simulations.
Course was offered Spring 2016, Spring 2014, Fall 2011
MSE 4320Origins of Mechanical Behavior (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Develops understanding of material deformation and fracture in response to mechanical loading. Engineering and scientific principles are integrated in an approach that includes: (a) material property phenomenology,(b) test methods, (c) causal mechanisms at the atomic defect to microstructure scale, (d) governing continuum mechanics equations, and (e) problem solving. Plastic deformation and creep are understood based on elasticity theory and dislocation concepts. Fatigue and fracture are understood based on continuum fracture mechanics and microstructural damage mechanisms. Special Topics provide capstone descriptions of content, and engage the student with future challenges and opportunities. Prerequisite: MSE 3060 or MSE 2090 plus instructor permission.
MSE 4592Special Topics in Materials Science (3.00)
Advanced undergraduate course on topics not normally covered in other course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the materials science and engineering field. Offerings are based on student and faculty interests.
MSE 4960Special Project in Materials Science and Engineering (1.00 - 6.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A fourth year project in MSE, under the supervision of a faculty member, is designed to give undergraduate students an application of principles learned in the classroom. The work may be experimental or computational, and the student is expected to become proficient in techniques used to process, characterize, or model materials. The project should make use of design principles in the solution of a problem. Six hours in lab per week, notebook. Prerequisite: 4th year standing and prior approval by a faculty member who is project supervisor.
MSE 6010Electronic and Crystal Structure of Materials (3.00)
Provides a fundamental understanding of the structure of crystalline and non-crystalline engineering materials from electronic to macroscopic properties. Topics include symmetry and crystallography, the reciprocal lattice and diffraction, quantum physics, bonding and band theory. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6020Defects and Microstructure in Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Basic course designed to provide a foundation for correlating defect structure and microstructure with physical, mechanical and chemical properties of engineering materials. The fundamental properties of point, line and surface defects in ordered media will be formulated. The thermodynamics of point defects in various types of solids will be discussed as well as the geometry and mechanics of crystal dislocations and their role in crystal plasticity elucidated. The essential elements of microstructure will be characterized emphasizing the concepts of phase constitution, microconstituent, polycrystalline aggregate and multiphase materials. The concept of real materials embodying a hierarchy of structures is emphasized. The principles governing the genesis and stability of material structure at various levels will be discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 and MSE 6230.
MSE 6050Structure and Properties of Materials I (3.00)
This is the first of a sequence of two basic courses for first-year graduate students or qualified undergraduate students. Topics include atomic bonding, crystal structure, and crystal defects in their relationship to properties and behavior of materials (polymers, metals, and ceramics); phase equilibria and non-equilibrium phase transformation; metastable structures; solidification; and recrystallization. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2010, Fall 2009
MSE 6060Structure and Properties of Materials II (3.00)
This is the second of a two-course sequence for the first-year graduate and qualified undergraduate students. Topics include diffusion in solids; elastic, anelastic, and plastic deformation; and electronic and magnetic properties of materials. Emphasizes the relationships between microscopic mechanisms and macroscopic behavior of materials. Prerequisite: MSE 6050 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Spring 2014, Spring 2011
MSE 6080Chemical and Electrochemical Properties (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduces the concepts of electrode potential, double layer theory, surface charge, and electrode kinetics. These concepts are applied to subjects that include corrosion and embrittlement, energy conversion, batteries and fuel cells, electro-catalysis, electroanalysis, electrochemical industrial processes, bioelectrochemistry, and water treatment. Prerequisite: Physical chemistry course or instructor permission.
MSE 6120Characterization of Materials (3.00)
Provides a fundamental understanding of a broad spectrum of techniques utilized to characterize properties of solids. The methods used to assess properties are described through integration of the basic principles and application. Methods more amenable to analysis of bulk properties are differentiated from those aimed at measurements of local/surface properties. MSE 3670 or equivalent, or a solid state materials/physics course.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013
MSE 6130Transmission Electron Microscopy (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Emphasizes the fundamental principles of transmission electron microscopy and illustrates its capabilities for characterizing the internal structures of materials by diffraction, imaging and spectroscopic techniques; includes weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 or instructor permission.
MSE 6140Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (3.00)
Fundamental course on the principles governing the behavior of modern magnetic materials employed in technology from transformer materials to permanent magnets and magnetic recording media including such new areas as nanomagnetism. The approach integrates the basic physics of magnetism with the materials science paradigm of processing-structure-properties-performance. The subject matter is developed at a level to enable students to understand magnetism and magnetic materials at the forefront of the field and to readily read the current research and technological literature. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010
MSE 6160Scanning Electron Microscopy and Related Techniques (3.00)
Covers the physical principles of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Laboratory demonstrations and experiments cover the operation of the SEM and EPMA. Applications of secondary and backscattered electron imaging, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis, wave- analysis are applied to materials characterization. Laboratory experiments may include either materials science or biological applications, depending on the interests of the student. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6167Electrical, Magnetic and Optical Properties of Materials (3.00)
Explore the fundamental physical laws governing electrons in solids, and show how that knowledge can be applied to understanding electronic, optical and magnetic properties. Students will gain an understanding of how these properties vary between different types of materials, and thus why specific materials are optimal for important technological applications. Cross-listed as ECE 6167. Prerequisite: Some background in solid state materials and elementary quantum principles.
MSE 6230Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria of Materials (3.00)
Emphasizes the understanding of thermal properties such as heat capacity, thermal expansion, and transitions in terms of the entropy and the other thermodynamic functions. Develops the relationships of the Gibbs and Helmholtz functions to equilibrium systems, reactions, and phase diagrams. Atomistic and statistical mechanical interpretations of crystalline and non-crystalline solids are linked to the general thermodynamical laws by the partition function. Nonequilibrium and irreversible processes in solids are discussed. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6240Kinetics of Transport and Transformations in Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An introduction to basic kinetic processes in materials and develops basic mathematical skills necessary for materials research. Students learn to formulate the partial differential equations and boundary conditions used to describe basic materials phenomena in the solid state including mass and heat diffusion in single- and two-phase systems, the motion of planar phase boundaries, and interfacial reactions. Students develop analytical and numerical techniques for solving these equations and apply them to understanding microstructural evolution. Prerequisite: MSE 6230.
MSE 6270Introduction to Atomistic Simulations (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to several classical atomic-level simulation techniques (molecular dynamics, Metropolis and kinetic Monte Carlo). The basic concepts, capabilities and limitations of the methods are discussed, an overview of the current state-of-the-art is provided, and examples of recent success stories are considered. The emphasis of the course is on getting practical experience in designing and performing computer simulations.
MSE 6310Nanomaterials (3.00)
Introduces relevant concepts governing the synthesis, science, and engineering of nanomaterials. Course modules cover the fundamental scientific principles controlling assembly of nanostructured materials; the types of nanomaterials that are extant; synthesis, measurement and computational tools; new properties at the nanoscale, and existing and emerging applications of nanomaterials.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Fall 2012
MSE 6320Deformation and Fracture of Structural Materials (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Deformation and fracture are considered through integration of materials science microstructure and solid mechanics principles over a range of length scales, emphasizing the mechanical behavior of metallic-structural alloys and electronic materials. Metal deformation is understood based on elasticity theory and dislocation concepts. Fracture is understood based on continuum fracture mechanics and microstructural damage mechanisms. Additional topics include fatigue, elevated temperature behavior, material embrittlement, time-dependency, experimental design, damage-tolerant life prognosis, small-volume behavior, and material property modeling. Prerequisite: MSE 4320, or BS in MSE, or MSE 6050, or permission of instructor for graduate students outside of MSE.
MSE 6340Physical Metallurgy of Transition-Element Alloys (3.00)
Reinforces fundamental concepts, introduces advance topics, and develops literacy in the major alloy systems. Emphasizes microstructural evolution by composition and thermomechanical process control. Topics include phase diagrams, transformation kinetics, martensitic transformation, precipitation, diffusion, recrystallization, and solidification. Considers both experimental and model-simulation approaches. Prerequisite: MSE 6060 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013, Fall 2010
MSE 6350Physical Metallurgy of Light Alloys (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Develops the student's literacy in aluminum and titanium alloys used in the aerospace and automotive industries. Considers performance criteria and property requirements from design perspectives. Emphasizes processing-microstructure development, and structure-property relationships. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 6555Special Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Special Topics in Distance Learning
MSE 6592Topics in Material Science (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A study of special subjects related to developments in materials science under the direction of members of the staff. Offered as required under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 6640Thin Film Growth (3.00)
Students are exposed to materials issues concerning the relevant growth models, techniques, and characterization of thin films pertaining to metals, oxides, and semiconductor materials. Growth techniques including sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, and molecular beam epitaxy will be discussed in detail.
Course was offered Fall 2009
MSE 6993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 6995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Master of Science or Master of Materials Science degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Spring 2010
MSE 7020Crystal Defect Theory (3.00)
Studies the nature and major effects of crystal defects on the properties of materials, emphasizing metals. The elasticity theory of dislocations is treated in depth. Prerequisite: MSE 6010 and 6020 or instructor permission.
MSE 7080Advanced Electrochemistry (3.00)
A highly-specialized course detailing specific subject matter in the areas of corrosion of stainless steel, cyclic voltammetry, and the adsorption of hydrogen on and diffusion of hydrogen through Palladium. Associated experimental methods are discussed. Prerequisite: MSE 6080
MSE 7130Advanced Electron Microscopy (3.00)
Emphasis placed on the applications of advanced techniques of transmission and scanning electron microscopy to modern research problems in materials science and engineering. Microdiffraction and microanalysis, lattice imaging, and convergent beam diffraction in TEM and STEM are treated. In SEM, quantitative probe analysis techniques and back scattered electron imaging and channeling are covered. Prerequisite: MSE 6130 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
MSE 7140Physics of Materials (3.00)
Basic course dealing with the physical principles governing the thermal, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of engineering materials. The approach integrates the fundamentals of materials science with essential concepts in solid state and condensed matter physics. Special attention is given to understanding the nature of the crystalline state and wave-particle diffraction with a strong emphasis on the reciprocal lattice concept. Thermal properties are approached by discussing the Einstein and Debye solids and the concept of lattice waves and phonons. The elements of Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics are reviewed leading to the development of an electron theory of solids. The concepts of Fermi surface and Fermi energy, Brillouin zones, valence and conduction bands are discussed extensively. The atomic origin of magnetism and magnetic effects in solids are analyzed as well as magnetic hysteresis and technical magnetic properties. The fundamental electrical and magnetic properties of superconductors are discussed including the new high Tc ceramic materials. Prerequisite: MSE 6140 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2013, Spring 2011
MSE 7220Surface Science (3.00)
Analyzes the structure and thermodynamics of surfaces, with particular emphasis on the factors controlling chemical reactivity of surfaces; adsorption, catalysis, oxidation, and corrosion are considered from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Modern surface analytical techniques, such as Auger, ESCA, and SIMS are considered. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Fall 2010
MSE 7240Diffusional Processes in Materials (3.00)
An introduction to elasticity theory, the thermodynamics of stressed crystals, and diffuse interface theory with application to understanding microstructural evolution in bulk materials and thin films. Prerequisite: MSE 6230, 6240.
MSE 7320Deformation and Fracture of Materials (3.00)
Emphasizes the roles of defects, state of stress, temperature, strain rate, and environment on macroscopic mechanical behavior of materials, as well as nano-to-micro scale modeling of such responses. The first half of the course considers dislocation theory with application to understanding materials plasticity, strengthening mechanisms and creep. The second half develops tools necessary for advanced fatigue and fracture control in structural materials. Linear and nonlinear continuum fracture mechanics principles are developed and integrated with microscopic plastic deformation and fracture mechanisms. Topics include cleavage, ductile fracture, fatigue, environmental cracking and micromechanical modeling of governing properties. Prerequisite: MSE 6320 or AM/MAE/APMA 6020 or CE 6720 or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2014, Spring 2011
MSE 7340Phase Transformations (3.00)
Includes the fundamental theory of diffusional phase transformations in solid metals and alloys; applications of thermodynamics to calculation of phase boundaries and driving forces for transformations; theory of solid-solid nucleation, theory of diffusional growth, comparison of both theories with experiment; applications of thermodynamics and of nucleation and growth theory to the principal experimental systematics of precipitation from solid solution, the massive transformations, the cellular and the pearlite reactions, martensitic transformations, and the questions of the role of shear in diffusional phase transformations. Prerequisite: MSE 6230 or comparable thermodynamics.
MSE 7555Advanced Topics in Distance Learning (3.00)
Advanced Topics in Distance Learning
MSE 7570Materials Processing (3.00)
Discusses scientific and technological bases of material processing. Examines solidification, deformation, particulate and thermomechanical processing from a fundamental point of view and discusses their current technological applications. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 7592Advanced Topics in Materials Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
An advanced level study of special topics related to developments in materials science. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MSE 7820Materials Science Seminar (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Broad topics and in-depth subject treatments are presented. The course is related to research areas in materials science and involves active student participation.
MSE 7993Independent Study (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
MSE 7995Supervised Project Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Formal record of student commitment to project research for Doctor of Philosophy degree under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Course was offered Fall 2011
MSE 8000TNon-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved (1.00 - 48.00)
Non-UVa Transfer/Test Credit Approved
MSE 8970Graduate Teaching Instruction-M.S. (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For master's students.
MSE 8999Masters Degree Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to master's thesis research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
MSE 9970Graduate Teaching Instruction-Ph.D. (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
For doctoral students.
MSE 9999PHD Dissertation Research (1.00 - 12.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Formal record of student commitment to doctoral research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated as necessary.
Science, Technology, and Society
STS 1000Introduction to Technical Communications for Non-Native Speakers (3.00)
Instruction in communication for students whose first language is not English. Specialized instruction in academic/content area communication as well as personal expression in a variety of settings will enable students to complete academic programs in a more efficient and timely manner. After completion of STS 1000, students must complete STS 1500 by the end of their first year of residency in the SEAS.
STS 1499Introduction to Technical Communications for Non-Native Speakers (3.00)
Instruction in communication for students whose first language is not English. Specialized instruction in academic/content area communication as well as personal expression in a variety of settings will enable students to complete academic programs in a more efficient and timely manner. After completion of this course, students must complete STS 1500 by the end of their first year of residency in SEAS. May be counted as an unrestricted elective.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
STS 1500Science, Technology, and Contemporary Issues (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course introduces students to contemporary issues involving science, technology, and engineering as well as the core ideas of STS. Emphasis is on three ideas: a) engineering is a social endeavor; b) technology shapes and is shaped by society; and c) technologies are sociotechnical systems. The course also teaches writing and public speaking, skills needed in engineering.
STS 1800Business Fundamentals for Engineers (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Explores key management & business concepts relevant to technology-dependent enterprises. Provides an overview of accounting & finance principles, operations, marketing, leadership, managerial decision-making & communications,& ethics. Engineering students should come away from this course with the knowledge & skills necessary to develop & direct technology in ways that add value to organizations. Count as an elective in the Eng. Business minor.
STS 2010Thomas Jefferson's Interests in Science and Technology (3.00)
Introduces Jefferson's use of scientific thinking in his major accomplishments and efforts to influence public policy, agriculture, education, invention, architecture, and religion. Readings in his writings, class discussions, guest lectures and field visits to local centers of Jefferson research. Short papers, in-class presentations, and a research paper are required. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent
STS 2030Humans and Machines: Visions of Tyranny and Freedom in 19th- and 20th-Century Literature (3.00)
Analysis of attitudes toward the problem of the machine and technological advances in modern civilization, as reflected in selected American and European writings and films. Discussions, oral presentations, papers, and a final exam. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2060American Environmental History (3.00)
Explores the historical relationship between people and the environment in North America, from colonial times to the present. Topics include the role of culture, economics, politics, and technology in that relationship. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2070Utopias and the Technological Society (3.00)
Lectures, readings, and discussions compare earlier and modern designs of the ideal society, stressing the relationship of their basic technologies to historical reality. Such writers as Plato, Thomas More, and Edward Bellamy are considered. Students give oral presentations, write short papers, and research technological utopias. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2071American Power and Energies - A History of the United States (3.00)
America today is a high-energy society. For over a century, the United States has also wielded vast economic, political, and military power. How do energy sources relate to social, corporate, or political power? This course examines that question across the history of the United States. It draws from political, business, technological, and environmental history to chart the growth, effects, and limits of power in its varied forms. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2080History of Flight (3.00)
Explores the development of flight from the earliest historical records of peoples' interest in flying through the achievements of the space age. Emphasizes the social and cultural impacts of flight, advances in technology, and the significance of the contribution of individuals. Guest lectures, film showings, visits to aviation museums, and student reports and projects supplement regular classroom lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2081Making the Machine Age: Technology in American Society, 1890-1990 (3.00)
Social history of American technology in the twentieth century. Primarily concerned with the interplay between society and technology. Historical perspectives on the causes of technological change and the ways in which technologies extend or upset centers of social power and influence. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent
STS 2090The History of Space Flight (3.00)
Explores the history of space flight, from peoples' earliest interest in rockets through the most recent developments in aerospace technology. Examines the contributions of various scientists, engineers, and inventors to space travel; the major eras of aerospace history and the impacts of U.S. and international space programs on society. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2100Technology and Social Change in 19th-Century America (3.00)
A study of the impacts of nineteenth-century American industrial development on the community, the worker, and engineering. Students make oral and written presentations, write short papers, and a research paper. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2120Religion and Technology (3.00)
A historical examination of the role of religion in the early development of technology; technology as a secular substitute for religion; and religious critiques of contemporary technological society. Equal time is spent on lectures, student-led discussions of the readings, and student oral presentations. Short papers and a major research project on a particular denomination's or congregation's attitudes toward technology-related issues. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2170Scientific and Technological Thinking (3.00)
Explores the ways scientists and inventors think, using concepts, theories, and methods borrowed from several disciplines, but focusing especially on psychology. Topics include experimental simulations of scientific reasoning, a cognitive framework for understanding creativity, and modeling discovery on a computer. Students read and discuss articles and conduct a short research project. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2180Invention and Design (3.00)
Investigates the way technology is created and improved. Offers a collaborative learning environment in which multi-disciplinary teams invent and design several modules that emulate problems, such as the invention of the telephone or the design of an expert system. Includes readings from psychology, history, computing, ethics, and engineering. Students keep design notebooks, present team project results, and write an integrative paper. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2201Technology in World History (3.00)
Surveys how cultures have developed technology from the earliest times to the end of the twentieth century. Includes both western and non-western cultures and explores how different cultures have used technology to produce economic abundance, social order, and cultural meaning. No technical or scientific expertise required. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or an equivalent STS course
Course was offered Fall 2012
STS 2500Science and Technology in Social and Global Context (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course invites students to explore the implications of STS core concepts within a specific topical or disciplinary area, drawing out the implications of STS 1500 in depth. The course explores the social and global context of engineering, science and technology. Although writing and speaking skills are emphasized, more attention is given to course content and the students' analytical abilities. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or an equivalent STS course.
STS 2570Special Topics in Engineering Business (3.00)
This course will cover various topics in engineering business.
STS 2580Special Topics for Engineering Entrepreneurship (3.00)
This course will cover various topics in engineering entrepreneurship.
STS 2620Science and Technology Public Policy (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Examines the development of public policies aimed at promoting and regulating science and technology. Topics include historical evolution of the federal government's involvement in science policy; the players, organizations, and agencies who make science policy; the reasons the government funds the research it does; how science and technology is regulated by the government. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2720Marketing for Engineers (3.00)
This course will provide engineers with an introduction to all facets of marketing, including creating compelling brands, working with media, and the role of product marketing. Students will also learn how the principles of marketing are applied in a variety of roles, such as personal brands in consulting and products within large companies.
STS 2730Engineers & the Art of the Deal (3.00)
This course will not only teach the key components of doing a transaction but also the skills necessary to negotiate effectively. The class will be interactive . Various case studies involving technology transactions will be analyzed and discussed. A reasonable amount of assigned reading and project work will be required.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
STS 2740Earth Systems Technology and Management (3.00)
Introduces students to earth systems technology and management, and related concepts such as industrial ecology (the objective, multidisciplinary study of industrial and economic systems and their linkages with fundamental natural systems).  The requirements of this course include regular and prepared participation in class and discussions, two semester projects, homework as assigned, and substantial reading and analysis of case studies and articles.  Additionally, students will become familiar with design methodologies, and apply those methodologies to case studies as part of a class project.  Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2750Engineers as Consultants (3.00)
This course will challenge students to take the role of engineering consultants. Students will learn skills pertinent to the end-to-end process of client side interactions, as well as survey project management theories and learn how to co-develop a project in an efficient and ethical manner. Experiential learning will be emphasized, and heavy student participation will be expected.
STS 2760Technology and Policy: Where Intent Meets Process (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In this course, we will explore four case studies illustrative of the potential disharmony between intent and process. In each case, the action is a public policy initiative with scientific or technological dimensions, where good intentions either led to unwelcome collateral consequences, or the process of implementation failed to fulfill the intent of the policy.
STS 2781Making the Machine Age: Technology in American Society, 1890-1990 (3.00)
Social history of American technology in the twentieth century. Primarily concerned with the interplay between society and technology. Historical perspectives on the causes of technological change and the ways in which technologies extend or upset centers of social power and influence. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent
STS 2810Introduction to Technology Entrepreneurship (3.00)
This course explores how engineers can be seen as entrepreneurs in the sense that engineering often involves coordinating diverse resources (technology, knowledge, capital, and labor) in order to fulfill human needs and wishes. It examines different concepts of entrepreneurship and reviews cases of engineer-entrepreneurs. Students give several presentations and work in teams to develop a new product through a patent application and business.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Spring 2016
STS 2820Presentation Strategies for Entrepreneurs (3.00)
This course provides real world, hands-on learning on how to start a company. Students will work in teams learning how to turn a great idea into a great company and how to present your concept to investors.
STS 2830Startup Operations for Entrepreneurs (3.00)
This class will teach you how to execute your idea into a viable business. Learn how to run a business within the context of its day-to-day operations and move forward to make a profit from the business. Learn about employee relations, legal issues, purchasing, developing for scalability, operations, financial reporting, and much more.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2016
STS 2840Entrepreneurial Finance (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Entrepreneurial Finance will introduce finance concepts for those interested in small biz startups. Through readings, cases and guest speakers, we will review several industries, from low tech to small business manufacturing to high tech. We will explore different ways small businesses are financed and the theory and practice behind those decisions. Class participation and a entrepreneurial project will be an important part of the class.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016
STS 2850Government and Entrepreneurship (3.00)
The course explores government contracting, how the government procures products and services, and opportunities created through government regulation.
Course was offered Fall 2017, Fall 2016
STS 2860Intellectual Property, Engineering, and Society (3.00)
Introduces the fundamentals and history of U.S. copyright and patent law and examines its impact on technological innovation, technological creativity, business strategy, public welfare in the U.S. and developing nations, and global competitiveness. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent.
Course was offered January 2016
STS 2870Scientific and Technological Thinking (3.00)
Explores the ways scientists and inventors think, using concepts, theories, and methods borrowed from several disciplines, but focusing especially on psychology. Topics include experimental simulations of scientific reasoning, a cognitive framework for understanding creativity, and modeling discovery on a computer. Students read and discuss articles and conduct a short research project. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2880Invention and Design (3.00)
Investigates the way technology is created and improved. Offers a collaborative learning environment in which multi-disciplinary teams invent and design several modules that emulate problems, such as the invention of the telephone or the design of an expert system. Includes readings from psychology, history, computing, ethics, and engineering. Students keep design notebooks, present team project results, and write an integrative paper. Prerequisite: STS 1500 or equivalent.
STS 2890The Entrepreneur in History (3.00)
This class will investigate the material development of human societies across history, inquiring into the role entrepreneurs played in creating new wealth. We will also apply lessons of history to developing your entrepreneurial skills. We will introduce a set of business tools called the Business Model Canvas (BMC) and apply these tools to historical examples. Working in groups, you will develop a new business or product for presentation.
STS 2993Independent Study: Technology and Society (1.00 - 3.00)
Special tutorial with a topic declared in advance. Limited to undergraduate SEAS students with third- or fourth-year standing. Not to substitute for STS 4500, 4600. The topic, work plan, and conditions are arranged by contract between instructor and student and approved by the department chair, with a copy to be filed in the department office. Prerequisites: STS 1500 or equivalent, a 2000-level STS course.
STS 3020Science and Technology Policy for Interns (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course is designed to prepare undergraduates for internships in science and technology policy in Washington, DC, Richmond, and Paris. In the longer term, it aims to develop future leaders in science and technology, inside and outside of government, by equipping engineers and applied scientists with knowledge and skills in public policy. Enrollment is limited to participants in the Internship Program in Science and Technology Policy at SEAS. Pre-Requisites: Acceptance into the SEAS Science and Technology Policy Program. All interns in the program must take the course in the spring term before their internship.
STS 3110Societal Dimensions of Nanotechnology (3.00)
Students will explore the societal dimensions of a new technology through a combination of readings and discussions and a simulation of nanotechnology policy. Students should have an interest in the management of nanotechnology and other emerging technologies, including how these technologies might transform our ways of living and even ourselves.
STS 3500Advanced Topics in Technology and Society (1.00 - 4.00)
Specific topics vary. Advanced level examination of the relationships among science, technology and society. Fullfills STS 2000-level requirement. Prerequisite: STS 1500
STS 4110The Business of New Product Development (3.00)
Provides overview of business considerations required to commercialize new products. Included is an understanding of the business structure, processes, vocabulary, product lifecycle, organizational capabilities and financial/analytical tools, as well as the challenge of leadership in meeting diverse expectations of internal and external stakeholders. Taught with lectures, case studies and experiential projects. Prerequisites: Business Minor & Fourth year standing or instructor permission.
STS 4500STS and Engineering Practice (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course engages students with the idea that success in posing and solving engineering problems requires attention to the social dimensions of professional endeavors and practice. STS theories and methods are applied to student thesis projects. Students produce a prospectus for the senior thesis project. Students must be in residence to take this course. Students are not permitted to take STS 4500 and STS 4600 simultaneously. Prerequisites: STS 2000 or STS 3000 level course.
STS 4600The Engineer, Ethics, and Professional Responsibility (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course focuses on ethical issues in engineering. The key theme is that ethics is central to engineering practice. The professional responsibilities of engineers are examined. Students produce an STS Research paper linked to their technical thesis project and complete all of the requirements for the senior thesis. Students must be in residence to take this course. Students are not permitted to take STS 4500 and STS 4600 simultaneously. Prerequisites: STS 4500.
STS 4810New Product Development (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Provides overview of business considerations required to commercialize new products. Included is an understanding of the business structure, processes, vocabulary, product lifecycle, organizational capabilities and financial/analytical tools, as well as the challenge of leadership in meeting diverse expectations of internal and external stakeholders. Taught with lectures, case studies and experiential projects. Prerequisites: Business Minor & Fourth year standing.
STS 4993Open Science (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students in this independent study work with the Center for Open Science learning how to develop tools that scaffold sharing in science, and considering the broader implications of the Center and its work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
STS 5500Topics in Technology and Society (1.00 - 3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first-level graduate/advanced undergraduate course relates technology or engineering to the broader culture. The specific subject will differ from time to time.
STS 5600Responsible Conduct of Research (1.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Responsible conduct of research is defined as "the practice of scientific investigation with integrity. It involves the awareness and application of established professional norms and ethical principles in the performance of all activities related to scientific research." (NIH) This course will follow the NIS recommended format of substantial face-to-face discussions, with case studies being used as the primary focus of these conversations.
STS 5610Knowledge Entrepreneurship: Launching Your Career in Engineering Research (1.00)
This course introduces new graduate students to engineering research providing them with an intellectual framework which will help them to succeed as innovators and leaders. Students will understand the process and skills needed to successfully launch their research, develop their communication skills and map out their education and long-term career goals.
Course was offered Fall 2017
STS 5993Independent Study: Technology and Society (1.00 - 12.00)
Detailed study of graduate course material on an independent basis under the guidance of a faculty member.
Course was offered Spring 2014
STS 6610Technology Innovation: From Discovery to Product Concept (3.00)
This course introduces the fundamentals of innovation to engineers and managers. It focuses on the unique aspects of what economists call "supply-push" innovation -- namely the process by which individuals convert new discoveries and knowledge into products. This sort of innovation involves both an awareness of how scientists and engineers create new knowledge as well as a willingness to listen and learn from customers.
Course was offered Fall 2017
Systems & Information Engineering
SYS 2001Systems Engineering Concepts (3.00)
Three major dimensions of systems engineering will be covered, and their efficacy demonstrated through case studies: (1) The history, philosophy, art, and science upon which systems engineering is grounded; including guiding principles and steps in the 'systems engineering approach' to problem solving; (2) The basic tools of systems engineering analysis, including; goal definition and system representation, requirements analysis, system assessment and evaluation, mathematical modeling, and decision analysis; and (3) system and project planning and management. Prerequisite: Systems Major; APMA 1110 and 2120.
SYS 2004Data Management and Information Management (3.00)
Introduces the integration and acquisition of information for decision-making using information technology. Discusses the impact of rapid software and hardware development on information integration, including the essential methodologies of client server and database systems. Topics include client server technology, the design and analysis of relational database systems, exposure to Microsoft Access, and the fourth-generation language SQL. This course is not intended for systems engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for both SYS 2202 and SYS 2004. Prerequisite: CS 1010 or ENGR 1620, or instructor permission
SYS 2048Introduction to Electromechanical Systems (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students are introduced to several engineering subjects in electrical, computer, mechanical, and systems engineering and build integrated systems that combine topics from these disciplines. Primarily hands-on, the course develops practical knowledge of sensor circuits, amplification circuits, dynamic systems, rapid prototyping, micro controllers, and data storage. Projects are designed to draw parallels between engineering subjects. Prerequisite: either ECE 2630, ECE/CS 2330, or MAE 2000; Co-requisites: APMA 2130.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
SYS 2054Systems Case Studies (3.00)
Focuses on the application of systems engineering methodology to an actual, open-ended situation faced by a client. Areas of emphasis will include the identification of system goals, the formulation of requirements and performance measures, the creation and evaluation of alternative solutions, and the presentation of results to clients. When offered abroad, this course also focuses on cutlural differences in engineering and business.
Course was offered January 2017
SYS 2055Technology Leaders Colloquium (0.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students learn about systems integration, technical leadership, innovation, professional development, interdisciplinary teamwork, and the engineering field through a variety of experiences including industry speakers, field trips, student presentations, in-class activities, and projects.
SYS 2056Technology Leaders Internship Colloquium (0.50)
Offered
Spring 2018
Students learn about systems integration, technical leadership, innovation, professional development, interdisciplinary teamwork, and the engineering field through a variety of experiences including industry speakers, field trips, student presentations, in-class activities, and projects. As distinguished from SYS 2055, students must also complete assignments relating their summer internship work to their field of study.
SYS 2057Management of E-Commerce Systems (3.00)
An introduction to the management, technology and performance assessment of electronic business systems. The course emphasizes the intimate relationship between business planning and technology planning for e-businesses. Details of specific e-commerce technologies will be covered as well as approaches to e-business planning. Topics include: technologies, architectures, and infrastructures; information security and privacy; supply-chain management and customer relationship management; requirements definition and analysis; development lifecycles; customer behaviors; performance models; service metrics; waiting and response times; traffic characteristics; load forecasts and scenarios; resources and costs estimation; risk analysis; optimization; capacity planning; and e-business financial planning and deployment. Prerequisite: CS 1010 or ENGR 1620, or instructor permission.
SYS 2202Data and Information Engineering (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course provides students with the background necessary to model, store, manipulate, and exchange information to support decision making. It covers Unified Modeling Language (UML), SQL, and XML; the development of semantic models for describing data and their relationships; effective use of SQL; web-based technologies for disseminating information; and application of these technologies through web-enabled database systems. Prerequisite: Systems Major; SYS 2001 and CS 2110, or Instructor Permission
SYS 2501Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
A second-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Course was offered Spring 2015
SYS 2502Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering (1.00 - 3.00)
A second-year level undergraduate course focused on a topic not normally covered in the course offerings. The topic usually reflects new developments in the systems and information engineering field. Offering is based on student and faculty interests. Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
SYS 2620Engineered Systems Public Policy (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
This course examines the lifecycle of engineered systems (ES) and the public policies developed to regulate them. It covers risks, costs, benefits, and equity as common evaluation criteria for ES and their regulatory policies. It uses case studies from current events and basic tools of decision analysis to enable students to critically evaluate the tradeoffs involved in developing and regulating ES through public policy. Prerequisite: STS 1500, APMA 1110, CHEM 1410, PHYS 1610
SYS 3001The Art and Science of Systems Modeling (3.00)
This course will introduce the students to the systemic process of model building and to the richness of the plethora of classes of models, spanning linear vs. nonlinear; static vs. dynamic; deterministic vs. probabilistic; discrete vs. continuous; single-objective vs. multi-objective. In particular, the central role of state space and state variables in system modeling will be the focus of model building. All models developed in class will be introduced with example problems and the students' learning experience in model building will be codified through group homework assignments, exams and a term project.
SYS 3021Deterministic Decision Models (3.00)
Introduction to deterministic optimization models: theory, algorithms, and applications. Coverage begins with highly structured network optimization models (e.g. shortest path models) and ends with unstructured linear optimization models (e.g. linear programing and integer programming). Applications include (1) telecommunications network planning and design, (2) design and utilization of transportation and distribution networks, and (3) project management and scheduling. Prerequisite: SYS 2001; corequisite: APMA 3080.
SYS 3023Human Machine Interface (3.00)
An introduction to the fundamentals for the analysis, design and evaluation of human-centered systems. For example, user interaction can be designed to leverage the strengths of people in controlling automation and analyzing data. Course topics include Task, User and Work Domain Analysis, User Interface Design Principles, Human Cognition and Information Processing (Top-Down Design), Human Perception (Bottom-Up Design), and Usability Testing. Prerequisite: SYS 2001 and major in Systems Engineering
SYS 3034System Evaluation (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Focuses on the evaluation of candidate system designs and design performance measures. Includes identification of system goals; requirements and performance measures; design of experiments for performance evaluation; techniques of decision analysis for trade-studies (ranking of alternatives); presentation of system evaluation and analysis results. Illustrates the concepts and processes of systems evaluations using case studies. Prerequisite: APMA 3120, SYS 2001, 3021, and major in systems engineering.
SYS 3048Integrated Systems Design (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
In this project-based course, students synthesize domain-specific knowledge from several engineering disciplines to produce integrated systems. Problems are approached utilizing both a top-down integration approach and a bottom-up component approach, and substantial focus is put on the interactions and interfaces between system components. Students get hands-on experience with prototyping, design evaluation, and iterative design. Prerequisite: SYS 2001, SYS 2048 and MAE 4710.
Course was offered Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
SYS 3054Systems Case Studies (3.00)
Focuses on the application of systems engineering methodology to an actual, open-ended situation faced by a client. Areas of emphasis will include the identification of system goals, the formulation of requirements and performance measures, the creation and evaluation of alternative solutions, and the presentation of results to clients. When offered abroad, this course also focuses on cultural differences in engineering and business. Prerequisites: SYS 2001, APMA 3100, APMA 3110, APMA 3120, or instructor permission.
Course was offered Fall 2013
SYS 3055Systems Engineering Design Colloquium I (1.00)
Students learn about the practice of systems engineering directly from practicing systems engineers. A variety of topics are covered by invited speakers from industry, government, and the academy (many of whom are alumni of our undergraduate program). Discussions include engineering design projects, alternative career paths, graduate studies, professional development and advancement strategies, and more immediate options and opportunities for summer internships and capstone projects. Prerequisite: Third-year standing in systems engineering.
SYS 3060Stochastic Decision Models (3.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
Introduction to mathematical modeling of forecasts and decisions under uncertainty using principles of statistical decision theory; judgmental and Bayesian techniques for probabilistic forecasting; forecast verification methods; static and sequential decision models for quality control, inventory control, queue management, hazard warnings; and economic, investment, and weather-sensitive decisions. Prerequisite: APMA 3100 and 3120, or instructor permission.
SYS 3062Discrete Event Simulation (4.00)
Offered
Spring 2018
A first course in the theory and practice of discrete-event simulation. Monte Carlo methods, generating random numbers and variates, spreadsheet add-ins and applications, sampling distributions and confidence intervals, input analysis and distribution fitting. Discrete-event dynamic systems, modeling, simulation logic and data structures, output analysis, model verification and validation, comparing alternative systems, simulation optimization, case studies. Applications span communication, computer, distribution, health-care, manufacturing, service, and transportation systems. Modern simulation software tools, including animation. Prerequisite: CS 2110, APMA 3100, 3120, and major in systems engineering.